Podcasts about ADT

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Best podcasts about ADT

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Latest podcast episodes about ADT

THE POWER OF REINVENTION with Kathi Sharpe-Ross
E84: Marketing - Life-long Learning and Ever-Changing with Tony Wells

THE POWER OF REINVENTION with Kathi Sharpe-Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 37:05


Tony Wells is the Senior Vice President, Marketing for Verizon. With more than 30 years of experience working with innovative, high-growth brands, he has deep expertise leading marketing, business development and strategic partnerships. Tony joined Verizon from USAA where he served as Chief Brand Officer. His corporate marketing career has been diverse and rich with senior roles at ADT, 24 Hour Fitness, Visa, General Motors and Nissan. Tony is a member of the Board of Directors for Yelp, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA's) and the New York Ad Club. He proudly served as an infantry officer in the United States Marine Corps. Tony grew up cherishing the friendships he made, had a drive for success, and loved working in a team environment. He speaks about how the marketing industry can change rapidly and embraces the challenges that come with that. Throughout his career, he felt that if he worked hard, there was no limit to what he could do and applied himself accordingly. He acknowledges that there's a long way to go with D&I in corporate America and shares that within these companies he worked for he was very aware that people who looked like him were not in C-Suite positions. Tony has leaned into this issue and is impacting change in the industry, but it still has a long way to go. As a mentor, father and grandfather, Tony has much advice to give and, as he says, even he still has a lot to learn in the industry. Some powerful takeaways from today's episode: The science of it all, and the data are much more important in the marketing world today The profession and industry are constantly changing Marketing is life-long learning, dynamic and ever-changing Some changes are forced, some you make, some take a leap of faith It's ok if your work-life balance is a work in progress Going into a new industry could also come with a personal Reinvention “Leave it better than when you got there” Links: Tony Wells' LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tonywells1/ THE RE:INVENTION EXCHANGE - for more Inspired Content, Blogs, Podcasts, Virtual Chats, or to buy a copy of my bookRE:INVENT YOUR LIFE! WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? visit https://www.TheReinventionExchange.com IG: KathiSR_Chief_Reinventor FB: Kathi Sharpe-Ross or The Reinvention Exchange LinkedIn: Kathi Sharpe-Ross Twitter: KathiSR or The Reinvention Exchange --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Daniel J. George, MD - Getting to the Heart of Personalized ADT for Advanced Prostate Cancer: Are You Able to Leverage New Data and Therapy Options to Maximize Cardiovascular Safety and Treatment-Related Outcomes?

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 48:27


Go online to PeerView.com/ZYP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. This educational program exposes learners to the science that supports the use of GnRH antagonists for appropriate patients with advanced prostate cancer and will enhance their ability to select optimal ADT regimens based on CV risk and other clinically-relevant factors, and optimize CV care and outcomes during ADT. Through a collection of short, focused educational modules, learners will combine self-assessment with concise clinical content in an interactive format. An expert GU oncologist presents digestible self-study segments, with a particular focus on CV considerations associated with ADT approaches. Explore topics pertinent to effective management of patients with prostate cancer on ADT regimens in your clinical practice and learn more about the impact of CV considerations and team-based models of care. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Differentiate between GnRH analogues (agonists or antagonists) for patients with advanced prostate cancer with respect to their mechanism of action, clinical effects, cardiovascular (CV) safety, and other attributes; Select patients with advanced prostate cancer who may benefit from treatment with a GnRH antagonist based on CV risk, comorbidities, patient preferences (eg, regarding dosing and/or administration route), and other individualized factors; and Collaborate with multidisciplinary and interprofessional care colleagues to appropriately assess and manage CV risk in patients with advanced prostate cancer who require ADT.

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Daniel J. George, MD - Getting to the Heart of Personalized ADT for Advanced Prostate Cancer: Are You Able to Leverage New Data and Therapy Options to Maximize Cardiovascular Safety and Treatment-Related Outcomes?

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 48:41


Go online to PeerView.com/ZYP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. This educational program exposes learners to the science that supports the use of GnRH antagonists for appropriate patients with advanced prostate cancer and will enhance their ability to select optimal ADT regimens based on CV risk and other clinically-relevant factors, and optimize CV care and outcomes during ADT. Through a collection of short, focused educational modules, learners will combine self-assessment with concise clinical content in an interactive format. An expert GU oncologist presents digestible self-study segments, with a particular focus on CV considerations associated with ADT approaches. Explore topics pertinent to effective management of patients with prostate cancer on ADT regimens in your clinical practice and learn more about the impact of CV considerations and team-based models of care. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Differentiate between GnRH analogues (agonists or antagonists) for patients with advanced prostate cancer with respect to their mechanism of action, clinical effects, cardiovascular (CV) safety, and other attributes; Select patients with advanced prostate cancer who may benefit from treatment with a GnRH antagonist based on CV risk, comorbidities, patient preferences (eg, regarding dosing and/or administration route), and other individualized factors; and Collaborate with multidisciplinary and interprofessional care colleagues to appropriately assess and manage CV risk in patients with advanced prostate cancer who require ADT.

Inside the ICE House
Episode 332: ADT CEO Jim DeVries on the Promise to Protect People, Property and the Evolution of the Blue Octagon

Inside the ICE House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 40:18


For a century and half, ADT (NYSE:ADT) has continued to evolve to best fulfill its mission to, “help our customers protect and connect to what matters most—their families, homes, and businesses.” Jim DeVries, President and CEO of ADT, returns to the New York Stock Exchange for the first time since the company's 2018 IPO to alert listeners on the longevity and future of those blue octagon signs and how ADT is combining technology with its infrastructure to meet customer needs. He explains why the company's future is sunny, robotic, and full of partnerships with companies like Google and State Farm.   Inside the ICE House: https://www.theice.com/insights/conversations/inside-the-ice-house  

Keeping Current CME
Case Review: Team-Based Approaches to Optimize Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Advanced Prostate Cancer

Keeping Current CME

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 32:01


Do you know which class of agents used for androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) appears to have the most cardiovascular risk? Credit available for this activity expires: 11/22/23 Earn Credit / Learning Objectives & Disclosures: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/984317ecd=bdc_podcast_libsyn_mscpedu

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)
The Pathway to Board Membership with Sigal Zarmi

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 32:52


715: Sigal Zarmi, Board Member of ADT & HashiCorp and senior advisor at Morgan Stanley & BCG, reflects on her seasoned career in technology, what she derives from her experiences, and what's next for her. She explains the growing strategic nature of the CIO role, the insights from her advisory experiences, and how they have all paved the way for her journey to board membership. Sigal also weighs in on how IT can be a differentiator for high-power intellectual organizations like the ones she has been a part of and why GE Capital became a powerhouse for growing the great CIOs of today. She looks back on her time at the Israeli University Technion and the tech and entrepreneurial community coming out of Israel. Finally, Sigal looks ahead at the trends in cloud computing and advises future CIOs on the difference makers in her career.

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Prostate Cancer | Meet The Professor: Optimizing the Use of Hormonal Therapy in the Management of Prostate Cancer — Part 1

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 65:52


Featuring perspectives from Dr Matthew Smith, including the following topics: Introduction: Abemaciclib for Prostate Cancer? (0:00) Case: A man in his early 70s with a PSA of 150 ng/mL, Gleason 4 + 4 and upper abdominal adenopathy — Jennifer L Dallas, MD (9:30) Case: A man in his late 60s with Gleason 4 + 4, PSA of 147 ng/mL and a negative CT — David S Morris, MD (34:30) Case: A man in his late 60s with coronary artery disease and Gleason 4 + 4 who underwent external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in 2013 and now has increasing PSA of 3.8 with a 6-month doubling time — Gurveen Kaur, MD (37:56) Case: A man in his mid 60s who experiences M0 progression after EBRT followed by androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) but refuses to continue ADT — Henna Malik, MD (41:44) Case: A man in his early 50s with a slowly rising PSA (now 1.31) after radical prostatectomy and salvage radiation therapy; PSMA PET scan denied by insurance, now appealed — Kapisthalam (KS) Kumar, MD (50:23) Case: A man in his late 70s with Gleason 5 + 4 and a PSA of 23 ng/mL increasing after EBRT followed by ADT, cryoablation and enzalutamide; after a response, 18F-fluciclovine PET shows subtle focus of uptake in left prostate — Susmitha Apuri, MD (57:06) CME information and select publications

Untitled Beatles Podcast
SPECIAL RE-RUN: Revolver LP (1966)

Untitled Beatles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 102:40 Very Popular


In anticipation of THE BIG DROP coming this week, T.J. and Tony (a.k.a. The Tab Two #sponsored #by #nutrasweet) dig into some of the teaser tracks already released, and then present the Super Replayable Super Re-Run Edition of our 2020 Deep Dish of Revolver. Be sure to follow our socials for details about our LIVE REACTION TWITCH & SHOUT coming soon!   ----- Originally released November 14, 2020 It's time to serve up a deep dish of The Beatles most colorful LP with a b/w cover. In this episode, T.J. and Tony talk ADT, LSD, Geoff Emerick recording techniques, and the Alan Civil War. Plus diversions into the goth Lennon & McCartney, Rupert the Bear, The Frogs, and the Soul Train Scramble Board. Revolver's track-by-track musings come augmented with enough collector scum needle drops to power a small, fab village, including a sample of their favorite punching bag, 60s Capitol Records honcho Dave Dexter. Turn off your mind, relax and float tangentially.   ----- EPISODE LINKS Like and subscribe! Come hang with us on Discord/Facebook/Twitter/Instagram! Drop us a review on Apple Podcasts!

Glowing Older
Episode 11:10 Kevin Jameson on His “Mission in the Making” with the Dementia Society of America®

Glowing Older

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 35:46


The Founder and President of the Dementia Society of America® talks about the misconceptions surrounding cognitive impairment, ways to improve brain health, and how the not-for-profit organization educates and empowers senior living communities and caregivers to better support those challenged with cognitive decline. About Kevin Starting as a young entrepreneur at age of 18 and having launched several start-up businesses in the security industry, Mr. Jameson built his career as a sales and marketing executive, which has included over 35 years with major corporate divisions of ADT, BOSCH, and Honeywell International. Author, singer, inventor, and patent holder, Kevin has traveled to Europe, Asia, India, Australia, the Middle East, Africa, South and Central America, and throughout North America to see how the world really lives. Kevin also has a personal story and connection to dementia. His first wife, Ginny, together for 32 years, died from dementia, and thus he leads the fight with thoughts, words, and deeds. In 2016, Jameson was awarded a Doctorate of Public Service, Honoris Causa (DrHC) for his life's work, by his alma mater. His establishment of the Dementia Society nearly ten years ago is still a mission in the making. Key Takeaways ​Senior living companies often “miss the boat” when it comes to dementia. Dementia is a syndrome not a disease (Alzheimer's is a disease.) Dementia effects more than memory. Early indicators of some types of dementia are personality and behavior changes. We can improve brain health and increase neuroplasticity by modifying risk factors and our environment. Important steps include improving nutrition, increasing movement, spending time outdoors, and creating cognitive reserves through lifelong learning. The Dementia Society offers presentations on dementia and brain health, virtually or in person, for senior living communities to share with prospects and residents. Informational pamphlets are provided to doctor's offices and care communities.

hanging out with audiophiles
HOWA EP 101 - TOTALLY ENORMOUS EXTINCT DINOSAURS

hanging out with audiophiles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 97:15


TEED has an excellent new LP out now called “When the Lights Go” available on his Nice Age label. Check it ooot! HERE is Link to the album, tour info and loads of ace merch! If you didnt already get the Chamberlin ADT sample instrument I made here https://www.patreon.com/HOWA 4.64 Gb sample instrument of the instrument used by Bowie on Low! ahhh yes…let's get on with the show….. It's high time I chatted with this chap. We've hung out at multiple LA gatherings over beers and somehow never ended up in a suitable setting for a good chin wag. This has now been completely set right in what is a true alpine ramble twixt myself and the excellent TEED. We pass many a scenic wonder on our winding adventures. Touching on: the LA twilight zone Honesty and ambition Being cool TEED history Unknown music! The making of the new tones Equal love of jungle and Bach It's just my kind of hang. Hope you enjoy it! Music comes from Andrew Huang ! he made his track exclusively with the Chamberlin ADT sample instrument I made from over 3000 samples of the VERY rare Chamberlin M1 all running to 2 Nagra tape machines simultaneously with a varispeed on only one deck to create phase and ADT effects PER note. EPIC! get it now! https://www.patreon.com/HOWA Ep101 ! YES It's a shortee this time. I'm trying for a half bi so I can keep up with the DELUGE of interviews I'm been doing of late. Such good people, I want to hurry them out. art lovers ! Please check out my wife's first solo paining show here it's called STIM. I've been present for all the making of these and I'm so proud of her. It's huge news for our family and I think so many of you will love the style and also the story behind the work as we discover about out autism. More on this soon

hanging out with audiophiles
HOWA EP 100 - NIGEL GODRICH

hanging out with audiophiles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 143:36 Very Popular


Nigel is my kind of producer He has a strong sense of quality, a strong sense of who he is and what potentials artists have to be cultivated and captured. He's my kind of producer because he gets his hands dirty and doesn't just act as a fan of the band and take on that guru role but he's in the trenches, setting up the mics for perfect phase alignment, getting all the sonic chains correct but without a limiting rule book. There's so much inventiveness in the productions alongside the incredible, undeniable tone. Of course there's that ego and strong sense of self and I ran into his resolute perspective a couple of times by asking questions he deemed sub par or misguided. Let's put it this way, you know where you stand with Nigel and of course he has a strong perspective. Imagine the courage and strength of conviction it would take to tell Thom Yorke or Paul McCartney that they could better a take or that a lyric felt cheesy or what have you. We might all think we want to be told yes all the time but Nigel, it feels, understands when to say no and let his point be known and I love that about him. I have immense respect for him. He's made some of my favorite records and I think it's fair to say that he's my favorite living producer. So needless to say it's an absolute thrill to have him on the show. It's even more special to me that he agreed to do episode 100. NIGEL!!!!! Nitty 100 is a BIG one I get my hands on a rare Chamberlin M1 from the excellent Rob Burger and sample it in a most painstaking manner yielding a set of 8 instrument captures that showcase the sounds on the tapes in a way that's never been heard before. I sent the finished pack to some amazing musicians and they all came back with beautiful music to demo the sounds. You'll hear tracks from Dave Sitek Hainbach Dana Wachs Andrew Huang RJD2 Money Mark and I also made one that sneaks in at the end of the show

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT
Episode 388: Insurers come for the smart home

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 55:21 Very Popular


This week launched with a bang for those interested in the role insurers might play in the smart home as State Farm agreed to make a 1.2 billion equity investment in security firm ADT. This follows on the heels of Google's equity investment in ADT in 2020 and signals a shift in the way insurance companies … Continue reading Episode 388: Insurers come for the smart home The post Episode 388: Insurers come for the smart home appeared first on IoT Podcast - Internet of Things.

