Podcasts about jewelry

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Form of personal adornment

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  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about jewelry

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Latest podcast episodes about jewelry

Maker Mom Podcast
Episode 225 - Pam Robinson

Maker Mom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 64:33


Pam Robinson is a metalsmith, goldsmith, jewelry maker and designer based out of Chicago, IL. She is the owner of Garnet Studios and is the Education Director for national non-profit The Furniture Society. In this episode we sit down to hear Pam's background and journey as a maker and artisan, and how she balances the duties of being an education director, business and studio owner, and artist. You can find Pam on Instagram and Garnet Studios. You can see more of Pam's work and information on her website.

In the Loupe
Shooting for the Moon, but Reaching the Stars: an Interview with Punchmark's Best Selling Jewelry Retailer

In the Loupe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:44


Selling fine jewelry online is a bigger challenge than selling shoes or costume jewelry. The luxury goods market requires a different type of e-commerce presence than your typical retailer... or does it? Punchmark's 2021 best-selling client, Graziella Fine Jewellery, shares how they garnered so much success selling fine jewelry online -- and it might be a simpler strategy than you'd think.Check out Graziella Fine Jewellery online!

Profitable Joyful Consulting
EP90: How To Receive What You Want

Profitable Joyful Consulting

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 18:23


On the Profitable Joyful Consulting podcast, I teach you how to increase your profits and enjoy your business more. In this episode, you'll learn exactly how to receive what you want in your business. Is it difficult for you to achieve your goals? Do you find that some of them simply elude you, despite your best efforts?  Your ability to receive is one of the things that either facilitates or blocks you from bringing in what you want to have in your business and your life. Having an obstacle to receiving is one of the recurring issues I see with my clients that's critical to address. Tune into this episode to learn how to become aware of your capacity for receiving and to get better at receiving so you can bring more of what you want into your life. If you've ever been stuck at a plateau in your business or struggled to delegate to team members, this episode is for you!  Key areas discussed in this episode: 00:43 Why most lottery winners go bankrupt within three to five years  1:08 The three things to work on receiving (hint: it's not just money!) 4:26 What someone is really saying when they're trying to support you in your business 5:53 Why trusting that help is available is so valuable (even if you think that doesn't work for you)  9:20 How to figure out where you're stuck at receiving money  12:12 How to expand your capacity to receive more money  Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/iZXfTAJuBRY or listen on your favorite podcast app: https://samanthahartley.com/blog-podcast/  to discover how to expand your capacity for receiving in your life and business.  #HowToReceive #ConsultingBusiness

Profitable Joyful Consulting
EP89: What's Working Now - Experimental Events

Profitable Joyful Consulting

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 11:02


On the Profitable Joyful Consulting podcast, I teach you how to increase your profits and enjoy your business more. In this episode, you'll learn exactly what's working right now in my consulting business to attract new clients.  In this episode, I'm sharing techniques I used over the past year that have brought the most clients into my business! This is what's working right now for me, and I think you might find that it could work for you as well. One of the big reasons it works is because you get to give your potential clients a big dose of “you.” Tune into this episode to learn how (and why it's so effective!). Key areas discussed: 00:28 The number one thing that's brought the most clients into my business this year 00:52 Why this strategy is working and what you could do to replicate it in your business 1:17 What I'm giving people the opportunity to experience with this marketing strategy 4:22 Why it's okay to give away some things for free 6:23 How to align the experience of your marketing strategy with the actual experience of working with you  8:08 The most important thing to include when you use this strategy  Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/1Z-lBjvFkt4 or listen on your favorite podcast app: https://samanthahartley.com/blog-podcast/ to discover how to bring more clients into your consulting business next year with this strategy. Episode Hashtags: #MarketingStrategy #ConsultingBusiness  Long show notes: 

Be The Good
Sustainably and Ethically Sourced Jewelry

Be The Good

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 47:35


Angela Monaco is the owner of a charming and ethical boutique jewelry store in Philadelphia, Angela Monaco Jewelry. Angela designs and produces everything locally on Philadelphia's historic Jeweler's Row and uses ethically sourced gem stones.Angela says that her company sees sustainability as a holistic and authentic strategy woven into the core of the brand – "a continuous journey of learning and celebrating the collective beauty of what we do and who we are." The intentionality and care that Angela takes in every step of her business is evident in all that she produces, from her beautiful website, gorgeous storefront and most especially her timeless & beautiful designs.Angela is here to share more with us about her authentic approach to a local, sustainable, and ethical business model and her genuine, passion driven, approach to creating more good in the world.Visit AngelaMonacoJewelry to learn more!Follow on Instagram Donate to her GoFund Me

The Nick DiPaolo Show
Insurrection My A$$! | Nick Di Paolo Show #649

The Nick DiPaolo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 44:32


Biden distracts with speech. Marathon bomber busted. K9s and "The sick making stuff that shall not be named. Car thief busted with severed head. Jewelry store owner stops smash and grab. Prisoner escape.

Soul Healing
Sustainable Jewelry. Conscious Living, Yoga & Meditation

Soul Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 72:27


Welcome to the Emotional Mastery with Rochelle podcast! To me, emotional mastery isn't about perfection, it's about having the tools to come back to yourself and your inner knowing.  In this podcast, I talk about everything emotional healing and emotional regulation! I talk about everything I've tried, everything that's worked for me, everything Spiritual, health, Human Design, Astrology and so much more!     In this episode, I talk to Gemma Totten of Chapter Six Jewelry about: Her path to helping the environment through creating sustainable jewelryBecoming a vegetarian at age 5Self-acceptanceTo Be Magnetic workGemma's passion for sustainability & designWhere Gemma gains inspirationRe Wild conservationLessons on setting boundaries and communicatingGemma's relationship with yoga & meditation Read the full blog & transcript here.Watch on YouTube. Resources talked about in the show: Re:Wild YokeMountain Rose HerbsEmotional Mastery Workbook: Use code EMR20 for 20% off! Join the Community! Support, heal, and grow within this community space! Find the tools that work for you, share your story, and join us as we lift each other up through this journey.  Affiliate Links:Get 10% off of The Aura Market ProductsWhere you can find Gemma:InstagramWebsiteWhere you can find Rochelle: Instagram WebsiteEmail Additional Info: Read the blog Book a sessionCheck out the shop

Paul Zimnisky Diamond Analytics Podcast

ALROSA's Deputy CEO and head of the company's United Selling Organization, Evgeny Agureev, joins the show from Moscow, Russia. Paul and Evgeny begin by discussing the current state of diamond industry fundamentals and whether the “good times will last.” Next, Evgeny shares his thoughts on ALROSA's short, medium, and longer-term supply potential. The conversation then shifts to mid-stream participant demand for rough and Evgeny talks about the industry's shifting priority towards ESG initiatives when sourcing goods. Lastly, the two discuss innovation in rough diamond sales platforms and ALROSA's new sales system which prioritizes allocating rough to clients that provide the greatest value-add.   Hosted by: Paul Zimnisky Guest: Evgeny Agureev Guest plug: www.alrosa.ru More information on PZDA's State of the Diamond Market report: www.paulzimnisky.com/products   Show contact: paul@paulzimnisky.com or visit www.paulzimnisky.com.   Please note that the contents of this podcast includes anecdotes, observations and opinions. The information should not be considered investment or financial advice. Consult your investment professional before making any investment decisions. Please read full disclosure at: www.paulzimnisky.com.

Profitable Joyful Consulting
EP88: The Million-Dollar Dress™

Profitable Joyful Consulting

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 12:10


On the Profitable Joyful Consulting podcast, I teach you how to increase your profits and enjoy your business more. In this episode, you'll learn how to create your most amazing year yet with an exercise I love called “The Million-Dollar Dress™.” Sometimes it's hard to imagine what we want for our future, but a really fun visualization can sometimes help. I use this exercise with my clients all the time to create alignment and help them reach their goals. In this episode, I'm sharing it with you.  You are a powerful creator, and I believe in your ability to create your best year yet! You already have everything you need to be massively wealthy and successful.    Key areas discussed in this episode:    00:34 How the idea for this exercise came about many years ago 1:19 Reaching our goals and intentions with intangible and energetic alignment  1:45 The Million-Dollar Dress™ exercise and how it can help you get clarity about your business  7:40 How to pull The Million-Dollar Dress™ exercise into your everyday work  9:02 A second creative exercise that can help you support your success this year  Cheers to your most expansive self and your most expansive business this year! Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/96ATtrw3y1k or listen on your favorite podcast app: https://samanthahartley.com/blog-podcast/ to discover how to use this multi-sensory visualization to create it.  Episode Hashtags: 

Mid-South Viewpoint // Bott Radio Network
5th Friday Sponsor Spotlight // December 31, 2022

Mid-South Viewpoint // Bott Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 27:00


5th Friday Sponsor Spotlight welcomes David Wiemar of Wiemar's Jewelry, Eric Walker of Walker Auctions, and Chris Hodges of Abiding Above Ministries. 5th Friday Sponsor Spotlight airs during the month's a 5th Friday is added to feature advertisers on Bott Radio Network Memphis affiliate.

The Rap Music Plug Podcast | presented by QLC TV
#89 - Your Old Droog - Space Bar REVIEW

The Rap Music Plug Podcast | presented by QLC TV

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 11:32


Video animation by: Big Flowers Intro/Outro beat by: BLOODBLIXING Beginning of Episode (0:49). After a stellar 2019 and 2020 that saw Your Old Droog drop his magnum opus, Dump YOD: Krutoy Edition, Droog's music has been on the decline since then. Thankfully, Space Bar corrects just about every issue I've had with Droog's recent output, through better production, rapping, and guest features. Space Bar's beats, although not as captivating as Dump YOD or what was on Jewelry for sure, are much more up my alley. Droog also tweaked his approach lyrically, showing improvement in this respect as well on Space Bar.  There's a fun braggadocios looseness that is more present here, that Droog has always thrived in, allowing him to up the bar quality in comparison with his last couple of projects. He's less personal on this album, and instead is more aggressive, airing out some grievances that he has with the rap game, and wack collaborators as well. Above all, YOD gives us punchlines on punchlines on punchlines. Space Bar doesn't try to do too much, and is better off for it. RMPP Preferred Cut: "Meteor Man" Buy/stream Space Bar here: https://yourolddroog.bandcamp.com/album/space-bar  -- Fiending for some more quality rap content? Visit the RMPP website: https://rmpp.squarespace.com/ Want to support and help us grow? Become a RMPP Patreon, and gain access to exclusive content: https://www.patreon.com/therapmusicplugpodcast  Looking to connect? DM me @rapmusicplugpod on Twitter and Instagram, or shoot me an email at qlctv.podcast@gmail.com

Profitable Joyful Consulting
EP87: Planning Your New Year

Profitable Joyful Consulting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 22:05


On the Profitable Joyful Consulting podcast, I teach you how to increase your profits and enjoy your business more. In this episode, you'll learn how to plan your next year successfully.  The reflection I discussed in last week's episode is the foundation for planning your business. Planning is powerful because it's a space of pure potential of imagination, of dreaming - where you can really create whatever you want to have happen in your life and in your business.  And I promise, your plan doesn't have to be a huge PowerPoint deck in a binder (because realistically, you won't use it in your business). It can be practical and actually excite you to work in your business! Making next year your most aligned, profitable, and joyful year yet all starts with planning. Learn how to set yourself up for success in this episode. Key areas discussed:  1:28 Questions to ask yourself to get more in touch with what you want to create in your business 2:05 Why it's helpful to create a vision board or write a vision statement for your business 2:45 How to create a practical plan for your business that you'll actually use and feel excited by  3:12 How to decide what you want to bring forward into the next year and what you want to release  6:50 Why you shouldn't create a bunch of new stuff next year  8:20 Figuring out your intentions for the next year in terms of tangible and intangible goals  11:08 Why traditional business planning doesn't work for a lot of people 15:30 What's usually happening when my clients are stuck at a revenue level (and how to plan to avoid that problem next year)  15:59 What you always need to do to achieve your goals 17:35 How to enlist different kinds of support to bring your goals and intentions to fruition  19:08 The work that's the hardest that will also get you the business you want to have Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/QIsQFK0kf4Q or listen on your favorite podcast app: https://samanthahartley.com/blog-podcast/ to discover how to plan for your most profitable, joyful year yet. Episode Hashtags: #BusinessPlanning   Long show notes: 

Psychopath In Your Life
Jews and JEWELRY? Are Italians secret JEWS?

Psychopath In Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 51:14


Get In Touch Website: https://psychopathinyourlife.com/ Contributions to the show are greatly appreciated. Support the Show – Psychopath In Your Life   The post Jews and JEWELRY? Are Italians secret JEWS? appeared first on Psychopath In Your Life.

The Bench with John and Lance
12/24/2021 The Bench with John and Lance Hour 1

The Bench with John and Lance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 47:40


The guys are live from Klein's Jewelry for the listener Christmas party.

The Bench with John and Lance
12/24/2021 The Bench with John and Lance Hour 2

The Bench with John and Lance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 49:54


The guys are live from Klein's Jewelry for the listener Christmas party.

The Bench with John and Lance
12/24/2021 The Bench with John and Lance Hour 3

The Bench with John and Lance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 47:07


The guys are live from Klein's Jewelry for the listener Christmas party.

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW
THE RICH CELENZA SHOW #919 - Is The Way You Look Memorable?

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 8:11


RICH CELENZA talks about how a lot of people may not realize it but the way they dress has a major impact when meeting up with others. The way people dress can make them stand out and be unforgettable. Or if your someone who is dressed like everyone else you may end up being forgettable. If you want to stand out and make an impact it may be time to dress to impress and depress. People also need to realize by dressing better may also make others feel better and inspire them to do the same.

