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  • 132PODCASTS
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  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about contributing writer

Latest podcast episodes about contributing writer

The Bill Press Pod
"Absolutely Stunning." The Reporters' Roundtable- Early Thanksgiving Edition

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 50:40


Jan 6 Burner Phones and Subpoenas. Kyle Rittenhouse a Hero? Fate of Paid Family Leave. Fed Chair Stays On. Gas Prices and Covid Hurt Biden. Trump's New Lies. With Maya King, covering national politics for Politico, Alayna Treene, Congressional Reporter at Axios and Hunter Walker, Reporter TheUprising.info, Contributing Writer at Rolling StoneToday's Bill Press Pod is supported by the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. More information at UFCW.org .See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

By Any Means Necessary
Kyle Rittenhouse Verdict Proves The Need For An Organized People's Movement

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 112:48


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Baba Zak Kondo, author of Conspiracies: Unravelling the Assassination of Malcolm X to discuss the exonerations of two men previously convicted in the assassination of Malcolm X, the serious mistakes made in the initial investigation of the killing, law enforcement's role in the life and death of Malcolm X, and issues of historical memory in remembering who Malcolm X actually was.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Ari Paul, Contributing Writer to Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting to discuss the Buffalo news media's bias against progressive mayoral candidate India Walton, the news media's double standard and thinly veiled use of the angry Black woman stereotype against Walton, the broader use of the word “woke” as a derogatory term for movements for justice by the news media, and how the attack on India Walton highlights a broader fear of the rise of progressive politics.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Mike Sampson, co-host of the RedSpin Sports podcast to discuss Enes Kanter's attacks on LeBron James' for his deals with Nike and his broader anti-China gimmick, Kanter's meetings with John Bolton and other US officials, the reality of what's really happening in China's Xinjiang region, and right-wing criticism of LeBron James in response to his comments on the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Kristine Hendrix, President to the University City School Board, Junior Bayard Rustin Fellow with the Fellowship for Reconciliation and contributor to the Truth-Telling Project and "We Stay Woke" podcast to discuss the not guilty verdict in the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, how the verdict highlights the need for a movement outside of the electoral system, the commutation of the sentence of Julius Jones, and the huge tax cut that Joe Biden's Build Back Better bill gives to the rich as working and poor people continue to struggle with hunger, housing insecurity, and more.

By Any Means Necessary
How Buffalo's Media Sabotaged India Walton's Mayoral Campaign

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 15:00


In this segment of By Any means Necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Ari Paul, Contributing Writer to Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting to discuss the Buffalo news media's bias against progressive mayoral candidate India Walton, the news media's double standard and thinly veiled use of the angry Black woman stereotype against Walton, the broader use of the word “woke” as a derogatory term for movements for justice by the news media, and how the attack on India Walton highlights a broader fear of the rise of progressive politics.

The Leading Voices in Food
Weight Loss Study Drives New Insight in Role of Carbohydrates in Overeating

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 21:26


For nearly 70 years now, Americans have been bombarded with advice on how to lose weight. Countless diet books have become bestsellers. Some diets like Atkins keep coming back in sort of a recycled way. And there really hasn't been agreement, even among nutrition scientists, about which approach is best. Lots of attention has focused in recent years on carbohydrates, but over the years, protein and fat have had plenty of attention. In this podcast, our guest, Dr. David Ludwig of Harvard University, discusses this history and the reason for re-envisioning how best to lose weight – and for people to maintain the weight loss, perhaps the most important issue of all. Ludwig recently published a landmark, exquisitely designed and controlled study that tests whether limiting carbohydrates actually makes sense. This study, published in the "American Journal "of Clinical Nutrition 2021," has been generating lots of attention.   Interview Summary   Access the study: https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab287     I'll begin by asking a question fundamental to this work. Why care so much about carbohydrates?   Great question, Kelly. Carbohydrates amount to at least half the calories in a typical diet today, which is interesting from a historical and evolutionary perspective. Because of the three major nutrients we eat, protein, fat, and carbohydrate, carbohydrate is the only one for which humans have virtually no requirement. Think of Northern populations, especially in the Ice Ages but also up to recently, such as the Inuit, that had access to only animal products and could eat plant products like berries maybe one or two or three months a year at most. So for nine months a year, they were eating only fat and protein. And yet, those populations were healthy. The women were fertile; they could breastfeed. And children grew normally. So recognizing that there's no absolute requirement for carbohydrates, the question then becomes: How much carbohydrate and what kind would be optimal for health and allow for the greatest flexibility, diversity and enjoyment in our diets?   So David, if the body doesn't have an innate need for these, presumably there's no biological driver to go out and seek these, why in the heck are people eating so much of this?   Well, carbohydrates are delicious. And the food industry certainly knows that and has taken advantage of that. In fact, when you step back and ask: What are the foods that we tend to binge on? They may have a combination of key flavors and nutrients. Oftentimes, we hear sugar, salt and fat. But I'll argue that there are virtually no binge foods that are just fat. Do people actually binge on butter? I mean, butter is very tasty. You might enjoy an initial bite. But very few people, perhaps with the exception of a major eating disorder, would sit down and eat a quarter pound, a stick of butter. But there are all sorts of high-carbohydrate binge foods. Sugary beverages are 100% sugar. Bread, baked potato chips, popcorn, especially the low-fat versions, these are easy to binge. And from one perspective, the key difference is the hormone insulin. Fat does not raise insulin. And so fat is digested slowly, and doesn't get directly stored in large amounts into body tissue. It has to be metabolized more slowly. Whereas carbohydrates, especially the processed ones, when eaten in large amounts, raise insulin to high levels. That insulin directs those incoming calories into storage. And a few hours later, blood sugar crashes and we get hungry again and are ready to have another blood sugar surge by indulging the next time in those foods.   So what question specifically was your study designed to address?   We conducted a large feeding study that had two parts. The parent study had 164 young and middle-aged adults, who were at least a little bit overweight, ranging from overweight to having obesity. And the first thing we did was bring their weight down by providing them all of their foods, delivered foods to their home, in a calorie-restricted way. You know, you cut back calories, and of course you're going to lose weight for a while. It doesn't address why people get hungry, and why they regain weight. But in the short term, we cut their calories, and they lost 10% to 12% of their weight. Then we stabilized them at their new, lower body weight, and then randomly assigned them to one of three groups: low, moderate or high-carbohydrate diets. And we kept them on these three different diets for another five months. And during this time, we were again delivering all of the meals to the participants. This was over 100,000 prepared meals throughout this time, so it was a really major effort. And during this low, moderate, and high-carbohydrate diet period, we adjusted calories to keep their weight the same. We wanted to keep them at that weight-loss anchor, 10% to 12% below where they started. The first study looked at what happened to their metabolism and their energy expenditure. And we found that when people were on the low-carb diet at the same weight as the other groups, they were burning about 200 calories a day more. So the study raised an interesting possibility, that the kind of calories you eat can affect the number of calories you burn. That from a biological perspective, all calories are not alike to the body.   David, this is fascinating work. I'd like to ask a strategy question. So this was an extremely intensive study of 164 people. And you mentioned the people were provided all their meals, very careful measurement and things like that. So the same amount of money, you could have studied many more people but just done a less intensive study with less supervision and fewer measurements of outcome. So why do the study in such an intensive way?   Right, there's always going to be a trade-off in design considerations. And you've identified a classic trade-off. You can study fewer people more intensively, or more people less intensively. Most weight loss trials have chosen the second route. They take a lot of people, and they try to study them for a long period of time, or at least some of them do: a year or ideally two years or longer. The problem is that without an intensive intervention, so what are we talking about? These studies would oftentimes have participants meet with a nutritionist once a month. They would get written educational materials, and maybe other kinds of behavioral support. But that's about it. And without greater levels of support and intervention, people characteristically can't stick to these diets over the long term. Maybe they make changes for two, three or four months. But by six months or a year, they're largely back to eating what they were originally. And the different diet groups don't look much different. So if the groups didn't eat in much of a different way throughout most of the study, why would we expect to see any differences in outcomes, such as weight or energy expenditure, or cardiovascular disease risk factors? So these studies don't test a dietary hypothesis very well. It leads to the mistaken conclusion that all diets are alike. Really, what the conclusion of these studies has to mean is that we need more intensive intervention in our modern toxic environment, if you will, to promote long-term change. And it's only when we get that long-term change can we actually figure out which diet is better and for whom.   So you've explained how the study was done and why you did it. What did you find?   So the first leg of the study, which was published in "BMJ" late in 2018, so just before the pandemic, showed that the kinds of calories you're eating can affect the number of calories you burn. And, that by cutting back on the total and processed carbohydrates, you can increase your metabolic rate. And that could be a big help in the long-term management of a weight problem. You know, you want your body on your side rather than fighting you when you're trying to maintain weight loss. And a faster metabolism would be a tremendous help if this is a reproducible finding and applies to the general population. We recently published in the September "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition," a second part of the study. And that asks: How do these different diets, low, moderate and high carbohydrate, affect cardiovascular disease risk factors? It's one thing to lose weight. Maybe a low carbohydrate diet helps you lose weight. But if your cardiovascular disease risk factors go up, that might not be such a good trade-off. So that's the aim of the second study. Because low-carbohydrate diets are often very high in saturated fat. So we wanted to find out what were the effects of this low-carbohydrate, high-saturated-fat on a range of risk factors.   So tell us specifically some of the cardiovascular risk factors that changed. And if you would, place the changes that you found in your participants in a context. Like are these big-deal changes? Are they small changes? Or put it in context, if you would?   The big problem with saturated fat is that it clearly raises LDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which is a classic cardiovascular disease risk factor. It's the main one that's targeted by many of the drugs, such as statins. Yeah, I think there's no question that on a conventional high-carbohydrate diet, a lot of saturated fat is harmful. So the combination of bread and butter is not a good one. But the question we wanted to ask was: What happens when you get rid of a lot of that bread? Does the saturated fat still comprise a major risk factor? And so our low-carbohydrate diet was exceptionally high in saturated fat, as is characteristic of how these low-carb diets are usually consumed. It had 21% saturated fat, which compares to the 7% saturated fat on the high-carb, low-fat diet that's oftentimes recommended to people at risk for heart disease.   So what did we find? Well, the first thing we found was that LDL cholesterol was not adversely affected at all. There was no difference in LDL cholesterol between those getting 21% versus 7% saturated fat. Suggesting that when you substitute saturated fat for processed carbohydrates, from the standpoint of this key risk factor, it's pretty much a wash. However, the low-carbohydrate, high-saturated-fat diet benefited a range of other risk factors that go along with what we call the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome. Specifically, we saw strongly significant, from a statistical perspective, improvements in triglycerides, that's the total amount of fat in the bloodstream; HDL cholesterol, that's the good cholesterol that you want to be higher; and other lipids that indicate overall levels of insulin resistance. Suggesting that insulin resistance was improving. And we know that low-carbohydrate diets show promise for diabetes in other studies, in part because they do tend to improve insulin resistance and lower blood sugar. And so our study suggests that if you are pursuing a low-carbohydrate diet, and we can talk about the different degrees of restriction of carbohydrate, and at the same time you're reducing the processed carbohydrates, then the saturated fat might not really be such a problem.   So then if you take all this information in this, as I said, exquisitely designed intensive study and distill it into what dietary recommendations would be, what do you think is a reasonable proportion of fat, carbohydrate and protein in the diet? And what sort of things should people think about as they want to lose weight and keep the weight off?   One key qualification I need to mention is even though this was an intensive study with a relatively large number of people for a feeding study of this magnitude, we still don't know how generalizable these findings are to people at different ages, different body weights, different levels of susceptibility. So no one study can inform a change of clinical practice like this, especially in the world of nutrition where there's so many complicated and interacting factors. I will also venture to say that there's no one diet that's going to be right for everybody. We know that some people can do perfectly well on a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet. I mean, think of the classic Asian agrarian societies where rates of obesity and diabetes are very low. But those societies tend to be highly physically active and the people insulin-sensitive. America is characterized by high levels of overweight and obesity, sedentary lifestyle. And these create insulin resistance as a highly prevalent problem. For societies such as ours, we think that high-carbohydrate diets that are raising insulin levels on the background of insulin resistance is a recipe for metabolic problems. And so for Americans, especially those struggling with weight, pre-diabetes, and even more so diabetes, a reasonable first step is to cut back on the processed carbohydrates. And I think that's an intervention that increasingly few experts would argue with. We're talking about concentrated sugars and refined grains. Where we start to get into the controversy is whether carbohydrates should be further reduced down to say 20% as in our study, which still leaves room for some unprocessed grains, beans, and a couple of servings of whole fruit a day, or even lower to what's called the ketogenic diet that's less than 10%. And that's where you really have to give up most carbohydrates and focus just on the proteins and fats. I think for people with diabetes, such a strict approach looks appealing in preliminary research studies. But again, this is going to need more research. And I would caution anybody with diabetes or anybody who's thinking about a ketogenic diet to discuss these kinds of dietary changes with their healthcare provider.   I realize your study wasn't meant to address this issue that I'm about to raise, but I'd appreciate hearing your instincts. One key, of course, to any recommended nutrition plan or diet, if you'd like to call it that, is whether people will stick to it. What do your instincts tell you, or data if you have it, on how readily people can adhere to this sort of an approach over the long term compared to other kinds of approaches?   Great question. And I'll approach that by saying: We all understand that if diet is a problem that's contributing to obesity, diabetes, heart disease, other chronic health problems, then we have to change our diet in one way or another regardless of what the mechanisms are. So I'll return the question to you by saying: Which do you think is going to be easier for most people over the long term: cutting back calories, getting hungry and trying to ignore that very intense drive to eat, or getting rid of certain kinds of foods that may be triggering hunger and making it so much harder to stick to a lower calorie intake?   As a doctor, as a pediatrician, and as a researcher, and also myself, I try to do N of 1 experiments on myself with any kind of a nutrition approach I might use with patients or with research participants. I've found that it's so much easier to just give up the processed carbohydrates and enjoy a range of other very satisfying, delicious, higher fat foods. And oftentimes, in my experience personally and I hear as reported by patients that the cravings for these highly processed carbohydrates go down. And lastly, I'll just say, it's not that these processed carbohydrates are inherently so irresistibly delicious. I mean, white bread, these common binge foods, white bread, unbuttered popcorn, baked potato chips, even though these are almost 100% carbohydrate yet they're commonly binged on not because they're so incredibly tasty. But I would argue because they're producing changes in our body that are driving overeating. So it's not that they're so tasty and we're getting so much enjoyment. We're eating these foods because we're driven to metabolically. And once you come off that blood sugar rollercoaster, it becomes much easier to say no.   When you mentioned before that with one approach, you're kind of fighting your body; and another approach, your body is becoming your ally in this process, I thought of going to the beach and, you know, you can go out and try to swim against the waves coming in, or you can ride the waves toward the beach. And one, of course, is a lot easier than the other. And it sounds that's kind of what you're talking about, isn't it?   When you line up biology and behavior, and clearly behavior, psychology, and our food environment are all factors that are going to have to be addressed. We don't want to make it much harder for people. So we do need to think in systems dynamics: the food supply, the environment. But on a strictly individual level, when you line up biology with your behavior, the effort required to accomplish your goals becomes less. You know, this is characteristic of so many areas of medicine and research. This is why we aim to identify the cause of a problem when you treat a cause. So let's use the example of fever. Fever you could say is a problem of heat balance: too much heat in the body, not enough heat out. And so from that perspective, you could treat any fever by getting into an ice bath. Couldn't you, right? The ice would pull the excess heat out of your body. But is that an effective treatment for fever? No, of course not. Because your body's going to fight back violently with severe shivering, blood vessel constriction. And you're going to feel miserable and you're going to get out of that ice bath quickly. In the case of obesity, the timeframe is much longer, but similar kinds of responses occur. The body fights back against calorie restriction because calorie restriction, according to this way of thinking, is an effect. It's not the cause. If the cause is the body's been triggered to store too much fat, then we have to address that problem by lowering insulin levels and producing a more stable blood sugar pattern after eating. If that happens, then the effort that you put into cutting back calories goes a lot further.   Bio:   David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is the founding director of the Optimal Wellness for Life (OWL) program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of diet on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease – with a special focus on low glycemic index, low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. He has made major contributions to development of the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model, a physiological perspective on the obesity pandemic. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations totaling over $50 million and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. He appears frequently in national media, including New York Times, NPR, ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN. Dr. Ludwig has written 3 books for the public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.  

