Podcast appearances and mentions of Michael Bennett

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Best podcasts about Michael Bennett

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Latest podcast episodes about Michael Bennett

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Authors Stephen Marche and Etan Thomas Episode 519

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 110:55


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Today's sponsor is Indeed.com/Standup 26 mins Stephen Marche is a novelist, essayist and cultural commentator. He is the author of half a dozen books, including The Unmade Bed: The Messy Truth About Men and Women in the Twenty-First Century (2016) and The Hunger of the Wolf (2015). He has written opinion pieces and essays for The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Esquire, The Walrus and many others. He is the host of the hit audio series How Not to F*ck Up Your Kids Too Bad, and its sequel How Not to F*ck Up Your Marriage Too Bad on Audible, and is currently at work on a book about the possibility of a civil war in the United States for Simon and Schuster. 1:03 Etan Thomas has amassed an amazing collection of interviews intertwined with the heartfelt commentary of his own to create a masterpiece. You'll read the voices of athletes, activists, media personalities, scholars, and the family of victims of police brutality. These voices include Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Bill Russell, D Wade, Russell Westbrook, Steve Kerr, Oscar Robertson, Mark Cuban, Michael Bennett, Carmelo Anthony, Derrick Rose, Swin Cash, Alonzo Mourning, Chris Webber, Michael Bennett, Jamal Crawfor, The Fab Five's Chris Webber, Juwan Howard, Ray Jackson, and Jimmy King, John Carlos, Laila Ali, Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, Bradley Beal, Tamika Catchings, Curtis Conway, Laila Ali, Harry Edwards, Chris Hayes, Craig Hodges, Chamique Holdsclaw, ESPN's Scoop Jackson, Bomani Jones, Michael Smith, Michael Wilbon and Jemele Hill, Shaun King, Ted Leonsis, Thabo Sefolosha, James Blake Torrey Smith, Eric Reid, Shannon Sharpe, Anquan Boldin, Ilyasah Shabazz, Kenny Smith, David West, Jahvaris Fulton (brother of Trayvon Martin) Emerald Snipes (daughter of Eric Garner) Alysza Castille (sister of Philando Castille) Valerie Castille (mother of Philando Castille) and Tiffany Crutcher (sister of Terence Crutcher) Today's athletes have delves into politics, current events, presidential elections, Black Lives Matter, women's rights, murders at the hands of the police, mass incarceration, and the list goes on and on. We Matter highlights and discusses this new wave of athlete activism; dispels the myth that current athletes are not connected and affected by what goes on not only within the confines of their own communities, but across society as a whole; gives credit and pays homage to the athletes of yesteryear who have paved the way for the Colin Kaepernicks and Lebron James's of the world to be as vocal as they are today; and encourages athletes of the future to continue to use their voice to bring about change Over the past decade, we have witnessed an unprecedented number of athletes across all sports using their positions, their platforms, their celebrity and the power of their voices for change. Athletes have an unprecedented ability to influence fashion, pop culture, and politics with their actions. It is refreshing to see many acting on their convictions. Muhammad Ali once said,”I don't have to be who you want me to be. I'm free to be who I want.” we talk about Etan's newest book Police Brutality and White Supremacy: The Fight Against American Traditions Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

“BREWS, POURS And SIPS” From AmericaOnCoffee sharing eventful happenings

[It was] a groundbreaking, Pulitzer Prize-winning musical, A Chorus Line, set a Broadway standard when it debuted in 1975 and [yet, it still] remains relevant today. A Chorus Line is a musical with a book by James Kirkwood Jr. and Nicholas Dante, music by Marvin Hamlisch, and lyrics by Edward Kleban. It shows an insider's view of the casting and audition process that goes in a Broadway show, centering around seventeen Broadway dancers auditioning for spots on a chorus line. The show won nine Tony Awards, along with a Special Tony Award for becoming Broadway's longest-running musical in 1984, and a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1976. Production History A Chorus Line was formed from several taped workshop sessions with Broadway dancers known as “gypsies.” The taping for the first session was at the Nickolaus Exercise Center in January 1974, with lead dancers hoping they could form a professional dance company for workshops for Broadway dancers. Original Broadway productions The show opened off-Broadway at The Public Theater on April 15, 1975. It was directed by Michael Bennett and co-choreographed by Bob Avian and Bennett. Word about the show quickly spread, creating a demand for tickets that the entire run sold out immediately. A Chorus Line premiered on Broadway in July 1975 at the Shubert Theatre, where it ran until April 1990 for 6,137 performances. The original cast included: Robert Lupone as Zach Clive Clerk as Larry Donna McKechnie as Cassie Ron Kuhlman as Don Kay Cole as Maggie Wayne Cilento as Mike Baayork Lee as Connie Michel Stuart as Greg Carole Bishop as Sheila Thomas J. Walsh as Bobby Nancy Lane as Bebe Trish Garland as Judy Ronald Dennis as Richie Don Percassi as Al Renee Baughman as Kristine Pamela Blair as Bal Cameron Mason as Mark Sammy Williams as Paul Priscilla Lopez as Dianna Most of the original cast went on to perform in the Los Angeles production. The new cast of the “New” New York Company included Ann Reinking, Christopher Chadman, Sandahl Bergman, Justin Ross, and Barbara Luna. When the show closed, it became the longest-running show in Broadway history until 1997, when Cats surpassed it. Original West End production A London production of A Chorus Line opened in the West End at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane in 1976. Initially, the international cast from the US retained their roles, including Jane Summerhays as Sheila. The original British cast took over the next year. It included: Jean-Pierre Cassel as Zach Jack Gunn as Larry Elizabeth Seal/Petra Siniawski as Cassie Lance Aston as Don Veronica Page as Maggie Michael Howe as Mike Cherry Gillespie as Connie Stephen Tate as Greg Geraldine Gardner as Sheila Leslie Meadows as Bobby Susan Claire as Bebe Judy Gridley as Judy Roy Gayle as Richie Jeff Shankley as Al Vicki Spencer as Kristine Linda Williams as Val Peter Barry as Mark Michael Staniforth as Paul Diane Langton as Dianna Plot Overview A tribute and celebration of the unsung heroes of the musical theatre, the chorus dancers, A Chorus Line examine a day in the lives of seventeen dancers all vying for a spot in a chorus line of a Broadway musical. Chorus dancers are often over-dedicated, highly trained, but are underpaid, and when they back up the star, they make him or her look more talented than they really are. For the most part, the characters portrayed in the show are based on the real-life experiences of Broadway dancers. The story takes the audience to a roller coaster of emotions as a group of potential Broadway performers is put through a dynamic series of dance numbers. Their numbers are gradually reduced from whom Zach, the director, must make his final choice. www.acriticsrant.com Image: Pinterest.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brewspoursandsipsdotcom/support

The Bakari Sellers Podcast
Michael Bennett on NFL Activism and Things That Make White People Uncomfortable 

The Bakari Sellers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 36:27


Bakari Sellers is joined by author, activist, and Super Bowl champion Michael Bennett to discuss how he's spending his post-NFL days studying architecture (7:12), opportunities (or the lack thereof) for Black coaches and executives in the league (10:45), and mental health in the Black community (20:51).  Host: Bakari Sellers Guest: Michael Bennett Executive Producer: Jarrod Loadholt Producer: Donnie Beacham Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Behind the Curtain with Joe Brown
Mindy Sterling, Arnetia Walker, and Stan Zimmerman