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Google 680: Failure As a Feature

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 156:24 Very Popular


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

Total Ant (Audio)
This Week in Google 680: Failure As a Feature

Total Ant (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 156:24


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Google 680: Failure As a Feature

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 156:24


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 680: Failure As a Feature - Pixel 7 Pro event, EU regulates updates, Twitter Edit, Android 14 satellite

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 156:24


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

Radio Leo (Video HD)
This Week in Google 680: Failure As a Feature

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 157:08


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Google 680: Failure As a Feature

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 157:08


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

Total Ant (Video)
This Week in Google 680: Failure As a Feature

Total Ant (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 157:08


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

This Week in Google (Video HI)
TWiG 680: Failure As a Feature - Pixel 7 Pro event, EU regulates updates, Twitter Edit, Android 14 satellite

This Week in Google (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 157:08


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

Total Jason (Audio)
This Week in Google 680: Failure as a Feature

Total Jason (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 156:24


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

Total Jason (Video)
This Week in Google 680: Failure as a Feature

Total Jason (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 157:08


Google announces October 6 event for Pixel 7, Watch - 9to5Google Google confirms Pixel 7 series will run on new 'Tensor G2' chip Apple Finds Its Next Big Business: Showing Ads on Your iPhone Pichai Says Google 'Pro-Competitive,' Sees Vibrant Tech Market Google Pixel Watch spotted on Sundar Pichai's wrist a month ahead of the official launch The Pixel Watch May Have Larger Bezels Than We Expected EU lawmakers push for all Android phones to to copy the Pixel 6's five years of updates Android 14 will support satellite connectivity and partners Apple picks Globalstar for emergency satellite service on iPhone 14 This is a test of Twitter's new Edit Tweet feature. This is only a test Twitter will let you edit your tweet up to five times Google commits another $150 million towards ADT partnership with Nest Great thread on how we're headed back to the old, pre-antitrust studio system with streaming KOZT The Coast FM Adobe to Launch a Camera App for Serious Photographers (Why tho?) Picks: Jeff - Newspaper publishers try to hold up Google Stacey - Suburban Dicks By Fabian Nicieza Ant - Masterminds and Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World by Rosalind Wiseman John Slanina - NOVA: A TO Z: How Writing Changed The World Jason - Midjourney Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: hover.com/twit eightsleep.com/twig nomadgoods.com/TWIG

Crain's Daily Gist
09/08/22: Big names in Chicago's sports landscape make housing moves

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 35:19 Very Popular


Crain's residential real estate reporter Dennis Rodkin talks with host Amy Guth about the busy housing week for some central Chicago sports figures and other real estate news. Plus: United Airlines threatens to end JFK service without more flights, Ald. Howard Brookins leaving City Council, Apollo-backed ADT sells stake to State Farm for $1.2 billion and Chicago wins central role in federal climate change investment.

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Impact By Acquiring, Developing, and Building Relationships

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 22:50


Don Wenner is the founder & CEO of DLP Capital. His mission is to serve the lord, leveraging DLP as his platform, and utilizing his skills as a CEO and Leader to positively impact the major crisis in the world of housing affordability, jobs, legacy, and happiness while being the best father and husband. Don has been the CEO of DLP Capital for 15+ years, Their team has helped more than 600,000 lives by providing solutions to their investors, sponsors, residents, clients, and team members. They have completed more than 5 billion in real estate transactions, achieving the Inc.5000 list for 9 straight years and the 4th fastest growing company in America to make the Inc.5000 list 5 or more years in a row.  Don is also an author & speaker. Let's join Don as he shares his journey with us!   Highlights:   [00:00 - 06:04] Opening Segment Don Wenner is the founder and CEO of DLP capital, a private real estate investment and financial services company. Don has humble beginnings, starting as a 16-year-old working for his parents in their home daycare. He developed himself as an entrepreneur and grew his company to 300+ team members and 3.4 billion capital under management. Today, DLP is one of the 5,000 fastest-growing companies in America and has impacted hundreds of thousands of lives.   [06:05 - 11:50] How to Succeed as an Elite Real Estate Agent Nathan Robinson convinced Don to get into real estate  Don started a lawn care company and hired friends to help him Don read a lot and developed a system for growing businesses Don shares that he realized that leadership was the main challenge in his organization and focused on developing leadership skills   [11:51 - 19:50] Developing Leaders Requires Dedication and Discipline Don spends over half his time on out-hiring, doing 6-day interviews a week for 10 years, focusing on developing leaders, developing capacity, and developing abilities to execute. Every person at DLP knows their key numbers and expectations and has a personal compass. Building leaders is a lot of work, but having a successful organization is worth it.   [19:51 -22:49] Closing Segment Reach out to Don See links below  Final words Resources Mentioned   Building An Elite Organization - Don Wenner Traction - Gino Wickman Five Levels of Leadership - John Maxwell   Tweetable Quote   “Building a great organization is investing in your people, and you can't fake it.”- Don Wenner   ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with Don Wenner by visiting www.DLPcapital.com Free resources: www.DLPelite.com Or email him through don@dlpcapital.com   Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com   Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   [00:00:00] Don Wenner: You can't fake it. You generally have to care. And in order to really invest in, in your people and invest in them as a whole. And that's one of the other quick notes that we invest a lot in. So I believe one of our core values is called living fully. And I believe living fully is when you're achieving success and significance across all areas, your life.   [00:00:30] Sam Wilson: Don winter is the founder and CEO of DLP capital of private real estate investment and financial services company focused on making an impact by acquiring, developing, and building relationships, housing leaders, and organizations. Don, welcome to the show. Hey pleasure. [00:00:43] Don Wenner: Thanks for having me on today. [00:00:45] Sam Wilson: Hey man. Absolutely. The pleasure's mine. There are three questions. Don ask. Every ghost comes to the show in 90 seconds or less, tell me, where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there? [00:00:53] Don Wenner: Great question. So I started in Beth in Pennsylvania to , two young parents who had me at 16 years old. I moved out of their home at 17 years old and went out on my own as a junior in high school. So humble beginnings. Mom ran a home daycare, six kids in my home. Plus my three younger siblings at all times. My dad ran a prison, was a prison guard. So those were the. Today we have 300 plus corporate team members, 3.4 billion capital under management. We've impacted hundreds of thousands of lives owned tens of thousands of units. We're a large lender and equity partner to other operators as well, grown 60 plus percent a year, every year for 16, straight years, 10 years in a row is one of the 5,000 fastest growing companies in America. Fourth last year out of any companies that made the list five times, we on list 10 straight years, we built a really. Consistent way of consistent growth which is centered around discipline and really great people. So that's where we're at [00:01:43] Sam Wilson: today, man. I love that. So you said you moved out when you were 17 years old and went out on your own. What was your next step? How did you get involved in real estate? I'm gonna ask you a whole bunch of questions here. Yeah, I got it. How did you develop yourself? I mean, as a person, cuz there's a mindset shift that has to happen. When you grow up in a working class run, and again, there's no, no problem with it. I'm not, I grew up very, not even blue collar. We grew up they're poor. Yeah. But there's a mindset shift that has to happen when you go from humble beginnings to, Hey, now we're running a billion dollar company. How did it happen? [00:02:19] Don Wenner: It's a big question. I'm gonna try to keep it tight. But so, the, so my dad told him my wedding he gave a speech at my wedding when he knew I was an entrepreneur and it was when I was in kindergarten and he got a call from the school because I was selling little brown hostess donuts to my classmates for 50 cents a piece. Right. Right. And yeah. And so that, that continued all through my childhood. I mean, in middle school, I. I didn't cut lawns. I ran a lawn care business. I hired my friends. I had marketing and distributions signed up lots of homes. So I just had this entrepreneurial desire at an early age. And my parents were the people who thought about everything is how do I save a penny instead of how do I make a dollar? Right. And it was scraping and claw. And I used to always find myself thinking. Why don't you just work more, right? Why don't you do something else? Why don't you do something more? Right. And so, I don't know what instilled that at an early age. I have a father of three young boys now and so I, I spent a lot of time teaching them and focusing around two big things with them. Grit. And growth mindset. And I think those are things that can be teach te taught and improved upon. But I was blessed that I was kind of born with a growth mindset, a mindset that, Hey, if I'm willing to work hard enough and learn and ask questions, I can do anything. Right. So when I was in middle school, a financial advisor came in. Let's tell you kind of how tell you guys got into real estate. Financial advisor came in, he showed this little chart. On his little chart he showed that financial advisors made more money than doctors, lawyers, accountants, all the jobs your parents tell you to become. Right. And as an eighth grader, when this happened, the, what I took from his presentation, I don't know if this is what he actually said, but this is what I remember was that to be great. As a financial advisor, you have to be really entrepreneurial self starter and you have to be great at. And I was like, well, that's me. Right. I was, perfect S a T score math. It was great, great math and I'm very entrepreneur, right? And I'm like, well, that's for me. Right. So I started shadowing financial advisors in middle school and high school. And I always knew that was what I was gonna do, but I like every other kid, I was told I had to go to college. And so I moved outta my parents' house as a junior high school waited tables to get through high school I'd work, swing shifts, I'd skip school, kind of midday work, swing shifts, get through. But I, still had the determination I needed to go to college fortunate due to. Grades and N a T scores and such. I got nearly a full ride to Drexel university in Philadelphia. And they have the best co-op program in the country. You go to school half the time and school half the time I did, 'em both at the same time but it's a really cool program where they set up these internships. I got to work at BlackRock. I had to work at Merrill Lynch at MC glad Poland, which is fifth biggest accounting firm in the country. Cause I was studying finance. And so I got all these cool experiences, but I already, I got my, my, all my licenses, the day I turned 18 and I could. For insurance and series six, I think 65. And anyway, so I . Knew what I was gonna do. Until, and I kept waiting tables on the weekends and this guy came into the restaurant, worked that I was 19 years old and he kept asking me to come work for him. And he wanted me to come work for him because if you ever worked at a restaurant, the least restaurants I'd work in, this was a Texas Roadhouse at the time. They'd say, Hey, whoever sells the most flaming Yas tonight makes 50 bucks or whatever. Right. So. Everybody was eating flam on that night. Right. So, so he kind of, he was a sales guy. He realized that I was, I had I had some basic sales skills, nothing great. Right. But at least I, had a little bit of persuasion. So, he convinced me to come work for him. Didn't really understand what it was. He told me it was security. It turned out it was ADT security. So my job consisted of. Knocking on people's doors. And I became the number one sales rep in the country for ADT at 19 years old, 150,000 reps. All that tells you is I knocked on a whole lot of doors. And a lot of doors, I got a little better as I went going, but I knocked on a lot of doors and he convinced me to come work for me, him by telling me I would make $2,000 a week. If I came to work. 19. That sounded pretty darn good. My first paycheck was $5,280, and then I was making six to eight grand every two weeks from there. And so I think I'm, I'm doing so great. I'm making all this money. I'm still in college. I'm still, got my plan. And one day I'm sitting at his kitchen table. And he's cuts me my check for the two weeks, whatever it was, 6,000 bucks or something. And I see on the other side of the table, a check for $17,000 a check for $20,000, I'm like, what's that about? And he says, that's my real estate business. So in addition, his name's Nathan Robinson addition to owning this security company, he was a real estate agent. And he, that, that night, he basically convinced me that if I wanted to get into real estate, I would do great at it. And I basically gave up sleep for about three weeks. Took my classes online. Took the exam flew out to Scottsdale Arizona. The day I passed my exam went to a marketing conference, came away from that conference with a marketing message of your home sold, guaranteed, or I'll buy it. And that was October, 2006, the peak of the real estate market. So my marketing message was at a good time. People were motivated to sell and I'd either help, 'em sell their home or I'd step in and buy it. And that was never the plan. But so I started doing and flipping their home and then, that built into all the things we do to this day. So complete mistake per se, but fell in love. Second, I got into the business and kind of never [00:06:55] Sam Wilson: turned back. Man. That's really cool. I love that. I love that. All of that story is fun. I wish we had more time to hear some of the nuance to it cuz that in stories like that. You just go man, like that's really cool. And it just shows the hustle and the grit, that it takes, I think that was the, was that the word you used earlier was grit. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So just, it just shows the, what it takes and that, that grid is so much of that. You've written a book called building an elite organiz. All right. I'm out here doing it to, and I know you kind of hit alluded to this early on. When you said you, you started lawn care company, you got, you were out hiring other kids to come work for you and cut grass, but there's still a shift from that to building a elite organization, bringing in right team members and effectively scaling your company. How did you learn how to do that. . [00:07:41] Don Wenner: Yeah. That's a great question. So, I was not afraid ever to hire I don't think until you just said that right now, I never connect personally connected the dots between the lawn care side and hiring my friends to, but when I got into real estate I was so busy, I'm in an office of 158 real estate agents, and I'm so busy running around. I realized from, I kind of learned this from the sales trainers, right. From eight to. I gotta be out selling, right. Everything else is a distraction. Right? So three weeks into the business, I hired an agent who wasn't productive in my office to help me part-time she was full-time by the end of the week, I had three assistants working for me by the third month in the business. I wasn't afraid to kind of delegate. And free myself up. And so I did that from early, early beginning. And then what happened was, after a few years of just hustling and I was the main salesperson driving, 90% of the business, I was driving all the strategy. I was, driving the engine forward. And while I'm doing on that, I'm reading a ton. So I had a discipline of reading about three books a week. For the last, 20, 15 plus years, I mainly do it on audible. But I read a lot and listen to lots of people. And then what was cool when I entered real estate, I realized, Hey, there's 1.2 million real estate agents doing the same job. Right? There's a small percentage of doing that job well. So I wanna figure out how to do it. Well, all I have to do is talk to the people doing it well, right. There are people doing well. So I always, took the mindset of, give first and so I. Would go out and reach out to the top real stages in the country and offer them something of value. Something I could teach them, which at the time was how to sell real estate on Craigslist for free. And they would let me come talk to 'em and I'd show up there with eight pages of questions. They want me to come show 'em this Craigslist, gimmick or trick, right. Which I was selling a lot of homes for free on Craigslist. And I'd come with eight pages of questions, right. And ask lots and lots of questions. And within, a number of months, people are inviting me into. Inner circles, these, mastermind groups. Right. And that's what the project, I took everything. When I wanted to get into investing, I said, well, who out there is slipping homes effectively. Right. And I reach out to 'em call 'em right. Go and talk to 'em. Right. And I've just had that pursuit that if I wanna learn something, the information, this is the information age, right. If you're willing to pursue knowledge it's out there. So, so that's the approach I took. And then, so all the reading, I'm doing all the learning I'm doing, I'm hiring people. What I realized is I felt I had this great understanding of how to grow a business from all the learning and all talking to people. But all the people in my company didn't right. They weren't reading three books a week. They weren't, understanding all this. And so about 11 years ago, maybe now I read book that's on your shelf there traction by my friend, Gina Wickman. I said, wow, this is great. This is the first book that actually kind of pulls it together into a system. And so I immediately became an implementer for genome just self-paced kind of went through his program and implemented it into my organization and it was so incredible that it gave that structure. How to grow business. So I realized really on the importance of, of culture, the importance of hiring great people, importance of developing leadership from listening to all these wonderful grades, like John Maxwell and Jim Collins and so forth, and then reading that system helped put into action. And then for us, what happened was that system wasn't enough. It's a great system to kind of get you going and take you from, a few people maybe to 20, 30, 40 people and get your foundation built. And then for us, it wasn't enough as we really started growing. So we. Took the basics of that. And some ideas from the ver harnesses of the world and the Sean coveys of the world and Jim Collins world. And we kind of built a lot of custom tools and we built our own system, which we call the elite execution system, which is what I wrote a book on called building elite organization that we run today, built a technology on and teach to other developers and operators, help them implement and run their business on it. Today, what do [00:10:56] Sam Wilson: you feel like have been some of the greatest challenges that you've overcome inside of your own organization? [00:11:03] Don Wenner: So there's only one real challenge. At the end of the day, in my opinion all challenges all revert back to one singular issue at the end of the day, which is leadership. Every problem you have in your organization comes down to leadership. So everything that we've ever had that hasn't gone, right, or isn't going right, or we're not executing as well as we want or not getting the results we want or having struggle or challenges always comes down to leadership. Every problem you have is a leadership problem, whether you realize it or not. So that's where I've put, for the last 10 years of my life. Yes, and I'm involved in raising capital and we raise lots of capital, right? I'm involved in doing deals. I'm involved in operations. I drive the engine of a lot of the organization, even though we have 300 plus corporate team members yet with all the things I'm involved in, the number one and number two allocation of my time for the last 10 years have been hiring leaders. And developing leaders. So I spend, well over half my time on out hiring I average six day interviews a week, half for 10 plus years, and I do six to eight one on one meetings with my leaders a week focusing on developing leadership, developing capacity, developing abilities to execute. So that's some level. Dedication and discipline around hiring and developing of leadership right. Is not typical. I find in most CEOs or leaders and but I've realized the importance of, and that's the fundamental reason to how we've been able to have the sustained level of growth we've had through multiple cycles, launching many different business lines, et cetera, and sustain. It has been not, I wouldn't say we've kept up with leadership to the growth organization. We've been close to keeping up, right? So we're always feeling we're fighting to have enough quality leaders and have them at the place of leadership level, to keep up with the goals and direction of the organization. But it's a conscious, focused effort [00:12:42] Sam Wilson: when you say, and remind me, sure, have the right question for this. But when you say developing leaders, meeting with your leaders, obviously, KPIs, things like that are important, but there's a lot of kind of soft skill. In leadership that maybe can't be measured on a spreadsheet, there's interpersonal skills. There's things like you just can't measure it. How are you effectively developing leaders? Like what are things that you say, man, these are things when someone comes into our organization that I really, when I onboard 'em I want them to understand. [00:13:12] Don Wenner: Yeah, it's a wonderful question. And so the best book on leadership that's ever been written in my humble opinion is called the five levels of leadership by John Maxwell. It's a classic, it's the best understanding of leadership. And John Maxwell himself has written a hundred books on leadership. This is the best book. And so the way I think about it is most people. And if you haven't read the book, this won't, I won't go too deep in the, we weeds to people, but. Level three leadership is where most people never achieve, which is to be able to consistently generate and produce results with and through a team. And so I realized that in my organization that I have a lot of people who had leadership titles and some influence because of who they are, and they're great people and encouraging, and great cheerleaders and so forth, but weren't able to consistently generate results. And so I spent, probably a couple years really evaluating. Our leaders internally and externally in terms, what are the things that, that great leaders do? What are those? And you said the kind of soft skills, the things that that, that really make a difference. And so the first thing I backtrack is a quick second that we do is every time we hire a leader or hire any person in the organization we. Clearly identified before we even start searching for the person. But then once we hire them, we identify, we call it the R R E K, which stands for role responsibilities, expectations of key numbers. So every person at DLP knows what the key numbers are, that their response, what the KPIs, as you said, and they know exactly what the expectations are. My belief, especially the people we. But most people wanna win. Right? Most people want to do good. Right. They want to be successful, but a lot of people in most organizations, especially entre organizations don't know what success is. It's never even been measured. So they don't even know what they're aiming for. Because no one's defined what success is for their job. So that's the first place that most organizations, most companies fall down. But once we've identified success or they're not achieving success, they're not achieving their goals. We fear why that is. Right. Is it, hopefully it's not the case, this is a hiring issue. If it's a will issue, right. They're not willing to do the work. Right. But if they have a skill issue, right. An ability issue we've developed over again, a couple years, the 24 consistent practices of highly effective leaders. So some examples of those are, discipline and building habits. So they're struggling with keeping up with the whirlwind, right? They don't have the discipline and structure to their life, let alone their business. Right. Do more than you ask for others, make hard decisions, have difficult conversation. We call alignment being aligned and we have a whole method around that. Listening, speaking simply. And. Coaching teaching follow through buy-in collaboration, emotional fortitude. Those are some of the examples and we actually have people self-assess themselves against those. And we have then their leader assess them across those. And just by categorizing those things that a lot of will be considered soft skills, categorizing them in that way, and then be able to give. Clear feedback. It helps sometimes when you feel like, I don't know how to guide them on what they're doing wrong, right. When I can look at this list of 24 practices, I can see, Hey, you've really been struggling with being able to critically think through an issue and be able to kinda lay out solutions, right. And give guidance on how to get better on that and how to improve and so forth. So, so yeah, it takes a lot of work and time and you have to first care enough to do it. Right. So I always tell people, the key in, in, in building a great organization is investing in your people and you can't fake it. Right. You can't fake it. You generally have to care. And in order to really invest in, in your people and invest in them as a whole. And that's one of the other quick notes that we invest a lot in. So I believe one of our core values is called living fully. And I believe living fully is when you're achieving success and significance across all areas, your life. And we categorize life across eight areas faith, family, friends, freedom, fun, fulfillment, fitness, and finance. We have an assessment process that people can assess themselves and we want to help people. The way I think about it simply is I want, if you worked in my organization, I want you to be a great father, a great husband, a great leader in your church, whatever the things that are important to you as well as certainly being very productive in your work. Right. But those aren't contradict. We call it work life integration. We want people who are successful in achieving their goals in all areas of life. And by investing in people as a whole, every person in our organization has a personal compass. They have a goal to what's their own core values, their mission, their family, B a. What they want accomplished in a hundred years and we help them, achieve their goals and connect what they really wanna get outta life and have fulfillment and so forth. And so, yeah, so there's a couple notes on building leaders. I [00:17:14] Sam Wilson: love that. No, that's absolutely awesome. And I think that's a tough thing to tackle a tough thing as you well know, building, building leaders inside your organization. That's a lot of work and it's a lot of. Planning and probably delayed gratification. I would even imagine as you look at it and go, okay, I'm gonna invest this in you. And then it could be two or three years before we start to see fruit. But yet it is that constant cultivation of both culture and people. I think that has taken you to where you are today. Turn left a little bit in this conversation. You guys are involved in a whole suite of real estate investments. Everything from, I think it was maybe I misunderstood this, but build the rent communities to lending, to direct development of multifamily properties. When you want to take on a new business line or a new asset class, how do you guys strategize around that? Figure out the goal and then bring on the people to do it. What's that process? [00:18:10] Don Wenner: That's a wonderful question. And we have throw this out there. So, one of our domain that has information on the book and a lot of these tools that I'm talking about, including when I'm about to talk of anybody can download for free DLP, elite.com, DLP elite.com. You can download this next tool. And a lot of the other tools I've talked about which we call the elite compass. And so the compass. Is in the term for it sort of intraction they call it VTO. So it's sort of like that but a lot more to it. And so we, we have very clear big pictured organization. What's our big hero goal. What's our purpose, our mission, our core values. Who's our core client. What's our secret weapon as we call it. Clearly understanding who we are. In who we serve. And then we go and we break that down then into what's our three year aim for the organization and what's our one year bullseye. And then we break that down to what we're gonna do in the next 90 days. So we've got this really clear direction of where we're going and it's not just something that I know it or I, senior leaders know the whole organization knows it. We do a vision day every year that we invite all of, not only our employees, but all of our investors, all of our operators to join us, or we lay out exactly where we're heading. So anytime we think about launching a new business line or a new product, we go and we look, we filter it against the compass and we say, Hey, is this in a line with our values, with our purpose, with our mission, with our big heritage goes, this gonna help us get there, or is it gonna be in conflict with where we're going? And then it's often a situation of, Hey, we've got 10 different things we wanna do. If we're gonna add one thing in, what's gonna be the most, advantageous thing to do, what's gonna best fit with being able to serve our clients. And one thing that's helped me as an entrepreneur cause I, I, there's lots of things I wanna do. Right. I have, kind of 12 different business lines today that make up DLP capital. But I have 50 that I liked. 'em right. And so one of the things that's helped me to avoid that is that I don't say no to things I say not now. Right? So I'm not ready to do it now. Cause we only have 24 hours in a day. All my leaders are busy, we're all swamped. And that's the other big thing. When we launch new business line, we don't go and set up a separate set of leadership and no we're gonna use the same marketing department, the same it department, the same legal department, the same HR department, same CFO, the same senior leadership team. Who's gonna oversee this, which is what makes it possible. I have to have separate leadership teams and separate values and separate missions. It's impossible too often. I have entrepreneur real estate entrepreneurs who sit down with those on a day. We do at DLP called compass day, where our members come in and we help them lay out the compass to the organization. I sit down with each of our members for a few hours and help them kinda lay out strategy. And I'll get operators sit down with me and they have 10 employees today and they have seven business lines. They're on property management, they're construction management, and they're doing acquisitions and they're raising capital. They're launching a fund and they're doing that in two markets. And they're telling me in the next year, they're gonna add five more markets. And now they're also gonna self-perform construction. And then they decided they're gonna launch a plumbing company. And oh, by the way, we thinking we're gonna lend some money and they have more businesses than they have employees. Right. . Are you doing any of those businesses? Well now are you actually making any money at any of them? No. Right. Why do you need, all these are big businesses. Why do you need to be in every chain? Right. Don't let your, your back of house, become front of the house. Right. And try to do everything yourself. So, that's kind of how we do it, but it's hard. It's hard as entrepreneurs. [00:21:09] Sam Wilson: That's that's well said, certainly appreciate that. And thanks for taking the time to break down. So many of your thoughts here from leadership to how you guys have built an elite organization systems you've built, I've loved hear in your story from, starting selling, what was it? Ding, dons or donuts, host donuts, hostess, whatever. , yeah, that's a fun story. I love that. That's that's something they shut us down. I think I was in third grade, second grade. You remember those those jolly rancher they to sell in stick forms. Huh? Remember that? Yeah. So that was, I used to sell jolly rancher sticks in the the oatmeal cream pies in second or third grade. And I got the teachers shut us down, but that's that's funny. So I'm glad to hear. Somebody else also was in the uh, but you started much younger than I did so well done. it's loads of fun, Don. Thank you for taking the time to come on the show today. This has been an absolute pleasure having you on. I know you've mentioned a few different websites here and ways that our listeners can get in touch with you or learn more about your organization, but just one last time. So it's always in the same place in the show. What is the best way to [00:22:07] Don Wenner: do that? Yeah. The domain I mentioned earlier, we can get all the free resources DLP elite.com. Our main website is DLP capital.com. You welcome to find me on all social media. I have a podcast called to impact with Don winter. And my email is Don DLP, [00:22:20] Sam Wilson: capital.com. Fantastic, Don, thank you so much. Appreciate your time today.[00:22:25]  Don Wenner:  I appreciate it, Sam.  