IsraelCast
Izabella Tabarovsky, Senior Program Associate, Kennan Institute (Wilson Center)

IsraelCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:07


For Jews living in the Soviet Union, identity was a complicated and sensitive issue. Though many Jews assimilated into Soviet culture, they still forged their Jewish identity through shared cultural interests, get-togethers, and the necessity to stand together in the face of anti-Semitism. In this episode, host Steven Shalowitz sits with Izabella Tabarovsky, Program Associate to the Kennan Institute, Contributing Writer at Tablet Magazine, and expert on Soviet Jewry, who talks about her experience growing up in the Soviet Union, what Americans can learn from the modern Refusenik movement, the importance of Russian-speaking Jews in the Zionist movement, and what Israel means to her personally.   

The Leading Voices in Food
We've Had it Backwards - New Model Explains Weight Gain and Obesity

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:20


A paper just released in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition challenges, and I mean really challenges conventional thinking about nutrition, weight gain, and what has caused the very rapid and profound increase in obesity rates over the last 50 years. This is a landmark paper by any standard, and saying that it will raise eyebrows is an understatement. The paper is authored by a number of distinguished nutrition scientists. The lead author is Dr. David Ludwig from Harvard University. Interview   David Ludwig MD, PhD is Professor of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, and Professor of Pediatrics in the Harvard Medical School. He has published innumerable books and papers on nutrition, contributors to obesity and diabetes, and what might be done with both practice and policy to improve things. He has a real remarkable breadth and scope of his work. David, Time Magazine once named you a warrior in work on obesity. This is exactly how I see you as well. You're really challenging the traditional ways of thinking, and as I said, you've broken new ground. So I'm proud to say that you and I have been friends for a number of years, and I'm also proud to say that we've written a number of things together. So thanks so much for being with us today. It's a real honor to have you.   Thanks, Kelly. Great to be with you. And I'm sitting here in my office looking at a plaque I have on the wall of an op-ed we wrote for the Washington Post almost two decades ago, so it's been a real honor and productive pleasure to know you.   The pleasure has been mine. So let's talk about the paper. So in this paper, you and your co-authors challenged the widely-embraced energy balance model. So can you say what the energy balance model is?   Well, the notion of energy balance is really just a restatement of physics, the first law of physics that says, that speaks to energy conservation, and it's commonly interpreted that in order to gain weight, you have to have a positive energy balance, that is you have to consume more calories than you burn off, and that to lose weight, you have to reverse that. You have to have a negative energy balance. You have to consume fewer calories than you burn off. But we argue first off that this doesn't tell us anything about causality, cause and effect, what's actually driving obesity. We use the example of a fever. Of course, a fever can only happen if the body generates more heat than it dissipates, more heat into the body than heat out of the body. But that's obvious that's, it's, you know, we don't need to be emphasizing that in textbooks. We don't need to be teaching patients that notion. The question is what's cause and what's effect? And the conventional way of thinking is that the positive energy balance is driving weight gain, is causing obesity. So we're surrounded by all these convenient, inexpensive, energy-dense, hyper-palatable, highly tasty foods. We lose control. We overeat them. We don't burn off those excess calories with our modern lifestyle, and so those excess calories get forced into fat cells, and we gain weight. So ultimately this view considers all calories are alike to the body, and that we have to eat fewer calories, and ideally burn more of them off by exercise to address the problem. So that's the conventional way of thinking.   So you have a different, and very science-based explanation for all of this that I'll get to in a minute, but before we do that, why did the field come to adopt this energy balance model?   Well, it does seem to make sense, and certainly over the short term, we know that this way of viewing things applies. If you force feed an animal, or if we just intentionally overeat ourselves, we can gain weight, and conversely, if we put ourselves on a low calorie diet, we can lose weight for a while, but characteristically, we know the body isn't a, you know, an inert energy storage depot. The body fights back in a dynamic way against changes in body weight and in energy balance, and this is something that almost every dieter has experienced, right? If it were just a matter of eating less and moving more, 150 calories less a day, that's a serving of juice, 150 calories out more a day, that's walking moderately for half hour, then virtually every weight problem should be solved within, you know, months to at most, a few years, but that's not the case. Very few people can adhere to, can stay with low calorie diets for very clear reasons. The first thing that happens is we get hungry, and hunger isn't a fleeting feeling. It's a primary biological signal that the body wants more calories. And even if we could, those few of us who are highly-disciplined, and can resist hunger, the body fights back in other ways, most notably by slowing down metabolism, which means that to keep the weight coming off, even as we're getting hungrier. We have to keep eating less and less, because the body's getting more efficient. So the conventional way of thinking about things, all calories are alike, calorie in calorie out, just eat less and move more. Doesn't seem to address the difficulty that people are facing, and recognize that despite a lot of attention to calorie balance, the obesity epidemic is getting worse and worse every year. I mean, the data just from the last year suggests that the weight gain during the pandemic was even faster than it was just prior.   Well, let's talk for a minute about what's at stake here. So vast numbers of people in the United States, both adults and children are overweight. This is increasingly becoming true of essentially every country in the world. The amount of weight that people have been gaining seems to be going up over time, and people find it very difficult, perhaps for the reasons you mentioned, to lose weight and keep it off, so it's a pretty dire situation then, and given the health consequences of excess weight, and the psychosocial implications of things, there's really a lot at stake here, isn't there?   Certainly so. We know that in childhood, obesity can affect virtually every organ system in the body, and set the stage for a lifetime increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, even many cancers. Among adults, the majority, and in fact 70% of adults in the United States have at least overweight, if not obesity, and this is becoming a huge driver of the chronic health burden on the healthcare system, and which so many patients themselves experience, in terms of diabetes, risk for heart disease, fatty liver, orthopedic problems, sleep apnea. So we have a problem that has gotten so much attention, and yet keeps getting worse with every effort that we can bring to bear. My coauthors and I have this new paper in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, arguing it's time for new thinking. And the carbohydrate insulin model that we are proposing is perfectly consistent with the laws of physics around energy balance, but it suggests that we've been coming at the problem in exactly the opposite way than would be most effective.   So let's talk about that. So if you have a different explanation than the traditional energy balance model, what is it exactly?   So the usual way of thinking, as we considered earlier is that overeating causes weight gain, and that certainly happens in the short term, but that model has a hard time explaining why people are gaining weight year after year, and their bodies are wanting to hold onto those calories. So we argue that a metabolic perspective would better explain this continuing creep upward in the so-called body weight set point. So the carbohydrate insulin model suggests that we've had it backwards, that overeating is not the primary cause of weight gain, that the body's process of gaining weight, and storing too much fat is driving overeating. So overeating and a positive calorie balance certainly has to exist. That's a law of physics, but it's a downstream effect. It's not at the source of the problem. And so this may sound a little surprising. How could the body gaining weight cause us to overeat? Well, let's take the example of an adolescent during the growth spurt. We know a teenager might consume hundreds, or a thousand calories more than he or she might have a few years earlier, and that adolescent is growing really quickly, but which comes first? Is the overeating that that child is doing causing the growth, or is the rapid growth and the deposition of many calories into new body tissue causing that adolescent to get hungry and to eat more? Neither explanation violates any law of physics, but they have radically different implications to how we understand growth, and what we might do about growth disorders. In the case of the adolescent, it's clearly the other way. It's the growth that's driving the overeating, and how do we know that? Well, Kelly, neither you or I, no matter how much we're going to eat or overeat are going to grow any taller. So something in the body is regulating hunger, based on the needs of growth, and we argue that the same thing is happening in the case of obesity, that the aspects of our diet, importantly, including the processed carbohydrates that flooded our diet during the low fat years, that these are triggering fat cells in the body to hoard too many calories, to hold onto too many calories, so there are fewer calories available for the muscle, the liver, and the brain, and our body recognizes that. We get hungry, and we eat more as a consequence.   You mentioned the highly processed foods, especially carbohydrates that bombarded the American scene during the low fat craze. Explain more about that.   These processed carbohydrates, that at one point, just 20 to 30 years ago, people thought, and you can find many examples of this written in the literature. In fact, the first food guide pyramid is a clear illustration of the fact that all fats were considered unhealthy, because they have so many calories per bite, more than twice the calories per gram than carbohydrates. Whereas the bottom of the food guide pyramid, you know, we were supposed to eat six to 11 servings of grains, many of which were highly processed. Sugar was considered benign, and a good way to, and this is what they said, dilute out fat calories. The problem is that these processed carbohydrates, white bread, white rice, potato products, virtually all of the prepared breakfast cereals, and of course, concentrated sugars, and sugary beverages. So when you eat these foods in substantial amount, and it's worse if the meal is also low in fat and protein, because they tend to slow down digestion. So if you just eat a lot of these processed carbohydrates, the body digests it into glucose literally in minutes. So blood sugar shoots upwards 10, 20, 30 minutes later, and that causes a lot of the hormone insulin to be produced. I sometimes refer to insulin as the Miracle-Gro for your fat cells, just not the sort of miracle you want happening in your body. We know that when a person with diabetes gets started on insulin, they'll typically gain weight, and if insulin is given in excess dose, they'll gain a lot of weight. So insulin is the hormone that promotes fat storage, and we argue that basically just endocrinology 101, all these processed carbohydrates, by stimulating more insulin than we would normally make on a less processed, lower carbohydrate diet, are driving too many of the incoming calories from a meal into storage and fat cells, instead of into muscle where they can burn. And so when you store, all it takes us to store one gram of fat too much a day to explain basically the whole of obesity, if one looks from childhood to adulthood.   