You Killed It
You Killed It Ep 204 - Claire's Jewelry

You Killed It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 59:05


Most of the cast of The Challenge: Spies, Lies, and Allies get together for a reunion and the You Killed It boys talk about what the competitors have to say. Follow us on Twitter: @ShelAlexander @jchidleyhill

Secrets to Win Big With Arjun Sen
S05E17: Never Give Up with VIP Guest Orianne Collins

Secrets to Win Big With Arjun Sen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 59:35


Orianne Collins is a globally acclaimed jewelry designer, a lifetime philanthropist and former wife of music legend Phil Collins. Jewelry designed by Orianne are influenced by her heritage and her travels around the world studying various cultures and craftmanship techniques, inspiration imbuing jewelry design with symbolism, color and eclectic elements. Orianne has made it her purpose in life to encourage people to “Never Give Up,” no matter what happens in life. She wants to show people if they push themselves every day, they can achieve whatever it is that they desire. Orianne has received the UNICEF Humanitarian Award Clarins in 2005, one of the highest humanitarian awards given for Orianne's contribution to social causes and impacting the lives of children worldwide.  Here are some key insights from this week's show: How to realize your objectives and take it to the next level. How to have a dream and then add the drive to achieve that dream. How to move forward to face the challenges of tomorrow and not get stuck with the challenges of yesterday. Prefer to watch the video version? Watch it here: https://youtu.be/W_nki_oDnTE

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 142 Part 2: The Language of Jewelry: How the Editor in Chief of JCK Finds Inspiration with Editor in Chief JCK, Victoria Gomelsky.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:12


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of JCK and the JCK Show How Victoria identifies trends to highlight in JCK Why the line between women's jewelry and men's jewelry has blurred, especially among younger consumers How travel influences jewelry design The most exciting new designers Victoria has her eye on About Victoria Gomelsky Victoria Gomelsky is editor-in-chief of JCK, a New York City-based jewelry trade publication founded in 1869. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Robb Report, AFAR, WSJ Magazine, the Hollywood Reporter, Escape, The Sun and Waking Up American: Coming of Age Biculturally, an anthology published by Seal Press. She graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with a BA in political science in 1995 and earned her MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia University in 2002. She specializes in jewelry and watch writing but her greatest love has always been travel — 60 countries and counting. Victoria was born in St. Petersburg, Russia and emigrated to the United States in 1978 with her parents and twin sister, Julia. She divides her time between New York City and Los Angeles. Additional Resources:  Victoria's Website Victoria's Instagram Photos: Victoria Gomelsky watches: Transcript: Victoria Gomelsky, editor in chief of esteemed jewelry trade publication JCK, was bitten by the travel bug during her first-ever trip—when she and her family immigrated to the U.S. from the Soviet Union in the late 1970s. Since then, she's visited more than 60 countries, often traveling to visit jewelry shows and report on jewelry trends. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how her career in jewelry started with a mysterious online job posting; why Gen Z is changing the way we categorize jewelry; and where to find her favorite jewelry destinations. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Keep your eyes open for part two, which we'll be posting later this week. Today, our guest is Victoria Gomelsky, editor-in-chief of the well-known industry publication JCK. Victoria is an accomplished writer. She's written about jewelry for the New York Times as well as an extensive list of respected publications. She also covers another of her passions, which is travel. She's had a quite a jewelry journey, as she was born in Russia and has been to more than 60 countries and counting. We'll hear all about her jewelry journey today. Victoria, welcome back to the program. Sharon: I have to ask you, why Las Vegas in July or in June? It's hot then.    Victoria: You know it's hot. It was this year that it was actually pushed back to August, which was so much hotter. It was hard to even fathom. I think the timing is such because it works well for the majors, the majors being the signets and the chain jewelers who really need to plan out their holiday buying much earlier than your average small boutique owner. A lot of it has to do with the schedule that makes sense for the industry. It's Vegas because it's hard to imagine another city that is appropriate for a giant tradeshow—   Sharon: That's true.   Victoria: That's easy to get, that has ample hotel room space. There are certainly smaller conferences that have been around the country. The American Gem Society has its annual conclave in a different city every year, but it's much, much smaller. It's convenience and ease of access, and I've gotten used to it. I don't love Vegas, but it does feel like my year is incomplete without my week at JCK. I've been going since 2000, so it's hard to imagine a year without it.   Sharon: How far in advance are you planning your publications? Are you thinking about the December issue in August?   Victoria: Well, if we had a December issue, yes.    Sharon: If it was an issue online?   Victoria: Online we can pull together pretty quickly. If it's a big feature, we like to plan it at least a month in advance, but so much of online is responding to what's happening in the world. Especially with the pandemic, it was really hard to plan because, as did everybody, we hit those walls where we thought, “This may not be relevant in a month.” Things were so changeable and volatile.    Online has a much different pace, but in terms of the print issue, we'll start planning the issue that heads out the door on the eve of JCK Vegas 2022. It'll probably go out in late May, and we'll probably start thinking about that in January in terms of big picture ideas. Just this morning, I was asked to give a sketch of content for a section on colored stones. It's hard to do that really early. You want to be timely. You want to be thoughtful about what people are thinking and what's happening the world.    Especially if an issue's coming out in the spring, I feel like after the holiday makes the most sense, because the holiday in the jewelry industry, as you can imagine or know, is everything. It's still the bulk of sales. The bulk of news comes out of this fourth quarter. To plan content without knowing how the holidays have gone is going to miss the mark, unless you're planning something general and vague. So, I like to wait until early January to start thinking about what makes sense and what people are talking about, what the news is.   Sharon: In terms of the holidays, since they're around the corner right now, you must have some features that are holiday-related that you think about early on, maybe in September or August.   Victoria: We do. If it's not about the holiday, it's about what people might start thinking about for the holiday. We do a lot of trend coverage on JCK, a lot of specific trend coverage, whether it be men's jewelry or something else. I'm actually working on a series of special report newsletters that go out every Monday in November all around the men's jewelry theme. We've covered colored stones, pearls, bridal. We tackle everything with a slight angle towards the holiday, questions like: Is this worth stocking? What are the trends? What kinds of things might retailers keep in mind as they prepare?    JCK is very much a style and trend publication, but it's also a business publication for people who happen to own jewelry businesses. We do a lot of marketing coverage, technology, social media apps that people need to know that might make them more efficient in their business. You could take jewelry out of a lot of what we cover and put in another field, whether it's fashion or home good or anything, and it might apply in terms of the strategies people might want to use to target customers, what they need to know. We try to cover it from all facets. It's always been a publication for businessowners in the jewelry space, so there's a lot of general business information we try to make sure our readers are aware of.   Sharon: If you're looking at trends, I'm thinking about the non-jewelry person that would go to Vogue or Harper's Bazaar or something like that—I'm dating myself, I realize—who can go online. I still think in terms of putting it online, like everybody else. Tell us about men's jewelry. Are men wearing more jewelry than before?   Victoria: Yes, they really are. It's funny, because I've been 20 years covering jewelry, and every four or five years, I'm either asked to or I initiate a story about the men's jewelry renaissance. There's always been something to say over the last 20 years. I do a lot of freelance writing for the New York Times. I did a piece for the Times about seven years ago, and there was a lot to say. There were a lot of jewelers introducing new men's collections and different takes on the subject, but no time has felt quite as relevant to that topic as now.    I think if you look to some of the most famous pop artists we see today, whether it's Harry Styles or Justin Bieber, the Jonas Brothers, Lil Nas X, any of these pop culture personalities, they are draped in jewelry, and not just any jewelry. A lot of them are draped in pearls, which for many of us are the most feminine gem around. There is this great, very interesting conversation about genderless or gender agnosticism in jewelry. Should we even define jewelry as a men's piece versus a woman's piece? Why not just make jewelry? Maybe it's a little more masculine/minimalist. Maybe it's a little more feminine/elaborate or diamond-set, but let it appeal to who it appeals to. Why do you need to tell people who it's for? It's a conversation.    I also write about watches quite a bit, and it's a conversation the watch world is grappling with, more so this year than any other year. Do we need to tell women that this is a “lady's watch”? Why don't we just market a watch, whether it, again, has feminine design codes or masculine design codes. Let whoever is interested in it buy it. We don't need to tell people what categories they are allowed to be interested in. It's been a very interesting conversation. I think fashion is embroiled in this conversation too, and it's been exciting to see.    When I talk about men's jewelry, I think what happens is that much of the industry still needs these categories because at retail, for example, a retailer might get a bunch of jewelry and they need to know how to merchandise or how to display it. For those kinds of problems, you still want to say, “O.K., well, this is my men's showcase,” but I think slowly things are changing. I don't know if in five years or 10 years, we'll even need those topics anymore. I think we'll just have a showcase of jewels. Again, they might be more minimalist or plainer, and they might appeal to men or women or people who consider themselves nonbinary.    Sharon: That's interesting, especially with watches, because when women wear men's watches, that's a fashion statement today.   Victoria: Very much so. I did a huge piece on female collectors for the Times in early 2020, and all of them wore men's pieces and felt a little grieved that they were being told what a woman's watch is. A woman's watch is a watch worn by a woman; that's it. I think the same might be true for jewelry. A men's jewel is a jewel worn by a man and so on. It's been an interesting thing to see evolve, and certainly there's a lot of momentum behind it. I think we'll slowly see these categories dissolve.   Sharon: There's a lot. I haven't seen men wearing brooches. Some of what you're talking about, to me, still has a way to go.   Victoria: A lot of it is being driven by Gen Z, Millennials, younger generations who look to their style icons like Harry Styles, as I mentioned. They're draped in a feather boa and necklaces. As that generation comes up they're going to age, and they're eventually going to be 30 or 40 and they'll be quite comfortable with jewelry because, 20 years later, they've been wearing it all these decades. But yeah, today, if you ask your average guy if he's going to wear a pearl necklace, I'm sure the answer's no, but I think these things do change. They change quicker than we expect them to. It's so much of what we see and what seems O.K. A lot of men might want to do that or might think they would look good in a pearl necklace.    I keep coming back to it because pearls are, again, the most feminine of gems, at least in terms of the lore we talk about, how we talk about them. Yet you see them on people like the Jonas Brothers or, for that matter, big, beautiful, iced-out Cuban chains. You see those on rappers or on hip hop stars. There is this communication out in the world where if you're just a regular guy and you're cruising through your Instagram and seeing these images, it all says to you, “This is O.K. This is right. Go for it if you're feeling it.” I think there is a lot more leeway in today's society to express yourself the way you want to. I think it's wonderful. It's quite exciting to see those barriers break down and have these conversations. It's been cool to write about.   Sharon: It would be interesting to have this conversation in 20 years. You reminded me of a conversation I had recently with an antique jewelry dealer about cufflinks. I said to her, “Cufflinks? Who wears cufflinks? I'm in Los Angeles.” Well, you're in Los Angeles too. Even the most staid businessperson, you don't see him with a cufflink, ever. I don't know.   Victoria: Maybe about a month ago, my boyfriend and I were invited to the opening of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which just opened in September in the heart of Miracle, right next to LACMA. It was a big gala affair sponsored by Rolex, which is a huge supporter of the Academy and the Oscars and now the museum. It was wonderful; it was like a little Oscars event, except it wasn't televised. It was black-tie glamor. Hollywood glamor was the theme, so my boyfriend rented a tux; he doesn't own one, of course, because we're in L.A. and it's a pandemic. Who needs a tux? But he got a tux, and I was gutted that I didn't have cufflinks for him or that he didn't have his own. He rented some, I think; he had a few shirt studs he was able to get from the rental place, but it was the first time. I thought, “Oh my God, cufflinks!” and we had a wonderful time. It was really exciting to be back in the world in such a fabulous way. It really felt special.   