SAE Tomorrow Today
122. Consumer Connections Will Define the Future

SAE Tomorrow Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 42:02


Ford Next is strengthening connections to consumers and defining the future of mobility. By integrating skill sets in consumer electronics, safety, regulation and public policy, it is expanding the Ford Motor Company outside of traditional automotive engineering to address the full spectrum of future mobility needs. It's Ford's equivalent of going to the moon. . Brought to life in late 2021, Ford Next is focused on accelerating the development of autonomous vehicles, prioritizing mobility services, and acting as a startup incubator. With Chet Dhruna, Head of Strategy & Business Planning, and Kristin Welch, Strategy & Operations, Ford Next is wasting no time exploring, seeding and scaling new technologies. . Among its many future-focused initiatives, Ford Next has entered into a new venture with ADT called Canopy to outfit vehicles with high-tech security systems to help reduce burglary and theft. The team has also invested in Cavnue, the leading developer of roadway and infrastructure technology designed to accelerate automated vehicles, including a first-of-its-kind connected corridor in Michigan. In addition, Ford's stake in autonomous vehicle startup Argo AI is part of the Ford Next ecosystem. . For over 100 years, Ford Motor Company has been responsible for many firsts in technology and innovation. With the recent creation of Ford Next, Chet, Kristin and team will ensure there will be many more over the next 100 years —and getting it right means Chet's 81-year-old father feels comfortable in an autonomous vehicle. . We'd love to hear from you. Share your comments, questions and ideas for future topics and guests to podcast@sae.org. Don't forget to take a moment to follow SAE Tomorrow Today (and give us a review) on your preferred podcasting platform. . Follow SAE on LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Follow host Grayson Brulte on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

Delighted Customers Podcast
From Impressed to Obsessed - Author Jon Picoult

Delighted Customers Podcast

Play Episode Play 43 sec Highlight Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 47:44


Jon shares gems from his new book: From Impressed to Obsessed: 12 Principles for Turning Customers an Employees Into Lifelong Fans.  Excellence is never an accident. Jon brilliantly pulls the curtain back on proven methods to fundamentally change the way you think about creating a successful, beloved business.Show NotesJon Picoult shared practical and proven principles from his new book From Impressed to Obsessed in this episode.  We talk about real world challenges for CX leaders and what cognitive science implies about where organizations go wrong and what leaders can do about it.Blog Reference: https://www.empoweredcx.com/post/the-holy-grail-of-cx-in-the-c-suiteAbout The AuthorJon Picoult helps companies impress their customers andinspire their employees, creating “raving fans” that drivebusiness growth. He is the founder of Watermark Consultingand a noted authority on customer and employee experience.A sought-after business advisor and public speaker, Jon'sinsights have been featured by dozens of media outlets,including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times,Fortune, and Forbes.com (where he is a regular contributor).His landmark study on the ROI of customer experience is oneof the most widely cited pieces of research in the industry,referenced by firms such as McKinsey, Deloitte, Accenture,Forrester, SAP, and Oracle.Jon is also the author of the new book, “From Impressed toObsessed: 12 Principles for Turning Customers and Employeesinto Lifelong Fans” (McGraw-Hill, Nov. 2, 2021), which debuted as an Amazon #1 New Releaseand has earned praise from business luminaries such as Horst Schulze (co-founder of Ritz-Carlton Hotels), Hubert Joly (former CEO of Best Buy), and Marshall Goldsmith (world-renowned executive coach).Jon has advised the C-suite at some of the world's foremost brands, including companies suchas AT&T, Allstate, ADT, Generali, and Becton Dickinson. He's helped these and otherorganizations capitalize on the power of loyalty – both in the marketplace and in the workplace.Prior to establishing Watermark in 2009, Jon held senior executive roles at Fortune 100companies – leading service, operations, distribution, technology, sales and marketing. Early inhis career, at the age of 29, Jon earned the distinction of becoming the youngest executiveofficer in the over 150-year history of a leading global insurance and investment firm.Jon received his A.B. in Cognitive Science from Princeton University and his M.B.A. in GeneralManagement from Duke University.Learn more at Jon's website.​