So David, provide some context for this, if you would. So what fraction of the American diet is comprised of these kinds of foods, and what would that number be if people followed the recommended dietary guidelines you suggested?   Well, back in the 1950s, it's not as if Americans were extremely healthy. We had much higher rates of heart disease, although much of that related to smoking, and we of course, had many fewer medications, and surgical procedures to help prevent or treat heart disease. But at that time, obesity rates were much, much lower, you know, about only one third of the rates they are today. And at that time in the 1950s, Americans ate about 40% of their calories as fat, and about 40% as carbohydrate, and maybe 15 to 20% as protein. Because of concerns around saturated fat and heart disease, which then got generalized to all fats being bad, well, we got the low fat diet of the 1980s, nineties, and the beginning of the century. Fat came down as a proportion of our diet. Carbs went up, but also the processing of those carbs. We got foods like the fat-free SnackWells cookies, a whole range of these fat-reduced products that simply took out fat, dumped in sugar and starch. These are after all processed foods, so they're not going to be putting in fruits and vegetables. And these products were considered healthy. We ate them as we were told to eat them, and at that time, obesity rates really exploded. And we're arguing that this is not just an association, that this change to our diet has played an important role in driving obesity, and that by bringing both the total amount of carbohydrates down, not necessarily a very low carb or ketogenic diet, but bringing them back down, maybe to what might oftentimes be characterized as a Mediterranean diet, focusing on getting rid of the processed carbs, eating more of the delicious and nutritious high fat foods, like nuts and nut butters, olive oil, avocado, even real dark chocolate. All of these high fat high, calorie foods look a whole lot healthier than the processed carbohydrates do in the best cohort studies.   You know, it's a somewhat hopeful message, isn't it? Because you're not just telling people you have to eat less of everything, but there are actually some things that are quite delicious where you can eat more, and maybe that hope will lead more people to try this sort of approach.   That is exactly the issue with the conventional approach. If all calories are alike, and overeating is the primary problem, then we really just have to control our appetites. We have to discipline ourselves. Yes, clearly the conventional thinking recognizes that environment has a lot to do with it, and psychology of behavior, but ultimately, one way or another, you have to cut back on calories, because overeating is driving the problem. But if the driver is at the fat cells, if the foods that we're eating are triggering our fat cells to store too many calories, and that's what's causing the hunger and the overeating, then just eating less doesn't solve the problem, and it actually could make it worse by slowing down your metabolism. So this model argues that a focus on what you eat, not how much is more effective. You focus on controlling the quality of the foods, importantly, the processed carbs, but there are other aspects that can help hormonal and metabolic response. That's what the person focuses on, and we let the body, based on our hunger levels, and satiety levels, determine how much we need to satisfy metabolic requirement.   So you've got what we call in the field a testable hypothesis, that people will do better if they follow the approach that you've mentioned, compared to the traditional approach. And you put that to a test in a study that we're going to be talking about in a second podcast. But before we get to that, what sort of pushback, if you had, as your paper has been published, are corporate interests involved in this picture at all?   Yeah, let me just say that we recognize that these ideas are not fully proven. There are animal studies, we've done one of them that provides what we could call a proof of concept, that when you give rodents, and this has been reproduced by many different groups. This is a very rigorous finding. When you give rodents high glycemic index, versus low-glycemic index starch, so that's fast-digesting, versus slow-digesting starch. You keep everything else the same, the ones that get the fast-digesting starch, that's like, all of those processed carbs we're eating that raise insulin a lot, well, they in fact show this whole sequence of events. Their insulin levels initially go up, they start getting fatter, and their energy expenditure goes down. They start moving less, and if you restrict their calories to that of the control animal, they're still fatter, because more calories wound up getting stored than burnt in muscle. So they wind up getting more fat tissue, and less lean tissue, even at the same total body weight when you prevent their weight from going up. So we argued that there's no way to explain that finding based on the conventional, calorie in, calorie out way of thinking. We need to examine whether this applies in humans, and to whom, you know? It may be that one model explains certain situations, or certain people better than the other, but it is a testable hypothesis. Unfortunately, this debate has become polarized, and we, in our article, specifically invite opponents to work with us on generating common ground. There's plenty of basis for common ground already, and in our article, which is freely available online at American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. We put out a diagrammatic model in which each step leads to another step, and each of these steps is testable. So we can figure out what we got right, what needs improvement, you know, and where common ground is. After all, this is what science is supposed to be about, to come up with new ways of thinking for intractable problems.   You know, you reminded me when you talked about the animal studies of work that occurred many decades ago on something that people in the field were referring to as the cafeteria diet. And I remember the slide that I used for years in my own talks that was given to me by Ted Van Itallie, one of the pioneers in the obesity field, that showed a rat sitting on top of basically a junk food diet, where they take animals, and in the cage, they would put Cheetos and Hershey bars, and marshmallows, and things like that. And the animals would eat a lot of those things, and gain an enormous amount of weight. But people were really attributing the weight gain to the fact that these were highly palatable foods. The animals would eat a lot of it just because it tasted really good, and that would bring a lot of calories, and that was the reason for the weight gain. And what you're saying is just, "Wait a minute, what happens to be that food that goes in there is a really important part of the picture," And that's been proven by controlling the calories in the experiment that you set.   Well, I think that's a really great point that you raised that it's easy to think in the cafeteria diet model, that the animals are getting fat because of the tastiness of the food, but these studies can't distinguish tastiness, and whatever that means, and we could come back to that point, because tastiness is elusive. It's a very squishy term to define, for reasons we can consider, but it's impossible in these studies to distinguish tastiness from the nutrient content of the foods, and they tend to be full of sugar and processed carbs. In fact, the few studies that have aimed to disentangle this provide clear support for the carbohydrate insulin model that tastiness by itself, when you control nutrients, does not result in obesity, but the nutrients, even in a bland or untasty diet does result in weight gain in animals.   Fascinating science. So, David, what do you think are some of the main policy implications of all this?   Well, there has been push back. Some of that relates to just the difficulty of paradigm change, amidst scientific uncertainty. You know, we need ultimately to be all working together on all sides of this. But in addition, there's resistance from the food industry that loves the notion that all calories are alike. All calories are alike, and there are no bad foods, and that you can drink a sugary beverage, have any kind of junk food, as long as you eat less of other things, or burn off those calories with physical activity. Whereas if this way of thinking, involving the carbohydrate insulin model, this opposite cause and effect conception is correct, then those foods have adverse effects on our metabolism above and beyond their calorie content. And that from that perspective, you really, can't just outrun a bad diet, that we really need to be thinking about how our food is influencing our hormones and metabolism, otherwise we're going to set ourselves up for failure, and that's not a message that many, although not all in the food industry like to hear, because it requires corporate responsibility for helping to create the nutritional nightmare that confronts so many of us, and especially children throughout so much of their days.   You reminded me about an interesting parallel with tobacco here, where the tobacco companies, you know, long after it was known that cigarettes were killing people, just said that it's not the tobacco that's killing the people, it's the fact that they're just consuming too much of it, and the food companies have made very much that same argument. And then the tobacco researchers said, "No, tobacco is bad in any amount, and even a little of it can be harmful." And that's not totally true of the processed foods you're talking about. I'm assuming people can have them in small amounts, but the parallel really kind of exists there, doesn't it? That these things are risky, and dangerous really, after you go beyond whatever that small amount is, and then you're going to have trouble, no matter what you're doing elsewhere in your diet?   The metaphor with tobacco is useful to a point, although it can also elicit some strong responses, because obviously, tobacco products aren't needed for survival, food clearly is. But I do think that there are some parallels that if these highly processed carbohydrates are undermining our metabolism, and also triggering, in part because of the metabolic changes. Fat cells communicate with the brain in many ways, including by releasing or withholding nutrients. If these foods are also triggering pathways in the brain that make managing calorie balance increasingly difficult, then we do really begin to need to think about food way beyond calorie issues, and that all calories aren't alike, and that the food industry may indeed have to manage the food supply in a way that makes weight control easier rather than harder.   The paper we were discussing today was published in September, 2021 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and is publically available for free.   Bio: David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is the founding director of the Optimal Wellness for Life (OWL) program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of diet on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease – with a special focus on low glycemic index, low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. He has made major contributions to development of the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model, a physiological perspective on the obesity pandemic. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations totaling over $50 million and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. He appears frequently in national media, including New York Times, NPR, ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN. Dr. Ludwig has written 3 books for the public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.  