Sharon: I didn't realize it had opened. I was at LACMA, the L.A. County Museum of Art, this weekend and there was a big crowd around the Academy Museum, but I didn't realize it had opened. My antique jewelry dealer friend was also saying that she has collectors who collect antique cufflinks. I thought, “That's interesting.” I didn't know that was a collector's item in some circles, I guess.   Victoria: Yeah, when I think about it, there are a lot of great ones in London. If you ever go through Mayfair or Old Bond Street and you find those antique dealers there—there's Deakin & Francis, an old U.K. firm that specializes in cufflinks. I've never owned any, but now that we're talking about it, I feel I need to buy my partner some.   Sharon: I stopped buying my husband them 20 years ago when they just sat on his dresser not worn. I said, “O.K., I tried.” You're a traveler. You've been to how many countries?   Victoria: I lose track. It depends a little on how you count countries. I think I've counted Macao separately from China, even though it's a special administrative region of Hong Kong. Somewhere around 60. It might be about 61 or 62. A lot of countries I've been to—I mean, I've been to Switzerland at least 20 times, Brazil five times, Russia four times. I keep going back to places even though it's always very exciting to take another country off my list. As I mentioned earlier, I was a backpacker after college. My first trip was to Central America with some girlfriends with backpacks on. We took off for three months. We went to Costa Rica and Panama and Venezuela, and I ended up in the Caribbean for a couple of weeks.    I had already started a little bit of traveling. Initially, we came from Russia as a kid. I think when we left Russia in late 1978 as part of the exodus of Soviet Jews from the Soviet Union, we were allowed to seek asylum in the States. We took this journey via Vienna and then Rome and ended up in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, of all places, because that's where we had an invitation. We had to have a formal invitation because we were political refugees.    I think very early on, even though it was never articulated to me—it was something I felt in my bones—I thought that travel was a way to lead a better life. It was a road to a better life, as it was for us. Early on that knowledge imprinted on me, on my soul. In high school, I started saving money to go to an exchange program in Spain. That was my first real trip outside—I'd gone to Mexico with my family, but I had never traveled outside of that. So, I had the bug. After college, I was always interested in slightly more offbeat places.    One of my favorite places in the whole world—and I dream about going back all time—is India. I love places that still feel like they're not discovered. Clearly, India's very discovered, but it's not as easy to travel there as it might be to go to Europe. I love Europe and Paris and London as much as the next person, but there's always something that feels a little easy in those spots. I love Southeast Asia. I went to Vietnam in the 90s a couple of times. I loved it. I love Malaysia. I love the food there. I love the smells and the culture. I love things that feel different. India couldn't be more different than our lives. A lot of the same people go between the two, between L.A. and India, for example, and you'll find a lot of creature comforts in places like Mumbai. The culture and the heritage and the history, the way of life and the way people look at life is so, so different, and I'm really drawn to that. I like going places that test me a little bit.   Sharon: How do your jewelry and travel intersect? I'm sure you're traveling to the shows like Basle. India must be a great place for jewels. I don't know about the shows there.   Victoria: My first trip to India was for a show. There's a famous show—famous, I guess, depending on the circles you move in—in Mumbai called the India International Jewelry Show. That was my first reason to get to India in 2004. I ended up going back to do some reports on the diamond trade there. Mumbai is a real hub of diamonds, so I was going back to do research and then Jaipur in the north. Rajasthan is famous for its colored-stone industry. There are tons of colored-stone dealers and cutters and jewelers there, including the very famous Gem Palace, which I visited a couple of times.   My most recent trip to India was in 2017 to Jaipur to attend a conference on colored stones. It happened to intersect with a fair I had always wanted to go to called the Pushkar Camel Fair. Nothing to do with jewelry, although of course you see lots of jewelry in India. Jewelry's a ubiquitous thing there. When I went to this conference in Jaipur, my partner ended up meeting me. We spent a few days in Jaipur together, went down to Udaipur, which is a wonderful town in the south of Rajasthan, just stunning in terms of its history and heritage and hotels and palaces. Then we finished off in Pushkar, also in Rajasthan, at this camel fair. My entrée was for jewelry, but I try to explore as much as I can around it.    India's just remarkable. I'm very pleased that jewelry has such a natural and obvious connection to India because anytime I can have a work trip, take me there. Then if I can add on to it, I do. My son is only three—he's not even three; he's three in November, but I'm thinking, “How old does he have to be to go to India? What is too young to take a young, little guy to India?” Maybe when he's seven, hopefully.    Sharon: That's an interesting question. It could be three. There are people who are 33 who won't go because they're too afraid. It's on my list, but you're so adventurous.   Victoria: I wouldn't have pegged myself as the adventurous sort, at least not in high school. I was very type A. I was student body president. I was a cheerleader. I was very on track at least to go to college and who knows what after that, but I never really thought of myself as a risktaker and an adventure seeker. After spending time in Southeast Asia—I went to backpack there in the 90s, through Vietnam and Cambodia and Malaysia and Singapore—it just settled in my bones. I wanted more and more and more. Those places feel adventurous, but once you get there, they're not as challenging—well, they are challenging in that there's a lot of poverty; the heat is oppressive; it's hard sometimes to figure out your way around if the signage isn't clear and you don't speak the language, but I genuinely feel like the world is full of very good people. Maybe a few bad apples in there, but most people are very kind. So, it's easier than it seems.   Sharon: Do you think if somebody is a jewelry designer or looking at the field or profession, that travel would inform what they do?   Victoria: Oh, 100 percent yes. There are some jewelers who very much look to other cultures or travel. I think of Lydia Courteille, who's a Parisian jeweler who does insanely elaborate, beautiful gem-set pieces usually after a trip somewhere. She's done pieces based on the Mayan heritage. I believe she traveled to Guatemala. She's done pieces based on myths from Russia and India, and a lot of her collections really are inspired by travel she's taken.    There's another jeweler who's part Mexican, part French, named Colette. She has incredible jewels, a lot of them takes on various places she's visited. I think if I were a jeweler, I would certainly use travel as a jumping-off point to create a collection. I can't think of anything more evocative than a jewel that reminds you of a place you've been or the color of the ocean. A lot of people go to Greece and create a beautiful blue jewel that reminds them of the Aegean. Why not?    Sharon: I'm thinking of Thierry Vendome, where he goes and finds rusted pieces on his travels and then he'll come back and incorporate them. One piece had a grenade—   Victoria: An exploded grenade.   Sharon: An exploded grenade, yeah. Tell us who we should keep our eyes on, the top three you think of we should keep our eyes on.   Victoria: I just wrote about a jeweler that I only saw in person recently in Las Vegas at the Couture show, but I had Zoomed with them. They are Mumbai-based. It's a company called Studio Renn. It's a husband and wife named Rahul and Roshni Jhaveri, and they create jewelry for art lovers that really does live at the intersection between art and jewelry, philosophy, design. Sometimes you have to talk to them to hear the inspiration, but for example, one of them—they had stumbled across an object on a walk around Lake Tansa, which is a lake on the outskirts of Mumbai. There was this conversation they had about what it means to give something attention. Does that put value on the piece? And for them, it was this exploration of the meaning of value. They took this piece that was an organic object. They didn't tell me what it was. They cast it. They 3D scanned the whole thing and then encased it in precious metal, put rubies inside it in a way that you could only see them if you shone a light on the piece. There was this written source of very layered, complicated but also beautiful jewelry. They're just very interesting. They're really thoughtful.   Sharon: How do you spell Renn?   Victoria: R-e-n-n.   Sharon: I have to say it's the second time this week that somebody has mentioned them as somebody to keep your eye on.   Victoria: Yeah, I was thrilled to speak to them, and I ended up doing a piece for the New York Times on them. An Up Next Profile is what the column is called, because even though they've been around for a few years and they're not brand new, they're obviously new to people in the States. They are exploring this market. They worked a tour for the first time. They're really lovely and interesting and do beautiful work.    Another jeweler that's gotten a ton of attention—I know her pretty well personally. She is a client of a very good friend of mine. Her name is Lauren Harwell Godfrey, and her collection is called Harwell Godfrey. She's gotten a ton of attention over the last year. In fact, I just saw that she was nominated for a GEM Award, which is like the Oscars of the jewelry industry. The ceremony takes place in January in New York. She was nominated in the design category. Really fantastic use of color, lots of interesting motifs that feel very signature to her, lots of geometric work. We ended up commissioning a piece for my mom for her 75th birthday that my dad gifted to her this last summer. it wasn't a super bespoke piece, but there were bespoke elements to it. It was by Harwell Godfrey. She's a really lovely woman, super-talented designer based in Marin in Northern California.   I'll name one more. He's a really interesting guy. He does a ton of work with AI, artificial intelligence, in a way that scares a lot of people that are used to jewelry as this handmade, soulful object. His point is that there's no less soul in it, even though a computer helped to generate an algorithm that created a pattern that he inputs into this machine. His name is Nick Koss. His company is called Volund Jewelry. He's based in Canada and has a very interesting background that I cannot even attempt to encapsulate because it's rich and complicated, but he does really interesting jewelry. A lot of it is using 3D modelling software, AI, but in a thoughtful way. Again, there is lots of meaning baked into the way he sees things. He could talk about it very intelligently. He does custom work. You can go down a real rabbit hole with him. Check him out on Instagram. It's V-o-l-u-n-d.   I have a soft spot for one jeweler because I wrote a whole book on them that was published by Assouline probably six or seven years ago. It's a company called Lotus Arts de Vivre. They're based in Bangkok. They've been around since the early 80s, I want to say. It's a real family business. The patriarch is originally from Germany. He moved to Bangkok in the 60s and fell in love with a woman who had been born in Thailand but was the product of many years of intermarriage. Her grandfather was a Scottish captain who fell in love with a tribeswoman from north Thailand. Her other grandfather was an Englishman who married a woman from Malaysia. So, she was the distillation of generations of inner marriage between European and Asian backgrounds. They have this huge compound in Bangkok, and they have two sons that now help run the business.    They do extraordinary objects in jewelry. They started out as jewelers, but they do everything from home goods to accessories for people's cars. They use a lot of natural materials in addition to the finest gemstones. They use Golconda diamonds or emeralds from the Panjshir Valley in Afghanistan combined with snakeskin and buffalo horn and different woods. They're huge on different exotic woods from across southeast Asia. They find the finest craftspeople across Asia, whether it's lacquer artists from China or Japan to carvers from Indonesia. They will employ those crafts in their work, and it's just stunning.    They used to be with Bergdorf Goodman for many, many years. They are still available in the States. In fact, they won at the recent Couture show for some of their work. So, they're still here and they're everywhere. They have boutiques in different hotels, especially in Asia, like the Peninsula in Hong Kong or Raffles in Singapore. They have a presence, but they're not as well known, I would say, in the States.   Sharon: I'll check them out, especially if you wrote a whole book about them.    Victoria: The family is beyond interesting. It's the von Bueren family. He's a raconteur, somebody who you could listen to for hours. He's very, very interesting and has seen a lot, and their clients are very interesting. They appeal to a lot of high-society people across Asia, so they have these events. They have a space, a showroom, at their factory in Bangkok right on the river, and they host these soirées that are just magnificent.   Sharon: Wow! I'm sure you know all the ins and outs. You can go down a long list of jewelers and manufacturers. You could tell me about all of them. Victoria, thank you so much for being here today. This is so interesting. I'm sure our audience will enjoy hearing what you have to say about JCK since it is such a stalwart. Thank you very much.   Victoria: Thank you, Sharon. This is lovely. Thank you for giving me such an opportunity to talk about myself.   Sharon: So glad to have you.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