Behind the Curtain with Joe Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 64:25


In this episode Joe sits down with the cast of "Yes, Virginia", Mindy Sterling and Arnetia Walker, along with writer and director Stan Zimmerman.   The Regional Theatre Premiere of Yes, Virginia is put on by Judson Theatre Company at The Bradshaw Performing Arts Center's Owens Auditorium November 18-21.  Get your tickets, here.Mindy is most recognizable from  the Austin Powers movies and Nickelodeon's iCarly and has been nominated for two Emmy Awards.  Arnetia performed for many years on Michael Bennett's Dreamgirls on Broadway, the series Nurses,  she has a recurring role on the CW's Dynasty,  and some of her bigger guest spots include Quantum Leap, Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Mad About You, NYPD Blue, and Everybody Loves Raymond. Mindy and Arnetia are not only super talented with an incredibly long list of TV, Film, and Broadway credits but they are also the perfect podcast guests, they're both extremely funny, down to earth, and easy to talk to.  Thanks for listening!

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Kevin Winkler (11/ 10/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 69:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/TdXaB8vhEqs For two decades, Tommy Tune was the maestro presiding over a string of glittering Broadway musicals that took the tradition of complete musical staging by a director-choreographer into a new era defined by spectacle and technology. He was last in a grand lineage led by Jerome Robbins, Gower Champion, Bob Fosse, and Michael Bennett, but also provided a link to a new generation of choreographers-turned-directors like Susan Stroman, Jerry Mitchell, and Casey Nicholaw. Unlike his fellow director-choreographers, Tune also maintained a successful performing career. His nine Tony Awards (plus a tenth, for Lifetime Achievement) were earned across four categories, not only for choreography and direction, but also as both featured and lead actor in a musical, for Seesaw and My One and Only--a distinction no one else can claim. Everything is Choreography: The Musical Theater of Tommy Tune is the first full scale book about the career of this prodigious artist. It celebrates and examines with a critical eye his major projects, and summons for readers a glorious period of dance, performance, and theatrical imagination.  Now available for Pre-Order: https://www.amazon.com/Everything-Choreography-Musical-BROADWAY-LEGACIES/dp/0190090731/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3KWXUZQAC37QX&dchild=1&keywords=kevin+winkler+tommy+tune&qid=1627771116&sprefix=kevin+winkler+tommy%2Cstripbooks%2C148&sr=8-1  

The Situation with Michael Brown

Hour 3: D.C. still claims this spending will be wonderful and cost nothing. The Supreme Court rules what is actually income available to tax. Michael Bennett campaign funds mostly comes from out of state. Michael explains money is necessary in politics, but the stakeholders need to be disclosed to the public.

An Honorable Mention w/ Shane & Jeff
Episode 188: Charm City Challenge (Presented by Patreon.com/AnHonorablePod)

An Honorable Mention w/ Shane & Jeff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 149:25


October 2013, nearly the end of the line for our illustrious co-host Shane Hagadorn after ten years with ROH, and this would be one of the events which he never saw because it was released after the fact!So that is what brings us to Baltimore for CHARM CITY CHALLENGE this week, and a rather interesting look at the state of things just before the last of the OG office was shown the door. To be honest, originally Jeff and Hagadorn didn't think they'd have a lot to say about the show but once they got started, there was plenty to discuss about the impending departure of Eddie Edwards, the nothing that was going on for Roderick Strong, the whole Outlaw Inc tenure, and just how good ACH versus Kevin Steen turned out to be!It's CHARM CITY CHALLENGE on this week's AN HONORABLE MENTION, brought to you by PATREON.COM/ANHONORABLEPOD, and presented on the CREATIVE CONTROL NETWORK family of podcasts!For information on how to help support the American Foundation For Suicide Prevention, visit https://afsp.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.participant&participantID=2389364.#12LargeForever-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-For information on how to help support the Jon Huber (Brodie Lee/Luke Harper) Legacy Foundation please visit https://jonhuberlegacyfoundation.org/#YouKnowWhatThatMeans-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-Charm City Challenge10/05/13Baltimore, MDDu Burns ArenaSingles MatchEddie Edwards vs. Adam PageFour Corner Survival MatchAntonio Thomas vs. Roderick Strong vs. Caprice Coleman vs. Tadarius ThomasTag Team MatchBLK OUT (BLK Jeez & Ruckus) vs. Outlaw Inc. (Eddie Kingston & Homicide)ROH World Television Title MatchMatt Taven (w/Kasey Ray, Scarlett Bordeaux & Truth Martini) (c) vs. Cedric AlexanderSingles MatchKevin Steen vs. ACHJimmy Jacobs Five Match Trial Series Match #3Jimmy Jacobs vs. Michael Bennett (w/Maria Kanellis)ROH World Tag Team Title MatchreDRagon (Bobby Fish & Kyle O'Reilly) (c) vs. Jay Lethal & Michael ElginROH World Title No Disqualification No Count Out MatchAdam Cole (c) vs. Roderick Strong-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-An Honorable Mention Podcast is hosted by Jeff Schwartz & Shane Hagadorn every Tuesday on the Creative Control Network.OUTLETS:iTUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/an-honorable-mention-with-shane-hagadorn-jeff-schwartz/id1348324250?mt=2TuneIn Radio: https://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports--Recreation-Podcasts/An-Honorable-Mention-p1101966/Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/an-honorable-mention?refid=stprSpreaker: https://www.spreaker.com/show/an-honorable-mention-with-shane-hagadornCastbox: https://www.castbox.fm/channel/id2083202Podbean: https://www.podbean.com/podcast-detail/6xh9y-77731/An-Honorable-Mention-with-Shane-Hagadorn--Jeff-Schwartz-PodcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6lTHBJI005H8u13KHDo5Rq?si=q9nOYoUFR9uilL1rg8YyjAiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-an-honorable-mention-w-sha-45911710/ListenNotes: https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/an-honorable-mention-with-shane-hagadorn-0nVes3d7roi/Podcast Addict: http://podplayer.net/?podld=2360081Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/an-honorable-mention-w-shane-h-625260Jiosaavn: https://www.jiosaavn.com/shows/an-honorable-mention-w-shane-hagadorn--jeff-schwartz/1/1iXfonQNStc_SUPPORT THE SHOW:Patreon.com/AnHonorablePodADVERTISE WITH US:advertisecast.com/anhonorablementionwithshanehagadornjeffanhonorablemention@gmail.comFOLLOW US FOR THE LATEST NEWS & NOTES!Twitter & Instagram- @anhonorablepodTwitter & Instagram - @mrjeffschwartz0Twitter & Instagram - @hagadornshaneAudio by Zach Johnson - @RadioZTanhonorablemention.wixsite.com/mainTwitch.tv/AnHonorablePodFacebook.com/AnHonorablePodYoutube.com/AnHonorableMentionPodcast