Critical Mass Radio Show
Critical Mass Business Talk Show: Ric Franzi Interviews Karen Bigman, Founder of Suite Solutions By Karen (Episode 1316)

Critical Mass Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 25:44


In 2021, Karen founded her second company, Suite Solutions by Karen, LLC. After several years running a Divorce Consulting business (The Divorcierge®), Karen decided she preferred ‘the business of the business.'   Using her experience and learnings from her first entrepreneurial venture, she now helps other Solopreneurs and small business owners grow and scale their businesses. Karen helps business owners get more time and mental space to focus on their high-impact work.   In addition to her own businesses, Karen's background includes work in computer programming, marketing for IBM, restaurant event management for Union Square Hospitality and Jean-Georges Vongerichten. Karen's education includes a B.S.B.A. from Boston University, a M.B.A. from Columbia Business School, Martha Beck Life Coach and iPEC Coach Certification (CPC®). Karen is also a CDC® Certified Divorce Coach.   Karen's articles have been featured in the Huffington Post, Thrive Global, Medium, YourTango.com, NextTribe.com, RevolutionGray.com, and BetterAfter50. She has also been profiled in the NY Post, Financial Times and UK's Daily Mail and has been a Contributing Writer to Divorced Girl Smiling and Worthy.com.   ---   Critical Mass Business Talk Show is Orange County's longest-running business talk show, focused on offering value and insight to middle-market business leaders in the OC and beyond. Hosted by Ric Franzi, business partner at Renaissance Executive Forums Orange County.   This edition of Critical Mass Business Talk Show is proudly supported by Gottlieb, Rackman & Reisman, P.C. GRR provides legal advice and guidance on all aspects of intellectual property law including patents, trademarks, and copyrights. Learn more at GRR.com.

Content Magazine
#70 - Brandon Roos - Artist, Journalist, DJ, and Content Magazine Contributing Writer

Content Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 53:50


#70 - Brandon Roos - Arts Journalist, DJ, and Content Magazine Contributing Writer Brandon has been a contributing writer for Content Magazine since our second year of publishing in 2013. In addition to Content, Brandon has written for Metro Silicon Valley and San José Jazz. In our conversation, we talk about his love of words and music and how they have come together in his career, as well as his approach to writing and his journey as a local writer. "I'll still do this thing where I get a legal pad and start writing the story off the top of my head, and if I don't know the quote, I put some brackets there. I realized that often, inspiration comes naturally in the process. You're able to kind of craft this thing by just trusting your intuition and catching those finer points. I don't have to reinvent the wheel every time. I can trust my instincts and believe that I know a thing or two about a narrative." - Brandon Roos Follow Brandon at: IG: @brandiathan and brandonroos.contently.com Hear Brandon DJing at Camino Brewing First Sundays with @firstearmusic! This episode's music is "408" by Jack Pavlina. Read more about Jack in Issue 14.1 Winter 2022 — release date: Dec. 9, 2021: https://bit.ly/Discover141 Follow Jack at @jackpavlinamusic Spotify: https://bit.ly/jackpavlina --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/content-magazine/support

Privacy Please
S2, E88 - Breaking News! - Damages Escalate Rapidly in Multiparty Data Breaches

Privacy Please

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 9:07


This week on Privacy Please - Breaking news, we dive into an analysis of the top-50 multiparty attacks over the past decade finds that nation-state-linked hackers focused on disruption and using stolen credentials cause the most damage.Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer - https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/damages-escalate-rapidly-in-multi-party-data-breaches

Indagare Global Conversations
Gay Gassmann, Art Historian and Architectural Digest Contributing Writer: An American in Paris

Indagare Global Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:17


What's it really like to be an American in Paris? Melissa Biggs Bradley talks with Gay Gassmann about seeing the world (and the City of Light) through an expat's lens and how travel, her career, (and her combined passions) have intertwined at the nexus of art and collecting, design and fashion. Plus, her favorite parts of the city and the best design cities beyond Paris—including Tokyo, Kyoto, Antwerp, Marrakech, Venice and more.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Is Dairy Good For Us? | This episode is brought to you by ButcherBoxWe have no biological requirement for dairy, and yet, we've been told over and over again that this food is a great source of calcium and that milk makes healthy bones and we should drink it daily. However, the research shows that none of this is true. In fact, close to 70 percent of the world's population is genetically unable to properly digest milk and other dairy products—a problem known as lactose intolerance. But even if you aren't lactose intolerant, consuming dairy can lead to weight gain, bloating, acne, gas, allergies, eczema, brittle bones, and sometimes even cancer.In this mini-episode, Dr. Hyman discusses why he often works with patients to eliminate dairy in conversations with his colleagues Lisa Dreher and Dr. Elizabeth Boham. He also speaks with Dr. David Ludwig about his recent research on milk and dairy products.Lisa Dreher is a registered dietitian who got her undergraduate nutrition degree at the Rochester Institute of Technology and completed a dietetic internship through Cornell University. Lisa first worked in the acute care hospital setting and became a Clinical Nutrition Specialist working in Pediatric Gastroenterology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. At the same time, she pursued her Masters degree in Nutrition and Integrative Health from the Maryland University of Integrative Health and started practicing integrative and functional nutrition in private practice before joining UWC in 2015. She has since received additional training through the Institute for Functional Medicine. Over the past 10 years, Lisa has delivered several public health lectures on the role of food as medicine and her work has been showcased in Reader's Digest, on National Public Radio, and she was featured in the Broken Brain 2 series. She also developed the Digestive Health and Gut Microbiome training module for the Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine practice group through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Elizabeth Boham is a physician and nutritionist who practices Functional Medicine at The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, MA. Through her practice and lecturing she has helped thousands of people achieve their goals of optimum health and wellness. She witnesses the power of nutrition every day in her practice and is committed to training other physicians to utilize nutrition in healing. Dr. Boham has contributed to many articles and wrote the latest chapter on Obesity for the Rankel Textbook of Family Medicine. She is part of the faculty of the Institute for Functional Medicine and has been featured on the Dr. Oz show and in a variety of publications and media including Huffington Post, The Chalkboard Magazine, and Experience Life. Her DVD Breast Wellness: Tools to Prevent and Heal from Breast Cancer explores the Functional Medicine approach to keeping your breasts and whole body well.David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is co-director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center and founder of the Optimal Weight for Life program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For more than 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of dietary composition on metabolism, body weight, and risk for chronic disease. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been a Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and The BMJ. He has written 3 books for the general public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox. Right now ButcherBox has a special offer for new members. If you sign up today you'll get 2 ribeye steaks free in your first box plus $10 off by going to butcherbox.com/farmacy.Find Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Lisa Dreher, “A Simple Diet Experiment That May Solve Most Of Your Health Issues” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/FeJHNRJ3 Find Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Boham, “Acne, Weight Gain, Facial Hair, Hair Loss, Infertility: Is PCOS The Cause?” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/68G64S1YFind Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Dr. David Ludwig, “Why Most Everything We Were Told About Dairy Is Wrong” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/DrDavidLudwig See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lincoln Project
Our Own Worst Enemy with Tom Nichols

The Lincoln Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 51:53


Host Reed Galen is joined by Author and Contributing Writer at The Atlantic Tom Nichols to discuss the lead-up and aftermath of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, the mass disbelief in the medical community, and the state of our nation's democracy through the lens of Tom's new book, Our Own Worst Enemy: The Assault from within on Modern Democracy.

No Barriers
Whitewater Healing with Antoinette Lee Toscano

No Barriers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 45:59


Antoinette, an 11-year United States Army Veteran,  is an American Adult Cross-Cultural Kid (ACCK) and Third Culture Adult (TCA) with family ancestry in Nigeria, Ireland, China, and Jamaica. Antoinette is a former IT executive, a blogger at the New Normal Big Life blog, Producer of New Normal Big LifeTV for Culturs Global Multicultural TV, Contributing Writer at Paddling Magazine and Culturs, global, multicultural magazine. Antoinette is also a transformational public speaker and an advocate for people living with traumatic brain injury, health challenges, and those diagnosed with anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress. She is also the Producer of WhitewaterTV, a Kokatat National Brand Ambassador, and co-founder— Diversify  Whitewater to name a few of her many accomplishments.Thank you to our sponsor, Prudential, for sponsoring this episode and more featuring alchemists like Antoinette.Resources:https://antoinettetoscano.com/about-me/https://www.instagram.com/antoinetteleetoscano/www.linkedin.com/in/antoinettetoscanohttps://xotv.me/channels/359-whitewatertvhttps://www.instagram.com/whitewatertv_xotvhttps://cultursmag.com/author/atoscano/https://twitter.com/AntoinettesPen

Pro Wrestling Illustrated Presents
Ep. 179 – Much Ado About Bray (And Other News)

Pro Wrestling Illustrated Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 74:36


This week on The PWI Podcast, Al Castle and Brian Solomon start off by offering an insider's preview of the new issue of the magazine. Then, they review the latest news and rumors in professional wrestling, including the release of Bray Wyatt, what CM Punk and Daniel Bryan might have to offer AEW, and where WWE might source its talent apart from its own developmental system. Plus, our newest Contributing Writer, Candace Cordelia, interviews NXT star Franky Monet (fka Taya Valkyrie). Order the latest issue of PWI: getpwi.com

3 Takeaways
Risk vs. Opportunity in the Market: Investing the Assets of Michael Bloomberg with Steve Rattner (#50)

3 Takeaways

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 31:18


Manager of Michael Bloomberg's personal and philanthropic assets,  Steven Rattner, shares what he is investing in now and how he views the opportunities and risks in the market. As a former Counselor to the Secretary of the Treasury and former head of Obama's Auto Task Force, he also provides insights on government.Steve is also the Economic Analyst for MSNBC's Morning Joe and a Contributing Writer for the The New York Times Op-Ed page. 