eBay the Right Way
eBay Chat with Wendy in CT: A Jane of All Trades! Costume Jewelry, Vintage Scarves, Collectible Paperweights

eBay the Right Way

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 72:13


Wendy is known on my Facebook Group by her costume jewelry sales. She regularly posts interesting sales and answers questions from other sellers. But her knowledge is not limited to costume jewelry as she sells a variety of different items. Email your comments, feedback and constructive criticism to me at Suzanne@SuzanneAWells.comGet your BOLO Book and eBay Calendar in my eBay Store here. Join my private Facebook group here.Find me on YouTube here.Join my online school for eBay sellers here.Visit my website here.Happy Selling!

The Rabbi Palacci Podcast
What Happens When You Buy Your Wife Jewelry

The Rabbi Palacci Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 7:47


Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 142 Part 1: The Language of Jewelry: How the Editor in Chief of JCK Finds Inspiration with Editor in Chief JCK, Victoria Gomelsky.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 24:30


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of JCK and the JCK Show How Victoria identifies trends to highlight in JCK Why the line between women's jewelry and men's jewelry has blurred, especially among younger consumers How travel influences jewelry design The most exciting new designers Victoria has her eye on About Victoria Gomelsky Victoria Gomelsky is editor-in-chief of JCK, a New York City-based jewelry trade publication founded in 1869. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Robb Report, AFAR, WSJ Magazine, the Hollywood Reporter, Escape, The Sun and Waking Up American: Coming of Age Biculturally, an anthology published by Seal Press. She graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with a BA in political science in 1995 and earned her MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia University in 2002. She specializes in jewelry and watch writing but her greatest love has always been travel — 60 countries and counting. Victoria was born in St. Petersburg, Russia and emigrated to the United States in 1978 with her parents and twin sister, Julia. She divides her time between New York City and Los Angeles. Additional Resources:  Victoria's Website Victoria's Instagram Photos: Victoria Gomelsky watches: Transcript: Victoria Gomelsky, editor in chief of esteemed jewelry trade publication JCK, was bitten by the travel bug during her first-ever trip—when she and her family immigrated to the U.S. from the Soviet Union in the late 1970s. Since then, she's visited more than 60 countries, often traveling to visit jewelry shows and report on jewelry trends. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how her career in jewelry started with a mysterious online job posting; why Gen Z is changing the way we categorize jewelry; and where to find her favorite jewelry destinations. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Keep your eyes open for part two, which we'll be posting later this week. Today, our guest is Victoria Gomelsky, editor-in-chief of the well-known industry publication JCK. Victoria is an accomplished writer. She's written about jewelry for the New York Times as well as an extensive list of respected publications. She also covers another of her passions, which is travel. She's had a quite a jewelry journey, as she was born in Russia and has been to more than 60 countries and counting. We'll hear all about her jewelry journey today. Victoria, welcome to the program.   Victoria: Hi, Sharon. It's so great to be here. Thank you so much.   Sharon: I will go into my normal questions, but my first question is—and it seems like a silly one—but you speak Russian, then?   Victoria: I do. It's actually not that silly. I came here when I was five with a twin sister. We arrived at JFK in December of 1978, pretty much the height of the Cold War. So, my sister and I really did not want to be Russian, as we were five, six years old. We didn't want to be different from our classmates. So, we started speaking quite quickly in English, and that's how my language developed.    I could understand Russian, but in terms of speech, I am not a great speaker. Those are really two different centers in the brain, as I realized. I can be a very good tourist. I can go to St. Petersburg or Moscow, ask for directions, order food at a restaurant, but if you want to have a deep conversation with me about business or anything that requires an extensive vocabulary, it's not going to be me. But I can understand pretty well.   Sharon: It always fascinates me. Did you speak any English when you came here?   Victoria: No, but having a twin sister and being five, you're a little bit of a sponge. I've read that before age seven, if you pick up another language before that age, that's more or less the cutoff. You can learn to speak quite fluently very quickly, and we did. We didn't know any words. We stopped in Vienna on the way out of the Soviet Union, and then we lived outside of Rome for a few months, so I probably picked up some Italian then, too, come to think of it, not that it stuck. But when we got to the States, it all happened very quickly. I really don't remember learning English. It was almost as if I picked it up by osmosis.   Sharon: Wow! It's a great way to learn, in terms of thinking about how it is to learn a language. Your English has solidified in a sense.    Victoria: Exactly.   Sharon: Were you artistic then? Were you already artistic? Do you consider yourself an artistic person?   Victoria: It's a good question. I don't know. I consider myself creative. My sister—again, I have a twin sister; she's really the artist of the family. She's much more visual. She's a graphic designer, an artist. She creates collages and all kinds of things with her hands. I'm not dexterous at all, so my creativity is on the page, what I write and how I see the world. So, I don't consider myself an artist, but I do consider myself a creative.   Sharon: Does she call you up sometimes and say, “What were you thinking about that layout on the page?”   Victoria: Oh yeah, she's super-critical. Trust me, I do not design or do anything around the home that doesn't get her buy-in, because if I don't get her buy-in on it, she'll come over and say, “Oh my God, I can't believe you put that on the wall.” She'll never let me hear the end of it. So, I make sure to get her buy-in on any artistic or design-oriented decision I have to make.   Sharon: She must be a great resource for you in terms of what you do. Did you come to jewelry through writing, or did you have a love of jewelry? How did that work?   Victoria: I came through writing. It was all quite random. I'll share the story because it's really my story; it's my original tale, I guess you would say.   Sharon: It's a journey.   Victoria: My journey. This was the beginning. I was in living in L.A. I was 25. I really wanted to move to New York, and I was too scared to move without a job or without knowing anybody. I really wanted to continue my writing career. I had been a journalist. Even though I majored in poli-sci at UCLA, I had always worked for the Daily Bruin. I had done internships at various news organizations, some of them in the television field; some of them were written publications.    I applied to one MFA program in total, and that was the Columbia University Master of Fine Arts program in their non-fiction writing department, specifically. That's the only school I applied to, because I wanted to move to New York and I wanted to continue writing, and that felt, to me, like the only possible way for me to do that.   I moved to New York in August of 1998, did two years of this Master of Fine Arts program, and then didn't want to leave. I was still working on my thesis and finishing my degree when I started applying for jobs that were in the writing field. Mind you, this was 2000, so it was the very first wave of web jobs. It was Web 1.0. I didn't realize it yet, but it was on the verge of crashing. That crash we had in 2001 was coming, but I didn't see it then. There were a lot of jobs; a lot more jobs than people to fill them.    I happened to go on Monster.com. I'm not sure if it's around anymore. It was a job search site. I had a profile on the site, and I happened to come upon a posting that said, “Luxury goods website seeks writer/editor with two to three years' experience. Click here to forward your profile to this employer.” I had no idea what that meant. It was very vague. At the time, you faxed people your résumé. I guess you could email, but a lot of times it was still faxed. There was just no information at all. It was literally a button. I clicked it and thought, “O.K.” and I forgot about it promptly.   A few days later, I heard from a woman named Lisa at a company called Gemkey.com. I had no idea what that was, but it turns out Gemkey was a startup in the jewelry space. It was meant to be a website where retailers would go on and source their inventory online, which was laughable because 20 years later, that's still something that most retailers don't do. It was way, way, way ahead of its time. It was founded by Fred Mouawad, whose father is Robert Mouawad. Robert Mouawad is a Lebanese businessman who donated a ton of money to GIA. His name graces their campus in Carlsbad. GIA being the Gemological Institute of America.   Sharon: That's why it sounded familiar. I was going, “Where do I know that from?”    Victoria: Yeah. Anyway, Fred was the son. He was an entrepreneur. He was based in Bangkok, and he had this website that had an office in New York. They were looking for some editors to fill out the news section of their site. I was hired as their pearl and watch editor, and I had no idea about either category. I didn't even know pearls were cultured. I really had no language to describe them. I knew what a watch was, but I knew nothing. I could have named Rolex, Cartier maybe, and maybe Timex.    I had been backpacking around the world in the late 90s prior to going to grad school, so I was living very scrappily and was quite frugal. I was in my early 20s, not really in the jewelry scene. One of my first trips was to a pearl farm in Australia to see the Paspaley farm located off the coast of Northern Australia. On the way there, I stopped in Bangkok to visit Fred Mouawad's main headquarters and meet some of my colleagues. On the way out, I stopped in Hong Kong to go to the pearl auctions, and I was hooked. It was a wonderful introduction to the world of jewelry, quite literally the world of jewelry. I had loved travel until then, and here was a way to combine my love of it with a way to explore this new category, this new universe. So, I came to jewelry through writing and then through travel.   Sharon: That must have been so exciting, to be writing about something you found you loved as opposed to—I don't know. I'm trying to think of some of the things I've had to market over the years where it's like, “You've got to be kidding me.”   Victoria: Yes, I think that was one of the things I learned quite early. My job with Gemkey didn't last long because it got bombed not that long after. I think I was employed with them for eight months or so, and then I got laid off because the company was losing money. I ended up getting hired almost right away by National Jeweler, which at the time was close to a hundred-year-old publication. It's still around, not in print form, but it's around in digital form. It was founded, I believe, in 1906. It's really an industry trade like JCK, one of the stalwarts of the business.    I got hired as their gemstone editor. I got to National Jeweler, and I realized the company—National Jeweler at the time was owned by a bigger corporation that owned lots of different publications, everything from the Hollywood Reporter to Billboard Magazine to a publication called Frozen Food News. I realized there are so many different niches in the world, and as a writer, I was grateful I didn't slip into the frozen food world, but the music world is great. If you enter music via Billboard, what a great way to learn about music.   I happened to enter through the trade of jewelry, and that was a wonderful way to get down into the trenches of an industry that is quite esoteric, quite hard to penetrate, and it still is. All these years later, there's still so much to learn about jewelry, but starting out through a trade was the key. When you're a trade reporter, you get to talk to dealers; you go to tradeshows; you learn from a very ground-up level, as opposed to being an editor of Vogue, where you don't get to see the real world. You spend your time in the limelight. You get to see all kinds of topical designers, but you don't always get the nitty-gritty details, that insight into the supply chain and insight into how a gemstone might emerge from the ground and the steps it takes to become a beautiful jewel. That all came through the trade, so I was very grateful to have that experience and the years and years I spent going to the Tucson shows to research the world of gems, to Basle to speak to high-end jewelers in Europe. There were all kinds of events. I have had a very unique perspective on this trade and the world at large through the lens of jewelry.   Sharon: Do you find that writing about jewelry has its own language, in a sense? It's like writing about sports. I couldn't write about sports.   Victoria: Very much so. The lingo takes a long time to understand. People think of jewelry as a very superficial subject. I think people who don't know about jewelry will perhaps think, “Well, it's just a bauble. It's just something you put on to sparkle, to add a little or to show off your status, whatever it is.” But there are so many layers to jewelry, and the way you talk about it gets ever more complicated the more you know.    There's a whole language around diamonds and gemstones and the ways you describe color, not to mention all the ways you talk about the fabrication of jewelry. That's always eluded me a bit. I've been to factories, and I've been to places where jewelry is made, and that still feels like a topic that's difficult for me to access because I don't have a brain to understand mechanics or engineering. When people are sitting there at the bench trying to tell me the steps of the process, I always get a bit lost. It does feel like a very complicated venture, but I have been fortunate enough to see a lot of that.   Sharon: No, I can understand. I was at some design show, and there was a jeweler talking about how much of jewelry is engineering. He was talking about getting the piece to balance, but it's also when you're talking about extrusions when a piece of jewelry is being manufactured.    So, you went into nonfiction. Was that something where you said, “I'm not a fiction writer”?   Victoria: Yeah, pretty much. I love fiction and I love poetry, but it never felt like a natural pursuit for me. I was always interested in telling stories, and the stories that really compelled me or held my attention were always nonfiction. I think we all know that truth is stranger than fiction. We've all had the epiphany many times throughout lives, I'm sure, where we realized that the stories in front of us are as compelling as anything made up.    My entrée into that world was initially through The Daily Bruin, which was a huge college newspaper at UCLA. I learned the basics of being a reporter and a journalist and hunting down sources and doing interviews, but at the same time I didn't love the grind of a daily journalism beat. It was good training, but when I applied to Columbia, I specifically did not apply to the journalism school. I applied to the arts program, to the Master of Fine Arts program, and I was drawn to the writings of, say, a Joan Didion or a Tom Wolfe or polemicists or memoirists—a lot of fiction authors who write beautifully in nonfiction or have beautiful examples of nonfiction in their repertoires. I was drawn to the kind of writing that was true, that was honest, but that still held all the same elements of a good fiction tale. It had characters, dialogue, a plot.    I probably don't do as much of that kind of writing as I hoped I would, or as much as I wish I could, because I'm making a living. I write journalism; I write stories, but in all the stories I write, I really try to spend a lot of time with the people who are my sources and get their stories. I really try to convey a sense of story, even if it's a short piece that's running in a newspaper. I do as best as I can in that limited word space with a storyline.   Sharon: Tell us about your job as editor. Are you pulling together all the departments, like you see on TV editorial meetings?   Victoria: It's a little bittersweet, because JCK—for those of you who aren't familiar, I'll tell you a little bit about what that stands for, because it's a mouthful. JCK goes back to 1869. It wasn't always JCK, which, by the way, stands for Jewelers' Circular Keystone. Jewelers' Circular was a publication in the 30s that merged with another jewelry publication called Keystone. From then on, they were called Jewelers' Circular Keystone, until the 70s when they shortened it to JCK. So, that's what those three initials stand for, but initially, it goes back to 1869 in Maiden Lane, New York, where the fledging jewelry district was growing up. There were watchmakers and jewelers who needed a publication to help them source their materials, help them sell. Various publications formed around them, and they eventually merged and aligned. What we know as JCK today really comes out of Maiden Lane in the 1870s. It's pretty stunning to think about.    I joined the magazine in 2010. I had moved back to Los Angeles after nearly a dozen years in New York because I was ready to move. I moved back in late 2009. I had lost my job with National Jeweler after the financial crisis, and that was fine. I had been there for eight years or so, so it was time to move back to California where I grew up. About six months after I landed back in L.A., I ended up getting asked by a friend of mine who was the publisher of JCK if I'd be willing to take a temporary job with JCK as their editor. They were looking for a new editor. They were looking for somebody in New York, but they needed somebody to get them over the hump of a few issues. I thought, “Great, this is a perfect bridge job as I find my footing back in L.A.”    Well, as it turns out, it was not that hard to manage a publication from L.A. because I knew the industry. I had my contacts. I even knew my colleagues because I had worked with them. They were editors at JCK, but I had met them many years ago, as I was one of their cohorts in the jewelry media space. So, I knew the people I was working with. After six months or so, everybody thought, “Hey, this is actually going pretty well,” so they brought me on full time. Luckily, I had an apartment in Brooklyn Heights that I had sublet out and hadn't gotten rid of, so I was able to come back to New York once a month for about a week. For about six years, I was truly bicoastal, from 2010 to about 2016.   In that time, JCK continued to be—its tagline is “the industry authority.” It's been reporting on this business for so long, and it was exciting. At first, we started out with 10 print issues a year. We had contributors; we had staff writers; we had a whole publishing team. Slowly over the years, that print frequency has shrunk. It became seven issues a year. Then it shrunk down to four print issues a year; mind you, with a robust website and a very strong daily news presence online, but print has always continued to shrink in this environment. As of this year, we went down to one print issue a year. That harried newsroom where people are running around and there are photoshoots happening, that did happen and still does happen, but just not to the frequency and level that you might imagine of a busy magazine publishing schedule.    The good thing is that we're published by a company called Advanced Local that is based at One World Trade Center in New York. Of course, nobody's been in the office for a good long while now, but when we are in the office, it's the same parent company, Condé Nast, so we use the same studios to do our photography. We rely on the same talent in terms of photographers and stylists that Vogue and GQ do. So, we have a really good team of people. They're not directly staffed. They're not members of the JCK staff, but they are people that are available to us.    We have a wonderful creative director, again, somebody who's a freelancer, but works with top magazines, a wonderful photo editor. When we do get back to being in the office, I'll certainly fly out to New York and partake, or at least be a witness to the photoshoots we do for our covers and our jewelry still lifes. But the hectic, frenzied nature of that has certainly calmed down. We do have, like I said, a robust online presence. We have a well-known news director named Rob Bates. He's covered the world of diamonds and jewelry news for 23 years, coming on 30, I think. We're staffed by some of the best in the business, but it definitely is a small, very scrappy operation.    Sharon: So, during Covid, you've been doing this through Zoom, I take it.   Victoria: Yeah, everything is through Zoom. We managed to get a bunch of photoshoots in right at the very beginning of March of 2020 that luckily saved us in terms of what we could produce through 2020. Then we did a photoshoot in May. There was that lull where things were looking pretty promising before the Delta variant, so we were able to do a photoshoot then. Like I said, now we're looking to 2022.    We have a big issue coming out. It always comes out on the eve of the JCK Show. The JCK Show is the big Las Vegas tradeshow. It shares our name. I don't want to get too complicated with this, but the show was founded in 1992 as a spinoff from the magazine. The magazine existed for all these decades, and the team involved thought, “Hey, isn't it time we use our clout in the industry to form a tradeshow?” And so they began this tradeshow in Las Vegas that then grew to be such a big presence in such an important industry meeting place that the tradeshow ended up being bought by different exhibition companies, and it eventually landed with Reed Exhibitions, which is a big company headquartered in the U.K. with U.S. headquarters in Connecticut. They run a lot of tradeshows and exhibitions, and they ended up buying the magazine and then hiring a different company to publish it. That may be more than your listeners want to hear. It's kind of complicated, but the point is we are related to JCK, this big tradeshow, but we're also an independent editorial voice, so we aren't bound to only write about JCK.   Sharon: That's interesting. What about Couture, which is part of the JCK Show, isn't it?   Victoria: It's a separate company. In fact, National Jeweler, when I worked there, was owned by the company that—it's gone through many iterations. The company that runs Couture is called Emerald Exhibitions, and they're headquartered in New York. That was the company that owned National Jeweler at some point. There's a lot of overlapping relationships in this world. Couture and JCK are separate companies, separate entities, but they happen at the same time in Las Vegas to make it easy for members of the jewelry industry to shop the shows.    There are different points of view. Couture is very much focused on couture-level, high-end designer jewelry. JCK has that, but it also has everything else you might imagine, everything from packing to loose diamonds, loose gemstones, dealers from Hong Kong, Turkey, China when the Chinese are able to visit. JCK is much more a mass marketplace for the entire industry, and Couture is much more focused on high-end design. They're complementary and I love going to both. 