Average Joe Finances
107. How to Overcome any Setback and Crush it in REI with Bryce McKinley

Average Joe Finances

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 42:38 Transcription Available


Join Mike Cavaggioni with Bryce McKinley on the 107th episode of the Average Joe Finances Podcast as he shares his amazing story in Real Estate Investing. Bryce is a testament to what it means to get back up after you've been knocked down... and more than once!In this episode, you'll learn:How growing up in a bad neighborhood can build characterHow hustle and determination can overcome limiting beliefsAbout Bryce's setbacks didn't hold him backThe importance of believing in yourselfAnd so much more!About Bryce McKinley:Bryce McKinley is on a mission to change the game in Real Estate Investing.  There's so much opportunity out there for everyone but the industry is riddled with fake experts sharing ineffective information.  After being involved in over 10,000 transactions, Bryce has developed the expertise to know exactly what it takes to go from the first conversation to closed deal faster than anyone else. Bryce McKinley has been globally recognized as a top 5 Sales Trainer, Motivational speaker, and an independent consultant for business including Fortune 500 Companies such as Ford, Nissan, Tyco, and ADT. He started his journey with nothing, making his first deals living out of his car and has taken that drive to help hundreds of people change their life through wholesaling properties all across the country.  This beginning has kept him humble and understanding that everyone deserves a chance to create the life they want.Find Bryce McKinley on: Website: www.5hourflip.comFacebook: www.facebook.com/REIResultsCoachInstagram: www.instagram.com/coachsharpenYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BryceMcKinleyAverage Joe Finances®Our social media links can be found here: www.averagejoefinances.com/linksCheck out: www.averagejoefinances.comBuying or Selling a House? www.averagejoefinances.com/realtorUse the same Audio/Video Editing Team that I use: www.editpods.comPodcast Book I'm in: www.averagejoefinances.com/daniel-larsonAutomate your Shopping Experience with Instacart: www.averagejoefinances.com/instacartPay Off Your Mortgage in 5-7 Years: www.theshredmethod.com/averagejoefinancesMake Real Estate Investing Easier with DealMachine: www.averagejoefinances.com/dealmachineFree Stocks:Robinhood: www.averagejoefinances.com/robinhoodWebull: www.averagejoefinances.com/webull Consolidate debt: www.averagejoefinances.com/sofi-loans/Get Life Insurance: www.averagejoefinances.com/ladderAverage Joe Finances Swag: www.averagejoefinances.com/resources/shop *DISCLAIMER* https://averagejoefinances.com/disclaimer If you are interested in writing for Average Joe Finances or joining us for an interview on the podcast, please visit https://averagejoefinances.com/contactSee our episode transcripts here: www.averagejoefinancespod.com/episodes/Employee Survival Guide®A Podcast only for employees. Mark shares information your employer does not want you knowListen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify The Better Bookkeeper PodcastBecome more confident as a bookkeeping professional by getting a deeper understanding...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Secrets of Technology
Cloud Services for Your Church

Secrets of Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 68:52


Some churches have been relying on free cloud services that are going away. Dom Bettinelli, Fr. Cory Sticha, and Joanne Mercier discuss the alternatives and why they're better anyway. Plus a Find My failure; Meta accounts; ADT and Google; and Amazon ditching Basics? The post Cloud Services for Your Church appeared first on StarQuest Media.

Property Profits Real Estate Podcast
5 Hour Flipping with Bryce McKinley

Property Profits Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 23:49


Being able to do a five hour flip in real estate sounds so impossible to many, but once you've mastered the process, you can actually do it that quick from start to finish! Do you want to learn what process that is? Join us today as our guest shares what you need to do to achieve that five hour flip! Bryce McKinley has been selling since he was eight years old. He has been globally recognized as a top 5 Sales Trainer, Motivational Speaker, and an Independent Consultant for business including Fortune 500 companies such as Ford, Nissan, Tyco, and ADT. In this episode, Bryce shares his book's main points as he shares tips – specifically focusing on the two-fold process consisting of seven and five steps, respectively – on how to do that five-hour flip in real estate. Checkout -- Raising Capital Without Rejection Full-Day Workshop (Online): https://investorattractionworkshop.com/ What you'll learn in just 23 minutes from today's episode: Get a short but on-point summary of what the book The Five Hour Flip is all about; Find out what steps are there in the two-fold process of achieving a five-hour flip; and Discover what the acronyms FORM and RAQ stand for and understand why these two play a complementary role with the steps Resources/Links: Grab a copy of the “5 Step Process to Flip Real Estate Deals With 5 Hours of Work” e-book. Go to https://5hourflip.com/ebook1 Topics Covered: 01:14 – Two processes on how to do a flip in five hours, as stated in Bryce's book, The Five Hour Flip 02:12 – The 7-step process when doing a wholesale deal/flipping 08:31 – First two steps on how to have effective conversations and marketing; what FORM is all about 15:41 – Third step of the five-step process of mastering conversations 17:53 – The five-step process' fourth step; what the RAQ acronym stands for 20:44 – What is step number five? 22:13 – Visit their website: https://5HourFlip.com Key Takeaways: "It takes more than five hours, but when you hone in and master the process, it can really only be five hours from start to finish.” – Bryce McKinley “The number one problem that people have is two-fold – (1) They just don't hire a coach, and (2) they tend not to trust the process.” – Bryce McKinley “I don't recommend having a massive CRM and a massive direct mail. When you're first starting out, running lean and running fast is the best way to the money, then taking that money and investing it back in.” – Bryce McKinley “People make it so much more difficult than what it is. Sure, there's micro-processes on each step, but if you understand the flow of the deal and the process, all of those other things, you just learn with time and repetition.” – Bryce McKinley “That one standalone Motivation or Money will never be truly solved if you don't know what is FOR.” – Bryce McKinley “I don't believe that people will always do business with people they know, like, and trust. They do business with people they know, they like, or trust, but they always do business with people that have a similar belief system. When they know that you care, they will care about what you know.” – Bryce McKinley “It's not what you say; it's how you say it.” – Bryce McKinley Connect with Bryce McKinley: Website: https://5HourFlip.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CoachSharpen Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coachsharpen/ Connect with Dave Dubeau: Podcast: http://www.propertyprofitspodcast.com/ Website: https://davedubeau.com/home Investor Attraction Workshop: http://www.investorattractionworkshop.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedavedubeau LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/davedubeau  

Cancer.Net Podcasts
2022 Research Round Up: Prostate, Testicular, Bladder, and Kidney Cancer