Benzinga TV
4 Stocks To Watch Today; Did Didi Chuxing Screw Shareholders? | July 2, 2021

Benzinga TV

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 68:23


Stocks on our radar today: Didi Chuxing $DIDI Tesla $TSLA Boeing $BA Virgin Galactic $SPCE Episode Summary: - Line in Sand for Tesla - Did Didi Chuxing screw shareholders? - Virgin Galactic stock $SPCE blasts off - The May Jobs Report FEATURED GUESTS: Markus Heitkoetter, Founder, Rockwell Trading 32:00 Sam Corey, Contributing Writer, Benzinga 61:00 MEET THE HOSTS: Dennis Dick Twitter: https://twitter.com/TripleDTrader Joel Elconin Twitter: https://twitter.com/Spus https://www.premarketprep.com/ Spencer Israel Twitter: https://twitter.com/sjisrael BENZINGA YOUTUBE:

SPORTS INTERN SHOW
Zach Welch, Cornell University Student, How to Get Much More Than a Degree from College

SPORTS INTERN SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 29:25


Today, we talk with Zachary Welch, a Cornell University student in his 3rd year of his B.S in Industrial and Labor Relations, Minoring in Information Science and Business, and Director of Training at Sports Aptitude. We spoke about why he decided to get into the sports industry, how he used college to do it, and his approach to networking. In addition, he shared his do's and don'ts of outreach and cleared up some doubts about the NBA draft. If you enjoyed the show, please leave us a five-star iTunes review. **********************************************************************"It seems disingenuous if you hop on a call with someone (already in the sports industry) and say basically, can I have a job?" - Zachary Welch about the dos and don'ts of outreach.   Zachary Welch acted as Contributing Writer and Co-President of Big Red Sports Network. He also volunteered as Video Scouting Assistant of Women's Basketball for the University of Houston and participated in an internship at the Sports Operations Intern program from The Tatnuck Group.  A big catalyst for his interest in the sports industry was the blockbuster trade between the Boston Celtics and the Brooklyn Nets when Boston send Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce, and Jason Terry to Brooklyn. He got so curious about the trade that he decided to do everything possible to be part of the NBA, and so he did.  We had a fantastic conversation about Zachary's experience so far networking and building his path into the industry, what worked for him, and what didn't.  We also talked about his experience working for the Atlanta Hawks and how consistency and commitment to excellence opened many doors.  You can find Zachary on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/zachary-welch/  

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast
Heavy Metal, English Literature and Oilfield Writing with Stephen Forrester, Content Development Manager at Gyrodata and Contributing Writer at OGGN and IADC – OGOS125

Oil and Gas Onshore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 55:39


In this episode, Justin sits down with Stephen Forrester to discuss his journey of being an English major in college to becoming one of the most well sought after oilfield writers in the industry. Stephen also discusses his love for Houston and heavy metal music.    Before we get going I want to highlight some fascinating technology provided by our sponsor, TechnipFMC.  Their new and integrated iComplete™ ecosystem is digitally enabled and delivers efficiency benefits by dramatically reducing components and connections while simultaneously providing real time data to operators about the #wellpad operations.  TechnipFMC is continuing to push the limits in order to achieve full frac automation. To discover more about all the benefits of iComplete™ click the link in the show notes or check them out on linkedin: https://lnkd.in/eeSVvcc Stephen's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/slforrester/ Website Link: https://www.linkedin.com/company/oilandgasglobalnetwork/mycompany/ TechnipFMC Giveaway https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/pcEvkKz/OGGN Ogio Dome duffle bag Yeti 20 oz purple tumbler Executive power bank Columbia neck gator AcePods 2.0 - True Wireless Stereo (TWS) Bluetooth Ear Buds Events HACK n WHACK: Anyone in the Houston area interested in playing oilfield hockey? Come join the Hack n Whack crew for some old timer hockey. We do it every two weeks at Memorial City Mall ice rink. Hit me up on LinkedIn for more details. Leave a Review Enjoy listening? Support the show by leaving a review in iTunes. Connect with OGGN Interested in Sponsoring? If you would like to get your company in front of our professional audience, please contact our Producer, Savannah Wilson. Engage with Oil and Gas Global Network LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN Make sure to check out our two new shows! Journey to the Energy C- Suite | Energy Scale Ups Street Team Facebook Group | LinkedIn Group Events on Deck: Get Modalpoint's Monthly Events Email Get Automatically Notified About Oil & Gas Events Once a Month Connect with Justin Gauthier LinkedIn | Oil and Gas Global Network

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Music: Comfort and Joy Play

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 69:45


Scott Foglesong says this program will be coverage of a potpourri (talk and music) of "pieces that have a particular gift of providing comfort and making us happy. Of course that’s quite subjective, and I’ll be selecting stuff that makes me happy. But my tastes aren’t particularly esoteric, and with any luck there will be something in here for everybody. What can make a piece of music a source of comfort? And maybe a bit about what doesn’t do that as a rule." Foglesong is a pianist, musician, teacher, writer, cat-lover, music history devotée, occasional computer geek and sometime programmer. He is the chair of the Department of Musicianship and Music Theory at San Francisco Conservatory of Music; a member of the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley, and The Fromm Institute of the University of San Francisco; a contributing writer and lecturer at the San Francisco Symphony. Professor Foglesong was formally educated at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore and the San Francisco Conservatory, but he says his "informal education continues everywhere, without cease." NOTES MLF: Arts SPEAKERS Scott Foglesong Chair, Department of Musicianship and Music Theory, San Francisco Conservatory of Music; Faculty, UC Berkeley, The Fromm Institute, USF; Contributing Writer and Lecturer, San Francisco Symphony Carol Fleming Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors; Chair, Commonwealth Club Member-Led Forums In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on May 18th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Music: Comfort and Joy

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 70:00


Scott Foglesong says this program will be coverage of a potpourri (talk and music) of "pieces that have a particular gift of providing comfort and making us happy. Of course that's quite subjective, and I'll be selecting stuff that makes me happy. But my tastes aren't particularly esoteric, and with any luck there will be something in here for everybody. What can make a piece of music a source of comfort? And maybe a bit about what doesn't do that as a rule." Foglesong is a pianist, musician, teacher, writer, cat-lover, music history devotée, occasional computer geek and sometime programmer. He is the chair of the Department of Musicianship and Music Theory at San Francisco Conservatory of Music; a member of the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley, and The Fromm Institute of the University of San Francisco; a contributing writer and lecturer at the San Francisco Symphony. Professor Foglesong was formally educated at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore and the San Francisco Conservatory, but he says his "informal education continues everywhere, without cease." NOTES MLF: Arts SPEAKERS Scott Foglesong Chair, Department of Musicianship and Music Theory, San Francisco Conservatory of Music; Faculty, UC Berkeley, The Fromm Institute, USF; Contributing Writer and Lecturer, San Francisco Symphony Carol Fleming Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors; Chair, Commonwealth Club Member-Led Forums In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on May 18th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KQED's The California Report
Citizen App Wrongly Accuses Man of Starting Southern California Fire

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 18:10


The Citizen app brands itself as a tool to report on local crimes and emergencies in your area. But it can also lead to false reporting as was the case last week, when a man was falsely accused of starting a fire in Pacific Palisades, after his picture appeared on the app. Guest: Boone Ashworth, Contributing Writer, WIRED Santa Clara County is one of four across the state that moved into the least restrictive yellow tier for reopening this week. Now, officials are mandating that businesses keep track of the vaccination status of employees. Providing people a guaranteed income with no questions asked has moved from a fringe notion to the mainstream with pilot projects popping up across the state.  The possibility of a Guaranteed Basic Income program in Los Angeles County took a step forward Tuesday with a vote by the L.A. County Board of Supervisors.  Reporter: Libby Denkmann, KPCC  Just months after Shirley Weber was confirmed as California's Secretary of State, she'll have to oversee her first statewide election. It's a recall election of Governor Gavin Newsom, who appointed Weber to her post back in December.   Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED 

The Well+Good Podcast
How Do We Sleep?

The Well+Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 28:11


For many, a good night's sleep can be extremely hard to come by. And with a rise in inconsistent schedules, chronic stress, uncertainty and screens seemingly at our every turn, our brains and bodies have been in overdrive and our collective sleep has been affected so much we’ve even coined new terms like, revenge bedtime procrastination and Coronasomnia. As many of us know, taking small steps to improve our sleep hygiene is important. Not just for disease prevention but for overall health, mental health and wellness but finding the energy to take the first step when you feel so incredibly fatigued can be extremely overwhelming so how do we get back to a sound sleep?HOST: Taylor Camille, Sr. Producer at Well+GoodGUESTS:Jordan Galloway, Contributing Writer at Well+GoodEve Prieto, Director of Meditation at HeadspaceDr. Carleara Weiss PhD, MS, RN, Behavioral Sleep DoctorWHAT WE TALKED ABOUT:Eve Prieto reminds us to take a closer look at our sleeping routines, you can follow her on social here or find her on the Headspace appDr. Weiss helps us to prioritize sleep while balancing our relationships, you can find her hereJordan Galloway recounts the time she sleep trained herself and how her sleep has been tested amidst the pandemic, you can find her on social hereABOUT THIS PODCASTAt Well+Good HQ, we spend our days talking to and learning from the most interesting people in wellness—experts, thought-leaders and celebrities. On The Well+Good Podcast we’re inviting you to join the conversation. With each episode, our hosts will dig into our most clicked on topics in order to reimagine what it means for you to live well. Tune in weekly to find the wellness that fits your frequency.You can also find us on our website on YouTube or social in between shows.