Profitable Joyful Consulting
EP86: End of Year Reflection

Profitable Joyful Consulting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 15:53


On the Profitable Joyful Consulting podcast, I teach you how to increase your profits and enjoy your business more. In this episode, you'll learn how to plan your business better by reflecting on the year that was.  Reflecting on the previous business year is a key part of planning. As Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit, says — the ultimate productivity hack is deep thinking. Deep thinking and reflection may be at the bottom of your list when you're juggling client work, managing your team, and finding new clients, but it's critical to visioning and growing a business that is truly profitable and joyful.    This information is what can make the year something you learn from, so you can grow expansively. Many of my clients who will double their business in the next year have done a deep dive on the year that was and brought in the support they needed to make that next year happen the way they want it to. So I promise, it's worth your time! Key areas discussed in this episode: 1:29 How often you should be making space for reflection in your business 2:07 How to involve different perspectives from different parts of you in your reflections  3:51 Key questions to ask yourself as you reflect on the year that was  Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/OEANnBgbKto or listen on your favorite podcast app: www.enlightenedmarketing.com to deepen your own understanding of yourself as a business owner and explore the development opportunities you have as you go forward into the next year. #EndOfYearReflection #BusinessPlanning Long show notes: 

Thrive By Design: Business, Marketing and Lifestyle Strategies for YOUR Jewelry Brand to Flourish and Thrive

Creating the Desired Brand Effect for your jewelry business is crucial in standing out in the industry's saturated market. One of ways to achieve this is through smart brand positioning. OXB is proof that having a unique angle can catapult your brand, even turning the simple idea of sweat proof gold filled jewelry into an extraordinary success.    Here are the resources mentioned in the show:   7+ Figure Jewelry Company Masterclass

Reading with Libraries Podcast
Browsing Books: Blue Earth County

Reading with Libraries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 11:13


This season we are moving through the state of Minnesota, looking at an interesting fact about each county and giving you a book prompt from that fact. We will share six book suggestions to meet that prompt, to get you started on reading new books. You can also take that prompt and find any other book to meet the challenge!   Blue Earth county is named for deposits of blue-green clay once evident along the banks of the Blue Earth River. To celebrate this county, this week you can read a book with jewelry.   We give you links to each of these books on our show notes page, taking you to Amazon.com. If you click on any of them, and buy anything at all - including a nice book - Amazon will send us a small percent of the profits they made on these sales. Thank you for supporting CMLE!

Side Hustle School
#1816 - ‘Jack n ginger' Admin Designs Island-Life Jewelry

Side Hustle School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 8:22


Drawing on inspiration from the islands of Hawaii, this office manager earns up to $4,000/month part-time with her island-style jewelry creations. Show notes: SideHustleSchool.com Email: team@sidehustleschool.com Be on the show: SideHustleSchool.com/questions Connect on Twitter: @chrisguillebeau Connect on Instagram: @193countries Visit Chris's main site: ChrisGuillebeau.com If you're enjoying the show, please pass it along! It's free and has been published every single day since January 1, 2017. We're also very grateful for your five-star ratings—it shows that people are listening and looking forward to new episodes.

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller
EP 239 - I USED TO CHASE THE MONEY & TITLES: Handshake Deal with PSA & The Hobby, RIP Drakeo The Ruler, Opening A Jewelry Shop in The Metaverse & more

Behind The Baller Podcast with Ben Baller

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 39:48


His name is Ben Baller, not Ben Humble & he's here to discuss: Not feeling well, coronavirus running rampant in USA, The Seahawks vs Rams game being postponed, going to future games, doing a handshake deal with PSA, pulling heat from his BB Boxes, RIP Drakeo The Ruler, what he's watching, podcast recommendations, deleting Cameo, BBDTS, opening a jewelry shop in the Metaverse, The sky not falling, coins on the come up, Paul KO'ing Woodley & more.  This episode is brought to you by: www.Bambee.com/Baller www.SimpliSafe.com/Baller www.MackWeldon.com/Baller www.SoleSavy.com/BALLER Check out Business Wars: Christmas Movie Wars - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/christmas-movie-wars-an-iconic-holiday-tradition/id1335814741?i=1000544611436 If you are interested in MLB, NBA, NFL & UFC Picks daily, weekly or monthly subscribe at www.CaptainPicks.com & Follow @TheCaptainPicks on Instagram Produced by: DBPodcasts www.dbpodcasts.com Follow @dbpodcasts on Instagram & Twitter Music by @lakeyinspired Available on all Podcast Platforms, YouTube & BehindTheBallerPod.com Behind The Baller Theme Music  Artist: Illegal Kartel (@illegal_kartel_mikal_shakur) Produced by: Gene Crenshaw @yuyuthemaker

Joy Joya Jewelry Marketing Podcast
155 - 5 Tips for Setting 2022 Goals for Your Jewelry Business

Joy Joya Jewelry Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 28:40


I share some specific guidance about how you can set goals for your jewelry brand in 2022. As you probably know, if you don't set clear goals for your business, then you won't be able to see the way ahead - both for the short term and the long term. If you want to set yourself up for success in the coming year, then you'll definitely want to listen to this episode and take note of my five tips.

This Filipino American Life
Episode 157 – A Few of TFAL's Favorite Things – Small Businesses to Support this Holiday Season

This Filipino American Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 57:38


  In this episode, we shout out some of the many Filipino Small Businesses that we are personal fans of, ones that you should definitely support this Holiday season!  Here is the list of who we mentioned on the show, along with some other ones that are also near and dear to our hearts: Jewelry...

For the Love of Jewelers: A Jewelry Journey Podcast
S2-09: Chris Gage, A Second Chance at Life

For the Love of Jewelers: A Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 59:48


For many years, lapidarist Chris Gage was known as Mr. Holly Gage, of Gage Designs. A well-respected chef in his own right, Chris accompanied his award-winning wife—a certified metal clay instructor—around the country and world providing delicious meals at her workshops and local retreats. But three years ago, he suffered a trauma so intense that it altered the course of his life completely. “As horrible as the whole thing was, there is something to be gained from it,” Chris says. His positive attitude throughout an incredibly challenging ordeal allowed Chris to heal, both physically and mentally, and to begin anew creating a program helping others appreciate their own wounds. A delicate navigation of a life-altering experience, this For The Love of Jewelers podcast episode shares the pain of trauma, the love it exposes and a strong commitment to a life of opportunity and growth.

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW
#908 - Do You Have A Signature Look? (RICH CELENZA Podcast)

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 9:32


RICH talks about how a lot of people may have a signature look. That can be for the way they dress or the accessories they wear. Or maybe it's the way they style their hair. This may be something that may make people feel very comfortable which is a good thing. But there are also people out there who get stuck looking a certain way for a long period of time that makes them feel old or out of date. Rich talks about how may be time to change some things up when it comes to their look, style, and identity.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 141 Part 2: How Emerging Jewelry Designers Can Cut Through the Noise with Writer & Editor, Amy Elliott