Cancer.Net Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 49:09


ASCO: You're listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests' statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses. In the Research Round Up series, members of the Cancer.Net Editorial Board discuss the most exciting and practice-changing research in their field and explain what it means for people with cancer. In today's episode, 4 Cancer.Net Specialty Editors discuss new research in prostate, bladder, kidney, and testicular cancers presented at the 2022 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium and 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. This episode has been adapted from the recording of a live Cancer.Net webinar held June 15th, 2022, led by Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, Dr. Timothy Gilligan, Dr. Petros Grivas, and Dr. Tian Zhang. Dr. Agarwal directs the Genitourinary Oncology Program at the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. Dr. Gilligan is an Associate Professor and Medical Oncologist at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig (TOSS-ig) Cancer Center. Dr. Grivas is the clinical director of the Genitourinary Cancers Program at University of Washington Medicine. He is also an associate member of the clinical research division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Dr. Zhang is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center and a medical oncologist at the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. Full disclosures for Dr. Agarwal, Dr. Gilligan, Dr. Grivas, and Dr. Zhang are available at Cancer.Net. Greg Guthrie: Good afternoon, everyone. I'm Greg Guthrie, and I'm a member of the Cancer.Net content team. I'll be your host for today's Research Round Up webinar focusing on cancers of the genitourinary tract. Cancer.Net is the patient information website of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO. So today, we'll be addressing research from 2 2022 scientific meetings, the ASCO Annual Meeting held in Chicago in June and the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium held in San Francisco in February. Our participants today are all Specialty Editors of the Cancer.Net Editorial Board, and they are Dr. Neeraj Agarwal of the Huntsman Cancer Institute in University of Utah, Dr. Timothy Gilligan of the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, Dr. Petros Grivas of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington, and Dr. Tian Zhang of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Thank you, everyone, for joining us today. So starting us off today is Dr. Agarwal who will be talking about research in prostate cancer. Go ahead, Dr. Agarwal. Dr. Agarwal: Hi. Thank you, Greg. So I'd like to start with 2 studies. They both are in prostate cancer which will be followed by my colleagues presenting studies in other cancers in bladder cancer and kidney cancer. So I'll start with this abstract, which was highly discussed by the doctors at the ASCO Annual Meeting a few weeks ago, and it has a lot of relevance in our practice. So this is abstract #5000 presented by Dr. Michael Hofman, and this was the update on a clinical trial which compared lutetium PSMA-617, or lutetium PSMA, to put it simply, with cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who had disease progression after receiving docetaxel chemotherapy. So, who were the patients who were enrolled on the study? These patients had, as I said, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, who had disease progression after docetaxel chemotherapy, and who had to have high PSMA-expressing prostate cancer. And the way they assessed the presence of high PSMA expression was by using a specialized kind of PET scan known as Gallium 68 PSMA-11 PET scan. In addition, they made sure that these patients do not have another type of prostate cancer, also call it dedifferentiated prostate cancer, by making sure that those patients did not have a traditional PET scan-positive disease. So this was a highly selected patient population who were expressing PSMA on their prostate cancer. Prior to this presentation, the earlier presentation had shown that lutetium PSMA was superior to cabazitaxel as far as progression-free survival is concerned and also was associated with lower incidence of grade 3 or 4 side effects. In this update, after a longer follow-up of 3 years, Dr. Hofman and Dr. Davis, who is a senior author, they presented the data on overall survival, which was a secondary analysis, and overall survival was similar with cabazitaxel as well as lutetium PSMA in the range of 19 months. We did not see any new safety signal. So, what does it mean for us? What does this mean for our patients? My key takeaway message here is, lutetium PSMA is a suitable option for men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer who are expressing high PSMA on their prostate cancer after they had sustained disease progression after docetaxel. However, cabazitaxel is also a valid option in this setting. I would like to add my own view in addition to this because lutetium PSMA was better tolerated and was also associated with better progression-free survival. In my patients who are progressing on docetaxel chemotherapy, I would like to use lutetium PSMA first followed by cabazitaxel chemotherapy. So that would be my key takeaway from this abstract. Now we can move to the next abstract. This was also an update, a much longer update, on ENZAMET trial. If you recall, ENZAMET trial was one of those trials which established that deeper androgen blockade, or deeper androgen signaling inhibitors such as enzalutamide, apalutamide, or abiraterone, these trials were conducted in 2015 onwards, and all these trials showed that upfront using deeper androgen signaling inhibitors at the time of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer onset improved survival. So ENZAMET trial used enzalutamide, and it showed in the first analysis, which was presented by Dr. Davis and Dr. Sweeney in the 2019 ASCO Meeting Plenary session, that adding enzalutamide to androgen-deprivation therapy in patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer significantly improved survival. In this longer follow-up of 68 months, so we are talking about almost 6 years of follow-up, now, these investigators from ENZAMET trial, as presented by Dr. Davis, showed that the combination of enzalutamide with androgen deprivation therapy or testosterone suppression therapy continues to significantly improve survival in patients with newly diagnosed hormone-sensitive prostate cancer or metastatic prostate cancer. One interesting part of this unique aspect of this trial was that patients were allowed to receive docetaxel chemotherapy concurrently to the protocol treatment. And in this trial, 45% patients actually receive docetaxel chemotherapy. So 503 patients exactly out of 1,000-plus patients. So if you look at the subgroup analysis of those patients who received docetaxel chemotherapy, enzalutamide does not seem to benefit those patients from the overall survival perspective. So on the face of it, it looks like enzalutamide is not helping those patients who are receiving docetaxel concurrently. But there are some caveats with that kind of subgroup analysis. The first one is this is not a randomized assignment of docetaxel chemotherapy. Patients were determined to have docetaxel chemotherapy after discussion with their respective oncologist. This was not a prespecified analysis that so many patients with docetaxel will receive enzalutamide. Also, this was not a randomized assignment of docetaxel. And third, that I don't think this trial had enough power to look for that subgroup analysis. So my take on this trial is that updated results from this trial, almost 6 years of follow-up now show that enzalutamide continues to improve overall survival with a 30% reduction in risk of death in patients with metastatic castration-sensitive or hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Furthermore, the effect of enzalutamide, in my view, on overall survival is independent of the receipt of docetaxel. If you look at the whole trial population for which the trial was covered for, enzalutamide improved survival for all patients. And based on these results, I feel more confident in saying that upfront intensification of treatment with deeper androgen inhibition remains a standard of care for our patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer and should be offered to all eligible patients with this condition. With that, I would like to wrap up the prostate cancer abstracts. Thank you very much. Greg Guthrie: And thank you, Dr. Agarwal. Next up, we will have Dr. Gilligan, who is going to be discussing testicular cancer. Dr. Gilligan: Thank you very much. So I have 2 studies I want to talk about and then just give a headline of some interesting things that I think are kind of coming down the road. Both of these abstracts have to do with improvement over time in specific patient populations we used to worry about. I'm not saying we don't worry about them anymore, but things are looking better now than they had 1 or 2 decades ago. So the first topic addresses late relapses in testicular cancer. And historically, we have been concerned that these patients did worse and had worse outcomes. And late relapse could variously be described as after 2 years or after 5 years. In the current study, they defined late relapse as being after 2 years and very late relapse as being after 5 years. And what was special about the study was that it captured the entire population of patients with testis cancer in Norway and Sweden so that it wasn't based on a center of excellence that gets selective referrals. It was actually a population-based study. And the key conclusion of the study was one I found, once again, that late relapses are rare. So for stage I patients, 2% of patients will relapse after 2 years, 1% after 5 years, and 0.5%, so 5 out of 1,000 patients, after 10 years. So if you're 2 years out, the likelihood of a relapse is quite low. And if you're 5 years out, it's half of that. In patients with metastatic disease, similarly, 3.6% relapse after 2 years, 1.6% after 5, and 0.8% after 10 years. And what was interesting to me was that if you looked at the more recent patients who were diagnosed after 1995 - I know that doesn't sound very recent, but they had even earlier patients also in the study - the very late relapse rate almost resolved and went away. It went from 2.2% all the way down to 0.8%. So I think with modern imaging, modern care patterns, we're seeing less of this than we used to. But overall, patients were doing better even if they do relapse late. One thing that was interesting in the study to me also was for stage I disease, we typically recommend surveillance rather than active treatment. So active treatment with non-seminomas would be a retroperitoneal lymph node dissection or more surgery or chemotherapy. With seminoma, it would usually be chemotherapy or radiation, although surgery is being investigated there now. And they did find that in men who chose surveillance, which we still recommend, the late relapse rate was a little bit higher, but it was still affecting a small percent of patients. So the relapse rate beyond 2 years was 4% rather than 1%, but out of 4,000 patients, there were only 3 deaths from late relapse. So this isn't changing the recommendation for surveillance, but it is an alert that patients who are on surveillance for stage I disease have a slightly higher risk of late relapse and that may affect how we follow them and specifically how long we follow them. One of the things that was interesting in the study is in the United States, we often stop scans at 5 years, but in the SWENOTECA countries, they continue scans all the way out to 10 years. I don't know that U.S. guidelines are going to change, but it was a provocative finding. The key thing, as I alluded to at the beginning, was that 61% of patients with late relapse were alive 10 years later, and while we would like that number to be higher, it used to be around 50% in older studies. So it's a significant improvement from where we were before. A particularly interesting thing to me was that patients relapsing 2 to 5 years out actually had the best prognosis. Patients who relapsed in years 1 to 2 had a worse prognosis and patients relapsing after 5 years had a worse prognosis, whereas the patients relapsing 2 to 5 years had a better prognosis. In the end, I think what this means for us is that patients are doing better. It's not going to really change our treatment patterns, but it's reassuring that we shouldn't be pessimistic about late relapses, and we still have a solid chance of curing them. So again, bottom line, most men with late relapse is cured and late relapse is less common now than it was earlier, particularly in non-seminomas. Let's go to the next study. So this is a different group of patients who had a particularly ominous prognosis historically and still we have a lot of room for improvement. These are patients with non-seminomas that start in the mediastinum. So in the chest, under the breastbone, under the sternum typically. And patients are treated aggressively upfront, they are considered poor risk at the initial time of diagnosis, and they're treated aggressively at the time with 4 cycles of BEP or 4 cycles of VIP chemotherapy. And then they go for surgery to remove any residual disease. And the hope is they're cured at that point because historically, if there was a relapse after chemotherapy and surgery, it was almost impossible to cure them. Indiana University published their results using high-dose chemotherapy in this population, and they reported that 30% of men who were treated with high-dose chemotherapy had no evidence of cancer after 2 years, and 35% were still alive. Obviously, we need longer follow-up, but most of the relapses you're going to see are going to be in the first 2 years. So while again, there is significant room for improvement here, this indicates that high-dose chemotherapy is a good option, and that has been a question. So this is reassuring in that regard. But it is a good option for men with relapsed mediastinal non-seminomas of the germ cell tumors. So there's hope there where in the past, this has felt a little bit helpless. The thing I wanted to also highlight was that there are 3 things I think are going to be interesting to keep an eye on over the next year. One is the use of surgery for early-stage seminomas. There are a number of papers out about that. I still think this is an investigational approach, and so I didn't want to go into great detail about it, but it is looking like that RPLND, or retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, will likely or may be an option for stage I and stage II seminoma in the future. We are getting more evidence for that. It's not quite as promising as we had hoped until there's more data that's needed, but it's looking like that will become an option. So for men with early-stage seminoma, at least raising the question whether surgery is an alternative to chemotherapy or radiation, is an important discussion to have with your oncologist. Secondly, MRI rather than CT scans for surveillance. So to keep an eye on men who have been treated or men who are just stage I and are being followed and typically come in routinely for CT scans, which expose people to ionizing radiation, which theoretically has a risk of causing cancer, there's more and more data that MRI is just as good as CT, and MRI does not use ionizing radiation. So there's probably going to be an expanding role for MRI as an alternative to CT scans. And lastly, the use of microRNA rather than just depending on serum tumor markers. So right now, we use the blood tests alpha-fetoprotein, beta hCG, extensively to monitor for relapse, and there's more and more evidence for using what we call microRNAs instead. It may be more accurate in multiple different settings. So it'll be interesting to see how that evolves and that's what I wanted to cover today. Thank you very much. Greg Guthrie: Thank you, Dr. Gilligan. And now we have Dr. Grivas, who's going to discuss some research in bladder cancer. Dr. Grivas: Thank you so much, Greg, and thanks Cancer.Net for the great opportunity to discuss this for our patients. We're very excited about the data from the ASCO Annual Meeting, and I would encourage the audience to review as possible other presentations as well. I'm going to cover 3 highlights. I'm going to start with the QUILT-3.032 study. This trial reported the final results of a clinical trial that took place in different centers and involved patients with what we used to call “superficial bladder cancer.” And the modern term is “non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.” Bladder cancer that does not involve the muscle layers, not that deep in the bladder wall. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer is usually treated by our colleagues in urology with installation inside the bladder with an older form of immunotherapy which is BCG. And that's the most common way we treat this disease. And proportion of patients may have tumors that may not respond to BCG that may come back or persist despite the installation of the BCG in the bladder. And these patients usually have a standard of care of getting what we call radical cystectomy, meaning, removal of the bladder and the lymph nodes around the bladder, radical cystectomy and lymph node dissection. However, many patients may not have, I would say, the opportunity to get the surgery because the body may not be that strong to undergo that significant procedure. Very few patients may have that challenge because of other medical conditions or what we call poor performance status. Or some patients for quality-of-life reasons may try to keep their bladder as long as possible. And for some of those patients, that might be an option. And we have been looking for those options in the last few years. Intravesical, inside the bladder, installations of chemotherapy have been used with some positive results in some other studies. So that's an opportunity. We call this intravesical, inside the bladder, installations of chemotherapy, and the other option is an FDA-approved agent given intravenously inside the vein called pembrolizumab, which is in the form of immunotherapy. Of course, research continues. And this study I'm showing here from Dr. Chamie and colleagues, looked at this combination of BCG plus this molecule called N-803. This is another form of immunotherapy, and this was tested in patients who have this BCG-unresponsive, as we called it, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The results were very promising. I would say impressive that it was a high response rate if we focus our attention on patients who had the superficial form carcinoma in situ, about 70% had no evidence of cancer upon further evaluation of the bladder. And in many of those patients that this response lasted for more than 2 years. 96% of patients avoided to have worsening of the bladder cancer in 2 years for those who had a response, and about 9 out of 10 avoided cystectomy again from those patients who had received the response. So it was 70% of all the population. And as you see, all patients, 100% were alive without dying from bladder cancer after 2 years, which again is a very promising finding. This combination, to conclude, this inside the bladder installations of BCG plus the N-803, looks very promising. For those patients with BCG-unresponsive non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, that might be an option down the road, we have to see. Now I'm going to shift my attention to patients with metastatic or spread urothelial cancer. I want to point out that I'm a co-author in this abstract and I participated in that survey I will show you the results from. This is a population of patients who have spread cancer from the urinary tract, either the bladder was the most common origin or other parts of the urinary tract, for example, what we call kidney, pelvis and ureter, or rarely the urethra. The urothelial cancer that starts from those areas, again more commonly bladder, if it spreads, if it goes outside the urinary tract system, usually those patients get chemotherapy, what we call with an agent called cisplatin if they can tolerate that chemotherapy drug or carboplatin if they cannot tolerate the cisplatin drug. And usually either of these, cisplatin or carboplatin, is combined with a drug called gemcitabine. That's the most common chemotherapy used as initial therapy for patients with spread metastatic urothelial cancer. In this abstract, Dr. Gupta and colleagues tried to survey 60 medical oncologists, including myself, who treat urothelial cancer that considered experts in this disease type, to see if there are any features that could deter us from using chemotherapy in those patients. In other words, are there any features that may make us think that chemotherapy may be too risky for our patients and we should not do it? We should give immunotherapy instead. This is probably a small proportion of our patients, maybe 10 to 20% in our practice, may not be able tolerate that chemotherapy. And which are those features? Poor performance status, meaning the body is very tired and the patient is not moving too much, is confined in the chair or the bed most of the day, and rely on others on daily activities. This is what defines the performance status of ECOG 3. Peripheral neuropathy, meaning that there is numbness or tingling or weakness in the hands or the feet that impact the quality of life. And patients may have trouble buttoning buttons or tying laces, so impacting the quality of life. That's grade 2 neuropathy. Symptomatic severe heart failure, there is a grading system, like New York Heart Association Class III or IV that is significant, notable heart failure symptoms. And also, patients with kidney failure with what we call creatinine clearance below 30 cc per minute. That's a marker how we measure kidney function and the creatinine clearance more than 60 is usually close to normal. As the creatinine clearance drops and goes below 30, chemotherapy with these platinum agents may become a challenge by itself or if it's combined with the ECOG performance status of 2, which means more patients are not moving most of the day. So those features again have to do with the functionality of the day-to-day life. The presence of significant neuropathy, heart failure, and poor kidney function may potentially make the oncologist recommend immunotherapy versus the standard of care, which is chemotherapy, in those patients. And I would say if someone gets chemotherapy, which is the majority of patients, usually they may get immunotherapy later. So pretty much I would say discuss with the medical oncologist what is the right treatment for you. Most patients get chemotherapy up front, followed by immunotherapy. Some others may need to get immunotherapy, and those criteria help us make that patient selection for the right treatment at the right time. So I just alluded to you that most patients with spread or metastatic urothelial cancer, most of them receive chemotherapy. We discussed some criteria in the previous studies that we may use immunotherapy upfront instead of chemo, but for the vast majority of patients, chemotherapy is used upfront and that was based on the results of phase 3 clinical trial called JAVELIN Bladder 100. This was presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting in 2020 about 2 years ago, and it was published in a big journal. And that study showed that if you give chemotherapy upfront, those patients who can tolerate the chemotherapy, of course, who do not have the previously listed criteria, those patients benefit and live longer, so longer overall survival, meaning they live longer, and they have longer progression-free survival, meaning they live longer without worsening of the cancer if they get immunotherapy with, immunotherapy drug is given through the vein, called avelumab. If that is given after the end of chemotherapy for patients who have a response or stable disease, meaning no progression on chemotherapy. So if you get a complete response, meaning that the CAT scans look normal after chemotherapy as at least we can tell visually. Partial response, meaning that the CAT scans look better, but still we can see some cancer spots. Stable disease, meaning that the scans look stable compared to the beginning before we start chemotherapy. If someone has worsening of the cancer in chemotherapy, then the concept of maintenance therapy doesn't apply. So it's only for patients with complete response, partial response, or stable disease, SD. And the poster we had, and I can tell you - I was a co-author in the abstract and co-investigator in the trial, as a disclosure - was sort of the benefit of the patient with avelumab as maintenance therapy after chemotherapy was notable in patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease. So in any of these 3 categories, avelumab immunotherapy should be offered as level 1 evidence and benefit patients in terms of overall survival and progression-free survival as long as there's no progression to the upfront initial chemotherapy of the patient with metastatic urothelial cancer received. Many other abstracts on these cancers were presented, and I would encourage you to look at them. Thank you so much for the opportunity today. Greg Guthrie: And thank you, Dr. Grivas. Next, we have Dr. Zhang who will discuss some research in kidney cancer. Dr. Zhang: Hi everyone, glad to be here today. I'll be discussing 2 highlights from ASCO 2022 in kidney cancer. The first one we wanted to highlight was a trial called EVEREST: everolimus for renal cancer ensuing surgical therapy, a phase 3 study. And in context, this study is a trial of evaluating everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in the post-surgical context. And we do have in the landscape 2 approved therapies, sunitinib and pembrolizumab. And as we have seen, some effective therapies in the refractory setting, many of these therapies are being tested in this postoperative space. So this particular study of EVEREST looked at patients with renal cell carcinoma who underwent resection for their primary nephrectomy and looking to evaluate postsurgical treatment. So everolimus has been approved as a treatment on its own in the refractory setting as well as in combination with lenvatinib. And so this question of whether everolimus alone could delay or prevent disease recurrence in the postoperative setting was tested in this EVEREST trial. The study ultimately enrolled more than 1,500 patients and assigned them to receiving either everolimus or placebo in the postoperative setting. Of these patients, 83% had clear cell kidney cancer and the remaining had non-clear cell kidney cancer. And the follow-up was quite long, over 5 years, and actually over 6 years, and the researchers looked at time until disease recurrence. And risk of recurrence was actually decreased by 15% in patients who were treated with everolimus compared to placebo. But the prespecified cut-off for a statistical significance was not quite reached, and the researchers took a specific look at a group of very high-risk patients defined by larger tumors, invasion of the perinephric fat in renal veins or invasion of nearby organs or known positive disease. And those patients with very high-risk disease had more benefit from everolimus compared to placebo. Of note, 37% of patients who were treated with everolimus had to stop treatment due to their side effects, and the most common severe side effects included mouth ulcers, high triglyceride levels, and high blood sugars. So ultimately this particular study did not show sufficient benefit of everolimus given the toxicity and lack of statistical significance. And so this is a balance between potential benefit in delaying recurrence versus treatment toxicities that we must have in this adjuvant setting. So what does this particular study mean for patients? Well, it was certainly a large phase 3 trial performed in the cooperative group setting and through the generosity of 1,500 patients and the principal investigators on the study, we learned this answer for a very important question of whether everolimus makes a difference in this postoperative setting. I think we're not using this in clinical context currently, but in this postoperative setting, we are always balancing this risk of toxicity with the potential for benefit and discussing the potential treatment options. I do not think this particular trial changes the standard of care in this adjuvant setting. And then I think finally for today's prepared talks, this abstract on depth of response and association with clinical outcomes with CheckMate 9ER patients treated with cabozantinib and nivolumab. So this was a post-trial analysis of patients who had kidney cancer with disease spread and treated with cabozantinib and nivolumab compared with sunitinib in the CheckMate 9ER study. And the context, this was the phase 3 trial in which the benefit of cabozantinib and nivolumab was established in the first-line setting and gained the registration and approval of this combination in the first-line treatment of metastatic kidney cancer. This particular analysis, presented at ASCO this year, was a post-trial prespecified analysis evaluating this depth of partial responses and associating those with clinical outcomes of time until disease progression as well as time until death. These depth of responses were defined as 80 to 100% for PR-1, 60 to 80% for PR-2, and then 30 to 60% as PR-3. And as we saw in this analysis, the deeper the responses on cabozantinib and nivolumab, the more correspondence with higher 12-month rates of disease-free progression compared with those same depths of responses from sunitinib. And there were similar 12-month overall survival rates for patients with similar depth of responses for either the cabozantinib and nivolumab combination compared with sunitinib. So I do think the degree of partial response in these settings is productive of time until progression and establishes further the efficacy and benefit of cabozantinib and nivolumab compared with sunitinib. And what does this trial mean for our patients? I think that early on, as we're looking for responses and radiographic changes for our patients on cabozantinib, nivolumab in the first-line setting, these deeper responses are associated with longer time until disease progression, and we can counsel patients, to discuss whether cabozantinib and nivolumab is working for them. This could be an early indicator for how patients will do overall on this combination. So with that I'd love to wrap up and turn it back over to you, Greg. Greg Guthrie: Thanks so much Dr. Zhang. And now it's time to move on into our Q&A session. This is for you, Dr. Agarwal. So the question is utility of triple therapy, ADT plus docetaxel plus ASI and metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer given ENZAMET was inconsistent with PEACE-1 and ARASENS. Would you give ASI concurrent or sequential after chemotherapy for tolerability? I'm assuming ASI here is androgen suppression, correct? Dr. Agarwal: Yes. Great question. There are 2 questions here. Number 1, if I would use triplet therapy given the negative subgroup analysis of the ENZAMET trial, and number 2, what is the role of triplet therapy in general? The answer to the first question is ENZAMET trial, subgroup analysis is very different from preplanned, prespecified, well-powered analysis from PEACE-1 and the ARASENS trial. So yes, we saw discrepant results, but my impression from ENZAMET trial is enzalutamide is an effective option for all patients regardless of the receipt of docetaxel chemotherapy because that was a subgroup analysis. So I don't think it really affects negatively the results of the ARASENS and the PEACE-1 trial. But a bigger question here is triplet therapy versus doublet therapy? Is triplet therapy for all or doublet therapy for all? Answer is no. Triplet therapy trials only showed that adding a novel hormonal therapy or deeper androgen blockade to the backbone of ADT plus docetaxel improves survival. These trials did not answer the question, if adding docetaxel chemotherapy to ADT plus, for example, enzalutamide or darolutamide or apalutamide, will improve survival. We do not have that question answered by any of the trials and unlikely any other trial will answer that question. So my take ADT plus docetaxel is replaced by ADT plus docetaxel plus these deeper androgen blocker therapy. So wherever I was going to use docetaxel chemotherapy, so those are the patients with visceral metastases or in my practice, when I do comprehensive genomic profiling, I see those molecular aberrations which predict lack of response to deeper androgen blockade such as baseline AR variants. Or if I see 2 out of 3 mutations of p53, RB loss, p10 loss, if I see 2 out of these 3, I tend to think about docetaxel chemotherapy. So in those patients where I'm using ADT plus docetaxel, I would add another androgen receptor blocker such as abiraterone and darolutamide. But when I'm using enzalutamide or apalutamide which I use for majority of those patients, my patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, I do not think about triplet therapy. Greg Guthrie: Thanks, Dr. Agarwal. We actually have a follow-up question, and this is, what is the role of oncology in low-stage early prostate cancer? Can neoadjuvant chemotherapy reduce the number of people who end up with metastatic prostate cancer? Dr. Agarwal: This answer is very simple. There is no role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in high-risk localized prostate cancer or any localized prostate cancer setting. Greg Guthrie: Great. Thank you. Next question. I believe that this is for everybody. How long will it be until the information from the trials discussed will be used in the community clinics? What can patients do to bring this information to their less experienced doctors? Dr. Grivas: So, Greg, just to clarify the question, is it about the translation of the results of the clinic from ASCO to clinical practice, generically speaking, or any particular tumor type or any particular data results? Greg Guthrie: The way I read this question, it's more just kind of a broader scope question about just like, how long does the results of clinical trials make it to community practice, and what role can patients have in perhaps fostering this transmission of information? Dr. Grivas: Of course, I can start briefly, and then my colleagues can add. I would say the world we live in right now, the information travels very quickly. It's much faster compared to the past. And I think there is much more alignment, in my opinion, in terms of information access between academic oncologists and community oncologists. If, for example, a trial result comes at ASCO being presented, and then there's a follow-up approval authority from a regulatory agency, this agent may be accessible to both community and academic practices. Of course, there are always opportunities for education, and Dr. Agarwal is the director of the ASCO Daily News, and he knows that well to disseminate the information well, broadly, in an equitable manner across academic oncologist providers and community providers. And I think CME, continued medical education practices, can help in that regard. And obviously, the other aspect of that is the ongoing clinical trials and how we can do a better job disseminating the opportunity for equitable participation in clinical trials across racial groups, ethnicity groups, minority groups, to give them the chance to participate in ongoing clinical trials that may change the practice down the road, which are just early thoughts. But other colleagues can comment. Dr. Zhang: Yeah, if I could chime in. I think these continuing medical education programs, particularly in the context after large symposia like the ASCO Annual Meeting we just had, are particularly important. And the Best of ASCO series, as well as ASCO Direct Highlight series - I believe Dr. Grivas and I are hosting 2 of these - are very helpful, I think, to bring the latest findings from the ASCO Annual Meeting to our community colleagues. And they really are our colleagues. We work together with our oncologists within the community to take care of our patients, oftentimes for standard of care treatments. Patients can access them more in their backyards. And I think from a patient standpoint on the second part of the question, they're able to hear these from patient-friendly platforms and to bring that to the attention of their oncologist, wherever that may be. It all helps in the grand context of clinical care. So I hope that these trial results and the latest findings from ASCO can get inseminated very quickly.   Dr. Grivas: And to also add very briefly, the role of patient advocacy groups, and in the bladder cancer work, there are many, for example, the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, World Bladder Cancer Coalition, and many others can help also in that regard and teaming up with all of us to disseminate information and also clinical trial access. Greg Guthrie: Great. Thank you, everyone. We have a question for Dr. Grivas. After the survey results in the study you described, is there any plan to make a guideline or tool to make sure we standardize the definition of cisplatin/platinum ineligibility? Dr. Grivas: Great question. Just 1 more thing on my prior answer, kudos to Cancer.Net for serving that mission, Greg and Claire in that-- or the previous question to have a complete answer. Answering this new question here, which is very important. I think the next step is to try to publish the results of the survey. The survey like the previous one done by Dr. Galski about 10 years ago-- it's a survey on expert oncologists, and it's a consensus-based definition. It's criteria that we came up with together. And I think the next step here is to publish this in a peer-review process. And our hope is by publishing these results, we can have a more formal definition to help guide our practices in academia, but also in the community oncology practices and make sure that we have a standardized way that we approach this therapy selection and of course, to help design clinical trials that for this particular patient population in order to improve outcomes in this setting. So hopefully publication will come soon. Greg Guthrie: Thanks, Dr. Grivas. I'll just drop a really quick pitch there. Here at Cancer.Net, we do have a very broad array of information on clinical trials. And patients can come visit us at Cancer.Net and learn about clinical trials, what they mean, and how they help advance cancer research. We now have a question for Dr. Zhang. Based on the results of EVEREST and other trials approved systemic therapies in the adjuvant setting like sunitinib and pembrolizumab, are there ongoing other trials in this setting and is risk stratification used? Dr. Zhang: The short answer is yes. There are ongoing adjuvant trials that build on pembrolizumab in the adjuvant setting. There's one that is looking at the addition of belzutifan with pembrolizumab in the adjuvant setting. So that trial is a global trial which is about to get started, if not enrolling already. And in the context of adding on in the adjuvant setting, I do think we really need to discuss with our patients how much of a benefit the treatment will have versus the real toxicity in the postoperative setting, many patients will not have symptoms from their cancer, so they may have some pain or healing side effects from surgery, but they won't have symptoms from cancer. So any toxicities from medications can be further amplified, so are we truly giving a lot of benefit in that context or not. So that's an individualized decision, and I do think conversations must be had to make that decision together. Greg Guthrie: Thanks, Dr. Zhang. I want to ask a question myself of Dr. Gilligan. You had mentioned that microRNA is an emerging field of study, and I've heard about this in other types of cancer as well. I wonder if you could discuss that a little bit more. Dr. Gilligan: Yeah, microRNA, the promise that holds is being a more accurate detector, specifically of testicular cancer. So the problem we have with alpha fetoprotein and beta HCG is half of the testicular cancers may not make 1 or both of those markers. So people can relapse without the markers going up, even though markers are most commonly what we see, there are a couple of different scenarios. Someone has stage I testicular cancer, which means their testicles removed and all their scans show no evidence of cancer. We know that 25% or so of non-seminomas and 20% or so of seminomas will relapse, even though we can't see what the cancer is, and the markers are negative in that situation. MicroRNA may be able to detect those people who still have cancer much, much earlier. So we know that they're, in fact, not stage I and that they need active treatment right away. So that's one place. Another place that we're seeing evidence is that men who've had metastatic testicular cancer. They go through chemotherapy, and they have residual masses. And we're wondering if there's cancer in those masses or is it all dead scar tissue or is it teratoma? MicroRNAs may be able to allow us to determine who needs additional treatment, who needs surgery without having it. Right now, we typically go in and operate just to figure that out. So there are a number of situations in which we could more accurately stage patients and figure out who's cured and who's not cured much earlier in the course of disease. And for a patient, this would be fantastic, because right now, if you've got stage I disease with non-seminomas and you go on surveillance and somebody says you have a 25% risk the cancer is going to come back, that's a 1 in 4 chance that at some point in the next 2 years, most likely, or longer, you're going to have to suddenly drop everything and go through months of chemotherapy. If we knew on day 1, it looks like you're cured, but in fact, there's cancer hiding there somewhere, and we need to treat you now, that would be helpful to know so they can get it over with. And the other men, we could say we're really extremely confident that there's not a 25% risk, it's a 5% risk or something much lower. So there are a number of ways, if this really gets proven and there's emerging data that's promising, I think we could reassure men, treat them more appropriately, spare them unnecessary treatment, and give them more peace of mind. Greg Guthrie: Great. Thanks, Dr. Gilligan. I think we have a question from Dr. Grivas now. Dr. Grivas: Thank you, Greg. This is a great panel. I like to learn from my colleagues here. One question for Dr. Zhang, you have done so much work in the field, leading the field there, Dr. Zhang. Any comments about the ideal end points in the adjuvant setting in kidney cancer, urothelial cancer, disease-free survival or overall survival? Would you comment about how we design trials, and what will be an acceptable benchmark? And what is meaningful for patients, too, in the adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for kidney cancer and urothelial cancer? Dr. Zhang: Oh, that's a great question, Petros. Thank you so much for asking. We have discussed this many times together because you and bladder cancer and myself and kidney cancer, we're thinking a lot along the same lines right as new immunotherapies get approved in the postoperative setting, so disease-free survival as an endpoint and recurrence-free survival as an endpoint is a valid endpoint. It's a direct result of the randomized treatment on the trial, so I do think that is the valid endpoint, and it's an endpoint that the FDA has approved the sunitinib and pembrolizumab indications in kidney cancer, nivolumab and bladder cancer. So I think it's certainly a valid endpoint to delay disease recurrence. How much of that is meaningful degree of improvement for an individual patient? Their own measure of recurrence is either yes or no. It's much more binary than population effects. So how much does that translate into benefits for the patient? I think that warrants deeper individualized discussion. But these disease-free survival endpoints in all of these studies is a valid endpoint to see whether the treatment is worthy in delaying disease recurrence in each of these disease types. Greg Guthrie: Thanks, Dr. Zhang. We have one last question here, and I believe this is a follow-up for Dr. Gilligan. And what is the time frame for the rollout of microRNA 371 to the community? Dr. Gilligan: I don't know the answer to that. I'm not sure that we have enough data right now that it's going to get approved. I think we're headed in the right direction, but it's very hard to know what the timing of that is. There are trials going on, so I don't know at the moment of exactly what the scenarios are in which people are going to be, which patient populations are going to be eligible, but there are trials going on. I think I'm hoping within the next 2 years or so, but I really don't know what the time frame is, unfortunately. Dr. Grivas: And if I may add a more generic comment to Dr. Gilligan's wonderful answer is that when we have what we call biomarkers that are like metrics that can give us information about how the patient does over time, it's important to tease out what we call prognostic, meaning how can this biomarker give us a sense of the chance of recurrence, as Dr. Gilligan said, or death from the cancer. But also, the bigger question is, is it going to give us information to predict benefit from an individual therapy? And that's a bigger question in oncology that is a harder one. This predictive question and try to identify biomarkers and validate them to make sure they have, they're clinically useful. They can help us make treatment decisions in the clinic. And I'm very excited about what Dr. Gilligan discussed about the promise in the future. But more trials are needed for many biomarkers. Dr. Gilligan: I think when we do this update next year, we'll have significantly more data then, I'm hopeful. Greg Guthrie: Thank you to you all. Thank you, Dr. Agarwal. Thank you, Dr. Grivas. Thank you, Dr. Gilligan. Thank you, Dr. Zhang, for sharing this great research with us, as well as your expertise. It's been a real pleasure this afternoon. And to all of our viewers, thank you for joining us. You can find more coverage of the research from ASCO Annual Meeting and other scientific meetings at the Cancer.Net blog, which is at www.cancer.net/blog. And if you're interested in more Cancer.Net content, please sign up for a monthly Inside Cancer.Net newsletter or follow us on social media. We're on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube where our handle is always @CancerDotNet, with dot spelled out. Thank you all, and be well. Thanks. ASCO: Thank you, Dr. Agarwal, Dr. Gilligan, Dr. Grivas, and Dr. Zhang. You can find more research from recent scientific meetings at www.cancer.net. Cancer.Net Podcasts feature trusted, timely, and compassionate information for people with cancer, survivors, and their families and loved ones. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts for expert information and tips on coping with cancer, recaps of the latest research advances, and thoughtful discussions on cancer care. And check out other ASCO Podcasts to hear the latest interviews and insights from thought leaders, innovators, experts, and pioneers in oncology. Cancer.Net is supported by Conquer Cancer, the ASCO Foundation, which funds lifesaving research for every type of cancer, helping people with cancer everywhere. To help fund Cancer.Net and programs like it, donate at CONQUER.ORG/Donate.