The Kim Monson Show
Deborah Flora to Challenge Michael Bennet for U.S. Senate

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 57:30


Visit Kim's website for We the People Voter's Guide, Brad Beck's Op-Ed Help Wanted and Patti Kurgan's Op-Ed Proposition 119:  Cronyism's LEAP “For the Children.”  Vote NO on Prop 119: LEAP, a proposed new retail marijuana tax “for the children.”  The more appropriate acronym for LEAP is Leftists End-Run Around the People.  As big beef processors increase prices, ranchers raise $300 million to build their own meat processing plant. Deborah Flora, candidate for U.S. Senate and founder of Parents United in America, explains why she is looking to defeat Michael Bennett, the “invisible” senator, in November, 2022.  She is a business owner, mother and wife and is fully aware of how destructive national policies are for Coloradans.  Policies are crushing the economy and families through inflation, and unnecessary programs incur debt for future generations who have no say in today's political arena.  Bennett's praise of Biden on Biden's Afghanistan withdrawal is telling.  Bennett supports the FBI targeting parents attending school board meetings while he calls the Taliban a great partner.  We need change in D.C. and Deborah is promising to do it.  Karen Levine, award winning realtor with RE/MAX Alliance, reports that the fall housing market is hot.  Sellers and especially buyers must be strategic in the present housing market.  Give Karen a call at 303-877-7516 for professional advice and an advocate for you throughout the process. Guest David Horowitz, who grew up as a “red diaper baby,” talks about his new book, I Can't Breathe:  How a Racial Hoax is Killing America.  The nation is divided because of the racial hoax rhetoric disseminated in mainstream media.  David gives details on what he describes as false reporting on George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, two examples from the book, and follows up with both their histories.  In George Floyd's case the prosecutor did admit that he had no evidence of a racial basis in Floyd's death.  Black Lives Matter's main focus is to destroy America no matter how it hurts individual people of every race.  Turning his attention to Washington, D.C., David refers to it as a “fascist regime.”  This regime calls parents “domestic terrorists” while supporting the radical left that burned cities to the ground.  America is moving away from accomplished achievement in favor of skin color and gender.  David's closing remarks are to defund the schools and let parents choose what is in their children's best interest in the educational arena.

Tim May Podcast
Michael Bennett evaluates surging Buckeyes, Bill Bender analyzes CFP race

Tim May Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 111:00


Lettermen Row's Tim May returns for another episode of the Tim May Podcast, and he is joined by Lettermen Row senior writer Austin Ward to analyze the Buckeyes win over Maryland and what it means going forward. Tim and Austin also take a look at the upcoming Ohio State bye week as the Buckeyes prepare for what should be a fun second half of the season. Tim is also joined by former Ohio State defensive lineman Michael Bennett to break down the Buckeyes surge up front. The defensive ends have shown improvement in recent weeks, and the interior pass rush has been a force over the last three games. Also, Tim brings in Sporting News college football writer Bill Bender for an in-depth look at how the Buckeyes have turned things around 180 degrees from the start of the season. The offense has been the most impressive in the sport in the last month since the close win over Akron. Bender takes a look at that unit, where Ohio State is trending and the team's place in the national landscape as part of the College Football Playoff race. #OhioStateFootball #OhioState #CFBNews Subscribe for more Ohio State Football coverage: https://www.youtube.com/c/Lettermenrow?sub_confirmation=1 Ohio State Buckeyes videos from Columbus, Ohio from the staff of Lettermen Row. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 1

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:47


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 1 below.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Marc Cohen. Marc is a former actor, set designer and stage manager. He is a highly regarded artist recognized for his box art, which graces the shelves of many celebrities. The box art pieces are often worn as brooches. We'll hear all about his jewelry journey today, but before we do that, I want to thank Lisa Berman of Sculpture to Wear for making it possible for Marc to be with us today. Marc, so glad to have you. Marc: As am I. Thank you for inviting me. Sharon: Great to be with you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It started with you traveling around the world from what you've said. Tell us about that and how everything worked from there. Marc: I was a 20-year-old young man and I left America, basically, on a freight ship. That's how I started the journey. I have a saying now, which is “Every box art tells a story.” The irony of that is that when I travel, because I was on the road for a very long time, going all over the world, I liked collecting things but I had no place to put them. I found these little, tiny boxes that I used to take candy out of, and when they were empty, I went, “Oh, this is a great thing to put little things inside of.” I already was starting the idea of collecting little objects that I might go back to at some point and use it as a part of the art. But I traveled; I went around the world all the way to India until 1970. Then in 1970, I decided to return to America and relocate myself within the country. Prior to that, I had left in 1966. It was during the Vietnam War.  I was raised in Southern California, so I came back to America and went back to my roots. I have a stepsister, and she had a friend named Tom O'Horgan. Tom O'Horgan is actually very famous in the theater world, primarily because he directed the show on Broadway called “Hair.” He directed many other shows after that, but that is the one he's most known for. In meeting each other for the first time, he asked me about myself, and I said, “I traveled around the world and I don't have any real direction about what I want to do next.” He said, “Well, I need a driver because I'm working on these film projects. Do you drive?” and I said, “Yeah, I drive.” So, he hired me as a driver.  During that period, which was in the mid-70s, I drove him around Los Angeles. I knew Los Angeles like the back of my hand, and we went to all these different studios and met all these different, incredibly famous people; directors, writers and the like, actors and so on and so forth. I was getting a little bit of a background, but what I didn't know at the time, not until many years later, was how I ended up becoming a curator and jewelry maker. I was influenced by the work of Tom O'Horgan. Being a set director, he did plays. The things he worked on in LA ended up getting finished, and he said, “I'm going back to New York. Keep in touch with me. Maybe there's some work for you in New York.”  About six months later, I called him on the phone. He said, “Marc, we're doing this show on Broadway. It's about Lenny Bruce and I have a great job. I'd love you to come and work on it.” I said, “Well, I've never lived in New York, but I do know who Lenny Bruce is. So yeah, I'm coming.” I went to New York and got a room at the Chelsea Hotel. It was during the time of Andy Warhol and a lot of other people living in the Chelsea Hotel. So here I am, in the middle of this incredible epicenter of activity; there was so much different art on the walls of the Chelsea Hotel back in those days, and all these Warhol people and other characters from the avant garde world in New York City. That's the background of how I got to where I got. What I mean is that as a young guy, I didn't know a lot, and I didn't have a lot of background in art per se. I was more like a young guy who was just wandering on the planet, as I said earlier.  So, here I am in New York. I'm in the middle of an epicenter of activity, and Tom says to me, “Well, we're in pre-production for the show, and there are a lot of other things I would like you to do for me.” He gave me a lot of different jobs, and I went around and did that for a while until the show went into production. During those pre-production meetings, he would meet with all these different designers. One of those designers is now a very famous set designer by the name of Robin Wagner. Robin Wagner went on to design “A Chorus Line” and a lot of other incredible Broadway productions. Robin, over the years, became one of my closest friends. The reason I bring him up is because we used to go his studio, which at the time was in a building called 890 Studios, which is owned by Michael Bennett, who was the director of “A Chorus Line.” I'd go to his studio with Tom, and he would have models of shows. I was picking up the incredibly creative process of how you put together an idea for a show and a stage. He would have little characters he would use to put on models of shows. I took note of those little figures, but I kept it hidden in the back of my brain, not knowing anything, nothing preplanned about what I was doing other than being Tom's assistant. We eventually went to Broadway with “Lenny.” “Lenny” opened. It was a big success and for about 30 years, I worked primarily with Tom O'Horgan in theater.  Sharon: Is it Tom O'Horgan? Marc: Yes, it's spelled O-‘-H-o-r-g-a-n. He was an artist. He always considered himself to be one of those people that didn't do things that are the typical Broadway. I mean, when you think about “Hair”—I didn't work on the original. I worked on a later production with Tom, but by that point, I had already worked on “Lenny Bruce,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and so many other amazing things. We did opera. Tom did a lot of things, and Tom's influences and Robin's influences are guides to what I eventually ended up becoming, which is an artist who creates wearable art.  When you think about jewelry, for me, typically jewelry would be semiprecious stones, silver, gold, pearls, all that kind of stuff. I'm not the kind of creator or designer that would even know where to start to put those things together. I love beads. In the 60s, I made my own beads and necklaces, but I didn't see that as where I wanted to go. Because of my memory of the stage and theater and stories—when I told you earlier about the boxes, during the period I was living in New York, I collected a lot of things in my little East Village apartment.  I happened to be downtown in the Soho area; I was down on Canal Street. I was walking along the street, and all the shops had things out in front of them for sale. I walked by, and there were empty boxes and lots of other things. I was just motivated to buy them, so I bought them. I brought them back to my apartment and I was sitting at my little worktable looking at all these objects. I'm thinking, “Maybe I could make something out of this. I know that this coming year, Tom has this big Christmas party, and usually he's the guy who gives everybody something unique for a present.” There I was, looking at all these things, and I looked at the little box and glued a little figure I had inside the box. For example, this is a box. It's an empty one. Sharon: Like an acrylic, plastic box. Marc: A plastic box, an acrylic plastic box. Most people would take this box. It has a lid. They would put anything in it, but they didn't think they could put a whole story together. When I put the little figures in the box like that, and it has a lid and I put it like that, then I have a box with people standing in front of it, but they're sort of looking through. What are they looking at? I started to figure out I needed to have an image to tell the story. This is the World Trade Center. Sharon: So, you're creating little worlds inside the box. Marc: Right. Since I started the idea in 1985, I have made thousands, and out of those thousands, many of them are one-of-a-kind. How I can I put it? Because of my traveling and because I'm a very sentimental guy—with these boxes, the little characters can't talk; they're little plastic figures. They only way you could tell the story, as jewelry tells a story, is by what you put behind them. So, in this case, I put the World Trade Center. I had a little character standing there looking at it. I actually made this before the World Trade Center fell down.  My meaning of all of this is that it was something in the beginning I was aware of. The one I'm wearing on my lapel—this one is a door. There's a woman standing, looking not at us; she's looking towards the doorway. Anybody who would come up and look at my work, they would say, “Wow, that is amazing! Where did you get that?” This is how it started and how I got into fashion. “Where did you get that?” and I said, “Well, I made it.” And they said, “Really? Where can I get one?” And I said, “You can buy this one.” In the beginning, I used to sell right off my lapel. I love dressing. Double-breasted suits are my favorite attire, so I would have a box on my lapel. As I said, I would go all over New York City to openings, plays and the like. At openings and galleries and museums or wherever I went, people from across the gallery, they would see me dressed and see this thing on my lapel, curious to what it is. They would walk up to me. They wouldn't even look at me; they would look right at the box and go, “Oh my god, what is that?” When I said, “Well, it's a box and I made it,” they would go, “Wow! I want it.”  It got me to the point where—this is the most interesting thing—many years later, after traveling and having lived in Israel—one of the places I did live—after about 25 years, I decided to go back there for a visit. I had friends that had immigrated to Israel, and some of my friends were there to stay. I went to visit them, and they all are in the arts. When I was there, one day they said, “Why don't we go to the Israel Museum up in Jerusalem?” I was in Tel Aviv staying with them. We go up to Jerusalem. I was wearing a box. I'm walking around the Israel Museum—this is so amazing to me—and a woman from across the room, a very tiny lady, walks up to me. She says the same thing many other people said: “Wow! What is that? Where did you get that?” I said, “Well, I made it,” as I said earlier.  The point of it is that these boxes have a story in them. For me, every story leads into another. How I mean that is that a person who I don't even know comes up to me, looks at my work; they're inspired by it; they talk about it; they tell me things about it that I've never myself, as the creator of it, imagined how significant it was or what it meant to them. As in theater, as in my relationship to Tom O'Horgan—who broke the fourth wall when he did “Hair” on Broadway—during the period I was creating these, people in New York and probably everywhere else didn't exactly walk up to each other and start a conversation with strangers. I had the object that changed all that, and I had not realized that until I started going out and wearing them.  Getting back to Israel, this woman, who I later found out was named Tammy Schatz, she was the curator of one of the wings in the Israel Museum. She invites me the next day to come and sit and talk with them, because they were planning this show and exhibition the following year called “Heroes.” So, I went back the next day. I sat with her and bunch of other people and they started telling me what they were planning. They said, “Well, you're an American, and you must know a lot about American pop culture. You know Superman and Batman and all the stuff like that,” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” Once they learned I worked in theater and designed sets—because by this point, I was not only making little box sets, I was also making large set pieces for shows. I have also done installations and the like. So, they invited me based on an illustration I sent to them. The next year, I went back to Israel, and I did this 10-feet-high, 25-feet-long three-dimensional cityscape. It was boxes, another version of boxes. It goes on and on from there, Sharon. It's always been fascinating me, how these boxes have gotten me into all kinds of great trouble. As I continue to say, every box tells a story. Sharon: We'll have pictures of the boxes when we post the podcast, but I want to describe it to people. These are small. What, two by two?  