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 26:26


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the most important thing a jewelry designer can invest in is high-quality photography How Amy finds the topics she writes about for JCK's “All That Glitters” blog How designers can find the story that helps them break through the crowded marketplace Who today's most exciting emerging and independent designers are How the jewelry industry changed during the pandemic, and what retailers must do to engage young consumers About Amy Elliott Amy Elliott is a writer, editor and brand storyteller who specializes in fine jewelry and fashion, and is fluent in other lifestyle categories, including food, weddings and travel. As a former staff editor at The Knot, Bridal Guide, Brides Local Magazines + Brides.com and Lucky, Amy is known for delivering high-quality editorial content across a variety of print and digital media. After recently serving as the Engagement Rings Expert for About.com, Amy joined the freelance staff of JCK as its All That Glitters columnist, while contributing articles about jewelry trends, estate and antique jewelry and gemstones to its prestigious print magazine. Amy also serves as the Fine Jewelry Expert for The Bridal Council, an industry organization composed of luxury bridal designers, retailers and media, and her byline has appeared in Gotham, Hamptons, DuJour, Martha Stewart Weddings, GoodHousekeeping.com and more. Additional Resources: Amy's Website Amy's Twitter Amy's Instagram JCK Article: Cicadas Swarm on Sienna Patti Gallery in Lenox, Mass. JCK Article: Christopher Thompson Royds' Flowers Bloom at Sienna Patti Gallery JCK Article: Look What Happens When Annoushka Gives Peridot A Go Examples of posts that reflect the intersection of jewelry with history, culture and current events: Bob Goodman Wants Jewelers To Join Him in Disrupting the Status Quo: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/bob-goodman-jewelers-disrupting/ The Ten Thousand Things x Met Museum Collaboration Is Coming In Hot: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/ten-thousand-things-x-met-museum/ Go “Sea” Some Serious Silver Treasures At Mystic Seaport Museum: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/sea-as-muse-silver-seaport-museum/ New Jewelry From Rafka Koblence, Olympic Wrestler Turned Designer: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/new-jewelry-from-rafka-koblence/ Transcript: As author of the “All That Glitters” blog for JCK, Amy Elliott has a front row seat to the jewelry industry's up-and-coming trends and designers. She's also been lucky enough to work with some of these designers, helping them refine their brands and create stories that resonate with customers. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what designers and retailers should do to stay relevant with younger consumers, how art jewelry has influenced high jewelry, and what jewelry trends to watch out for in the coming months. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: When you say you like strong, new collections, what catches your eye when somebody's presenting a new collection to you or sends you a press kit or email? Amy: Every time I'm ever interviewed for something, I always say this, but photos are so important, beautiful, beautiful photos. Whatever budget you have, use it for the photography. I love glamorous jewelry. I love high jewelry. I love glamor, big, bold, extremely extravagant jewels; from an editorial standpoint, I love them. I love to excite the senses with beautiful jewelry that makes you stop in your tracks. So, the jewels have to be beautiful, and you need to have beautiful photos to accurately portray that. It's just a strong point of view.  Boucheron came to me, and they have a whole series inspired by a cat that belonged to the Maison Boucheron early on in their life. His name is Vladimir, and it's a whole collection that takes this Persian cat with his swept fur. There's a story there; there's a heritage story. I love that. I love to take a new collection and look back at how it came to be. I love figuring out what a designer's signature is, whether they're well-established or they're just coming out. Every once in a while you'll find a newcomer with a strong point of view and you're like, “I've never seen this before. I'm so excited to tell that story.” Sharon: I think it's so important to say or to reiterate that for everybody, no matter what kind of jewelry you're selling, whether it's fine jewelry or antique jewelry. I'm thinking of some of the tradeshows when I've talked to dealers and they're like, “Oh, I don't have the money for photos.”  Amy: I don't know what to say. I've been saying it for 20 years and it's still a problem. There are some designers that are really overexposed and there are some that are underexposed. I'm always excited to discover somebody I'm not following on Instagram. How exciting! A lot of times, they're international. I'm connected with a PR firm in Paris right now. They've been calling me a lot, and it's a goldmine of designers that don't get featured a lot over here. I think I'm the only editor at JCK that covers estate and antique jewelry. I'm always covering auctions and exhibitions in that vein and all of the art fairs. I've written about Sienna Patti up in the Berkshires several times. It really is a pleasure, and anything goes. I have an action-packed calendar for the holidays. Sharon: It sounds like it, yes. Sienna Patti, I know she's in the western part of Massachusetts.  Amy: Yes, she's in the Berkshires. Sharon: She has an art jewelry gallery I'd love to get to someday. How does art jewelry fit in here? Does it catch your eye if the right photos are sent to you? Do you see it taking more of the market or having a higher profile? Amy: It's interesting. The one thing I will say, and it's so hard to speak in terms of trends when you're dealing with very expensive, high-end, collectible jewelry, but what I have noticed a little bit of is the selling of sweet sets, something that might be convertible, a multipiece set. Christopher Thompson Royds does that. You get a beautiful box, and then it's an earring that can be worn three or four different ways. Annoushka did a collaboration with Fuli Gemstones. Beautiful, bright green peridot like you've never seen. It was not really a collection; it was an eight-piece set. That is what the customer is being asked to buy into, and that feels very collector, very connoisseur, a very specific kind of angle. It's a very specific customer that is going to want to invest in jewelry that can be worn but is presented as an art object or sculpture or something to display in your home as sculpture, but then you can take it out and wear it. I see that as a direction with very, very high-end jewelry that's being shown in galleries, this notion of buying a boxed set. Sharon: When you said sweet sets, I was thinking edible sweets. That's interesting. Amy: Sets of jewels.  Sharon: There's an idea. Tell us who the emerging, independent designers are today. Who should we keep our eye on? Who's overlooked? Who's being so creative, knocking it out of the park, but you don't hear talked about? Who's collectible? Amy: I know this is a very informed and qualified audience, Sharon, so I'm sure these names are going to be familiar to many in your audience, but I think the industry has collectively embraced the work of Harwell Godfrey. Sharon: Now, that's one I don't know.  Amy: Lauren Harwell, I think she's based in LA, and she has a strong point of view. It's beautiful inlaid jewels, weighty, substantial, geometric, absolutely a strong point of view, Sharon. Sharon: I see her on Instagram a lot.  Amy: Yes, Harwell Godfrey is probably one of the strongest voices to emerge in the pandemic era. Before that it was Anna Courey, absolutely with her diamond ear cuffs. I think she set us on a course with that. Glenn Spiro is an under-the-radar but highly, highly couture jeweler. There's a book out from Assouline on him that Jill Newman wrote. I think his name is going to become more well-known among collectors. He's a private jeweler based in London, I believe, and I think we're going to be hearing more about that. Anytime there's a book or an auction, the names are elevated; the names are surfaced and get a little more traction, so I definitely would be watching Glenn Spiro. Nikos Koulis has been around for the last three or four years. He's Greek, and it's sort of neo-Art Deco, very geometric, very strong uses of color, edgy, really modern. Bea Bongiasca with her enamel and ceramic pieces— Sharon: How do you say that? Is she here? Amy: Bea. I think she's based in London but is Italian. She works at Central St. Martin's. Alice Cicolini, also British, does extremely beautiful work with enamel. I think her work is going to be really collectable in the coming years. I think she has a strong point of view. Sharon: Can I interrupt? What does that mean, a strong point of view? What does that mean to you? Amy: It means singular and inimitable.  Sharon: You know it's her when you see the piece of work. Amy: Yes. It's very singular and striking and absolutely inimitable. There's a lot of borrowing of ideas that goes on in the jewelry industry. I think the people I'm mentioning here, their voices present themselves to me as something unique. You can't replicate it; you're not going to see that show up in some form on Amazon. Maggi Simpkins, we all fell in love with her in the Brilliant and Black exhibit at Sotheby's. She did the most beautiful pink diamond ring. Everything is centered in these fan-like, feathered cocoons of gems. It's very feminine and lavish and beautiful. So, Maggi Simpkins is someone, and then Studio Renn. My editor at JCK, Victoria Gomelsky, writes for the New York Times and she did a piece on them. She really has seen everything. They are part of an exhibit that is now ongoing at Phillips that Vivienne Becker curated. I think Studio Renn is a newcomer that is going to be sticking around for a while. Finally, there's Fabio Salini, who's also part of the Vivienne Becker capsule at Phillips. Those are just a few. It changes all the time, but the pandemic era has brought incredible work from the designers in our industry, and they are just now hitting their stride. After all that time creating and dreaming and ruminating, refining their voices, cultivating their Instagram audiences, getting feedback from buyers—now they're out there in the world and ready to be embraced.  Sharon: What about pre-pandemic? Everybody's at home in their living room thinking and designing, so I could understand why it's emerging right now, but what about pre-pandemic? Do you see a big difference? Amy: Yes, the industry has modernized considerably since the before times. The biggest difference is that a mom-and-pop jeweler in the middle of country who had a website but never updated it, they've gone in there, hired a firm, hired a chat bot, completely modernized. The pandemic era forced the industry to fast-track into the digital age. That is a huge, huge difference, making it so you are available to your customers, wherever they may be, whether that's texting or someone dedicated to Instagram inquiries. A lot of this is being done on Instagram now, and that was not true in January 2020. Since jewelry emerged as a category that is a portable asset, it's not a flash in the plan; it has staying power. It's not like buying a trendy handbag, but using your discretionary income to buy jewelry became a thing and was embraced a lot of people during the pandemic as they were sparkle scrolling, as they call it, on their phones. Sharon: I haven't heard that term.  Amy: A lot of people used the time to upgrade their engagement rings and wedding bands, so the bridal industry saw a huge boost. The jewelry industry is really healthy right now, I think, in terms of sales, but what I have noticed is not everybody has a wedding band. Not everyone has a budget to upgrade to a big, giant, 20-carat eternity band, so I'm noticing a lot of brands creating price points under $1,500. They're creating little capsules, creating diffusion lines, if you will, so a customer with modest means can have that same meaningful purchase, that same, “I'm investing and treating myself to something that will last, my first diamond bracelet or my first diamond pendant.” I'm seeing more of those opportunities at the retail level. Sharon: That's interesting. In terms of the emerging designers you've mentioned, is this trickling down to the rest of us who don't have $15,000 to go out and buy a trinket tomorrow? Amy: There's definitely a spectrum. I think estate jewelry in general is so hot, and there are a gazillion ladies on Instagram. They're moving delicate, little gold charms for $200 a pop. There's so much. I hate the term low-hanging fruit, but there is so much attainable luxury out there at the regular-person level. If you're the type to spend $200 on a bunch of drinks on a Saturday night, you can easily do that and buy yourself a beautiful paper clip chain estate piece on someone's Instagram feed.  Also, even further than the art jewelry investment piece, there's a run on pink diamonds, practically, and yellow diamonds were a big story coming out of JCK. That color, yellow, that bright, hopeful, joyful feeling that yellow presents, suppliers and manufacturers—cases were filled with yellow diamond engagement rings. A lot of people are talking about a potential uptick in yellow diamond engagement ring sales, both from the rarity of the investment angle and from the pure joy of it, the feeling that it gives. Also, there's this idea that today's young woman getting engaged doesn't want anything to do with what her mother had. Any ring that remoted resembles that chunky, big, platinum, three-stone diamond ring from 1990, she wants something completely new and different feeling, and yellow diamonds fulfill that. They check that box. I have heard from some of my diamond tiara friends that people are buying very high-end and special loose, fancy-colored diamonds from an investment standpoint because it's a portable asset and they are decreasing in supply. Like I said, there's a whole spectrum of possibilities. Sharon: It's interesting you mention that diamonds are not so much in demand for young women getting engaged or getting married today. Sometimes I look at my diamond wedding ring, which is actually an upgrade from my first one, and I look at it and go, “This looks really dated.” What are you seeing in terms of what's more contemporary or modern? Amy: Here's what everyone's doing. Everyone is taking their old jewelry and up-cycling it, whether their old engagement ring, in your case, or they're taking their grandmother's engagement ring that was given to them and creating a whole new design and style. Heirloom stones are recast as something new and wearable. It could be an engagement ring; they could be breaking apart a clustered diamond pin and creating a “diamonds by the yard” style necklace. That is a huge trend right now because it also covers sustainability. You have this precious item in your possession, but it just isn't your style. You have the materials to work with a designer to make it something new you can wear and enjoy. I feel like every independent designer I speak with nowadays has taken on commissions along those lines. Entire businesses are being built around that very concept of reimagining old jewelry. Sharon: What about non-diamond wedding rings or engagement rings? Are other stones being used besides yellow diamonds?  Amy: I think we can anticipate a sapphire—I hate to say a sapphire boom because jewelry is slow and static, but blue sapphires. The Crown season four, I think, came out last winter, and it centered around Diana. There's a whole generation of young women out there that were not clued into that story, and that blue sapphire engagement ring from Garrard was back in the spotlight again, even though Kate Middleton wears it as hers now. Anyway, there's a whole generation of consumers for whom Diana's blue sapphire ring was not on their radar. Then there is a movie coming out with Kristen Stewart in the starring role called “Spencer” that will center on Diana. I think that's going to put the blue sapphire engagement ring on people's radar again. Honestly, any time the royals or once-were royals are in the news—and they are—it definitely trickles down into consumer appetite. Sharon: Amy, you've seen a lot from both sides of the desk. You've seen the big people; you've talked to people on the business side; you've talked to the designing side, the creative side, and I know you've written several books and things like that. If you had to distill it down into one book or a couple of paragraphs, what would you say are the main challenges? How would you advise people like this? Amy: I love to give advice. I'm solicited in other ways. To retailers, I would say listen to your customers and tune into the social climate. The customers are giving you information you need every time they set foot in your store. Ask them what they like, what they're into. There's an adversarial relationship, almost, between the younger consumers of today and the old-school jewelry retailer, and change is necessary. Try to learn and understand them. If they want a salt and pepper diamond ring and you think it's ugly, that's fine, but you still have to find it for them if you want to retain them as a customer. I think a willingness to change is vital; a willingness to modernize is vital on the part of the retailer. Diversity and inclusion and social justice is very important to the majority of young consumers. You can look at what Zales and Kay Jewelers and these mainstream guys are doing for clues; the same with Tiffany. You can look at what they're doing. That's all informed by serious market research that is telling them that today's younger consumer prioritizes diversity and inclusion, and they're watching companies to see if what they're doing aligns with their values. I'm certainly not the first person to say that, but it is critical; it's essential. To designers, I would say please use whatever discretionary funds you have, again, towards shooting your jewelry with a professional photographer. That is the most important thing. Don't worry about a campaign. Don't worry about hiring models. Literally just still-life photos and giant, big files are what you should be spending your money on. Stay true to your signature and try to be as authentic as possible, but also take advice. Just don't design in a vacuum. Look at what's out in the world and try to see where your point of view fits in. The market is saturated with a lot of same old, same old. How can you break through that? How can you break through the basic and come at it in a different way? It could be as simple as everybody knows alphabet charms are popular and wonderful and a new jewelry wardrobe essential, so what's your thought going to look like? How's your thought going to reflect who you are? What does the alphabet charm reflect for you, and what's the story? Did you see it on a poster for a 1960s Grateful Dead show? Did you go to an exhibit and see an illuminated manuscript? There are so many ways, I think, to get inspired and find your voice. Sharon: That's great. That's very good advice for both sides of the desk. Amy, thank you so much for being here today. Amy: Thank you, Sharon, it's a pleasure. I'm always happy to talk about jewelry and give my opinions. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
1012 - E-Commerce for Simulated Diamond Jewelry with Starlette Galleria's Olivia Starling

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 18:29


1012 - E-Commerce for Simulated Diamond Jewelry with Starlette Galleria's Olivia Starling

The Bert Show
Her Husband Buys Her The Same Jewelry Every Year...And She's Over It! 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 5:39


Her husband buys her the same jewelry from the same store every year for Christmas. To make matters worse, the jewelry is a color she hates!So how does she tell her husband she wants jewelry, just not from this particular store? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Kincaid & Dallas
1073: My Little Secret - Sold Dad's Jewelry

Kincaid & Dallas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 2:37


She sold an expensive piece of jewelry her dad bought her, and he doesn't know.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 141 Part 1: How Emerging Jewelry Designers Can Cut Through the Noise with Writer & Editor, Amy Elliott