Can Crushers Wrestling Podcast
Can Crushers Spotlight with Asylum Wrestling Revolution Owner Gary Emmitt

Can Crushers Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 41:27


Joining Mark this week on the Can Crushers Wrestling Podcast Spotlight is the owner of Asylum Wrestling Revolution Gary Emmitt! Mark and Gary discuss the upcoming Asylum Deathmatch Tournament that will take place on July 8th & 9th in Indianapolis, IN. The guys chat about some on the competitors in this year's tournament, do's and don'ts if this is your first time attending a deathmatch tournament (like Mark), what weapon Mark can make for Necro Butcher to use, and so much more. Get your tickets today ADT "God of Death"!Collar X Elbow - The Wrestling Brand Use promo code CanCrushers to save 10% off your order!Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Matthew R. Smith, MD, PhD - Realizing the Potential of Novel Treatment Intensification Strategies for Metastatic Castration-Sensitive Prostate Cancer: The Experts' Take on Key Clinical Evidence, Practical Considerations, and Best Practices for Individual

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 84:16


Go online to PeerView.com/UDM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The therapeutic landscape for metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer (mCSPC) has evolved rapidly in recent years, and research endeavors continue to expand treatment options with significant implications for patients. In addition to the approval of multiple second-generation androgen deprivation therapies (ADTs), current clinical trials are investigating novel targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and combination approaches in different disease settings. Furthermore, when managing patients with mCSPC, clinicians must consider established, newly approved, and emerging therapies, as well as individual patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors. Given the wealth of new options, how do clinicians determine the best treatment course for each patient? Answers to this and other thought-provoking queries are provided in this educational activity based on a recent live symposium, as a panel of prostate cancer experts examine the latest clinical data for novel and emerging therapeutic approaches and discuss evidence-based strategies for individualizing treatment for each patient with mCSPC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Assess the rationale and clinical evidence for novel therapeutic approaches for patients with mCSPC, such as the addition of novel androgen axis inhibitors or docetaxel to ADT, Develop optimal, individualized treatment plans for patients with mCSPC that incorporate novel therapeutics as appropriate, taking into consideration individual patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors, Apply evidence- and team-based strategies to proactively mitigate and manage treatment-related adverse events that may occur in patients with mCSPC who are receiving novel therapeutics as part of their care, Employ effective strategies to engage patients with mCSPC in shared decision-making, with the goal of maximizing patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes, and treatment adherence.