Keen On Democracy
Natasha Lennard on how to Live a Non-Fascist Life in a Modern-Day Minefield

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 32:58


In this episode of "Keen On", Andrew is joined by Natasha Lennard, the author of "Being Numerous: Essays on Non-Fascist Life", to discuss fighting fascism in the real world and breaking free from the self-imprisonment of the human mind. Natasha Lennard is a Contributing Writer for the Intercept, and her work has appeared regularly in the New York Times, Nation, Esquire, Vice, Salon, and the New Inquiry, among others. She teaches Critical Journalism at the New School for Social Research and coauthored Violence: Humans in Dark Times with Brad Evans. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The GaryVee Audio Experience
What Is the Future of Music, Audio, and Sonic In 2021? | Marketing For The Now #20 Part 2/2

The GaryVee Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 62:19


Today’s episode is Part 2 of Marketing For the Now #20 where we ask the question “What is the future of music, audio, and sonic in 2021?”. We’re joined by an elite lineup of guests including: Ryan Tedder, 3x Grammy Award-Winning Songwriter, Investor, Entrepreneur Amazon Music, Global Head of Artist Marketing, Kirdis Postelle Bose Corporation, CMO, Jim Mollica Cari Champion, Host, Journalist, Founder of Brown Girls Dream e.l.f Beauty, CMO, Kory Marchisotto Geojam, CMO, Noelle Chesnut Whitmore Intel, VP/GM Brand, Creative and Media, John Coyne Kara Swisher, Host of Pivot and Sway Podcasts and Contributing Writer, NY Times Opinion Microsoft, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Amy Sorokas TikTok, Global Head of Music, Ole Obermann Q&A, Founder, and CEO, Troy Carter TaP Music, President, Wendy Ong Sign Up for Marketing For The Now: mftn.vaynerx.com Enjoy! Let me know what you thought. Tweet Me! @garyvee Text Me! 212-931-5731 My Newsletter: garyvee.com/newsletter P.S. As I mentioned in the intro, May is going to be a very very very very big month for a lot of people in this community. Checkout the article below for more details https://www.garyvaynerchuk.com/how-to-make-a-cryptocurrency-or-nft-wallet/

The GaryVee Audio Experience
What Is the Future of Music, Audio, and Sonic In 2021? | Marketing For The Now #20 Part 1/2

The GaryVee Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 60:49


Today’s episode is Part 1 of Marketing For the Now #20 where we ask the question “What is the future of music, audio, and sonic in 2021?”. We’re joined by an elite lineup of guests including: Ryan Tedder, 3x Grammy Award-Winning Songwriter, Investor, Entrepreneur Amazon Music, Global Head of Artist Marketing, Kirdis Postelle Bose Corporation, CMO, Jim Mollica Cari Champion, Host, Journalist, Founder of Brown Girls Dream e.l.f Beauty, CMO, Kory Marchisotto Geojam, CMO, Noelle Chesnut Whitmore Intel, VP/GM Brand, Creative and Media, John Coyne Kara Swisher, Host of Pivot and Sway Podcasts and Contributing Writer, NY Times Opinion Microsoft, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Amy Sorokas TikTok, Global Head of Music, Ole Obermann Q&A, Founder, and CEO, Troy Carter TaP Music, President, Wendy Ong Sign Up for Marketing For The Now: mftn.vaynerx.com Tweet Me! @garyvee Text Me! 212-931-5731 My Newsletter: garyvee.com/newsletter P.S. As I mentioned in the intro, May is going to be a very very very very big month for a lot of people in this community. Checkout the article below for more details https://www.garyvaynerchuk.com/how-to-make-a-cryptocurrency-or-nft-wallet/

Mother of Reinvention
Embracing Discomfort & Learning Resilience Through Travel with Heather Greenwood Davis: The Mother of Reinvention Show, Ep 3

Mother of Reinvention

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 54:24


Could you pick up your family and leave life as you know it for a year - or more? Heather Greenwood Davis is a long-time travel writer, and in 2011 - when her sons were 8 and 10 - she embarked on a multi-continent, year-long trip with her entire family. Nearly ten years later, Heather shares the way that this trip was life-changing for her family, how it's made them more courageous and resilient separately and as a unit, and how she's taken this sense of adventure forward into her career, life, and relationships. Whether you've been a lifelong traveler or are just getting around to it in this phase of your life, Heather's story of grit and gusto is sure to inspire you to start filling out that passport application and planning your next adventure. Featured Sponsor: Prep Dish is a subscription-based meal planning service catering to Keto, Gluten-Free, and Paleo lifestyles. Now featuring SUPER FAST menus with included grocery lists: shop once, do an hour of prep whenever you have time, and you'll enjoy healthy, delicious meals all week long. Sign up at PrepDish.com/MOR to get your first 2 weeks FREE. Sponsor Shout-Out Vionic is the place to elevate your shoe game with cute styles, amazing comfort. (Check out the Willa Flat in blue suede to turn your at-home look into total Boss Lady.)  Get free shipping when you use code MOR at vionicshoes.com. About Heather: Heather Greenwood Davis is a Contributing Writer and on-air storyteller for National Geographic and a Feature Writer with The Globe and Mail. Her work appears regularly in a host of national and international publications. Heather also appears on television stations across North America and has been featured in O Magazine and NPR. She is the resident travel expert on The Social - a national daily lifestyle show -  and co-host of Get, Set, Go!. Heather believes in travel as a change agent, and has shared insights as a speaker in university classrooms, at conferences and at trade gatherings. Heather is also the voice behind GlobetrottingMama.com – an international, family travel blog that features the adventures she takes with (and without) her husband Ish and their two sons, Ethan and Cameron. Episode Links: Read about Heather's year-long around-the-world trip with her husband and kids - which awarded them the title "National Geographic Travelers Of The Year". Check out Heather's website to learn about her many media outlets and what she's up to now.Globetrotting Mama is a great place to get inspired about what's possible around traveling with kids. Please get in touch! Send an email to motherofreinvention@gmail.com to say hello.And if you’d like to find out more about some of Meagan’s favorite products, head over to the MOR Faves page at MORfaves.com. Just for fun - a pic of Heather and I looking glam at the 2018 Iris Awards.

Women Shifting Gears Driven by Hemmings with Amanda Busick
002: Mercedes Lilienthal - Owner/Founder Crankshaft Consulting | The New York Times Contributing Writer | Freelance Journalist

Women Shifting Gears Driven by Hemmings with Amanda Busick

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 40:34


Mercedes Lilienthal uses her writer's podium to shine a light on “women who are unseen and notable” in the automotive world through her stories for the New York Times, Tread magazine, Toyota Cruisers, and Trucks, and the communication platform “Crankshaft Culture” she shares with her husband, Andy Lilienthal. Her Twitter handle, “@WriterWithGrit”, captures her determination to focus on life's great journey. Her travels include the Alcan5000 Arctic rally in a RHD diesel through -40 degree temps, the grueling and competitive Rebelle Rally, and a pandemic-2020 thirteen-state cross-country journey.She shines a light on women who inspire seizing opportunity, including one of her she-roes, Jessie Combs, whose “go get ‘em” attitude and competitive spirit she came to greatly admire during their interview conversations. Mercedes chooses to focus on women who wrench cars, work in diesel, rally, and get out there in the left seat -- oftentimes behind the scenes but mission-critical roles.Mercedes believes that “if you aren't uncomfortable, you aren't learning”.Her faithful and loyal travel companions include her husband Andy Lilienthal and her beloved stuffed bunny, Bert, who's traveled the world with Mercedes. Their choice of road trip music: “we let the road speak to us”. What a perfect motto for this engaging and strong woman who uses her positive energy to develop her life story. 

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
King of Stuff: Karol Markowicz on New York (#223)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 34:43


The King of Stuff welcomes Karol Markowicz to chat about Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s troubles, Mayor Bill De Blasio’s schadenfreude, and everything New York. Karol is a Columnist at the New York Post, Contributor to Spectator USA, and a Contributing Writer at Washington Examiner Magazine. Subscribe to the King of Stuff Spotify playlist featuring picks from […]

King of Stuff
223. Karol Markowicz on New York

King of Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 34:43


The King of Stuff welcomes Karol Markowicz to chat about Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s troubles, Mayor Bill De Blasio’s schadenfreude, and everything New York. Karol is a Columnist at the New York Post, Contributor to Spectator USA, and a Contributing Writer at Washington Examiner Magazine. Subscribe to the King of Stuff Spotify playlist featuring picks from […]

The Press Zone
Flyers, Phantoms, Special Guest: Bill Meltzer | Press Zone Philly ep. 171

The Press Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 62:54


Welcome to The Press Zone for hockey prospects on Rocket Sports Radio! This premier podcast is featured on http://ahlreport.com (The AHL Report), and provides hockey fans with the latest news, analysis, and commentary regarding the Philadelphia Flyers, Lehigh Valley Phantoms, and teams all around the AHL. Our podcast hosts Rick Stephens (http://twitter.com/allhabs (@AllHabs)) and Amy Johnson (http://twitter.com/flyersrule (@FlyersRule)) will provide information on the American Hockey League, as well as the ECHL, junior hockey leagues, international hockey, prospects, and potential NHL draftees. It's an informative and entertaining weekly show brought to you by a team of credentialed, knowledgeable hockey journalists! Segment 1: Philadelphia FlyersSpecial Guest: http://twitter.com/billmeltzer (Bill Meltzer), Contributing Writer for the Philadelphia Flyers NHL site Sam Morin's journey Carter Hart's struggles Team identity Trade deadline Segment 2: Lehigh Valley PhantomsGuest interview with Bill Meltzer continues! Phantoms' success Tanner Laczynski, Wade Allison, and top prospects Flyers prospects in the NCAA: Cam York, Jay O'Brien, Jack St. Ivany, Noah Cates Segment 3: Around the AHLCCM/AHL Player of the Week: Philippe Maillet (Hershey Bears) Zach Fucale's new NHL contract Feel Good Finale: Happy Easter/Passover! Check out a new episode of The Press Zone for hockey prospects every Tuesday, where Amy and Rick talk about prospects in the AHL, ECHL, NCAA, OHL, and European leagues, as well as taking a closer look at other AHL teams, news, entertainment, and special events around the American Hockey League. Plus, don't miss our daily game recaps, player profiles and league news on http://ahl.report/ (AHL Report). Follow all the action on social media: http://twitter.com/theahlreport (Twitter), http://facebook.com/ahlreport (Facebook), http://instagram.com/ahlreport (Instagram).

Inside Medical Assisting
Naïve Realism: The Power Your Perception Has Over Your Life. My Conversation with Jessica Koehler Ph.D. Contributing Writer at Psychology Today.

Inside Medical Assisting

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 38:07


Jessica Koehler, Ph.D. Contributing Writer at Psychology Today Perception is everything—and it is flawed. Most of us navigate our daily lives believing we see the world as it is. Our brains are perceiving an objective reality, right? Well, not quite. Everything we bring in through our senses is interpreted through the filter of our past... The post Naïve Realism: The Power Your Perception Has Over Your Life. My Conversation with Jessica Koehler Ph.D. Contributing Writer at Psychology Today. first appeared on Inside Medical Assisting Podcast.