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 26:06


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the most important thing a jewelry designer can invest in is high-quality photography How Amy finds the topics she writes about for JCK's “All That Glitters” blog How designers can find the story that helps them break through the crowded marketplace Who today's most exciting emerging and independent designers are How the jewelry industry changed during the pandemic, and what retailers must do to engage young consumers About Amy Elliott Amy Elliott is a writer, editor and brand storyteller who specializes in fine jewelry and fashion, and is fluent in other lifestyle categories, including food, weddings and travel. As a former staff editor at The Knot, Bridal Guide, Brides Local Magazines + Brides.com and Lucky, Amy is known for delivering high-quality editorial content across a variety of print and digital media. After recently serving as the Engagement Rings Expert for About.com, Amy joined the freelance staff of JCK as its All That Glitters columnist, while contributing articles about jewelry trends, estate and antique jewelry and gemstones to its prestigious print magazine. Amy also serves as the Fine Jewelry Expert for The Bridal Council, an industry organization composed of luxury bridal designers, retailers and media, and her byline has appeared in Gotham, Hamptons, DuJour, Martha Stewart Weddings, GoodHousekeeping.com and more. Additional Resources: Amy's Website Amy's Twitter Amy's Instagram JCK Article: Cicadas Swarm on Sienna Patti Gallery in Lenox, Mass. JCK Article: Christopher Thompson Royds' Flowers Bloom at Sienna Patti Gallery JCK Article: Look What Happens When Annoushka Gives Peridot A Go Examples of posts that reflect the intersection of jewelry with history, culture and current events: Bob Goodman Wants Jewelers To Join Him in Disrupting the Status Quo: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/bob-goodman-jewelers-disrupting/ The Ten Thousand Things x Met Museum Collaboration Is Coming In Hot: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/ten-thousand-things-x-met-museum/ Go “Sea” Some Serious Silver Treasures At Mystic Seaport Museum: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/sea-as-muse-silver-seaport-museum/ New Jewelry From Rafka Koblence, Olympic Wrestler Turned Designer: https://www.jckonline.com/editorial-article/new-jewelry-from-rafka-koblence/ Transcript: As author of the “All That Glitters” blog for JCK, Amy Elliott has a front row seat to the jewelry industry's up-and-coming trends and designers. She's also been lucky enough to work with some of these designers, helping them refine their brands and create stories that resonate with customers. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what designers and retailers should do to stay relevant with younger consumers, how art jewelry has influenced high jewelry, and what jewelry trends to watch out for in the coming months. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, our guest is Amy Elliott, founder of Amy Elliott Creative. She is a writer, editor and thought leader who specializes in fine jewelry and fashion which makes most of us envious. That's a great profession. She is a contributing editor to the industry publication we all know, JCK, and writes the blog “All That Glitters.” We will hear all about her jewelry journey today. Amy, welcome to the program Amy: Thank you very much for having me, Sharon. It's a pleasure to be here. Sharon: So glad to have you. I'm always envious of people who are writing about jewelry or makers and designers. That's fabulous. I have no talent in that area, so when I hear about people writing, I think, “Wow, it's great.” Tell us all about your jewelry journey. Amy: My jewelry journey is a mix of personal and professional. I'm an avid collector of jewelry. My mother is a big collector of jewelry, so from age 12 on, jewelry was always a part of my life and something that I gravitated to. As a professional, jewelry has been central to my career as a journalist and a writer since the very beginning, starting at The Knot in 1999. Sharon: The Knot being the bridal publication. Amy: Yes. At that time, it was just a website. I was there when they moved into magazines. I helped coordinate the gowns and accessories for fashion shoots and got a taste of engagement rings and diamonds, the 4Cs. That was my first introduction to jewelry on a professional level. Then I took a job at Bridal Guide Magazine, which is a leading print publication still around, privately owned. I was a senior editor there. I had many duties, but one of them was to produce a jewelry column, and that is when my education in jewelry really began. I began forming connections within the industry to educate myself on the 4Cs, pearl buying, colored gemstones. I've always been drawn to color, so that's when I became a student, if you will, of gems and jewelry and how jewelry fits into conversations about fashion trends and cultural and social current events. That was when I really got into jewelry as a métier. I was one of the founding editors of Brides local magazines, which was a Condé Nast publication of regional wedding magazines that no longer exists. Because we were short on staff, I would call in all the jewelry for our cover shoots. Even though I had a leadership role there—I was the executive editor—I also made it part of my job to call in jewels for art cover shoots. I kept that connection, and then on the side I would freelance for luxury publications. It became the thing that I liked to do the best. I loved the people in the industry. I would always learn something. No matter what I was doing or writing about, I would learn something new, and that's still true to this day. There's always something for me to learn. I discovered that jewelry is the perfect combination of earth science, history, culture, and straight-up beauty and aesthetics. It's a very gratifying topic to cover. I love the way it intersects with current events and with, as I mentioned, the fashion conversations at large. Sharon: When you went to Vassar, did you study writing? They're not known for their metalsmithing program, so did you study writing with the idea “I just want to write”? Amy: Pretty much. I was always pretty good at writing and facility with language, so I went there knowing I'd be an English major. For my thesis I wrote a creative writing thesis; it was like a little novella. I've always had a love affair with words and expression of thoughts, and I loved reading, so I knew I would do something that had to do with words and writing. I actually graduated thinking I would be a romance novelist. That was what I thought I would do. Then, of course, I started out in book publishing, and I found it really, really slow and boring, just painfully slow, and I decided perhaps that wasn't for me. Then I took a job in public relations. I really loved the marketing aspect of it and the creativity involved. Of course, it involved a lot of writing.  Eventually I decided I wanted to be on the editorial side of things once and for all. I had always written for the high school newspaper. I had done an internship at Metropolitan Home Magazine in the design department in college, so magazines were always lurking there and were always the main goal. I ended up there; it just took a couple of years for me to get there. Once I did, I knew I wanted to work for a women's magazine. I love things that would fall under the heading of a women's magazine, relationships, fashion. The wedding magazines I worked at were a great fit for me because it's pure romance and fantasy and big, beautiful ball gowns and fancy parties. It was a good fit for me, and I was able to take that and home in on jewelry as a particular focus elsewhere in my career after those first years.  I will say Vassar is known for its art history program. I was not a star art history pupil by any means, but I took many classes there. I find myself leaning on those skills the most as a jewelry writer, looking closely at an object, peeling back the layers and trying to understand what the artist or jeweler is trying to say through jewelry, much like you would with a painting from the Renaissance. So, I am grateful for that tutelage because I found myself drawing on it often, even though I was definitely a B- student in art history. Sharon: It seems to me if you're not going to be a maker, if you're not going to be a metalsmith or a goldsmith or if you're not going to be selling behind the counter, it seems like art history is a fabulous foundation for jewelry in terms of the skills you draw on. Amy: Absolutely. Historical narratives and every historical event that's going on in the world can be—you can look at jewelry from the past and tie it into something that was going on, whether it was the discovery of platinum or the discovery of diamonds in South Africa. It all intersects so beautifully. Vassar taught me to think critically; it taught me how to express myself, to develop a style of writing that I think is still present in my writing today. I always try to get a little lyricism in there. A good liberal arts foundation took me into the world of magazines and eventually digital publishing. I stayed with Condé Nast for a long time. Then I went to Lucky Magazine and was on staff there for a little over a year and a half. I was exposed to fine jewelry on a more fashion level, like the kind cool girls would wear, gold and diamond jewelry that wasn't big jewels by Oscar Heyman. It was a different category, but still within that universe. That was a great education, to look at fine jewelry in a fashion context. They had layoffs in 2012 and I was forced to strike out on my own, but I've been freelance ever since, doing a mix of copywriting for fashion brands and writing for various publications. I've been writing for JCK since 2016. Sharon: Wow! Amy, we want to hear more about that, but just a couple of things. First, thank you to our subscribers. I want to thank everybody who's gotten in contact with me with their suggestions. I love to get them, so please email me at Sharon@ArtsandJewelry.com or DM me @ArtsandJewelry. Also a big shoutout to Kimberly Klosterman, whose jewelry is featured in the exhibit “Simply Brilliant: Jewelry of the 60s and 70s” at the Cincinnati Art Museum. It's on now through February 6. You can listen to our interview with Kimberly on podcast number 133. Now, back to our interview with Amy. Amy, what I like about what you said—you expressed it very well—is the intersection of jewelry with current events and history. I know I always have difficulty explaining to people why I'm interested in jewelry or jewelry history. They think, “Oh, you like big diamonds,” and it's hard to explain how it tells you so much about the period. Amy: Yes, I think acknowledging how global our industry is and learning about different cultures has been so critical to becoming fluent in this world and the gemstones that come from Afghanistan or Ethiopia or Mozambique. Just learning about the sapphires from Sri Lanka—it's so global and all-encompassing. I read the Cartier book, and their story is so fascinating. I am interested particularly in World War II and how that impacted the jewelry industry, how Susan Beltran saved the business of her lover, how the events of World War II Germany impacted Paris and the jewelers there, how the Cartiers would do the birds in the cage and all that stuff. I think you can look at historic jewels and see reflected back at you current events and moments in our history. Sharon: Definitely. I imagine when you look at something, it's not just seeing the jewel, but you're seeing the whole background behind it, how it sits within that context, that nest of history with World War II and platinum. It's an eye into the world. Amy: Even someone like Judith Leiber, who fled Hungary during wartime and became this amazing designer of handbags in New York. So many of the jewelers that are leaders and pillars of our industry came here because of the pogroms in Russia and Eastern Europe. It really does intersect with what was happening in the world. The jewelry industry is a microcosm of all those events, even going to back to the Silk Road and Mesopotamia and the Armenians and the Ottoman Empire. It is a rich tapestry of moments. Historic jewels in particular can give you insight, not just into an artist's vision, but into a moment of time. Sharon: I didn't know that about Judith Leiber; that's interesting. You left Lucky Magazine and opened your own shop. You do a lot of writing and editing. How do the graphics also play into it? Do you art direct? If clients come to you and say, “I need a brochure,” I assume you're doing all the copy and editing, but do they bring you the photos? How does that work? Amy: My background in magazines definitely has given me a pretty robust skillset in terms of working with graphic designers and art directors, conveying ideas and working with them to solve problems. You do emerge with a sense of the visuals, and a taste level is part of it when you're covering fashion and jewelry and things related to style. So yes, I think as a copywriter, one of the things I bring to the table is that I will be able to advise you on the quality of your photos and your look book on the crops, on the model even. Also there's the hierarchy of information; that's definitely a form of direction. It's not very glamorous, but I'm good at understanding how things should be stacked and arranged on a page in terms of hierarchy of messaging. I do have a lot of opinions, I guess, about what looks good and what doesn't. If that feedback is welcome, I'm always happy to share it. Sometimes a client will send me an email for review, and I know they just want to get it out, but I'm like, “No, this is spelled wrong, and the headline should be this, and this needs to go there,” and I'll mock it up on the screen as to where things should go. The best editors and writers, especially when you're dealing with jewelry and fashion and beautiful objects, you have to have a strong sense of the visual. Sharon: I know sometimes clients push back, but I assume they come to you because they want your opinion or they'd do it themselves, right? Amy: Yes. My favorite clients to work with are emerging designers who are just getting out there. They have so many ideas, so many stories to tell, and I help them refine their vision, refine their voice. For many of them, it's the first time they're coming to market, and I can help them present themselves in a professional way that will be compelling to buyers and to media. Sharon: What type of issues are potential clients coming to you for? Is there an overarching—problem might not be the right word—but something you see, a common thread through what they're asking? Amy: There are a number of things. One could be a complicated concept that needs to be explained, something technical like the meteorite that's used in a wedding ring. “We have all this raw material from our supplier. How do we make that customer-facing? How do we make that dense language more lively and easier to digest?” Sometimes it's collection naming. “Here's my collection. Here are the pieces. Can you give them a name? Can you help name this product?” Sometimes it's, “We want to craft a story around this,” and I'm able to come at it with, “I know what the story is here. We've got to shape you to be able to present that story to the world, whether it's a buyer or an editor.”  Usually there is some sort of a concept that is involved; it just hasn't been refined and it's not adjustable. They're so focused on the work and the design vocabulary, they need someone to come in and look at it holistically and figure out how they're going to package this as an overarching idea. Sometimes it's as simple as, “I need to write a letter. These are the things I want to get across to buyers or new accounts or an invitation to an event.” I can take these objectives, these imperatives, and spin them into something compelling and customer-facing and fun to read. It's a mix of imaginative work and down-and-dirty, let me take this corporate document and finesse it and make it more lively and more like something a consumer would want to read on a website. Sharon: They must be so appreciative. Their work may be beautiful, but they have to condense it to say what they are trying to express and get that across to somebody who may not know the language, so somebody wants to pick it up and say, “Oh, that's really interesting.” Amy: Storytelling is a big buzzword right now in the industry, but it's so important. The marketplace is so crowded, and it's not enough to be like, “I have a new collection of stacking rings,” or “I've expanded these rings to include a sapphire version.” You have to come up with some sort of a story to draw in an audience, and then you can use that story on all of your touchpoints, from social media to your email blasts to a landing page on your website. There are a host of jewelry professionals out there that can advise in different ways, to help you get into stores, to help you with specific branding, refining your collection from a merchandising standpoint. There are so many professionals out there that specialize in that, but I think what I bring to the table is knowledge of the industry and a facility with language. It's almost like I'm a mouthpiece for the designer or the corporate brand and a conduit to the consumers' headspace. Sharon: It sounds like a real talent in the areas where there are gaps in what a designer and retailer/manufacturer needs. Telling the story may be a buzzword, but it's words, and you have to use the right words. Tell us about the JCK. You write the blog “All That Glitters,” which is very glittery. It's very attractive. Tell us about it. Amy: Thanks. I was JCK's center for style-related content. Obviously, there's no shortage of breaking news and hard business news, because JCK's first and foremost a serious business publication. Sharon: With the jewelry industry. Amy: With the jewelry industry. I've evolved the blog to be—my favorite things to cover are new collections. I like to interview designers about inspirations. I like to show a broad range of photos from the collection. A lot of it is just showing collections that I love. Maybe I've seen them at Fashion Week; maybe I saw them at the JCK shows or at appointments in the city; maybe I saw something on Instagram. I love to cover design collaborations. Those are one of my favorites things to cover: how two minds can come together to create a new product, like when Suzanne Kalan partnered with Jonathan Adler to do a line of trinket trays. I am interested in cultural events. I like to cover museum exhibits. I covered the Beautiful Creatures exhibit at the Natural History Museum. Because I live in Connecticut, I was able to make it up to Mystic Seaport. They have a beautiful collection of silver trophies by all the best makers, from Tiffany to Shreve, Crump & Low and Gorham. I was able to go up there and see that collection.  It's a blog about culture. It's a blog about things I love. I've written about TV shows that have to do with jewelry. I like the title “All That Glitters” because it gives me a lot of leeway in terms of what I can cover. I've written about writing instruments. Fabergé did a collaboration with whiskey brands and I wrote about that. I try to leave it open, but if there's a strong, new, exciting collection, especially from a high jewelry brand—I'm going to be writing something on one from David Webb coming up. They just released a new collection called Asheville, inspired by his hometown. I like to do a deep dive into a designer story or to show a new collection. My colleague, Brittany Siminitz, does beautiful curations. Sometimes I'll do curations, meaning a roundup of beautiful products that correspond to an overarching theme. I love to do those, but I am happiest when designers come to me with a new collection and something that people haven't seen before. I particularly love discovering new voices and emerging designers that haven't been featured in the press before, so I can be that first introduction.

Profitable Joyful Consulting
EP85: Leaders vs Managers: Which are you?