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Matthew R. Smith, MD, PhD - Realizing the Potential of Novel Treatment Intensification Strategies for Metastatic Castration-Sensitive Prostate Cancer: The Experts' Take on Key Clinical Evidence, Practical Considerations, and Best Practices for Individual

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 84:07


Go online to PeerView.com/UDM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The therapeutic landscape for metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer (mCSPC) has evolved rapidly in recent years, and research endeavors continue to expand treatment options with significant implications for patients. In addition to the approval of multiple second-generation androgen deprivation therapies (ADTs), current clinical trials are investigating novel targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and combination approaches in different disease settings. Furthermore, when managing patients with mCSPC, clinicians must consider established, newly approved, and emerging therapies, as well as individual patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors. Given the wealth of new options, how do clinicians determine the best treatment course for each patient? Answers to this and other thought-provoking queries are provided in this educational activity based on a recent live symposium, as a panel of prostate cancer experts examine the latest clinical data for novel and emerging therapeutic approaches and discuss evidence-based strategies for individualizing treatment for each patient with mCSPC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Assess the rationale and clinical evidence for novel therapeutic approaches for patients with mCSPC, such as the addition of novel androgen axis inhibitors or docetaxel to ADT, Develop optimal, individualized treatment plans for patients with mCSPC that incorporate novel therapeutics as appropriate, taking into consideration individual patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors, Apply evidence- and team-based strategies to proactively mitigate and manage treatment-related adverse events that may occur in patients with mCSPC who are receiving novel therapeutics as part of their care, Employ effective strategies to engage patients with mCSPC in shared decision-making, with the goal of maximizing patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes, and treatment adherence.

PeerView Kidney & Genitourinary Diseases CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Matthew R. Smith, MD, PhD - Realizing the Potential of Novel Treatment Intensification Strategies for Metastatic Castration-Sensitive Prostate Cancer: The Experts' Take on Key Clinical Evidence, Practical Considerations, and Best Practices for Individual

PeerView Kidney & Genitourinary Diseases CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 84:07


Go online to PeerView.com/UDM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The therapeutic landscape for metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer (mCSPC) has evolved rapidly in recent years, and research endeavors continue to expand treatment options with significant implications for patients. In addition to the approval of multiple second-generation androgen deprivation therapies (ADTs), current clinical trials are investigating novel targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and combination approaches in different disease settings. Furthermore, when managing patients with mCSPC, clinicians must consider established, newly approved, and emerging therapies, as well as individual patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors. Given the wealth of new options, how do clinicians determine the best treatment course for each patient? Answers to this and other thought-provoking queries are provided in this educational activity based on a recent live symposium, as a panel of prostate cancer experts examine the latest clinical data for novel and emerging therapeutic approaches and discuss evidence-based strategies for individualizing treatment for each patient with mCSPC. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Assess the rationale and clinical evidence for novel therapeutic approaches for patients with mCSPC, such as the addition of novel androgen axis inhibitors or docetaxel to ADT, Develop optimal, individualized treatment plans for patients with mCSPC that incorporate novel therapeutics as appropriate, taking into consideration individual patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors, Apply evidence- and team-based strategies to proactively mitigate and manage treatment-related adverse events that may occur in patients with mCSPC who are receiving novel therapeutics as part of their care, Employ effective strategies to engage patients with mCSPC in shared decision-making, with the goal of maximizing patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes, and treatment adherence.

A Dangerous Thing Podcast
Episode 28: Pop Quiz (With Jeff Lyons)

A Dangerous Thing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 65:32


ADT is six months old, making it the longest running podcast in history. To celebrate, we brought in our good friend Jeff Lyons (@usedwigs on Twitter, Junk Miles with Chip and Jeff) and quizzed him on some of our favorite facts from previous episodes. Find out if the Hatfields and McCoys really did fight over an NFT and what romantic dinner entrée makes Jeff want to vomit. This episode was recorded a few weeks ago, but we added a new intro to say we are matching up to $500 in donations to any abortion-related organization. Tweet your donation receipt to @ADTPod and we'll match it. We recommend abortionfunds.org, but any decent one providing care, services, legal aide, or whatever is important to you.  

True Underdog
#TUClassic: Coming Full Circle with Michael O'Byrne

True Underdog

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 34:09


Today Jayson is talking with Michael O'Byrne, the founder and CEO of the home security company Affinity Integrated Solutions, Inc.  Finding meaning in life is about discovering your “why.” Michael O'Byrne, the CEO of a home security and home automation company, remembers precisely when he found his why, and how it changed the course of his working career.  O'Byrne grinded his way to being his own boss and a dealer for ADT, and now he has 230 employees across nine states. True Underdog Jayson Waller discusses O'Byrne's journey, and he can't help but enjoy hearing about the picture O'Byrne has hanging in his office. Highlights: Michael lessons learned early that if you want something you have to go get it Dropping out of high school to work with an electrical contractor How the passion got ignited after the first alarm installation Why you can't be truly committed until you find your why Michael's struggles with the business early on Building something bigger than you to help those around you Letting the haters in your life fuel the passion Why you can't teach desire to win Big decisions are made based on the good of the whole GET A COPY OF OWN YOUR POWER - AN AMAZON'S NUMBER 1 BOOK RELEASE! Immerse yourself with 8 key life-changing principles, worksheets to create your own map, and how to reach another level of your game!  It's all Real Life Stories! It's You vs You! Warning: This book is not suitable for pessimists, excuse-makers, and haters! SPONSORS: Express VPN - Visit ExpressVPN.com/trueunderdog. That's ExpressVPN.com/trueunderdog to get three extra months free. The Jordan Harbinger Show - Check out jordanharbinger.com/start for some episode recommendations HubSpot PINK ENERGY is the leading solar energy company installing solar panels and solar power for homes.  Looking for a job in the Energy Industry Serving Communities? Join the solar movement! www.Powerhome.com/careers Social‌ ‌Media:‌ Check out Jayson's website: https://www.jaysonwaller.com/ ‌ Follow True Underdog and Jayson Waller on your favorite social media channels and digital podcast platforms: https://linktr.ee/trueunderdog True Underdog is a Top 3 Entrepreneurship podcast on Apple hosted by Jayson Waller, CEO of Pink Energy, one of the fastest-growing private companies in the USA, and his high-profile guests share motivational tips, inspiring stories, and business-building lessons to help each listener grow in their entrepreneurial journey. Reach‌ ‌out‌ ‌to‌ ‌Jayson‌ ‌directly‌ ‌at:‌ ‌ Jayson@trueunderdog.com‌ ‌ Guest Social Handles / Links In The Episode: Website: https://aisnation.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/themichaelobyrne Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/themichaelobyrne Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/michaelobyrne Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/themichaelobyrne Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AUAUniversity
AUA2022 : The Changing Face of Advanced Prostate Cancer 2022

AUAUniversity

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 103:29 Very Popular


The Changing Face of Advanced Prostate Cancer 2022(2022) CME Available: https://auau.auanet.org/node/36010 LEARNING OBJECTIVES At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to: 1. Identify and treat a patient with new diagnosed M1 prostate cancer with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) plus be able to offer additional therapies that extend survival. 2. Recognize high volume new M1 prostate cancer to be able to refer to a genitourinary (GU) medical oncologist for systemic chemotherapy. 3. Diagnose M0 metastatic CRPC and educate patients about using novel oral AR targeted therapeutics added to traditional ADT as a way to improve their patient's overall and radiographic progression-free survival. 4. Identify the differences between these AR targeted oral agents and to educate patients about side effects and toxicities. 5. Describe the latest phase III randomized control trial (RCT) results for new therapies in M1 CRPC.

劉軒的How to人生學
EP129|【心情Studio】用清晰的思緒,拿回生活裡的主控權

劉軒的How to人生學

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 42:28


常感覺自己在忙碌的生活中,好像同時在接來自四面八方的球嗎? 手上才解決一個任務,又緊接著要同時拋接好幾顆球,內心總隱隱恐懼自己會不小心漏接球。 在生活中也漸漸出現思緒不清晰、情緒緊繃的情況,這時候你可能正慢慢走向「注意力缺乏特質(ADT)」的狀況。 根據研究發現,ADT的影響其實遠超過我們以為的忘東忘西,它可能深深影響著工作表現、生活品質⋯⋯等,所以在這一集我們就要來深入討論這個過往常被忽略的現代人困擾——「注意力缺乏特質(ADT)」: (0:19 ) 本集主題:現代人越來越常見的「注意力缺乏特質」 (4:24) 「注意力缺失症」(ADD) 和「注意力缺乏特質」(ADT)的不同 (10:45) ADT的其他特徵 (12:26) ADT如何影響職場團隊運作 (17:54) 從自身生活習慣,調整ADT的三個建議 (29:27) 書桌環境也影響著你的專注力 (32:50) 透過OHIO法則,整理周邊環境 (33:54) 結束一天工作前,列下明天優先的3件待辦事項 (34:29) 組織文化如何影響一個人的ADT狀況 ▬ ▬ ▬ ▬ ▬ ▬ 《AM :PM Journal 早安 / 晚安筆記本》套組 https://lihi1.com/2av9v 《我想聽你說 Popcorn Talks 歡樂對話卡牌組》 https://lihi1.com/8AMhC 即日起至06.08(三) 選購軒言文創商品,結帳時輸入「new50」 即可再享優惠折扣價!

A Dangerous Thing Podcast
Episode 25: Business

A Dangerous Thing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 63:45


Chip and James take on the capitalism itself in this desperate attempt to win whatever the podcast equivalent of an Pulitzer is. Okay, really they talk about the New Coke disaster and the Phoebus Cartel selling bad light bulbs was the original version of your phone dying after two years. Listen in and get your honorary MBA from ADT!

Black Men Vent Too
BMI: Fatherhood In A Black Man With Pastor Dr. James Clay

Black Men Vent Too

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 81:25


Good Morning Nashville! ☀️ We're officially now in a new month , and our audience knows that with a new month comes a NEW SEASON OF BMVT! We're super excited to bring to the month of June “Fatherhood” as a topic of discussion for this month . We will host guests that are young and old in the father role and get them to vent on how they've embraced the fatherhood title. Today's guest surely provides #BMVT with a great roadmap into our new season . Pastor Doctor James Douglas Clay is today's guest on Black Men Vent Too

At Home with Linda & Drew Scott
BRB! Busy Relishing in Babytime!

At Home with Linda & Drew Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 23:17


We have a very special guest on today's chat! We welcomed our baby boy and are over the moon to be starting this next chapter of our adventure together. We're taking a little break from the podcast to enjoy this time as we navigate our new roles as parents (and try to catch some zzz's… although that's probably wishful thinking!). We'll be back with lots of questions and reflections. Until then, we'll just be right here, soaking it all in (literally)… Thank you for all the love and support! LINKS N' THINGS: Thanks to our friends at ADT for making it possible for us to share these stories in a safe and secure place, At Home. https://www.adt.com/AtHomeText 310-496-8667 with your questions for #AtHomePodcast !If you've enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, rate and share with a friend! Thank you for being a part of the At Home community! Connect with Linda & Drew: instagram.com/athomeinstagram.com/imlindorkinstagram.com/mrdrewscott#AtHomePodcastTHEME SONG BY: Victoria Shawwww.instagram.com/VictoriaShawMusic Chad Carlsonwww.instagram.com/ChadCarlsonMusic MUSIC COMPOSED AND PRODUCED BY:Rick Russohttps://www.instagram.com/rickrussomusicSpecial thanks to all our At Home homies: PRODUCERS:Brandon AngelenoHanna PhanPOST AUDIO ENGINEER:Chris CobainNicole SchacterWEBSITE:Wesley FriendSERIES PHOTOGRAPHER: Dennys Ilicwww.instagram.com/dennydennSponsored by:ADT: It's important to have not just a beautiful home -- but a smart and safer home.https://www.adt.com/AtHomeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

BackTable Urology
Ep. 41 Radiotherapy for Unfavorable Intermediate Prostate Cancer with Dr. Neil Desai

BackTable Urology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 64:30


Dr. Neil Desai, a radiation oncologist with UT Southwestern, shares his perspectives on radiation therapy indications, algorithms, side effects, and prognoses for unfavorable intermediate risk prostate cancer patients. --- CHECK OUT OUR SPONSOR Laurel Road for Doctors https://www.laurelroad.com/healthcare-banking/ --- SHOW NOTES In this episode of BackTable Urology, Dr. Aditya Bagrodia interviews Dr. Neil Desai, a radiation oncologist from UT Southwestern, about radiation therapy indications, algorithms, side effects, and prognoses for unfavorable intermediate risk prostate cancer patients. Intermediate risk prostate cancer is defined by a Gleason grading score of 7 or more and a PSA level above 10 ng/mL but below 20 ng/mL. Radiation therapy is a common unimodal or multimodal therapy in these prostate cancer patients. Dr. Desi recommends additional imaging via MRI to stage the cancer before starting treatment. Additionally, bone scans and colonoscopies may be beneficial in order to find metastases and colon cancer, respectively, that can also be treated with radiation therapy (RT). A thorough patient history is important to obtain before choosing a radiation therapy option. Dr. Desai divides his history into 2 different categories-–patient-specific factors and disease-specific factors. For patient-specific factors, baseline urinary symptoms, metabolic disorders, hormonal disorders, patient preferences, and baseline sexual potency are important. Contraindications under this category include connective tissue disorders, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease. Prostate anatomy, such as large median lobes, also need to be assessed. Dr. Desai emphasizes that many of these contraindications do not totally rule out the possibility of radiation therapy, but just warrant careful consideration of the intensity of radiation used on the patient. Next, he discusses disease-specific factors, such as the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The majority of prostate cancer patients are started on ADT for 4-6 months first, and then begin RT. Next, Dr. Desai summarizes his explanation of RT to his patients. He starts by delineating the differences between internal and external RT, which exist on a continuum. Based on which RT option the patient chooses, the acuity and duration of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) will vary. The RT option he most commonly recommends to patients without contraindications is brachytherapy with an external beam, which results in less cancer recurrence but more LUTS. However, he acknowledges that brachytherapy may not be offered in all centers, may have reduced efficacy in big prostates, and may be an unfavorable choice in patients with severe LUTS. In these cases, conventional fractionation, hypofractionation, or ultra hypofractionation are better options. Furthermore, Dr. Desai dives into more technical aspects of RT, such as the importance of a full bladder as a form of protection from external beam RT and the superiority of photon-based RT over proton-based RT. Additionally, he recommends measuring PSA levels after 3 months post-RT to minimize the chance of picking up noise. He mentions that physicians should address the “PSA bounce”, a fluctuation of PSA level post-RT followed by a transient resolve, with their RT patients because it may be a source of patient anxiety. Finally, Dr. Desai highlights the importance of the collaboration between urologists and radiation oncologists. The patient should be made aware that both specialties are in communication and feel comfortable discussing treatment options with both sides. Dr. Desai will usually advise his patients to meet with their urologists before making a final decision on their radiation therapy. Also, it is important for both sides to coordinate any new tests and check in periodically with patients.

ASCO Daily News
Key Posters on Advances in GU Cancers at ASCO22

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 19:50


Guest host Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, of the University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute and the ASCO Daily News editor-in-chief, discusses key therapeutic advances in mRCC and mUC, as well as new research that proposes periodic scans to monitor patients with mCSPC for disease progression, with Dr. Jeanny-Aragon-Ching of the Inova Schar Cancer Institute.  Transcript:  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Daily News podcast. I'm Dr. Neeraj Agarwal, the director of the Genitourinary Oncology Program, a professor of medicine at the University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, and editor-in-chief of the ASCO Daily News.  My guest today is Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching, who is a medical oncologist and the Clinical Program Director of Genitourinary Cancers at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute in Virginia.  Today, we will be discussing key posters in genitourinary (GU) oncology that will be featured at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. Our full disclosures are available in the show notes and disclosures of all guests on the podcast can be found on our transcripts at asco.org/podcast.  Jeanny, it is great to have you on the podcast today.  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Thanks, Neeraj. It's a pleasure for me to be here as well.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Jeanny, let's begin with Abstract 4510. This is a trial that represents a growing interest among researchers worldwide in the microbiome and how it is impacted by antibiotics and how it modulates immune checkpoint inhibitor response. Can you tell us about this study?  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Thanks, Neeraj, I would be happy to. So, the title of the abstract is, “Characterization of the Microbial Resistome in a Prospective Trial of CBM 588 in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Offers Mechanism for Interplay Between Antibiotic Use and Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Activity.”  So, this is an interesting abstract that originated likely from the observation that getting antibiotics while on checkpoint inhibitors typically results in worse outcomes, perhaps because antibiotics can clear the normal gut flora and thereby increase these pathogenic antibiotic-resistant bacteria.  Now, on the other hand, there were some retrospective studies using a live microbial product called CBM 588, which seems to improve outcomes in patients on checkpoint inhibitors and getting antibiotics.  So, the idea, therefore, is that shifting the genes encoding antimicrobial resistance could result in a better checkpoint inhibitor response. So, this Abstract 4510 is a small study conducted by Dr. Nazli Dizman and Dr. Sumanta (Monty) Kumar Pal, and colleagues, and enrolled 29 metastatic clear cell RCC patients with intermediate or poorest disease. And they were stratified into receiving either nivolumab or ipilimumab compared to nivo/IPI with CBM 588.  Now stool samples were collected at baseline in week 12. And they did this whole metagenome sequencing to analyze a stool microbiome composition, and they also looked at the antibiotic resistance genes for the most common classes of antibiotics.  The results showed an astounding improvement in objective responses. So, 58%, for instance, in nivo/IPI and the CBM 588 arm compared to only 20% in the nivo/IPI arm. And it seems like also the antibiotics resistance genes were also decreased in those getting the CBM 588 alongside nivo/IPI. Therefore, responses were improved by shifting the gut microbiome alone. So, these findings were published actually recently by these authors in Nature Medicine. So, in case anyone wants to take a deep dive, it would be a good interesting read for this dataset.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Very interesting, indeed. Jeanny, what is the main message here for our colleagues?  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: I think, Neeraj, the key takeaway message is that this is a very provocative proof of concept trial that suggests shifting the gut microbiome has the potential to improve responses to checkpoint inhibitors and outcomes. So, this is a very up-and-coming trial and is seen also across the board in other cancers.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Thanks, Jeanny. Moving on to urothelial cancer, there is a poster that I think is a must-see for our colleagues. This is Abstract 4577 titled, “Defining Platinum Ineligible Patients with Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.”  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: So, Neeraj, what can you tell us about this abstract?  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: So, over the past few years, there has been a tremendous evolution in the treatment landscape for patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma. For over 40 years the standard of care for these patients has been cisplatin-based chemotherapy.  However, approximately 50% of patients are cisplatin-ineligible, due to underlying comorbidities, and are offered carboplatin as an alternative. So, although the checkpoint inhibitors pembrolizumab and atezolizumab were approved as first-line therapy for these patients in 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has now restricted the use of first-line pembrolizumab to platinum ineligible patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma.  The challenge we face as oncologists since the FDA restriction is the absence of a formal definition of platinum ineligibility and the inclusion of this definition in the guidelines. So, in Abstract 4577, Drs. Shilpa Gupta and Jonathan Rosenberg, along with the team present an updated consensus definition for platinum ineligibility based on an online survey of 60 genitourinary oncologists in the United States.  Based on the results from this survey, any patient with metastatic urothelial carcinoma, meeting 1 of the following 5 clinical and or laboratory parameters should be considered platinum ineligible, and these are 1 of the following: an ECOG performance status of 3 or more, creatinine clearance of fewer than 30 mils per minute, or peripheral neuropathy of grade 2 or more, or heart failure class of 3 or more—so, this is NYHA heart failure class of 3 or more—and lastly, the combination of performance status of 2 or more, plus a creatinine clearance of less than 30 mils per minute.  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Well, this is a timely update, Neeraj. So, what do you think is a key takeaway from this abstract?  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: These criteria based on simple and easily available clinical and or laboratory parameters will now allow us to readily define platinum ineligibility in our patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma, which is a need in busy clinics, both in academic and community settings.  So, I think once published and obviously once endorsed by guidelines, we really would like to be able to use this criterion to quickly define platinum ineligibility in our clinics.  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Agree. Yeah.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: So, Jeanny, let me switch the gears. PSMA testing is a hot topic this year. And there is an abstract that could potentially have an impact on future guidelines, and how we will practice further down the road.  So, I'm referring to the Abstract 5088 titled, “Predictive Value of Extra Prostatic Disease Detection by Preoperative PSMAPET for Biochemical Recurrence-free Survival in Patients with Otherwise Localized Prostate Cancer and Who are Treated with Radical Prostatectomy.”  So, this is a follow-up analysis of a multicenter prospective phase 3 imaging trial. So, could you please tell us more about this abstract where they are using PSMA PET scan in the preoperative localized prostate cancer setting?  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Absolutely, Neeraj. So, you may recall that the multicenter prospective phase 3 imaging trial that garnered gallium PSMA approval by the FDA was actually based on this study that looked at the intermediate and high-risk patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy and lymph node dissection, and they underwent prior gallium PSMA PET scanning for pelvic nodal metastases prior to surgery.  So, this was actually previously reported by Dr. Calais and group. Now they are reporting on Abstract 5088 as a post hoc analysis of the same population and group of patients looking for extraprostatic disease. And the final pathology was also correlated to look at nodal disease in these patients in order to predict biochemical recurrence, so they follow these patients for biochemical recurrence occurrence.  So, of the 36% of patients who did undergo radical prostatectomy after they underwent PSMA PET scan, about 41% of them recurred with biochemical recurrence, and 40% of them underwent some kind of salvage therapy or some treatment.  What was very interesting was when they looked at the biochemical recurrence-free survival. It was better in those who were PSMA negative, and that recurrence-free survival was easily about 33 months, compared to only about 7.3 months in those who were PSMA-positive scans.  Furthermore, the ones who had the longest and the highest biochemical recurrence-free survival, intuitively, were those who were node-negative and PSMA PET-negative, so probably not surprisingly. And that rate was about 46 months—close to 4 years. Whereas those who are node-positive on final pathology and their PSMA PET was also positive, they only had about 3 months of biochemical recurrence-free survival.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Very interesting. So, it looks like the PSMA PET scan is predicting biochemical recurrence-free survival in localized prostate cancer settings. So, Jeanny, what is the key takeaway from this trial?  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: I think, Neeraj, the bottom line is that patients with extraprostatic disease that is detected by their preoperative PSMA PET scan does predict strongly a high risk of biochemical relapse, and this can really be an additional tool that clinicians can use to help inform and guide future therapy.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Thanks, Jeanny. The research on preoperative PSMA testing and its implications on future treatment strategies in the setting is going to be really interesting to watch in the very near future.  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Yes, absolutely. I really think we should also discuss Abstract 5072, along those lines, the importance really of radiographic monitoring for disease progression in patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Yes, thanks for reminding and this is Abstract 5072. This is a post hoc analysis of the ARCHES trial, titled, “Radiographic Progression in the Absence of PSA Progression in Patients with Metastatic Hormone-sensitive Prostate Cancer.”  During the last several years, we have seen many of these agents typically given for gastric resistant prostate cancer moving upfront to the castration-sensitive prostate cancer setting. This is especially true for androgen receptor access targeting agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and apalutamide, all being now approved for patients with metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer.  What is noteworthy from all these trials, and is reported in Abstract 5072, is the use of imaging studies to evaluate disease progression. So, in Abstract 5072, Dr. Andrew Armstrong and Dr. Arun Azad performed a post hoc analysis of the ARCHES trial to investigate the concordance between radiographic progression and the PSA Progression as defined by PCWG2 criteria, or between radiographic progression and any rise in the PSA above nadir, in patients who were being treated with this novel hormonal therapies, in this case, enzalutamide for metastatic castration sensitive prostate cancer.  And as a quick reminder, ARCHES was a phase 3 trial that showed a significant reduction and radiographic progression-free survival and improved overall survival for patients with metastatic castration sensitive prostate cancer treated with enzalutamide plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus those treated with placebo plus androgen deprivation therapy.  So, very interestingly, the findings from this study indicate that 67% of patients on the enzalutamide plus ADT arm did not have [Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 2 criteria] PCWG2-defined prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression at the time of radiographic progression. And discordance was present in the ADT-only arm as well, where they found 42% of patients on the ADT-only arm had radiographic progression but did not have PCWG2-defined PSA progression.  Interestingly, this discordance of radiographic disease progression was also seen with any rise in the PSA above nadir. And I personally found this information to be very clinically relevant when we are seeing the majority of patients actually experiencing radiographic disease progression, not experiencing PSA progression at the same time.  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Yeah, absolutely. I agree with that, Neeraj. So, very interesting data. So, what do you think is the key takeaway message for the clinicians listening to us?  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: I'll make the message very simple. I think the message is that patients with metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer need to be monitored for disease progression with periodic scans, and PSA monitoring alone is not sufficient in the majority of these patients.  Again, we cannot undervalue the role of periodic imaging studies in these patients so that we can timely diagnose them to have disease progression.  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: I agree with that.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Jeanny, the last abstract I would like to mention before we wrap up the podcast is Abstract 4509, the results from the phase1 live SPARC 001 study. So, can you please tell us more about this study titled, “Phase-1 Live SPARC 001: The Study of Belzutifan in Advanced Solid Tumors,” which is an update of the renal cell carcinoma cohort with more than 3 years of total follow up?  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Thanks, Neeraj. So, while the current therapeutic landscape for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has changed dramatically over the past several years, with significant improvement in patient outcomes. Most patients unfortunately still experience disease progression on current treatments.  So, in-depth molecular profiling of clear cell RCC has revealed recurrent loss of function mutations in VHL in actually greater than 90% of patients. So, the VHL protein, as you will recall, is part of the oxygen-sensing pathway, regulating levels of HIF which is hypoxia-inducible factor protein, it's a transcriptional activator that mediates the response to hypoxic conditions. So, HIF-2α is a key oncogenic driver in RCC.  So, previous data you may recall from the phase-1 Live SPARC 001 trial was designed to evaluate belzutifan so, this was a novel HIF-2α inhibitor which showed durable anti-tumor activity and acceptable safety profile in patients with metastatic clear cell RCC.  So, in Abstract 4509, Drs. Jonasch and Toni Choueiri presented updated results from this trial after more than 3 years of follow-up. Of the 55 patients enrolled 16% of patients remained in treatment. And 62% of patients had discontinued treatment because of, unfortunately, disease progression.  The median progression-free survival (PFS) for the total cohort was 14.5 months. And the overall disease control rate was 80%. Forty percent of patients experienced grade 3 treatment-related adverse events with the most frequent ones being anemia and hypoxia.  There were no great 4 or 5 treatment-related adverse events. And these results, therefore, show that belzutifan monotherapy continues to show a high rate of disease control and a safety profile in a heavily treated population of patients with metastatic RCC. So, it is great to see that there were no new safety signals.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Very nice data indeed. So, Jeanny, what is the key takeaway message here for our listeners?  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Yeah, I think the message here is that the use of belzutifan monotherapy continues to show efficacy and safety in patients with metastatic clear cell RCC, which have progressed on multiple prior contemporary therapies, and there are phase 3 trials currently underway.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Jeanny, any final thoughts before we wrap up the podcast today?  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching: Thanks, Neeraj. I think it's a really exciting time to be in genitourinary (GU) oncology, and I'm truly looking forward to seeing some great sessions at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting.  Dr. Neeraj Agarwal: Thank you, Jeanny, for sharing your insight with us today. It was a great conversation. And thank you to our listeners for joining us today. You will find links to the abstracts discussed today on the transcript of this episode. Finally, if you value the insights that you hear on the ASCO Daily News podcast, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you get your podcast.    Disclosures:   Dr. Neeraj Agarwal:   Consulting or Advisory Role: Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Nektar, Lilly, Bayer, Pharmacyclics, Foundation Medicine, Astellas Pharma, Lilly, Exelixis, AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Merck, Novartis, Eisai, Seattle Genetics, EMD Serono, Janssen Oncology, AVEO, Calithera Biosciences, MEI Pharma, Genentech, Astellas Pharma, Foundation Medicine, and Gilead Sciences  Research Funding (Institution): Bayer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Takeda, Pfizer, Exelixis, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Calithera Biosciences, Celldex, Eisai, Genentech, Immunomedics, Janssen, Merck, Lilly, Nektar, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, crispr therapeutics, Arvinas  Dr. Jeanny Aragon-Ching:   Honoraria: Bristol-Myers Squibb, EMD Serono, Astellas Scientific and Medical Affairs Inc  Consulting or Advisory Role: Algeta/Bayer, Dendreon, AstraZeneca, Janssen Biotech, Sanofi, EMD Serono, AstraZeneca/MedImmune, Bayer, Merck, Seattle Genetics, Pfizer, Immunomedics, Amgen, AVEO, Pfizer/Myovant, Exelixis  Speakers' Bureau: Astellas Pharma, Janssen-Ortho, Bristol-Myers Squibb , Astellas/Seattle Genetics  Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Dendreon, Algeta/Bayer, Bristol Myers Squibb, EMD Serono, Astellas Pharma  Disclaimer:   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions.  Guests on this podcast expressed their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.