Marc: Two-inch square, three quarters of an inch deep. When you buy them, they're empty; they don't have anything except the lid and the box. I basically invented an idea; up to that point, I never saw anybody else doing what I was doing. Later on, I found that I inspired other people's creativity. There was these little boxes, and every picture tells a story. A picture's worth a thousand words. Sharon: Marc, before all this happened, before you befriended Tom and he befriended you, did you consider yourself artistic or creative? Was that a field you wanted to pursue? Marc: Kind of. I didn't literally say, “Wow, I'm an artist! I'm going to create.” When I was a young guy growing up—I grew up in Philadelphia until I was about 13. My father and mother were in the beauty business. My father was a very well-known women's hairdresser. He had his own beauty parlor. My parents were beatniks back in the 50s in Philadelphia. They were very artistic people, and all their friends were very artistic. When you're a 13, 14-year-old, it doesn't register, “Oh, I'm going to grow up to be like my parents,” but they are influences. They all wore black all the time, and as I was growing up, that was my look; I wear all black. I'm going to high school during the 60s, and it's all surfers and bleach blond hair, and here comes me with skin-tight black pants and Beatle boots and cravats. Kids who were friends, they would come up and say, “Who are you? What do you think you're doing? You must be an artist.” The idea stuck, but as I said about journeys through life, the fascinating thing for me is that I could go around the world, have all these different things happening in my 20s, return to New York and be on this journey where I'm still at.  I know your podcast has to do with why we're here: to talk about jewelry. I came up with a way for people to wear jewelry that has a story in it and it isn't just a beautiful necklace. Most of my clients over the years have been women, and women know something much more than men know about wearing an object that attracts attention. Women know how to find beautiful objects and adorn themselves, whether it's a necklace or earrings or the like. What I also found was interesting—and this actually happened; I neglected to mention this, but at one point when I stopped doing theater with Tom and only focused on making box art, I ended up becoming a street artist.  I was selling in the beginning to every major department store, and I was getting orders for thousands of boxes that I had to come up with. I was a one-man factory, so I was pulling my hair out of my head thinking, “How the hell am I going to get all these boxes out?” Eventually I discovered there's no way I can be a manufacturer of these things; they're all one-of-a-kind. I'm not going to make 12 of the same thing. A friend of my said, “There's a street fair down on Broadway. Maybe you should go there and sell on the street.” That opened a doorway, like this doorway that's on my lapel, into a world that I have never been able to look back on. What I mean by that is that once I discovered going to Soho, which was in the early stages of its evolution to become an epicenter for artists, many of them very famous—Keith Haring, David Hockney, the list is incredible of the people that were living in Soho during this period.  I went down there; on West Broadway there were very few artists, and I was one of them. I would be standing there all dressed, and people would be walking up and down the street. It was the most incredible way for them to find out if I was marketing what I had on my lapel. People would walk by, they'd see this guy with a fedora all in black, wearing a box, and they'd be curious. “What's he wearing?” They'd come up. They wanted to ask me a about them and how much they were. They would say, “I'll take that one, that one and that one,” and that used to happen to me constantly. I never could make enough. The thousands I had made that never got sold in department stores were being sold like crazy on the streets of Soho. I started to get a reputation as the box man. One of the clients that bought from me called me the box man. There were times I would go down to Soho in the early morning on Saturday or Sunday, and there were people milling around where I would stand, waiting for me. They would go, “Here comes the box man.” It was crazy.  Among all those people, some of the people that stopped and looked at my work were people like David Hockney. David Hockney actually came up to me one day, after a lot of people walked away buying my stuff, and he was looking at them real close up. He started talking to me and giving me suggestions about what I could do with them and how I could display them. He said, “You've got this little box. Where are you going to put it? Maybe you should put it in something, like a frame?” That was the most incredibly brilliant selling idea for my boxes. What I did with the frame idea, when I figured out how to do it—there are many of them behind me; they're all frames. The idea was that you can wear it, but you can also put it on your wall, and your wall can wear your art. I made it so the frame had an opening in it that the box sat inside of. If you're going out to an opening or a fashion show or something like that, “I think tonight I'll wear one of the Marc Cohens.” That was the idea, and that took off like crazy from there.  I have to also tell you I didn't have any agents. I didn't have a rep or anything like that. The only rep I had was Marc Cohen. So, it was a cool journey through art. I evolved the idea of being an artist selling on the street, where I just had an easel, to having a pushcart. It was like immigrants coming to America way, way back, my family being some of them that went to Philadelphia. My great, great grandmother, she had a pushcart on South Street in Philadelphia. It's another part of the story of jewelry. It bridged into me getting even more known.  I went back to California where I grew up. I found that in Santa Monica, they had a promenade they were developing. They actually had people with carts they rented they would put out on the promenade. I found out I could rent carts, so I rented one and came up with this idea. It actually came from people on the street. People would walk by and say, “Wow, you're like a tiny gallery with all your art.” I came up with this name, the World's Smallest Art Gallery. I took the cart and turned it into a miniature to scale, like if you went into a gallery, but it was open to the people to see it from all different sides. I had walls and characters that were larger than the ones in my boxes. They were standing looking at the art. It was all on that level; it was very interactive. People would walk by, and there would be a lot of celebrities all the time on the street. Suddenly, not only was it regular people buying work, not only David Hockney, but very famous people in Hollywood. Along the way, I reconnected with a friend of mine who was very famous, Paula Wagner. She's now very famous for being a producer with Tom Cruise; they had a company called Cruise Wagner. She's a friend of mine from all the way back to the “Lenny” days. We rekindled our friendship in LA. She knows everybody in Hollywood, and once she saw my work, she flipped out and said, “We've got to do something with this.” She hired me, and the first thing I did for her was wearable box art in a frame. It was for Oliver Stone.  Sharon: I'm sorry, who it was for? I didn't hear. Marc: Oliver Stone the director. Sharon: Oliver Stone, oh wow!  Marc: She also represented Val Kilmer and Tom Cruise and Demi Moore. Before you know it, she's asking me if I can make a box for this person, on and on. The biggest thing for me at the time was Madonna. I knew Madonna from a long time ago. When I say I knew her, I lived in New York in the early 70s and 80s, and I used to go to all these clubs. I would go to this one called Danceteria. At the time, Madonna was a coat check girl there, and eventually she did a show there, which I saw with a bunch of my friends. Then she went on to do whatever she wanted on her own.  Somehow or another, a friend of hers bought one my pieces to give to her as a gift, but this is the best part of it. I didn't know this until much later on. One night in LA, I went to this private photo exhibition; it was a photographer who had done all the photography for Rudi Gernreich, the fashion designer with those bathing suits. I'm going to the exhibition with friends. I had my box on my lapel. I'm walking around and it's a tiny, little gallery, so people don't follow each other—everybody goes wherever they're going. A bunch of people are coming that way and we're walking, walking, walking. We come to this one, most famous photograph of a topless model. I'm looking at photograph, and standing next to me is Madonna. I turn and right away, she looks at me and goes, “I have one of those boxes.” I said, “I'm the artist. I made it,” and she said to me, “I Iove that box and I have it right by my bed,” and I said, “Oh, how cool.” She asked me a few questions and I filled her in on my background. I didn't bring up the fact that I remember her from Danceteria.  Then it was like an avalanche. I got picked up by Maxfield's Clothing Store in LA when I started the frames. Everybody saw how cool it is as an art piece, but you can wear it. Maxfield loved what I was doing, and he took me on and carried my stuff in his store. This is another amazing thing: the dresser for Arsenio Hall was in the store one day buying things for him to wear on the show. I don't know whether it was a man or a woman, but they bought an outfit for Arsenio, and the salesperson said, “We just got this new wearable art piece in. You've got to see this.” They looked at it and bought one. That night on the Arsenio Hall Show—if you ever watch his talk show, there's intro music, and then the curtain goes away and he stands there; it's Arsenio Hall. On that particular night, he's standing there, wearing a collarless Armani suit, and on his jacket is a square.  From a distance you can't tell what it is. I found out this afterwards. I got the tape. It was amazing; he didn't himself know what it really was, but he came out and the camera zooms up on him. When I saw what the box was, I got a chill. It was a period where I started to not just do people standing in the box, looking at the image or looking out away from the image; it was a period where I was putting images up against the face, so it would be a three-dimensional idea. In this particular one, it was Martin Luther King. I had done part of his face in profile in the foreground, and then I had done some backdrop. It had something to do about racial issues.  I didn't just make cutesy box art. I really am not about cutesy box art. I'm very passionate about a lot of things in life. I'm very political about certain things, and I want people to have an opportunity to talk with each other about things that are meaningful, particularly where we live these days. It's important to have that doorway of how people get through it and interact with each other without being sensitive and thinking you're going to be judged by whatever they say or do. We are in a period where people have to be careful about that. So, it amazes me that this tool—because it is a tool—is, in a way, much different than things made by other jewelry designers that Lisa Berman curates or represents. That is mostly what Lisa represents, like Robert Lee Morris. I knew Robert Lee Morris personally. He's a genius and he's a friend. Thomas Mann is one of my closest friends. I'm friends with others as well because of how we interact with each other.  The image is what it's about. It's how the characters are placed within the box. Along the way, I started thinking, “I want to get out even more than what I've done. I want to try to make work even more original.” We live in a period where they have this thing called a 3D printer. It prints pretty much anything. I can create a series of my own characters, which is something I always wanted to do. I've only just started doing this. I started developing this idea, where I custom make three-dimensional boxes on this scale and a much larger scale. That's where I'm headed. I have lots of collectors. They would be more than happy if I started making little box art again. My newest work is much larger. I make boxes now that are 20 feet big, installation pieces.  Sharon: They're hard to wear. Marc: They're hard to wear, right? I know your program is primarily about jewelry. The thing about that, though, is what I am planning to do. When I do have that exhibition, the large-scale Marc Cohen box art exhibition, I will have miniatures of that exhibition, like many other people do when they market things. The Van Gogh Experience—I don't know if you've seen this, but there's a thing on the road right now that's video mapping Van Gogh's paintings on a building. When you go to the gift shop, they've marketed Van Gogh's work to death. I would do something similar as a collectable.  I had Sotheby's in London; they heard about me through our people in Israel. I was invited to do this big exhibition at Sotheby's. It's a big auction and a silent auction. I got commissioned to make three boxes with lights. There weren't any more wearable, but I did that, and it sold for the equivalent to $10,000. Suddenly, my prices are changing. The people that bought my boxes on the street from the beginning—it's embarrassing to say—but when I first started selling them, my boxes were $20. They're no longer $20. They have been selling at auction for a lot more than $20. Now there's talk about me in way that I never, ever imagined, and it's joyful. After 40 years of doing nothing but making boxes, I don't know what— This is part 1 of a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week! Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

First Class Fatherhood
#540 James Patterson

First Class Fatherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 30:29


Episode 540 James Patterson is a First Class Father and Legendary Author. His enduring fictional characters and series include Alex Cross, the Women's Murder Club, Michael Bennett, Maximum Ride, Middle School, and Ali Cross. His books have sold more than 300 million copies. He has received many accolades for his works including the 2019 National Humanities Medal. The National Book Foundation presented him with the Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community, and he is also the recipient of an Edgar Award and nine Emmy Awards. He is the World's Best Selling Author. In this Episode, James shares his Fatherhood journey which includes his son Jack. He discusses the importance of kids learning to read and how parents can get their kids interested in reading. He talks about his new book “E.R. Nurses: True Stories from America's Greatest Unsung Heroes”. He gives advice for parents of kids who want to become writers. He offers some great advice for new or about to be Dads and more! E.R. Nurses: True Stories from America's Greatest Unsung Heroes - https://www.amazon.com/R-Nurses-Stories-Americas-Greatest/dp/0316301078 Subscribe to First Class Fatherhood and watch on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCD6cjYptutjJWYlM0Kk6cQ?sub_confirmation=1 SPONSORS: DML CBD - https://dmlcbd.com Promo Code: Father SeatGeek - https://seatgeek.com Promo Code: FirstClass Save: $20 off tickets MY PILLOW - https://www.mypillow.com Promo Code: Fatherhood Save Up To 66% Off 1-800-875-0219 More Ways To Listen - https://linktr.ee/alec_lace First Class Fatherhood Merch - https://shop.spreadshirt.com/first-class-fatherhood-/we+are+not+babysitters-A5d09ea872051763ad613ec8e?productType=812&sellable=3017x1aBoNI8jJe83pw5-812-7&appearance=1 Follow me on instagram - https://instagram.com/alec_lace?igshid=ebfecg0yvbap For information about becoming a Sponsor of First Class Fatherhood please hit me with an email: FirstClassFatherhood@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alec-lace/support

Purple Pen Podcast
PPP123 - Hyperbaric Medicine with Conjoint Professor Michael Bennett AM

Purple Pen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 58:01


Kristin caught up with Conjoint Professor Michael Bennett AM (Academic Head, Wales Anaesthesia and Dept. Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine Prince of Wales Clinical School) to discuss Hyperbaric Medicine. It is used to treat decompression illness, carbon monoxide poisoning, necrotising infections, soft tissue & bony radiation injury and chronic non healing wounds.

Morning  Juice
Morning Juice September 24, 2021

Morning Juice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 126:03


It's a Football Friday! We previewed the Ohio State/Akron game...the Buckeyes have a new starter at Quarterback tomorrow...former OSU defensive lineman Michael Bennett took a look at some of the things ailing the Buckeye defense...and Austin Ward of Lettermen Row joined our OSU discussion.

Fire Theft Radio
FTR 59: Two Masters with Dr. Future

Fire Theft Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 117:04


“No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other." (Mat 6:24) In this episode Dr. Michael Bennett or as he is better known by Dr. Future the host of Future Quake is with us today. We talk about his new book "Two Masters and Two Gospels Volume 1". This episode is going to flip some wigs! Chuck and Dr. Future talk about Christians and current day politics and how Christians have been serving two masters as of late. So, sit back and get ready to get your wigs flipped! Show Notes: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/two-masters-and-two-gospels-volume-1-j-michael-bennett/1136786287 https://twospiesreport.wordpress.com/  

I AM Athlete Podcast
NICK YOUNG | If I Feel Like I Need To Cry, I'm Going To Cry

I AM Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 57:32


I Am Athlete LA is a newly expanded series of the successful franchise, I Am Athlete Podcast, that is filmed in Los Angeles, California. I Am Athlete LA, short for IAA LA, is hosted by former NBA and NFL players Nick Young, Brandon Jennings, Michael Bennett, Duke Ihenacho, and led by successful entrepreneur, Keenan Beasley. These public figures are all stars whether on the field, on the court, in business, and behind the mic. This crew covers popular, controversial, and relatable topics surrounding culture, entertainment, business, and sports, with an LA twist. Through their discussions and viewpoints, they all convey they are much bigger than an “athlete.” IAA LA Season 1: Episode 4Keenan, Nick, Brandon, Michael and Duke start off episode 4 with a mental check-in on one another. The L.A crew also discuss betting on themselves and reveal where their source of confidence grew from. The cast go on to share their perspectives on topics like expressing emotions, masculinity and being vulnerable as an athlete, husband and father. Chef Alex cooks up barbeque shrimp po'boys and discuss her passion and her journey to chasing her dreams. I Am Athlete LA is filmed at @SuperVinylUSA in West Hollywood, CA. I Am Athlete LA theme music provided by @NovaDuffy.MusicI AM ATHLETE:Official Site: https://iamathletetv.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/iamathlete  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamathletep...HOUSE OF ATHLETE:Official Site: https://houseofathlete.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thehouseofa... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/houseofathlete  For I Am Athlete merchandise and apparel, visit https://houseofathlete.com/apparel#IAALA#IAMATHLETE#BrandonMarshall#NickYoung#SwaggyP #BrandonJennings#MichaelBennett #KeenanBeasley#MoreThanAPodcast

I AM Athlete Podcast
NBA vs NFL: WHO CONTROLS THE CULTURE? | I AM ATHLETE LA

I AM Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 40:55


I Am Athlete LA is a newly expanded series of the successful franchise, I Am Athlete Podcast, that is filmed in Los Angeles, California. I Am Athlete LA, short for IAA LA, is hosted by former NBA and NFL players Nick Young, Brandon Jennings, Michael Bennett, Duke Ihenacho, and led by successful entrepreneur, Keenan Beasley. These public figures are all stars whether on the field, on the court, in business, and behind the mic. This crew covers popular, controversial, and relatable topics surrounding culture, entertainment, business, and sports, with an LA twist. Through their discussions and viewpoints, they all convey they are much bigger than an “athlete.” IAA LA Season 1: Episode 3The LA Crew is back in Episode 3 and go head to head on topics surrounding the NBA and NFL. The crew discuss who is best dress to who is more responsible for shaping the current culture. Chef Alex serves up a tasty seafood gumbo dish while educating the cast on the holy trinity. Brandon Jennings goes on to explain how he is making NFT's work for him and his brand. I Am Athlete LA is filmed at @SuperVinylUSA in West Hollywood, CA. I Am Athlete LA theme music provided by @NovaDuffy.MusicI AM ATHLETE:Official Site: https://iamathletetv.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/iamathlete  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamathletep...HOUSE OF ATHLETE:Official Site: https://houseofathlete.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thehouseofa... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/houseofathlete  For I Am Athlete merchandise and apparel, visit https://houseofathlete.com/apparel/i-...#IAALA#IAMATHLETE#BrandonMarshall#NickYoung#SwaggyP #BrandonJennings#MichaelBennett #KeenanBeasley#MoreThanAPodcast

UGA Football Live with J.C. Shelton
JT Daniels, UAB Preview and Michael Bennett

UGA Football Live with J.C. Shelton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 40:19


J.C. breaks down the news regarding star Georgia QB J.T. Daniels' injury, previews the Dawgs' upcoming game versus UAB and is joined by special guest, former Georgia receiver Michael Bennett to talk his time in Athens and what to look for in UGA's receiver room . 

I AM Athlete Podcast
Nick Young: I Always Loved Her, I Knew I Would Always Come Back To Her | I AM ATHLETE LA

I AM Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 42:00


I Am Athlete LA is a newly expanded series of the successful franchise. The I Am Athlete LA Podcast is filmed in Los Angeles, California. IAA LA, short for I Am Athlete LA, is hosted by former NBA and NFL players Nick Young, Brandon Jennings, Michael Bennett, Duke Ihenacho, and led by successful entrepreneur Keenan Beasley. These public figures are all-stars on the field, on the court, in business, and behind the mic. This crew covers popular, controversial, and relatable topics surrounding culture, entertainment, business, and sports, with an LA twist. Through their discussions and viewpoints, they all convey they are much bigger than an “athlete.” IAA LA Season 1: Episode 2Nick, Brandon, Michael, Duke, and Keenan kickoff episode 2 by discussing whether or not they would allow their kids to play football and why. While most of the cast used sports as an outlet while growing up, discussions grew as they tackled topics surrounding parenting children who don't play sports for the same reasons as they did. Conversations then take a turn even more as the cast gives their opinions on the best ways to prioritize marriage and relationships as an athlete. Get ready for another episode of thought-provoking and in-depth conversations from our new LA Crew's perspectives.I Am Athlete LA is filmed at @SuperVinylUSA in West Hollywood, CA. I Am Athlete LA theme music provided by @NovaDuffy.Music.I AM ATHLETE:Official Site: https://iamathletetv.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/iamathlete  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamathletep...For I Am Athlete merchandise and apparel, visit https://houseofathlete.com/apparel/i-...#IAALA#IAMATHLETE#BrandonMarshall#NickYoung#SwaggyP #BrandonJennings#MichaelBennett #KeenanBeasley#ChefAlex#MoreThanAPodcast

I AM Athlete Podcast
Mental Health, Relationships and Vaccines | I AM ATHLETE LA Ep.1

I AM Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 42:07


I Am Athlete LA is a newly expanded series of the successful franchise, I Am Athlete Podcast, that is filmed in Los Angeles, California. I Am Athlete LA, short for IAA LA, is hosted by former NBA and NFL players Nick Young, Brandon Jennings, Michael Bennett, Duke Ihenacho, and led by successful entrepreneur, Keenan Beasley. These public figures are all stars whether on the field, on the court, in business, and behind the mic. This crew covers popular, controversial, and relatable topics surrounding culture, entertainment, business, and sports, with an LA twist. Through their discussions and viewpoints, they all convey they are much bigger than an “athlete.” IAA LA Season 1: Episode 1The West Coast Boys have a lot to talk about and the Season premier of I Am Athlete LA covers multiple popular topics and heated controversies. Nick, Brandon, Michael, Duke, and Keenan Beasley do more than carry the torch from the Miami OG IAA crew with elevated conversations around mental health, vaccines, relationships, and Kobe Bryant's impact on sports and family.  Stay tuned for the thought provoking and in-depth conversations from our new LA athlete's perspectives. I AM ATHLETE:Official Site: https://iamathletetv.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/iamathlete  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamathletep... For I Am Athlete merchandise and apparel, visit https://houseofathlete.com/apparel/i-...Use code [ IAALA ] for 25% OFF sitewide on www.HouseofAthlete.com (Expires 8/31)

William Ramsey Investigates
Author J. Michael Bennett discusses his book Two Masters and Two Gospels, vol. 1, session number 3

William Ramsey Investigates

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 70:50


Author J. Michael Bennett discusses his book Two Masters and Two Gospels, vol. 1, session number 3: The Fascist Era in Christian Media. https://www.amazon.com/Two-Masters-Gospels-Teaching-Pharisees/dp/1952249007/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=two+masters+two+gospels&qid=1629505215&sr=8-1 https://twospiesreport.wordpress.com/

MinistryWatch Podcast
Ep. 124: A Conversation With Dr. Michael Bennett

MinistryWatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 28:33


At MinistryWatch we bring you the latest in charity and philanthropy, all designed to help us become better stewards of the resources God has entrusted to us. On today's MinistryWatch Extra episode, I'm welcoming to the program, Dr. Michael Bennett. Michael Bennett has a doctorate in Mechanical Engineering, and he spent most of his career as a Defense Department scientist and high-tech inventor and entrepreneur.  But in recent years he has turned his attention to writing thoughtful, deeply researched, and provocative books about the evangelical movement.  His latest book is Two Masters and Two Gospels, and he takes aim at talk radio and cable news – including Christian talk. The producers for today's program are Rich Roszel and Steve Gandy.   We get database and other technical support from Cathy Goddard, Stephen DuBarry, and Casey Sudduth. May God bless you.

Just The Cats
2021-08-11-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 39:24


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Coach Stoop's comments after practice yesterday, the best player nicknames in SEC history, and all the latest news.

Peter Boyles Show Podcast
Peter Boyles August 10 7am

Peter Boyles Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 41:29


Peter Boyles is on his spiritual journey to Sturgis and we have Jimmy Sengenberger fill in.  We start the hour with the leadership of the Colorado Republican Party, Krsiti Burton Brown, and Pricilla Rahn.  They talk about the newly released Commitment 2 Colorado.  Then we check in with newly announced Senatorial Candidate, Eli Bremer and why he thinks he can unseat Michael Bennett.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Just The Cats
2021-08-10-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 39:35


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk MLB's Field Of Dreams game and which sports movie you would like to have made a cameo in.

Just The Cats
2021-08-09-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 39:29


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk UK Football Media Day, Jalen Duren picks Memphis, and a 30mph Major League Baseball pitch.

Fringe Radio Network
DOCTOR FUTURE! pt2 - WILLIAM RAMSEY WEEK ON FRN!

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 66:59


Author J. Michael Bennett returns to discuss Two Masters and Two Gospels, Volume 1, Part 2.Two Masters and Two Gospels, vol. 1The Teaching of Jesus Vs. the “Leaven of the Pharisees” in Talk Radio and Cable NewsJ. Michael Bennett, Ph.D, pub. 2020. 7 years of FutureQuake as Doctor Future, www.futurequake.com He is a contributing author of the books How to Overcome the Most Frightening Issues You Will Face This Century and Pandemonium's Engine (both of Defender Publishing) He was a researcher and on-camera host of the documentary, Dark Clouds Over Elberton: The True Story of the Georgia Guidestones. He also irregularly posts his musings on his blog site dedicated to Joshua and Caleb and other “minority views” of God's people, “The Two Spies Report” (www.twospiesreport.wordpress.com), and also hosts a site (www.mikebennettbooks.com) dedicated to news about his published works.

Just The Cats
2021-08-05-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 39:32


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk all the latest UK sports news and an update on the $28 beer in LaGuardia Airport.

Just The Cats
2021-08-04-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 39:28


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Sydney McLaughlin's gold medal in the Olympics, Michael's basketball playing days, and a bear walks into a bar in Gatlinburg.

Just The Cats
2021-08-03-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 39:32


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Dontaie Allen's new commercial, Prince's estate releasing a new album, UofL erecting a Lamar Jackson statue and all the latest UK sports news.

Just The Cats
2021-08-02-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 39:24


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Olympics, Dontaie Allen's endorsement, ZZ Top continues to tour without Dusty Hill, and the Delta variant continues to spread.

Just The Cats
2021-07-29-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 39:29


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk about the UK Football quarterback battle, Reds games blacked out, and the passing of ZZ Top's Dusty Hill.

Just The Cats
2021-07-28-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 39:28


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Jordan Anthony committed to play football at UK and Michael attends a Dan Issel Q&A.

Just The Cats
2021-07-27-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 39:32


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk UK/UofL Football rivalry, Texas and Oklahoma announce they are officially leaving the Big 12, and Shannon gets a food delivery.

Just The Cats
2021-07-26-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 39:18


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Olympics, Guardians, and Texas A&M upset that Texas could be coming to the SEC.

Just The Cats
2021-07-23-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 39:35


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk more about Oklahoma and Texas joining the SEC, signs that you are old, and the debut song of Michael's rap career.

Just The Cats
2021-07-22-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 39:38


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Oklahoma and Texas possibly joining the SEC, Dolly Parton recreates her Playboy Cover, and a woman let's "God take the wheel."

BS3 Sports & Music #XSquad
NBA Finals, Biz Markie + Our Guest Michael Bennett!

BS3 Sports & Music #XSquad

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 119:38


We talk NBA Finals, Biz Markie, Texas and Oklahoma to the SEC. Michael Bennett, host of Just The Cats, joined us to talk UK Football, Tom Brady and more.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cats-talk-wednesday/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cats-talk-wednesday/support

Just The Cats
2021-07-21-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 39:38


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk the Bucks winning the NBA Championship, SEC Media Day with Coach Stoops, and a woman breaks into a dentist office and pulls a patient's teeth.

William Ramsey Investigates
Author J. Michael Bennett returns to discuss Two Masters and Two Gospels, Volume 1, Part 2.

William Ramsey Investigates

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 64:44


Author J. Michael Bennett returns to discuss Two Masters and Two Gospels, Volume 1, Part 2. Two Masters and Two Gospels, vol. 1 The Teaching of Jesus Vs. the “Leaven of the Pharisees” in Talk Radio and Cable News J. Michael Bennett, Ph.D, pub. 2020. 7 years of FutureQuake as Doctor Future, www.futurequake.com He is a contributing author of the books How to Overcome the Most Frightening Issues You Will Face This Century and Pandemonium's Engine (both of Defender Publishing) He was a researcher and on-camera host of the documentary, Dark Clouds Over Elberton: The True Story of the Georgia Guidestones. He also irregularly posts his musings on his blog site dedicated to Joshua and Caleb and other “minority views” of God's people, “The Two Spies Report” (www.twospiesreport.wordpress.com), and also hosts a site (www.mikebennettbooks.com) dedicated to news about his published works.

Just The Cats
2021-07-20-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 39:35


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk SEC Media Days, a new SEC song, and Jeff Bezos goes to space.

Just The Cats
2021-07-19-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 39:39


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk about media predictions for UK Football this season, ZZ Top in Louisville, and Lebron James drinking tequila at Game 5 of the Bucks vs. Suns.

Just The Cats
2021-07-16-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 39:39


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk UK Basketball, Football, mac n cheese ice cream, and getting penalized for throwing the "Horns Down."

Morning  Juice
Morning Juice July 16, 2021

Morning Juice

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 123:58


Jensen Lewis was in this morning with Beam. Previewing the second half of the Indians season. Schlegs joined the show during the first hour. Colin Morikawa is lighting up The Open Championship. Bryson DeChambeau continues to make a fool of himself. Previewing the second half of the Reds season. Michael Bennett joined us in the second hour. A full-MLB second half preview. AJ Hawk joined the show in the third hour as he does every Friday.

Just The Cats
2021-07-15-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 39:36


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Kofi Cockburn staying at Illinois, Jalen Duren's top schools, and bath or shower?

Just The Cats
2021-07-14-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 39:18


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Kofi Cockburn's announcement about his announcement, NIL, and songs that sound that same.

Just The Cats
2021-07-13-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 39:37


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk MLB Homerun Derby, CJ Fredrick's injury, and Richard Branson's trip to space.

Just The Cats
2021-07-12-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 39:29


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk grown men wearing a basketball jersey, things you own but are embarrassed to admit, Shark Week, and the NBA Finals game 3.

Just The Cats
2021-07-09-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 39:36


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk Dare Rosenthal's commitment to play at UK, NBA Finals Game 2, and the UK Coaching Staff in attendance to watch Reed Sheppard play.

Just The Cats
2021-07-08-Just The Cats

Just The Cats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 39:37


Michael Bennett and Shannon The Dude talk UK Football, Madison Lilley named SEC Athlete Of The Year, UK Takeover Day on the SEC Network, and the best looking pro sports trophy.