The Michael Berry Show
Karol Markowicz

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 9:03


Columnist For NY Post , Contributor for SpectatorUSA , Contributing Writer at Washington Examiner. Discussing her latest article in The NY Post

Liz on Biz with Liz Theresa
E209 – Jennifer Love – How Wealth Is So Much More Than Money

Liz on Biz with Liz Theresa

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021


Jennifer Love CEO. Entrepreneur. Advisor. Speaker. Contributing Writer.  Jennifer is rated among the top 5% of advisors globally and her mission as a Money Therapist is helping leaders build what she calls TRUE WEALTH. This takes the stress out of the money equation so they can effectively raise, make, manage, and give money IT ALSO creates … Continued

The Bay
Why California’s Vaccine Rollout Has Been So Slow

The Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2021 16:09


On Monday, California’s COVID-19 death toll reached 30,000. Gov. Gavin Newsom and health officials are relying on mass vaccinations to slow the spread, but there’s a lot of reason to believe accomplishing that will be hard. A majority of California is under stay at home orders until things get better, but the first phase of the rollout has already been slower than some hoped. Guest: Barbara Feder Ostrov, Contributing Writer for CalMatters Read the transcript here.

Coffee with a Journalist
Christine Hall, Crunchbase News

Coffee with a Journalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2021 18:34


We’re joined by Christine Hall from Crunchbase News on today’s episode. Christine has been a Contributing Writer for Crunchbase News since April of 2020 covering startups and venture capital with a focus on venture-backed companies, entrepreneurs, trend pieces, and funding announcements. She started her career as a reporter for The Houston Business Journal in 2002.  On the episode today, Christine tells us about her process for reading, responding, and forwarding emails to colleagues, how she’s adapted to remote work, her favorite kinds of novels, and more.

Green Room On Air
Michael Gene Sullivan - San Francisco Mime Troupe

Green Room On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2020 102:37


The Tony Award-Winning SAN FRANCISCO MIME TROUPE debuts a NEW Activist Adaptation of the Dickens Classic as a Radio Play A RED CAROL An Activist Adaptation of the Dickens Classic Written and Directed by Michael Gene Sullivan A 21st. Century SFMT spin on Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol Online Fri. Dec. 11, 2020 - Jan. 17, 2021 -  FREE (suggested $20 donation) https://www.sfmt.org/   Michael Gene Sullivan (Writer, Director,Actor, SFMT Collective) is an award-winning actor, director, and playwright based in SF. As an actor Michael has worked with the American Conservatory Theatre, the Denver Center Theater Company, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Theatreworks, CA Shakespeare Theatre, SF Playhouse, SF and the African American Shakespeare Companies, and the Aurora, the Marin, the Magic, the Lorraine Hansberry Theater, and has been a principle actor for the SF Mime Troupe for over 30 years. Michael's directing credits include work with SF Shakespeare Festival, TheatreFirst, the African American Shakespeare Company, Street Of Dreams Theatre Company, and over a dozen shows with SFMT. Michael was also director of the all-woman, all-clown Circus Finelli. From 1992 -1999 Michael was a Contributing Writer for the despite-its-name-never-silent, Tony and OBIE Award-winning SF Mime Troupe before being named SFMT's Resident Playwright 2000 to present. Michael is also a Resident Playwright for the Playwrights Foundation, and in 2017 was playwriting resident at the Djerassi Arts Center. Mr. Sullivan's political dramas, musicals, and satires include Walls (Ningun Humano Es Ilegal!), Treasure Island, For The Greater Good, Freedomland, Red Carol, Too Big To Fail, Did Anyone Ever Tell You-You Look Like Huey P. Newton?, Mr. Smith Goes to Obscuristan (with Josh Kornbluth), Godfellas, Too Big to Fail, Possibilidad or The Death of the Worker, the all-woman farce Recipe, and his one person show, Did Anyone Ever Tell You -- You Look Like Huey P. Newton? Mr. Sullivan's plays have been performed at the Melbourne International Arts Festival, the International Festival of Verbal Art (Berlin), The Hong Kong Arts Festival, and in Greece, Spain, Columbia, Argentina, New Zealand, Ukraine, England, Scotland, The Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Mexico, as well as in theaters throughout the USA. 1984, his critically-acclaimed stage adaptation of George Orwell's dystopic novel of the oppressive present/future, had its world premiere in 2006 at the Actors' Gang, directed by Academy Award-winning actor Tim Robbins. After several extended runs in LA, 1984 has gone on to several national and international productions, has been translated into six languages, and published in two. Michael is also a Collective Member and Board Member of the SF Mime Troupe.  www.michaelgenesullivan.com

Behind the Bars, Motorcycles, Memories and Mayhem
Ep 10, S4, Jake Bright, Tech Crunch/Revzilla Writer, on his creation, the KTM, Triple Threat. TX3

Behind the Bars, Motorcycles, Memories and Mayhem

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2020 25:42


Ep 10, S4, Jake Bright, Tech Crunch/Revzilla Writer, on his creation, the KTM, Triple Threat. TX3 Regular guest Jake Bright, Award winning author, Contributing Writer to Tech Crunch and Common Tread, visits with John and Mark to talk about a new project he is developing called the Triple Threat or Tx3. This revolutionary concept is really three motorcycles in one. Tune in to learn more about this unique project. Bonus content… Mark has an epiphany about the future of the HD LiveWire while barbecuing a giant steak on his gas grill! True story. Article on Triple Threat CLICK HERE Short Youtube Video on Project Special thanks to Wilkins Harley-Davidson, who sponsors Behind the Bars.

Vox's The Weeds
On biracial identity (with Thomas Chatterton Williams)

Vox's The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 62:54


Jane and Thomas Chatterton Williams talk about mixed-race identity, race and racism, and what being biracial means now. Resources: "My Family's Life Inside and Outside America's Racial Categories" by Thomas Chatterton Williams, NYT "A Detailed Look at the Downside of California’s Ban on Affirmative Action" by Kevin Carey, NYT "Thomas Chatterton Williams on Race, Identity, and “Cancel Culture”" by Isaac Chotiner, NYT "The Great Escape From Slavery of Ellen and William Craft" by Marian Smith Holmes, Smithsonian Magazine "Black With (Some) White Privilege" by Anna Holmes, NYT "Still Processing: Being Biracial" by Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham, NYT "The Case for Reparations" by Ta-Nehisi Coates, The Atlantic Guest: Thomas Chatterton Williams (@thomaschattwill), Contributing Writer at New York Magazine, Columnist at Harpers Magazine Host: Jane Coaston (@cjane87), Senior Politics Reporter, Vox Credits: Jeff Geld, (@jeff_geld), Editor and Producer The Weeds is a Vox Media Podcast Network production Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts About Vox Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow Us: Vox.com Facebook group: The Weeds Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rob Dibble Show
Brian Mull - The Caddie Network.com

Rob Dibble Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2020 22:25


Contributing Writer for TheCaddieNetwork.com Brian Mull joined the Rob Dibble Show

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Why Most Everything We Were Told About Dairy Is Wrong with Dr. David Ludwig

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2020 65:57


Why Most Everything We Were Told About Dairy Is Wrong | This episode is brought to you by Thrive Market and TushyThere are so many myths when it comes to nutrition and health. One of the most prominent, that is still being supported by our government policies today, is that we need three servings of dairy a day to get enough calcium and achieve optimal wellness. We now have plenty of research to show us this just isn’t the case. Not to mention, upwards of 65% of the world’s population are lactose intolerant after infancy! Cow’s milk is not nature’s perfect food for human adults, despite what the lobbying efforts of the dairy industry say. On this episode of The Doctor’s Farmacy, I was excited to sit down with Dr. David Ludwig, whose research I’ve followed for the past 20 years and has helped shape the way I practice medicine. David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children’s Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is co-director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center and founder of the Optimal Weight for Life program, one of the country’s oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For more than 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of dietary composition on metabolism, body weight, and risk for chronic disease. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been a Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and The BMJ. He has written 3 books for the general public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.This episode is brought to you by Thrive Market and Tushy.Right now, Thrive is offering all Doctor's Farmacy listeners an amazing deal. Select a free gift from Thrive Market when you sign up for a 1 year membership. And, any time you spend more than $49 you’ll get free carbon-neutral shipping. Just head over to thrivemarket.com/Hyman. The Tushy bidet is a sleek attachment that clips onto your existing toilet and connects to the water supply behind your toilet to spray you with clean, fresh water. And it’s really affordable, starting at only $79. Right now Tushy is offering Doctor’s Farmacy listeners 10% off, too, so it’s a better time than ever to make the switch to a bidet. Just go to hellotushy.com/HYMAN. Here are more of the details from our interview: Examining the potential impact of people following the US dietary guidelines for drinking milk, and how these guidelines originated (10:59)Debunking the “Got Milk?” campaign (14:40)The importance of considering the impact of milk in the context of its interaction with overall diet quality (17:19)Do you really need to drink milk to get enough calcium, and for healthy bones? (19:54)How industrial agriculture results in higher amounts of naturally occurring hormones in milk (30:13)The misguided school lunch requirements for milk (34:35)Whole milk vs skim milk (36:40)Butter and saturated fat from dairy (40:02)How is the quality of the dairy we consume today different than it was 100 years ago? (49:43)Summary of Dr. Ludwig’s findings on dairy consumption (58:38) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inside Medical Assisting
How to Make the Magic Happen in Your Life, in Your Career; My Conversation with Jessica Koehler, Ph.D. Contributing Writer at Psychology Today

Inside Medical Assisting

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 41:29


Open yourself to new possibilities, ignite your imagination, unchain yourself from conforming forces and actualize your latent potential. Connecting the Science of Psychology to Learning and Life. Jessica Koehler, Ph.D. Contributing Writer at Psychology Today Contributing Writer Medium KOEHLER ACADEMY: CONNECTING THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY TO LEARNING AND LIFE More about Jessica Koehler Ph.D. Contact Information: dr.jessicakoehler@gmail.com,...

Slate Daily Feed
What Next: The Battle for Wisconsin's Dairy Farmers

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 17:46


Having the Democratic National Convention in Wisconsin was supposed to be a way for the Democrats to atone for 2016. Hillary Clinton was the first presidential candidate from either party to not campaign in the state since Richard Nixon in 1972. Wisconsin flipped from blue to red in the last presidential election as rural voters voiced their disaffection with the Democratic Party and supported Donald Trump for president. Now, four years later, the Democrats are hoping they can use Trump’s record in office to win them back. Guest: Dan Kaufman is Contributing Writer at The New Yorker and author of The Fall of Wisconsin Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What Next | Daily News and Analysis
The Battle for Wisconsin's Dairy Farmers

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 17:46


Having the Democratic National Convention in Wisconsin was supposed to be a way for the Democrats to atone for 2016. Hillary Clinton was the first presidential candidate from either party to not campaign in the state since Richard Nixon in 1972. Wisconsin flipped from blue to red in the last presidential election as rural voters voiced their disaffection with the Democratic Party and supported Donald Trump for president. Now, four years later, the Democrats are hoping they can use Trump’s record in office to win them back. Guest: Dan Kaufman is Contributing Writer at The New Yorker and author of The Fall of Wisconsin Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Force For Growth Live
Meet: Joe Beccalori

Force For Growth Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2020 35:27


Joe has been happily married for 22 years, and is the proud father of three children, two dogs, a cat, and a turtle. When not working, he enjoys playing piano, hiking, golfing, attending rock concerts and taking scenic drives in a modest collection of classic sports cars. CEO at Interact Marketing, Owner at Slingshot SEO, Contributing Writer at Forbes, Huffpost, Relevance . . . #growth #mindset #forceforgrowth #inspire #motivation

Behind the Bars, Motorcycles, Memories and Mayhem
Ep 7, S4, Grading Harley-Davidson's Electric Motorcycle, TechCrunch Contributing Writer, Jake Bright talks about LiveWire Grade

Behind the Bars, Motorcycles, Memories and Mayhem

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2020 32:40


Ep 7, S4, Grading Harley-Davidson's Electric Motorcycle, TechCrunch Contributing Writer, Jake Bright talks about how he grades LiveWire In this podcast, John and Mark revisit with Jake Bright, Contributing Writer to Tech Crunch and electric motorcycle enthusiast. Jake offers his grading policy for the new Harley-Davidson LiveWire. This is a provocative conversation that calls into question the early success of Harley’s EV program. Jake Bright's Article, Missing Links to Grading Harley-Davidson's EV Pivot Jake Bright A big thanks to our sponsor, Wilkins Harley-Davidson #HarleyDavidson #HarleyDavidsonPodcast #MotorcyclePodcast #BehindtheBarsPodcast #MotorcylingPodcast #HDPodcast #LiveWireMotorcycle

Midlife Love Out Loud podcast
038: The Upside of Divorce with Karen Bigman

Midlife Love Out Loud podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2020 28:54


Karen Bigman started The Divorcierge (TheDivorcierge.com) to help women struggling with their lives during divorce, and those trying to build a new life afterward. Karen partners with individuals faced with the myriad of emotions and tasks associated with divorce, acting as a guide and confidante, and consulting with them on how to navigate the emotional, financial and logistical issues. Karen’s work includes helping to manage all aspects of the divorce process from pre-divorce planning through post-divorce life. In addition to individual coaching, The Divorcierge offers online advice and products for those looking for divorce information, as well as seminars and workshops in the New York City area. Karen’s background includes a B.S.B.A. from Boston University, an M.B.A. from Columbia Business School, Martha Beck Life Coach and iPEC Coach Certification (CPC®). Karen is also a CDC® Certified Divorce Coach. Her articles have been featured in the Huffington Post, Thrive Global, YourTango.com, NextTribe.com and BetterAfter50. She has also been profiled in the NY Post, Financial Times and UK’s Daily Mail. Karen is also a Contributing Writer to Divorced Girl Smiling and Worthy.com. Check out Karen and her podcast here: https://thedivorcierge.com/ Want to stop going on sucky dates? Grab your MIDLIFE LOVE GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL DATING and learn how you can call in Mr. Right, right now!  If you’d like some one-to-one support with Junie, sign up for your Love Breakthrough Session today so she can support you on your love path. And don’t forget to subscribe to Midlife Love Out Loud so that you don't miss a single episode. While you're at it, won't you take a moment to write a short review and rate our show? It would be greatly appreciated! To learn more about our previous guests, listen to past episodes, and get to know your host, go to www.CoachJunieMoon.com and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.  

Hashtag No Filter
78 - 'Cosmopolitan' Contributing Writer Gabi Conti on Going From Serial Monogamy to Dating, How to Know if Someone Likes You, Foot Fetishes, and Her New Book

Hashtag No Filter

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2020 46:53


In episode 78 of Hashtag No Filter Julie talks with 'Cosmopolitan' Contributing Writer Gabi Conti, who is also a host, storyteller, comedian, and most recently, an author. Gabi's book "Twenty Guys You Date in Your Twenties" comes out on May 26th (available for pre order now), and Julie and Gabi talk all about it, the inspiration behind it, how Gabi went from serial monogamy to dating, how it's been living with her boyfriend (they moved in together right before quarantine!), stories of some of her ex boyfriends (!!), how she went on 30 dates in 3 days, the question she hates when guys ask, foot fetishes, how she knew an ex boyfriend wasn't right for her, advice for single girls and guys, how to know if someone likes you, and much more. Follow Gabi @itsgabiconti Visit Gabi's website and buy her book: https://www.gabiconti.com/twenty-guys-you-date-in-your-20s Hashtag No Filter | Real, raw, honest, authentic conversations with real people. No sugar coating, no BS, and no filter. Topics range from dating to friendships to motherhood to nutrition to sex and quite literally, everything in between. You might laugh, you might cry, and you'll appreciate the honest and vulnerable conversations. Julie believes in living an unfiltered life, as seen through her podcast, her writing, and on her Instagram stories @byjulielauren. Website: julielauren.com Subscribe on reVolver Subscribe on iTunes Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers

The Primalosophy Podcast
#72 – David Quammen

The Primalosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2020 63:18


David Quammen is an author and journalist whose books include The Song of the Dodo, The Reluctant Mr. Darwin, and Spillover, a work on the science, history, and human impacts of emerging diseases (especially viral diseases), which was short-listed for eight national and international awards and won three. His shorter books Ebola (2014) and The Chimp and the River(2015) were drawn from Spillover, each with a new introduction. His forthcoming book (August 2018) is The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life, which explores the drastic revisions in understanding of life's history on Earth forced by recent discoveries from genome sequencing, and the story of a scientist named Carl Woese. In the past thirty years, Quammen has also published a few hundred pieces of short nonfiction—feature articles, essays, columns—in magazines such as Harper's, National Geographic, Outside, Esquire, The Atlantic, Powder, and Rolling Stone. He writes occasional Op-Eds for The New York Times and reviews for The New York Times Book Review. Quammen has been honored with an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and is a three-time recipient of the National Magazine Award. He was a Contributing Writer for National Geographic, in whose service he travels often, usually to wild and remote places. Home is Bozeman, Montana. Connect with David Quammen: https://www.davidquammen.com/ Get David's books Twitter: @DavidQuammen Personal Health Coaching: https://www.primalosophy.com/ Nick Holderbaum's Weekly Newsletter: Sunday Goods (T): @primalosophy (IG): @primalosophy iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-primalosophy-podcast/id1462578947 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBn7jiHxx2jzXydzDqrJT2A The Unfucked Firefighter Challenge

Stigma Podcast - Mental Health
#31 - COVID-19, Isolation, Loneliness and Your Mental Health with Kasley Killam

Stigma Podcast - Mental Health

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2020 23:45


In the time of COVID-19 and social distancing, it’s important to know how we can maintain our mental health.  Kasley Killam, joins me for a conversation about loneliness, and isolation during this trying time and how we can protect our mental health even when we may not be able to connect physically with others. Kasley is a Masters of Public Health Candidate at the Harvard School of Public Health.  She is also a World Economic Forum Global Shaper and a social health advocate as well as a Contributing Writer at Scientific American (and has been for 5 years).  In March, 2020 she published an article in Scientific American titled, “How to Prevent Loneliness in a Time of Social Distancing.”  In this conversation we cover her suggestions on this topic, and we dig into what isolation is, how it’s different than loneliness and why both impact us as humans so much. Connect with Kasley: Her Website, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Some of Kasley’s recent writing: How to Prevent Loneliness in a Time of Social Distancing A Hug a Day Keeps the Doctor Away The Need for Human Connection in Digital Mental Health Care   HERE ARE SOME OF THE THINGS WE TALKED ABOUT: What is loneliness?  What is Isolation?  Kasley describes the difference between loneliness and isolation as well as physical impacts that a lack of social interaction can have on the human body. Social Isolation – Is about being physically isolated.  It’s objective.  It could be because you live alone, or you have physical limitations or you lack transportation, etc. Loneliness – Feeling connected to other people.  It’s subjective.  Do you feel like you have people you can reach out to and connect with? Chronic loneliness and social isolation can impact your health in a number of ways including these examples.  Here are some examples of how isolation can negatively impact our health:            a. More likely to catch a cold           b. More likely to experience depression            c. Increased risk of heart disease/stroke            d. Shortened life span            e. Decreased immunity            f. Increased inflammation            g. Decreased happiness, joy, sense of purpose     Loneliness is on the rise, but is certainly not a “new thing.” Kasley referenced a Cigna survey launched in January 2020 where they polled 10,000 American adults.  They found that across all age groups that 61% of people are lonely, compared to 54% the year prior.  This is particularly common among Gen Z who reported 79% feeling lonely.  This has been an issue long before this pandemic.  Link here to Loneliness Survey conducted by Cigna. Why are we so lonely?  Common reasons:           a. People are increasingly living alone           b. Technology - easy to blame and the evidence is                      mixed           c. Less participation in social clubs and community                    organizations           d. People have less time to invest in relationships                      as they are working more           e. Social anxiety How can we fight against isolation during this time of social distancing?  Kasley tells us that one universal that we are all going through is that we are having to adapt and figure out how to function and flourish during this time.  There are a number of things we can and should be doing including:            a. Reflect on what social well-being looks like for                       you. This is different for everyone. This can                             include contemplating questions such as "how                       much time do I want to spend interacting with                       other people?" and "how do I spend quality time                   with others?"            b. Make a list of the people you want to keep in                         touch with and focus on the relationships we                         want to prioritize in our lives. We need to figure                     out how we want to engage with those people.              c. Connect at least once a day with people on our                     list, or more, if we can. We also talked about how technology plays a role in both creating isolation, and how technology can be a tool to provide connectivity at the same time.  When discussing how to use technology in a healthy way Kasley explained that technology is often to blame for isolation, and it’s true, because many of us have unhealthy habits with social media and technology.  Kasley recommends that we use this time to figure out how we can use technology in ways that support your social well-being. We also talked about how introverts and extroverts handle isolation and loneliness differently as well as what healthy can look like for different types of personalities both during this time and later when we return to our old way of life. We also talked about what socially healthy use of technology and social media can look like now and in the future.  Kasley gives us tips on how to define what healthy looks like for ourselves and how we can manage our engagement with our devices and social media. Finally, Kasley gave us an overview of what a Masters of Public Health program is about, why she chose to get into the psychology space and what she plans to do once she obtains her Masters. Connect with the Stigma Podcast in the following ways: Website, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Email Connect with host Stephen Hays here: Stephen Hays Personal Website, Twitter, LinkedIn, What If Ventures (Mental Health Venture Fund)

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene
1442: Preeth Kumar shares his passion for automobiles

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2019 45:08


Preeth Kumar shares his passion for automobiles by writing and marketing a digital magazine titled Its Preeth Kumar on Instagram.  He grew up in New Jersey in a family where car culture was central to their lives. He started autocrossing in his E46 M3 and his need for speed grew. He sold Porsches at Manhatten Motorcars in New York City and Rusnak Porsche in Westlake after moving out west to Pasadena, California where he embraces the SoCal car culture with open arms. He and past Cars Yeah guest Vinita Khilnani have fun with a humor site on Instagram titled The Indian Aunties. He’s a Contributing Writer for L.A. Dreams Magazine and active in a multitude of automotive track events and car clubs.