Profitable Joyful Consulting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 15:49


On the Profitable Joyful Consulting podcast, I teach you how to increase your profits and enjoy your business more. In this episode, you'll learn the differences between leadership and management.  Management and leadership are both important skills, but managing is a totally different skill set from leadership. You need both components in your business, whether you hold them within yourself or hire them on. When you don't have both (and many of my clients don't when they come to me), it can cause a ton of frustration and misunderstanding.  In this episode, you'll be guided to understand your skills and roles as a leader and as a manager, and where you have gaps to fill to grow your skills in both areas.  Key areas discussed in this episode: 00:41 How I first started to ask myself: in what ways am I a leader, and who am I leading? 2:08 Questions to ask yourself to understand your relationship with being a leader 2:34 What leadership always brings with it 2:43 What it really means to be a leader  6:53 Managing as a totally different skill set from leadership  8:59 The piece that's missing for a lot of consultants that ends up driving them crazy  10:30 Why only you can be the leader of your business  Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/M09wQRG7KRQ or listen on your favorite podcast app: www.enlighenedmarketing.com to discover how to develop your skills in leadership and management for a more profitable, joyful consulting business.  #Leadership #ConsultingBusiness 

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
CONTEST FINAL TOUCH: SHOES, JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #458

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 6:55


Godfather of Flexible Dieting and macronutrient tracking, Klemczewski, a former WNBF professional bodybuilder, has helped almost 500 clients win pro cards and more than 150 pro titles. {~} Tyler Wiebe was selected by Paul Revelia as one of Pro Physique's original coaches. Wiebe's expertise in kinesiology and his dedication to the client experience sets him apart as a model to the next generation of coaches. {~} Together, Klemczewski and Wiebe will take you through the real life challenges and strategies to make your training and competition experience a mental force that powerfully matches your effort in the gym. The Mind-Muscle Connection podcast is your source to build a winning mindset, unleash powerful mental growth, and make the world of physique and strength sport endlessly rewarding! The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joe.klemczewski Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joeklemczewski Audio Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

Really Riley
Episode 282: Holiday Gift Guide For Him

Really Riley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 7:26


Because guys love jewelry and candles too!

The Style That Binds Us
The Story Behind Iconic Fashion Jewelry Designer Kenneth Jay Lane

The Style That Binds Us

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 39:49


We are so excited to have Chris Sheppard, President at Kenneth Jay Lane, on The Style That Binds Us podcast! I worked with Chris while working on the jewelry buying team at Barneys because KJL was my vendor! Kenneth Jay Lane is a phenomenal fashion jewelry company that has been worn by Jackie' O, Audrey Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor, Greta Garbo, Nancy Reagan, Princess Diana, Babe Paley, Diana Vreeland, Barbara Bush, Carolina Herrera, among many others. It has also been worn by Rihanna, Lady Gaga, Jennifer Lopez and more. Faking It, but Kenneth Jay Lane:https://rstyle.me/+cugAVbdyU8zNUsy8MJT1rg Elizabeth Taylor: My Love Affair with Jewelry: https://rstyle.me/cz-n/f3jkxjckf47 Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat's Jewel Box by Madeleine Albright: https://rstyle.me/cz-n/f3jk38ckf47 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/delia-folk8/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/delia-folk8/support

Wedded Wellness
Crystals, Manifestation, and Wearing Magic with Jordyn Diorio of Mend Jewelry

Wedded Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 45:10


Ashley is joined by fiery entrepreneur, passionate business consultant, and expert manifestor Jordyn Diorio. Jordyn is also a lively designer and believes success is a mix of working hard, empowering those around her and cracking jokes along the way. Her love for simplistically designed jewelry paired with her entrepreneurial spirit led her to the creation of  MEND Jewelry in 2017. Since the launch of her brand, she's caught the attention of venture capitalists  (receiving enough to quit her job in tech), sold online at Nordstrom.com, launched a holiday store at the Mall of America and won several awards.Ashley and Jordyn discuss her manifestation and visualization process that earned her a six figure check and allowed her to leave her job to run her own company, the importance of taking Inspired action, the inspiration behind MEND and incorporating gemstones, the power of negotiation, adding personalization to your self-care practices, being conscious in our consumption and reconciling where we put our dollars, and how she allows her own self-care practice to change and evolve.Jordyn wants to blaze the trail for young women who aspire to run their own companies in the future. She currently lives in Minneapolis and when she's not full steam ahead on MEND, she mentors students at the University of Minnesota, consults business owners through marketing strategy, project management , and public relations and indulges in macarons and podcasts. Resources Mentioned:What Oprah Learned from Jim Carrey Learn More:Follow MEND on Instagram: @mendjewelryFollow Jordyn on Instagram: @jordyndiorioShop MEND Jewelry: https://mendjewelry.com/Learn more about Jordyn: https://www.jdpconsult.co/, https://founders-co-mn.myshopify.com/Follow along on Instagram: @yogamagicpodcast and @ashleysondergaard.yogaLearn more about Ashley and Yoga Magic at www.ashleysondergaard.com There's Still Time to Join the Self-Care Challenge! All December, we'll come together for a celebration of all things self-care. Packed with practice ideas, bonus episodes, giveaways, and free workshops - you won't want to miss this! If you're already on the Yoga Magic newsletter, you're in! To join, sign up here. https://tremendous-leader-9896.ck.page/614556994e Work with Ashley:Book a 1:1 Cosmic Self-Care Session with Ashley  | Learn how to use your astrological birth chart to personalize your self-care routines, rituals and practices. Book a Birth Chart Reading with Ashley | Learn about the key components of your natal chart and how you can work with the energy in your life today during this 30 minute reading. Upcoming Yoga Magic EventsCosmic Self-Care: Using Capricorn Energy | 12/22 4:00 PM CT | Learn It Live

Profitable Joyful Consulting
EP84: Organic Content Marketing

Profitable Joyful Consulting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 13:47


On the Profitable Joyful Consulting podcast, I teach you how to increase your profits and enjoy your business more. In this episode, you'll learn how to utilize organic posts as assets in your business.  Organic posts can be videos, articles, text, drawings, any type of content that isn't paid. Any of that content can become an asset in your business, because intellectual property is an asset and your organic posts are a form of IP. When organic posts become assets, those assets will bring value into your business — sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars worth.   Generating a consistent body of work and consistent assets for your business can help build your brand, convert your clients, and grow your business. Learn how in this episode.    Key areas discussed in this episode: 0:58 How thinking of organic posts as assets began to change my behavior  2:41 How I used organic content to create a paid course on attracting clients to your business 3:49 What happens when you pull content out of your head and why it matters  4:38 How organic content becomes an asset for your business  6:00 How organic content builds your brand  8:03 The key thing to do when you put organic content out there  8:40 What to track to understand the effectiveness of your organic posts 11:36 Why consultants struggle to create organic content  Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/LOD_MpXbtkI or listen on your favorite podcast app: www.enlightenedmarketing.com/podcast to discover how to grow your business with organic posts as assets.  Episode Hashtags: #ContentMarketing #OrganicContent 

Ash Said It® Daily
Holiday Fashion Jewelry For Her

Ash Said It® Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 7:03


The holidays are just around the corner so you don't want to shop last minute. Browse with ease at the latest Isabelle Grace Jewelry collection! There is literally something for everyone! And if by chance you don't see anything that captures your eye there are options. A personalized gift from Isabelle Grace Jewelry is sure to excite the room! Quantities are limited so visit the site today before they sell out! Web: https://www.isabellegracejewelry.com Follow: @isabellegracejewelry About the show: ► Website: http://www.ashsaidit.com ► Got Goli Gummies? https://go.goli.com/1loveash5 ► For $5 in ride credit, download the Lyft app using my referral link: https://www.lyft.com/ici/ASH584216 ► Want the ‘coldest' water? https://thecoldestwater.com/?ref=ashleybrown12 ► Become A Podcast Legend: http://ashsaidit.podcastersmastery.zaxaa.com/s/6543767021305 ► Review Us: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ash-said-it/id1144197789 ► SUBSCRIBE HERE: http://www.youtube.com/c/AshSaidItSuwanee ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/1loveash ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ashsaidit ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/1loveAsh ► Blog: http://www.ashsaidit.com/blog ► Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/1LoveAsh/ #atlanta #ashsaidit #ashsaidthat #ashblogsit #ashsaidit® Ash Brown is a gifted American producer, blogger, speaker, media personality and event emcee. The blog on AshSaidit.com showcases exclusive event invites, product reviews and so much more. Her motivational podcast "Ash Said It Daily" is available on major media platforms such as iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio & Google Podcasts. This program has over half a million streams worldwide. She uses these mediums to motivate & encourage her audience in the most powerful way. She keeps it real!

Coffee & Quaq
Episode 19: Native Earring Creators (Part 2)

Coffee & Quaq

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 58:32


This episode features Delaney Thiele, the artist and creator behind AK Cloudberry. Cloudberry is the catalyst for Delaney's reconnection with her culture and has contributed to strengthening her identity as an Indigenous woman. Some questions that guided this conversation were: How do you feel about cancel/consequence culture and what role does social media play in that? Are there differences in individual vs community ownership in patterns/designs/ideas? And if so, what are those differences? How does an Indigenous-owned business or business model/approach work in a capitalist society? (Does it work?) Delaney Arnaq Naruyaq' Thiele is a Dena'ina Athabascan and Yup'ik woman from Anchorage, Alaska. Delaney graduated from the University of Alaska Anchorage with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and a minor in Alaska Native Studies. Since graduation, Delaney has been running a small jewelry business featuring hand woven beaded accessories: Cloudberry. Delaney fell in love with the ancestral knowledge and beauty of beadwork and from this love, Cloudberry was born. Cloudberry has been the catalyst for Delaney's reconnection with her culture and traditions and has significantly contributed to her ongoing journey of reclamation and strengthening of her identity as an Indigenous woman. Delaney predominately uses Japanese glass beads and takes inspiration for her work from traditional Indigenous techniques and her picturesque homeland.You can find her work at akcloudberry.com or @ak.cloudberry on Instagram.

The My Wife Quit Her Job Podcast With Steve Chou
383: 19 Yr Old Makes 1 Million Per Year Selling Pup Rings On TikTok With Parth Kukreja

The My Wife Quit Her Job Podcast With Steve Chou

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 55:03


Today I’m really happy to have Parth Kukreja on the show. Parth is a genius, he’s only 19, and he started a 7 Figure business selling pet jewelry online. Parth is open-minded, constantly learning and he’s willing to try any strategy. In this interview, you’ll learn how Parth grew his business to 7 figures using TikTok. What You’ll Learn Parth’s journey and how he started a 7 figure business at 19 years old How creating viral Tiktok videos grew his Jewelry business Parth’s advice to all young aspiring entrepreneurs Other Resources And Books PupRings.com Sponsors Postscript.io – Postscript.io is the […] The post 383: 19 Yr Old Makes 1 Million Per Year Selling Pup Rings On TikTok With Parth Kukreja appeared first on MyWifeQuitHerJob.com.

Thrive By Design: Business, Marketing and Lifestyle Strategies for YOUR Jewelry Brand to Flourish and Thrive

So many successful jewelry designers get stuck around the $100k mark in business. Let's talk about 5 steps you can take to get out of your own way and strategically scale.   Here are the resources mentioned in the show:   Momentum Coaching Program

A Thing or Two with Claire and Erica
BECs, Celebrities Reading Memoirs, and Other Things We Love Talking About

A Thing or Two with Claire and Erica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 54:43


What an episode we have in store! We're going deep on some of our favorite recent discoveries from our Monday newsletter—which: If you aren't signed up for that thing, now's your chance to fix that.   The usefulness of the term bitch eating crackers (BEC) (for context: Someecards).   Celebrity memoirs as audiobooks: Inside Out by Demi Moore, Acid for the Children by Flea, and Yearbook by Seth Rogen (see also: this profile by Jonah Weiner for NYT Magazine). Next up: My Life So Far by Jane Fonda, Faithfull by Marianne Faithful,  The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish. Oh, and: the podcast Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily. Also: Please read Open by Andre Agassi and J.R. Moehringer!   Important breaking news: There is now Spelling Bee merch.      Let's hear Claire's QVC pitch for the Pattern mist spray bottle!! Somewhat related: Mario Badescu Facial Spray with Aloe, Herbs and Rosewater...as a hair product?   Erica's 11 a.m. tea go-to: Soul Chai. Another (slightly sweetened rec): Dona.   A workspace-changing Philips Hue light strip. You may also like: Gorilla mounting tape, Storage Theory Power Perch, and the Pretty Handy Girl video for changing your doorknobs.   Jewelry renovation with Spur = talk about amazing.   You know we love to hear from you! Get us at 833-632-5463, podcast@athingortwohq.com, or @athingortwohq.   Didya know we do six-month or one-year Secret Menu subscriptions? Ideal for gifting, tell you what.   Find your body skin type with Esker and get 20% off with the code ATHINGORTWO. Control your coffee and tea temp with Ember. It's 10% off for first-time purchasers with our link. Snuggle up with Printfresh's perfect-for-gifting sleepwear—and get 15% off your first order with the code ATHINGORTWO. Score Ana Luisa jewelry during their biggest sale of the year—60% off on the second item you purchase with our link.  YAY.   Produced by Dear Media

The Playbook
Buying The Sacramento Kings, Designing Luxury Jewelry, Redefining Healthy Eating, & Investing in an Uber Driver | Office Hours S1E6

The Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:07


Welcome to Office Hours, hosted by Legendary Sports Executive, Entrepreneur, and Investor, David Meltzer. Where the brightest millionaires, billionaires, and entrepreneurs, in business, sports, and entertainment get together to talk about success, failure, and everything in between. Take a deep dive into the mind of some of the world's most impactful guests to share their strategies and tools to dominate their respective fields. My co-hosts for today's episode are David Moreno, founding partner at Mediabundance, Nada Lena, Founder and CEO of Rise Up For You, and True Underdog himself, Jayson Waller, the founder & CEO of Powerhome Solar. Joining us on today's episode is Vivek Ranadive, owner of the Sacremento Kings, Ben Baller, world renowned jewelry designer, Ming Tsai, American restaurateur, television personality, celebrity chef, and Shane Riggs, the founder of the VA Group. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices