Podcasts about Dizzy Gillespie

American jazz trumpeter

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Tempo 110
Hommage aux maitres du jazz américain

Tempo 110

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023


John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, Cole Porter, Dizzy Gillespie, Wayne Shorter... Un trio rend hommage aux monstres sacrés de l'histoire du jazz et de la musique du XXe siècle.

Wolf In Tune
#34 - Effortless Self-Mastery - Kenny Werner

Wolf In Tune

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 68:06


Kenny Werner is a world-renowned pianist, composer, teacher and author from New York. His first book, Effortless Mastery has sold over 150,000 copies. He is currently the artistic director of the Effortless Mastery Institute at the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston. Werner is a Guggenheim Fellowship Award recipient for his seminal work, No Beginning, No End, and has performed with numerous jazz greats, including Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Lovano, Chris Potter, Ron Carter, John Scofield, Jack DeJohnette and Toots Thielemans. In this enlightening episode, Kenny shares his path to the concept of effortless self-mastery to lift musicians and artists to their highest level of performance. Richard and Kenny talk about Kenny's time in rehab with a bonafide hitman, learning to stop questioning how you sound when playing your instrument, and how to let go of  your expectations along with much more. This is a packed episode with great mind and body concepts and insightful meditative practices to better performance and life.   LINKS:   Website :  https://kennywerner.com/  Stay in touch :  http://eepurl.com/hveRMf  Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/effortlessmastery/ Video:  https://youtu.be/k-gpIIFUjYs  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBnYgcmSJG8     Follow us on Instagram @WolfInTune  https://www.richardwolf.net/ Read "In Tune: Music As The Bridge To Mindfulness"  https://tinyurl.com/tz67aqm  

hr2 Jazz
Jazzfacts - Zum 100. Geburtstag des Vibrafonisten Milt Jackson

hr2 Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 29:51


Der 1999 verstorbene Milt Jackson gilt bis heute als einer der bedeutendsten Vibrafonisten des Jazz und als der Musiker mit dem wärmsten Sound auf diesem metallischen Instrument. Mit dem "Modern Jazz Quartet" erlangte Jackson weltweite Berühmtheit und Anerkennung, er spielte aber auch mit Dizzy Gillespie, seinem "Entdecker", mit Thelonious Monk, Oscar Peterson, Miles Davis und vielen, vielen anderen. Am 1. Januar wäre Milt Jackson 100 Jahre alt geworden. (Sendung vom 25.1.)

My Weirdest Experience
S2 Ep 97 I Fell Asleep Backstage and Had No Choice But to Jam With the Band with Rick DellaRatta

My Weirdest Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 69:35


Having performed with everyone from Dizzy Gillespie to Paquito D' Rivera, Rick DellaRatta is now considered by many to be one of the finest Singer/Pianists performing today and one of only a handful of Jazz Artists who can make a successful musical presentation to a large audience without having to abandon the true art form of Jazz. Rick DellaRatta and Jazz for Peace™ - Considered “One of the most significant cultural events of our time!”, this Mainstream/Latin/Brazilian act has built a reputation as "One of the worlds greatest Jazz performers!" In this episode, Rick shares some of his most unique experiences performing for audiences in Rwanda, Pakistan and more. In Rwanda he actually fell asleep backstage, woke up to realize the concert was under way and had no choice but to jam with the band on stage. In Pakistan, he was taken from place to place by guides who spoke very little English. He explains how his nonprofit Jazz for Peace helps charities raise money with a unique way of email networking. We talked about helping one of my favorite charities, the Friends of Berkeley Animal Center and plans are under way to get Rick and his band down here in Charleston to play for the very first time! Watch this interview on Youtube: https://youtu.be/Eqh3jnxpAIQ Rick's links: www.rickdellaratta.com www.jazzforpeace.org www.facebook.com/JazzForPeaceGrant https://www.linkedin.com/in/rick-dellaratta-08199818/ https://twitter.com/jazzmgmt https://www.instagram.com/jazzforpeace/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/jazz-for-peace™/ Music: Creative Minds by Bensound --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/myweirdestexperience/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/myweirdestexperience/support

It's Time To Watch The Muppets

IT'S TIME TO WATCH THE MUPPETS! This week with special guest Dizzy Gillespie. Distracted rants include but are not limited to answering a tweet, Being John Malkovich, Cameron Diaz, trumpeting technique, cold reading woes, Gwen Stefani, No Doubt, wocka wocka, and much more!"Statler is sick (of the show), so Waldorf brings his wife, Astoria, to the show. Meanwhile, Inspector LaBrea of the County Environmental Department arrives backstage to monitor the noise level of the show. LaBrea tells Kermit that to keep the noise down, he has to cut the trumpets for the show. Kermit tries to keep LaBrea busy while Dizzy performs. At last, things turn out all right, because LaBrea reveals that he's a big fan of the trumpetist, and he accompanies Dizzy and the Electric Mayhem on saxophone in the closing number."Follow us:Twitter.com/ittwtmInstagram.com/ittwtm

Un Día Como Hoy
Un día como hoy 6 de enero

Un Día Como Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 7:55


Un día como hoy, 6 de enero: 1412, nace Juana de Arco. 1832, nace Gustave Doré. 1872, nace Aleksandr Skriabin. 1946, nace Syd Barrett. 1831, fallece Rodolphe Kreutzer. 1949, fallece Victor Fleming. 1993, fallece Dizzy Gillespie. 1993, fallece Rudolf Nuréyev. 1999, fallece Michel Petrucciani. Conducido por Joel Almaguer Una producción de Sala Prisma Podcast. 2023.

Les Matins Jazz
30 ans après sa mort, le souvenir tonitruant de Dizzy Gillespie

Les Matins Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 16:14


MuppeTrek
MuppeTrek - Episode 86 – Dizzy Gillespie and "The Survivor"

MuppeTrek

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 22:48


Join us on the MuppeTrek Podcast! This week on The Muppet Show: Jazz trumpet legend and giant inflatable head, Dizzy Gillespie! And Star Trek The Animated Series episode, "The Survivor." A shapeshifting alien has infiltrated the Enterprise. But to what end?!

A Play On Nerds
MuppeTrek - Episode 86 – Dizzy Gillespie and "The Survivor"

A Play On Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 22:48


Join us on the MuppeTrek Podcast! This week on The Muppet Show: Jazz trumpet legend and giant inflatable head, Dizzy Gillespie! And Star Trek The Animated Series episode, "The Survivor." A shapeshifting alien has infiltrated the Enterprise. But to what end?!

The 1937 Flood Watch Podcast
"Gee, Baby, Ain't I Good to You?"

The 1937 Flood Watch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 5:37


Don Redman — a young man from Piedmont, West Virginia, who did much to create the sound that the world came to know as big band swing — composed “Gee, Baby, Ain't I Good To You?” just as The Roaring Twenties came to a close. In fact, the song's first studio recording, featuring Don performing with McKinney's Cotton Pickers, came out just one week after the 1929 stock market crash that started the Great Depression.The crash even inspired a revision of the song. Andy Razaf's original words reflected the consumer-driven culture of the ‘20s, using expensive gifts to illustrate the depth of the narrator's sentiments. “Bought you a fur coat for Christmas and a diamond ring,” said the initial lyrics, “a big Packard coupe and everything.” Ut-oh, Packard was bankrupted and went out of business. (“Big Cadillac car” took its place in the verse.)The mid-1920s had been good for Don Redman. He was responsible for integrating the rhythmic approach of Louis Armstrong's playing into his arrangements for Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra. In 1927 Redman was wooed away from Henderson to join McKinney's Cotton Pickers, the house band at the celebrated Greystone Ballroom in Detroit.It turned out the 1930s were darn good for Don as well. The trademark of his ever-more sophisticated band arrangements was the harmony he wrote to play under the group's solos. His brass and reed sections played off each other in a titillating call-and-response pattern; one section punctuated the figures of the other, while the melody moved around to different orchestral sections and soloists. So innovative was the Don Redman style that it was to be widely imitated in jazz arrangements for decades to come.Redmond remained active in music until his death in 1964 at age 64. And while he never again lived in West Virginia, he did not forget his home state, especially Harper Ferry's Storer College, from which he graduated in 1920. His most lasting musical contribution to the institution was his composition of the “Storer College Alma Mater,” which endured throughout the school's history.Back to the Song“Gee, Baby, Ain't I Good to You?” was the first song Don Redman wrote for McKinney's Cotton Pickers, but after its 1929 release, the tune went into cold storage.More than a decade passed before the next major jazz artist recorded the song, and it turned out to be yet another West Virginian. Saxophonist Chu Berry, a Wheeling, WV, native, recorded the song in 1941 on the flip side of his rendition of “Sunny Side of the Street.” (Sadly, it would be Berry's last recording before his untimely death from an automobile accident in northern Ohio later that year.)Two years later, Don's song finally made the big time when the great Nat King Cole turned “Gee, Baby, Ain't I Good To You?” into a hit, topping the 1943 R&B charts. Around the same time, Count Basie adopted the song as a favorite, using it to showcase vocalists, including Jimmy Rushing and Joe Williams.Though modernists like Dizzy Gillespie, Art Blakely and Paul Bley also recorded the tune over the years, it was among more traditional jazz players that “Gee, Baby, Ain't I Good To You?” remains a favorite.Our Take on the TuneLast week was our first outing on this great old jazz standard.When we started it, Veezy said she wasn't sure she was familiar with it. By the time we finished it, it sounded like she wrote it herself! This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit 1937flood.substack.com

This Week in Virology
TWiV 968: A spillover waiting in the wings

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 109:19 Very Popular


TWiV reviews eukaryotic viruses recovered from ancient permafrost, a mistake made by scientists on Omicron origins, and close relatives of MERS-CoV from bats that bind ACE2 for entry into cells. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Support MicrobeTV with a Spike t-shirt (Vaccinated.us) with promo code MicrobeTV Positions with the Mosquito and Vector Control Division in Harris County Public Health (one and two) Ancient eukaryotic viruses from permafrost (bioRxiv) We made a mistake (Science) Bat MERS-like CoV bind ACE2 (Nature) Letters read on TWiV 968 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Weekly Picks Dickson – Alto Saxophone: Paul Desmond/Cannonball Adderley/Charlie Parker/Randal Despommier: Paul Desmond: Signature album: Paul Desmond:The Complete RCA Victor Recordings (1961-1965). Signature song: Take Five (Dave Brubeck Quartet). Cannonball Adderley: Signature album: The Cannonball Adderley Quintet: Mercy, Mercy, Mercy. Signature song: Mercy, Mercy, Mercy. Charlie Parker (Bird): played in many groups: Signature album: Dizzy Gillespie and His Allstars. Signature song: A Night In Tunisia; Randal Despommier: Signature album: A Midsummer Odyssey. Signature song: I Hope It's Spring For You. Brianne – How a See-Through Frog Hides its Red Blood from Predators (also covered in The Atlantic) Rich – Mindfulness in Plain English by Ven. Henepola Gunaratana Vincent – Unveiling skin macrophage dynamics explains both tattoo persistence and strenuous removal Listener Picks Rona – WKCR, FM 89.9 Columbia‘s radio station Alan – XKCD Proxy Variable Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv

Escala en París
Abraham Mansfaroll: 'Paris es una ciudad cosmopolita y aquí hago música cubana'

Escala en París

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 13:32


Un virtuoso de la música, explorador de las percusiones, gran representante de la música cubana, ese es Abraham Mansfaroll. Su más reciente proyecto lo ha llevado a colaborar con la cantante y bajista ecuatoriana Helena Recalde en su álbum 'Karishina'. A ritmo de cajas acústicas, palmadas y un endiablado ritmo de los pies, el artista cuenta su travesía musical desde Cuba hasta París. Nacido en Guantánamo y con estudios musicales en la isla, donde ganó no pocos premios, Mansfaroll recuerda que esos años no fueron fáciles: "La educación fue muy rigurosa porque tuve que hacer toda la parte clásica, estudiar el xilófono, el timbal, y luego, paralelamente, las percusiones cubanas, el batá y los tambores de la tumba francesa. Mucha exigencia pero al final el resultado es genial”. El invitado de 'Escala en París' es el creador del 'PI A PA'. Cuando se le pide definir ese ritmo sus manos entran en acción para marcar el ritmo: “Son tres sonidos, se creó en el año 1997 en la Habana, cuando hicimos una interpretación para el trompetista estadounidense Wynton Marsalis”. Instalado en Francia, Abraham Mansfaroll trabajó con un percusionista indio, uno que toca las percusiones africanas, y otro de de música brasileña para prolongar esta práctica. El artista cubano se define como “un músico curioso, que siempre está creando sorpresas” aventurándose por senderos musicales desconocidos que lo han llevado hasta la capital francesa: “París es una ciudad cosmopolita, hay espacio para todo y me dije que iba a hacer aquí música cubana. Es una utopía”. En su larga y prolífica producción, Abraham Mansfaroll rindió homenaje al gran ttrompetista Dizzy Gillespie. Igual ha compartido aventuras con innumerables artistas como otro grande la música cubana, Chucho Valdés.“Cuando hablaba con Chucho Valdés, Chucho me dijo ‘a Dizzy le debemos todo; en los años 40 ayudó a los músicos cubanos y en los 60 y 70 ayudó a Irakere' (fundado por el propio Valdés)”, recuerda Mansfaroll. También ha compartido escenario con el trompetista Ibrahim Maalouf, el cantante francés Charles Aznavour, Papa Wemba y, broche de oro, las hermanas Faez de la Casa de la Trova, de Santiago de Cuba. Y 2022 ha sido también un año prolífico con el álbum 'Karishina'. Sus percusiones acompañan a  la cantante y bajista ecuatoriana Helena Recalde.  “La música te permite contactar con todo tipo de cultura. Gracias a la música he conocido el mundo, me siento dichoso de tener la música como forma de conexión con las personas”. Cuando preguntamos a Manfa, como sus amigos conocen al percusionista cubano, si ha pensado alguna vez volver a Cuba sin dudarlo responde “claro que sí. Quisiera realizar dos grandes sueños, el primero es grabar un disco en Cuba; el segundo, hacer un viaje por Cuba a través del ritmo, compartir con el mundo y decirle Cuba es Buena Vista, Chucho Valdés, Frank Hernández, la Tumba francesa, Polo Montañez. Presentar a través del ritmo a pintores, bailarines. ¡Que la gente diga, ah!, Cuba no solo es ron, cigarro y sol. Cosas que la gente no conoce”.   #EscalaenParís también está en las redes sociales. Un programa coordinado por Florencia Valdés, realizado por Souheil Khedir, Fabien Mugneret y Vanessa Loiseau.

Escala en París
Abraham Mansfaroll: 'Paris es una ciudad cosmopolita y aquí hago música cubana'

Escala en París

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 13:32


Un virtuoso de la música, explorador de las percusiones, gran representante de la música cubana, ese es Abraham Mansfaroll. Su más reciente proyecto lo ha llevado a colaborar con la cantante y bajista ecuatoriana Helena Recalde en su álbum 'Karishina'. A ritmo de cajas acústicas, palmadas y un endiablado ritmo de los pies, el artista cuenta su travesía musical desde Cuba hasta París. Nacido en Guantánamo y con estudios musicales en la isla, donde ganó no pocos premios, Mansfaroll recuerda que esos años no fueron fáciles: "La educación fue muy rigurosa porque tuve que hacer toda la parte clásica, estudiar el xilófono, el timbal, y luego, paralelamente, las percusiones cubanas, el batá y los tambores de la tumba francesa. Mucha exigencia pero al final el resultado es genial”. El invitado de 'Escala en París' es el creador del 'PI A PA'. Cuando se le pide definir ese ritmo sus manos entran en acción para marcar el ritmo: “Son tres sonidos, se creó en el año 1997 en la Habana, cuando hicimos una interpretación para el trompetista estadounidense Wynton Marsalis”. Instalado en Francia, Abraham Mansfaroll trabajó con un percusionista indio, uno que toca las percusiones africanas, y otro de de música brasileña para prolongar esta práctica. El artista cubano se define como “un músico curioso, que siempre está creando sorpresas” aventurándose por senderos musicales desconocidos que lo han llevado hasta la capital francesa: “París es una ciudad cosmopolita, hay espacio para todo y me dije que iba a hacer aquí música cubana. Es una utopía”. En su larga y prolífica producción, Abraham Mansfaroll rindió homenaje al gran ttrompetista Dizzy Gillespie. Igual ha compartido aventuras con innumerables artistas como otro grande la música cubana, Chucho Valdés.“Cuando hablaba con Chucho Valdés, Chucho me dijo ‘a Dizzy le debemos todo; en los años 40 ayudó a los músicos cubanos y en los 60 y 70 ayudó a Irakere' (fundado por el propio Valdés)”, recuerda Mansfaroll. También ha compartido escenario con el trompetista Ibrahim Maalouf, el cantante francés Charles Aznavour, Papa Wemba y, broche de oro, las hermanas Faez de la Casa de la Trova, de Santiago de Cuba. Y 2022 ha sido también un año prolífico con el álbum 'Karishina'. Sus percusiones acompañan a  la cantante y bajista ecuatoriana Helena Recalde.  “La música te permite contactar con todo tipo de cultura. Gracias a la música he conocido el mundo, me siento dichoso de tener la música como forma de conexión con las personas”. Cuando preguntamos a Manfa, como sus amigos conocen al percusionista cubano, si ha pensado alguna vez volver a Cuba sin dudarlo responde “claro que sí. Quisiera realizar dos grandes sueños, el primero es grabar un disco en Cuba; el segundo, hacer un viaje por Cuba a través del ritmo, compartir con el mundo y decirle Cuba es Buena Vista, Chucho Valdés, Frank Hernández, la Tumba francesa, Polo Montañez. Presentar a través del ritmo a pintores, bailarines. ¡Que la gente diga, ah!, Cuba no solo es ron, cigarro y sol. Cosas que la gente no conoce”.   #EscalaenParís también está en las redes sociales. Un programa coordinado por Florencia Valdés, realizado por Souheil Khedir, Fabien Mugneret y Vanessa Loiseau.

Composers Datebook
Roumain's "Ghetto Strings"

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 2:00


Synopsis From its founding in 1986 the Minneapolis Guitar Quartet has both commissioned new works and arranged old ones for their ensemble of four virtuoso guitarists. On today's date in 2001, the Quartet premiered a new commission, a suite of four pieces entitled Ghetto Strings, written by the Haitian-American composer Daniel Bernard Roumain. Daniel Bernard Roumain – or DBR as he likes to be called – was born in Skokie, Illinois, but grew up in Southern Florida, surrounded by music from Latin communities – the Bahamas, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic – as well as his own family's Haitian music. He took up violin at age five, and says he absorbed a variety of classical and contemporary music. In junior high, he formed his own rock and hip-hop band and in high school played in a jazz orchestra which brought in guests like Dizzy Gillespie and Ray Charles. He later pursued formal musical studies with mentors William Bolcom and Michael Daugherty, earning both his masters and doctoral degrees. The four movements of his Ghetto Strings evoke four places Roumain has called home at various points in his life: Harlem, Detroit, Liberty City in Miami, and Haiti. Music Played in Today's Program Daniel Bernard Roumain (b. 1970): Haiti, fr Ghetto Strings (Minneapolis Guitar Quartet) innova CD 858

Culture Gabfest
One Year 1942: The Day the Music Stopped

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 57:16


On Aug. 1, 1942, the nation's recording studios went silent. Musicians were fed up with the new technologies threatening their livelihoods, so they refused to record until they got their fair share. This week, Evan Chung explores one of the most consequential labor actions of the 20th century, and how it coincided with an underground revolution in music led by artists like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. One Year is produced by Evan Chung, Sophie Summergrad, Sam Kim, and Josh Levin. Derek John is senior supervising producer of narrative podcasts and Merritt Jacob is senior technical director. Slate Plus members get to hear more about the making of One Year. Get access to extra episodes, listen to the show without any ads, and support One Year by signing up for Slate Plus for just $15 for your first three months. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Toute une vie
Pannonica de Koenigswarter (1913-1988), la bonne étoile du jazz

Toute une vie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 58:34


durée : 00:58:34 - Toute une vie - par : Anaïs Kien - Charlie "Bird" Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Blakey, Bud Powell, Walter Davis, Sonny Clark, Lionel Hampton et bien d'autres, Pannonica de Koenigswarter les a tous soutenus. La baronne a tout envoyé valser pour donner à la musique qu'elle aime les moyens d'exister.

Peligrosamente juntos
Peligrosamente juntos - Lonnie Liston Smith - 04/12/22

Peligrosamente juntos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 59:09


Classic Jazz-Funk 1 : Definitive Jazz-Funk Luiggi Collection : Lonnie Liston Smith “Expansions” Ronnie Laws “Always There” Gil Scott-Heron “The Bottle” Donald Byrd “Change (Makes You Want To Hustle)” Wilton Felder “Inherit The Wind” Spyro Gyra “Shaker Song” Johnny Hammond “Los Conquistadores Chocolates” John Klemmer “Brasilia” Dizzy Gillespie “Unicorn” Escuchar audio

JazzPianoSkills
Special Guest, Liz Kinnon, Pt. 2

JazzPianoSkills

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 47:51 Transcription Available


Liz Kinnon (pianist/arranger/composer/educator/film coach), a native of Los Angeles, has performed all over the world with numerous artists, including Dizzy Gillespie, Andy Williams, Barbara Morrison, Sherwood Sledge, Kenia, Octavio Bailly, and Jackie Ryan.Ms. Kinnon's songwriting credits include Say Goodbye on Kenia's Love Lives On CD. Her arrangements have been featured on a variety of recordings and live performances, including The Duke Ellington Memorial Concert with legendary jazz greats Pepper Adams, Sonny Fortune, and full orchestra; strings for Sandy Graham's 2003 CD, By Request; tracks on jazz vocalist Jackie Ryan's last three CD releases and ongoing performances. In May 2007, Ms. Kinnon was commissioned to write and perform her own arrangement of Smile with Maiden Voyage (17-piece big band) at the Kennedy Center's “Tribute to Women In Jazz” and returned in 2010 for a concert to honor jazz icon Mary Lou Williams.During the 1990s, Ms. Kinnon worked as an orchestrator for Emmy award-winning composers Richard Stone, Steve Bernstein, and Tim Kelly on cartoons Animaniacs, Pinky and the Brain, and Histeria; also for composer Shirley Walker on the feature film Mystery Men. Liz went on to compose and record the scores for the documentaries The Life and Times of Jean DePaul (2005) and Nicole Wood: Cars & Beauty (2012) in Los Angeles, CA. She has worked in music preparation for hundreds of films, live performances, and television shows, including many years on the music team for the Academy Awards.As a young faculty member at the Dick Grove School of Music from 1984-1992, Ms. Kinnon taught classes in jazz theory, arranging, and piano. In 2009 she joined the faculty as Jazz Piano Instructor at the Colburn School of Performing Arts and in 2012 she helped to launch Colburn's Adult Studies program, where she is currently the Director of Adult Jazz Workshops and teaches other jazz-related classes.In 2015 Liz drew from her skills as a performer and educator to coach actor Ryan Gosling through preproduction and filming for his role as an accomplished jazz pianist in the film La La Land, for which he won the Golden Globe award for Best Actor. Since then, she has worked as a piano coach on other film projects including Lost Transmissions (Simon Pegg and Juno Temple), Covers (Dakota Johnson), Coda (Eugenio Derbez), Hollywood Stargirl (Uma Thurman and Elijah Richardson), Evolution of Nate Gibson (Hannah Riley), and Mothership.Ms. Kinnon graduated from the Composing and Arranging Program (CAP) at the Dick Grove School of Music in 1982. She returned to school in 2006 and received a Bachelor's Degree in Applied Studies with a minor in Communications from CSU Dominguez Hills in 2008. She was selected as one of five Los Angeles artists in 2010 for the prestigious Teaching Artist Training Program (TAAP) conducted by the Music Center Education Foundation.Ms. Behavin', Liz's first solo CD, was released in March 2007. Many top international artists are featured in this dynamic merging of Brazilian, Latin, and bebop jazz.Support the show

JazzPianoSkills
Special Guest, Liz Kinnon

JazzPianoSkills

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 49:54 Transcription Available


Liz Kinnon (pianist/arranger/composer/educator/film coach), a native of Los Angeles, has performed all over the world with numerous artists, including Dizzy Gillespie, Andy Williams, Barbara Morrison, Sherwood Sledge, Kenia, Octavio Bailly, and Jackie Ryan.Ms. Kinnon's songwriting credits include Say Goodbye on Kenia's Love Lives On CD. Her arrangements have been featured on a variety of recordings and live performances, including The Duke Ellington Memorial Concert with legendary jazz greats Pepper Adams, Sonny Fortune, and full orchestra; strings for Sandy Graham's 2003 CD, By Request; tracks on jazz vocalist Jackie Ryan's last three CD releases and ongoing performances. In May 2007, Ms. Kinnon was commissioned to write and perform her own arrangement of Smile with Maiden Voyage (17-piece big band) at the Kennedy Center's “Tribute to Women In Jazz” and returned in 2010 for a concert to honor jazz icon Mary Lou Williams.During the 1990s, Ms. Kinnon worked as an orchestrator for Emmy award-winning composers Richard Stone, Steve Bernstein, and Tim Kelly on cartoons Animaniacs, Pinky and the Brain, and Histeria; also for composer Shirley Walker on the feature film Mystery Men. Liz went on to compose and record the scores for the documentaries The Life and Times of Jean DePaul (2005) and Nicole Wood: Cars & Beauty (2012) in Los Angeles, CA. She has worked in music preparation for hundreds of films, live performances, and television shows, including many years on the music team for the Academy Awards.As a young faculty member at the Dick Grove School of Music from 1984-1992, Ms. Kinnon taught classes in jazz theory, arranging, and piano. In 2009 she joined the faculty as Jazz Piano Instructor at the Colburn School of Performing Arts and in 2012 she helped to launch Colburn's Adult Studies program, where she is currently the Director of Adult Jazz Workshops and teaches other jazz-related classes.In 2015 Liz drew from her skills as a performer and educator to coach actor Ryan Gosling through preproduction and filming for his role as an accomplished jazz pianist in the film La La Land, for which he won the Golden Globe award for Best Actor. Since then, she has worked as a piano coach on other film projects including Lost Transmissions (Simon Pegg and Juno Temple), Covers (Dakota Johnson), Coda (Eugenio Derbez), Hollywood Stargirl (Uma Thurman and Elijah Richardson), Evolution of Nate Gibson (Hannah Riley), and Mothership.Ms. Kinnon graduated from the Composing and Arranging Program (CAP) at the Dick Grove School of Music in 1982. She returned to school in 2006 and received a Bachelor's Degree in Applied Studies with a minor in Communications from CSU Dominguez Hills in 2008. She was selected as one of five Los Angeles artists in 2010 for the prestigious Teaching Artist Training Program (TAAP) conducted by the Music Center Education Foundation.Ms. Behavin', Liz's first solo CD, was released in March 2007. Many top international artists are featured in this dynamic merging of Brazilian, Latin, and bebop jazz.Support the show

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock is Lit: Jennifer Haupt, Author of 'Come As You Are'

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 71:36


Jennifer Haupt is here to talk about her new novel, ‘Come As You Are'. Set against a backdrop of Seattle in the early '90s, ‘Come As You Are' is a compelling love story and family drama that addresses the question: Can we alter our dreams and stories from the past to create a better future for our children?In the second half of the show, we're joined by two giants of the real Seattle grunge world: music journalist Charles R. Cross, author of the award-winning 2001 biography on Kurt Cobain, ‘Heavier Than Heaven', and Nabil Ayers, co-founder of Seattle's iconic Sonic Boom Records store and author of the new memoir ‘My Life in the Sunshine'. Charles and Nabil share their memories of and insight into that pivotal moment in music history. Jennifer:The significance of the title and Nirvana, particularly Kurt Cobain, in the novelHow Jennifer depicted drug addiction, anxiety, and grief in the storyThe death of Jennifer's own sister and how that informed the novelWhat music, especially the music of Nirvana, means to the main charactersMusic as a religion; Kurt Cobain as a god-figure in the novelJennifer's brush with celebrities: Dizzy Gillespie, author Wally LambHow seeing live music helps disparate people bondWhat “Smells Like Teen Spirit” means to Jennifer CharlesThe difference between Kurt Cobain's public and private personas and his attitude toward fameKurt's struggles with drug addiction, mental illness, and gastrointestinal problemsKurt's family history of suicide and his own many suicide attemptsHow Charles found out Kurt had diedWhy the ‘Nevermind' album is greatWhy naysayers of Nirvana should listen to their MTV Unplugged performanceWhen Charles first heard “Smells Like Teen Spirit”The genius of Nirvana's music and their impact on the culture NabilNabil's new memoir, ‘My Life in the Sunshine', about trying to connect with his father, funk, soul, and jazz legend Roy AyersSeattle in the early 1990s: music, record stores, clubs, atmosphere in general at that time (“Everyone here just looks like they're in a band”)Sub Pop RecordsBands Nabil saw play live in Seattle clubs that became grunge legends, like Mudhoney, Alice in Chains, Soundgarden, NirvanaTales of when Eddie Vedder and Chris Cornell used to shop at the record store where Nabil workedOK Hotel Nirvana show Nabil saw when Nirvana played “Smells Like Teen Spirit” for the first timeOpening Sonic Boom Records in Seattle in the ‘90s and interacting with the many great bands that frequented and played at the store Listen to the episode then migrate to the Rock is Lit Vault for the uncut interview with Charles R. Cross and outtakes from the Jennifer Haupt and Nabil Ayers interviews: https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/rockislit MUSIC AND MEDIA THAT APPEAR IN THE EPISODE IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:“Come As You Are” by Nirvana (instrumental)“Piggy” by Nine Inch Nails“Hurt” by Oliver Tree“About a Girl” by Nirvana“Come As You Are” by Nirvana“Heart-Shaped Box” by Nirvana“Smells Like Teen Spirit” by Nirvana“Jesus Doesn't Want Me for a Sunbeam” by Nirvana“Something in the Way” by Nirvana“I Hate Myself and Want to Die” by NirvanaAudio clip of Kurt Cobain talking about his stomach problems, drug use, suicidal thoughts“Smells Like Teen Spirit” by Nirvana (Kurt solo), MTV Unplugged“All Apologies” by Nirvana“Smells Like Teen Spirit” live at the OK Hotel, 17 April 1991Clip of Michael Stipe inducting Nirvana into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2014LINKS: Jennifer's website, https://www.jenniferhaupt.com/Jennifer on Twitter, @Jennifer­­_HauptJennifer on Instagram, @jenniferhauptauthor Charles' website, https://charlesrcross.com/Charles on Twitter, @charlesrcross  Nabil's website, https://www.nabilayers.com/Nabil on Twitter, @nabilayersNabil on Instagram, @nabilayers Link to Nabil's ‘Rolling Stone' article on Nirvana's OK Hotel show, “The Night Nirvana Changed Everything,” https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/nirvana-smells-like-teen-spirit-first-performance-1154128/ Link to Nabil's ‘The Stranger' article on Soundgarden, https://www.thestranger.com/music/2017/05/18/25153388/soundgarden-will-never-be-the-first-seattle-band-anyone-mentions-but-for-me-soundgarden-was-the-first-band-that-changed-everything Christy Alexander Hallberg's website, https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/Christy Alexander Hallberg on Instagram, @christyhallberg Christy Alexander Hallberg on Twitter,  @ChristyHallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg on YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfSnRmlL5moSQYi6EjSvqagRock is Lit Vault, https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/rockislit

Slate Presents: Charged | A True Punishment Story
1942: The Day the Music Stopped

Slate Presents: Charged | A True Punishment Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 57:16


On Aug. 1, 1942, the nation's recording studios went silent. Musicians were fed up with the new technologies threatening their livelihoods, so they refused to record until they got their fair share. This week, Evan Chung explores one of the most consequential labor actions of the 20th century, and how it coincided with an underground revolution in music led by artists like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. One Year is produced by Evan Chung, Sophie Summergrad, Sam Kim, and Josh Levin. Derek John is senior supervising producer of narrative podcasts and Merritt Jacob is senior technical director. Slate Plus members get to hear more about the making of One Year. Get access to extra episodes, listen to the show without any ads, and support One Year by signing up for Slate Plus for just $15 for your first three months. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Encore Houston
Encore Houston, Episode 190: Houston Jazz Collective – Jalen Baker Group

Encore Houston

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 69:31


On this episode of Encore Houston, Kinder HSPVA graduate Jalen Baker and other young jazz artists perform for the Houston Jazz Collective, presenting some original works and a few classics featuring jazz vibraphone. Music in this episode: SAM RIVERS: Cyclic Episode JALEN BAKER: Healing BAKER: Don't shoot BAKER: Praise BAKER: We Regret to Inform you BAKER: Obey/Disobey OSCAR PETTIFORD: Blues in the Closet DIZZY GILLESPIE: Bebop Jalen Baker, vibraphone Gavin Moolchan, drums Sam Reid, piano Corey Dozier, bass Performance date: 3/21/2021 Originally aired: 10/29/2022 New episodes of Encore Houston air Saturdays at 10 PM, with a repeat broadcast Sundays at 4 PM, all on Houston Public Media Classical.

One Year
1942: The Day the Music Stopped

One Year

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 57:16 Very Popular


On Aug. 1, 1942, the nation's recording studios went silent. Musicians were fed up with the new technologies threatening their livelihoods, so they refused to record until they got their fair share. This week, Evan Chung explores one of the most consequential labor actions of the 20th century, and how it coincided with an underground revolution in music led by artists like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. One Year is produced by Evan Chung, Sophie Summergrad, Sam Kim, and Josh Levin. Derek John is senior supervising producer of narrative podcasts and Merritt Jacob is senior technical director. Slate Plus members get to hear more about the making of One Year. Get access to extra episodes, listen to the show without any ads, and support One Year by signing up for Slate Plus for just $15 for your first three months. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slow Burn
One Year: 1942 - The Day the Music Stopped

Slow Burn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 57:16 Very Popular


On Aug. 1, 1942, the nation's recording studios went silent. Musicians were fed up with the new technologies threatening their livelihoods, so they refused to record until they got their fair share. This week, Evan Chung explores one of the most consequential labor actions of the 20th century, and how it coincided with an underground revolution in music led by artists like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. One Year is produced by Evan Chung, Sophie Summergrad, Sam Kim, and Josh Levin. Derek John is senior supervising producer of narrative podcasts and Merritt Jacob is senior technical director. Slate Plus members get to hear more about the making of One Year. Get access to extra episodes, listen to the show without any ads, and support One Year by signing up for Slate Plus for just $15 for your first three months. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
One Year: 1942 - The Day the Music Stopped

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 57:16


On Aug. 1, 1942, the nation's recording studios went silent. Musicians were fed up with the new technologies threatening their livelihoods, so they refused to record until they got their fair share. This week, Evan Chung explores one of the most consequential labor actions of the 20th century, and how it coincided with an underground revolution in music led by artists like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. One Year is produced by Evan Chung, Sophie Summergrad, Sam Kim, and Josh Levin. Derek John is senior supervising producer of narrative podcasts and Merritt Jacob is senior technical director. Slate Plus members get to hear more about the making of One Year. Get access to extra episodes, listen to the show without any ads, and support One Year by signing up for Slate Plus for just $15 for your first three months. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rush Hour with Bernie, Blewey & Jars Catch-Up - Triple M Adelaide 104.7
DEAD SET LEGENDS: Brad Haddin, Dizzy Gillespie and biggest loss you've been involved in?

The Rush Hour with Bernie, Blewey & Jars Catch-Up - Triple M Adelaide 104.7

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 77:17


Australia v New Zealand T20 Preview Triple M Drinks Review Pat Cummins Climate Stance – Calls Special Investigation Rocky's Stuff Up! Home and Away Rusty's Motorsport Update Brad Haddin Ross Lyon back at St Kilda Scott Hodges on Rocky's Local Legends Garden Disasters Jason Gillespie Biggest loss you've been involved in? Calls See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Good
Episode 655: A major UK bank will cease funding new oil & gas, a lovely PG Wodehouse quote, cycling is on an upswing in England, the beauty of Murdoch Avenue in the Adelaide Botanic Garden, two celebrations of Dizzy Gillespie’s birthday, and mo

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 17:05


Good News: The Lloyd’s Banking company in the UK has pledged to stop funding new oil & gas projects, Link HERE. The Good Word: A really lovely quote from PG Wodehouse about real happiness. Good To Know: An amazing historical fact about women and a cross country motorcycle trip! Good News: Cycling continues to increase […]

Music History Today
Music History Today Podcast October 21 - What Happened On October 21 In Music History

Music History Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 9:30


On the October 21 edition of Music History Today podcast, Madonna pushes the envelope again, Michael Jackson organizes, & some major musicians pass away. Plus, happy birthday to Dizzy Gillespie & the Queen of Salsa, Celia Cruz. ALL MY LINKS - https://allmylinks.com/musichistorytoday --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musichistorytodaypodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/musichistorytodaypodcast/support

This Day in Quiztory
10.21_Nicci Gilbert_Musician Dizzy Gillespie

This Day in Quiztory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 1:07


#OTD Jazz musician and composer Dizzy Gillespie was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. Recording artist Nicci Gilbert celebrates his life and legacy.

History & Factoids about today
Oct 21st-Apples, Dizzy Gillespie, Kane Brown, Old Dominion, Carrie Fisher, Manfred Mann, Alfred Nobel

History & Factoids about today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 10:24


National Apple Day. Pop culture from 2014. 1st Europeans to sail in Pacific ocean, 1st U.S. troops to fight in WW1, Alec Baldwin shoots and kills crew member on movie set. Today's birthdays - Alfred Nobel, Joyce Randolph, Peter Graves, Manfred Mann, Mathew Ramsey, Carrie Fisher, Dizzy Gillespie, Kane Brown. Jack Kerouac died.

Album 4 the Day
Lee Morgan

Album 4 the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 18:03


Get the story from behind the MUSICIANS, ARTISTS, and PRODUCERS who made some of the greatest albums of all time. This episode discusses Lee Morgan- He played with some of the legends of jazz including Dizzy Gillespie, Clifford Brown, John Coltrane, Hank Mobley, Art Blakey and more. He produced 25 albums for Blue Note and sat in on MANY more. His shocking death at the age of 33 sent shock waves through the jazz community. We give a little background on his style, his life, and some of the albums he's played on in his extraordinary career. Listen to the stories behind the music! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/album4theday/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/album4theday/support

JAZZ LO SE
Jazz Lo Sé Standards: Episodio 112

JAZZ LO SE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 16:40


"I'm Through With Love" (Terminé con el amor) fue escrita en 1931 por Fud Livingston, Matty Malneck y Gus Kahn. La canción ha sido popular desde que fue escrita, con grabaciones de Nat Cole, Chet Baker, Dizzy Gillespie y Sarah Vaughan, entre muchas grabaciones. Marilyn Monroe cantó la canción en la película Some Like It Hot de 1959. Escuchamos algunas de ellas, junto a Carmen McRae, Getz, Jarret, Diana Krall, Monheit y hasta Woody Allen. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

SimplyWhy
Todd Williams: Thrivin' From a Riff

SimplyWhy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 20:08


This week Connor is joined by Jazz musician and IWU professor Todd Williams. Todd has played with bands such as the Wynton Marsalis Quartet, Septet, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra in venues ranging from Carnegie Hall to the White House. Listen in to learn how to break into the music industry, what it's like auditioning for Wynton Marsalis, and why teaching music is important. Follow Todd:Website: http://www.toddmaxmusic.com/Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/3NVHlbpleMQsgYAhWmthSW?si=zFuqTIymQUm5JBVGhAsDDgAmazon: https://www.amazon.com/music/player/albums/B0B1W9FN98?ref=sr_1_1&keywords=introducing+quartet+trio&crid=2EN8B8N0CUDM6&sprefix=introducing+quartet+trio%2Caps%2C85&qid=1664549126&sr=8-1

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

No ha habido en la música un artista más genial que Charlie Parker, un tipo tan revolucionario como caótico, que lideró la reconversión más salvaje del jazz impulsando el bebop. Charlie tocó con todos los nombres grandes de la historia del jazz, la mayoría adolescentes en esos gloriosos años cuarenta, pero Parker necesitaba a alguien a su altura, alguien que pudiese elevarlo, llevarlo a otros lugares. Ese alguien resultó ser Dizzy Gillespie, juntos coincidieron en varias ocasiones y grabaron algunos discos que son parte de la historia de la música. La relación entre Dizzy Gillespie fue larga y no resultó sencilla. Parker, un estudioso de la música, acabó preso de sus adicciones y la relación se torció. Dizzy solía viajar con un trompetista de repuesto por si Charlie no aparecía o desaparecía, pero la unión fue tan intensa y poderosa que Dizzy llegó a calificar a su socio como la otra mitad de su latido. Tras años de colaboraciones en 1952 llegó a las tiendas su último trabajo, un álbum que los juntó con Max Roach o Thelonious Monk Esta semana regresamos al jazz para recordar esta joya de dos de sus más grandes talentos, un álbum que vamos a recorrer en la compañía de Manuel Recio y con los reportajes de Lucía Taboada.

Sofá Sonoro
Bird y Dizz: la unión más salvaje del jazz

Sofá Sonoro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 34:36


No ha habido en la música un artista más genial que Charlie Parker, un tipo tan revolucionario como caótico, que lideró la reconversión más salvaje del jazz impulsando el bebop.  Charlie tocó con todos los nombres grandes de la historia del jazz, la mayoría adolescentes en esos gloriosos años cuarenta, pero Parker necesitaba a alguien a su altura, alguien que pudiese elevarlo, llevarlo a otros lugares. Ese alguien resultó ser Dizzy Gillespie, juntos coincidieron en varias ocasiones y grabaron algunos discos que son parte de la historia de la música. La relación entre Dizzy Gillespie fue larga y no resultó sencilla. Parker, un estudioso de la música, acabó preso de sus adicciones y la relación se torció. Dizzy solía viajar con un trompetista de repuesto por si Charlie no aparecía o desaparecía, pero la unión fue tan intensa y poderosa que Dizzy llegó a calificar a su socio como la otra mitad de su latido. Tras años de colaboraciones en 1952 llegó a las tiendas su último trabajo, un álbum que los juntó con Max Roach o Thelonious MonkEsta semana regresamos al jazz para recordar esta joya de dos de sus más grandes talentos, un álbum que vamos a recorrer en la compañía de Manuel Recio y con los reportajes de Lucía Taboada.

North Star Journey
Born 100 years ago and raised in Minnesota, Oscar Pettiford changed the sound of American music

North Star Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 5:39


If you've ever learned a band instrument, or know someone who has, chances are you've heard the tune "Blues in the Closet" — a signature of the bebop era. What you may not know is that its roots go back to north Minneapolis, where one of its creators grew up. And today — Friday, Sept. 30, 2022 — marks exactly 100 years since that jazz pioneer, Oscar Pettiford, was born. Pettiford music 1 Pettiford got his start on the stages of the Twin Cities, helping create a "Minneapolis sound" long before Prince — a sound that forever changed American music. He played with a who's-who of jazz greats across the U.S. and in Europe, before his untimely death. "He probably doesn't get the right amount of credit that he should," bassist Christian McBride, host of NPR's "Jazz Night in America" and a six-time Grammy winner, said of Pettiford. Courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society Oscar Pettiford, on bass, played with his brother Ira, a trumpeter, at the University of Minnesota's Coffman Union in Minneapolis in 1941, in this photo from the Minnesota Historical Society collections. "He was probably the most important bass player of that bebop generation in terms of creating new language for the bass, and playing what Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker were playing, on the bass." Pettiford was born in Oklahoma, the son of Native American and Black families. Oscar, his brother Ira, and their large, musical family soon moved to Minnesota. "They were traveling musicians, who traveled with different artists, who picked up different skills, who jumped in different bands," said Jamela Pettiford, a singer from St. Paul who still carries the family name. She also teaches theater at Battle Creek Middle School. Oscar was her grandfather's cousin. "Coming here to Minnesota, looking for a better life, of course hoping for less discrimination — and there was a music scene here. They very much were the Minneapolis sound at the time." It was Oscar who rose above the rest. Bands passing through town heard his sound, forged in the ferment of a musicians' strike in the early 1940s that all but shut down the recording industry and had musicians making a living with relentless performing and creativity. Pettiford music 2 Oscar Pettiford remembered the era with another jazz legend — radio host Leigh Kamman —in the early 1950s, captured in a recorded interview still held by the Leigh Kamman Legacy Project. "I recall one night when you had a big session with Coleman Hawkins," Kamman says in the recording. "Up in Duluth, Minnesota. Before then, it was Cab Calloway and Duke Ellington." "And you wound up with the Duke, didn't you, as a member of his rhythm section?" "Yeah, Duke Ellington, and also Coleman Hawkins." Asked by Kamman to describe his musical talents, Pettiford said: "Well, basically I'm a bass player. For kicks I play cello, for thought I play piano, and for odd moments I beat on the drums.” Courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society This undated promotional photo of Oscar Pettiford is datelined New York City, where he was a regular in the post-World War II jazz scene, often backing the likes of Miles Davis, Thelonius Monk, Earl Hines and Coleman Hawkins. Pettiford left for New York City in the 1940s and became a regular at the legendary Minton's Playhouse, the Harlem incubator of the sound that succeeded the Big Band swing era. He played with the likes of Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk. He went on to become a regular with Miles Davis and Milt Jackson. Pettiford's style would come to sound familiar to any modern ear — featuring virtuoso turns of bass in a small group and propelling the rhythm section to the front of the sound. Anthony Cox is a well-known Twin Cities bass player and student of the era. "He had, let's call it that three-dimensional style, that really wasn't examined before," Cox said. "And what I mean by that is that the bass was really starting to outline the harmonies, providing propulsion and time." But Oscar Pettiford never had the legacy of Miles Davis or even bassist Ron Carter. And there are a couple reasons for that. First, Pettiford got sick and died literally at the height of his powers. He was only 37 when, by some accounts, he contracted something like polio and died in 1960. But there's also where he died — in Copenhagen, Denmark. He'd moved to Europe, like many of the jazz greats, in the late 50s — to flee the pernicious racism that even music stars and pioneers couldn't escape. Tim Nelson | MPR News Jamela Pettiford says people still ask her family about her grandfather's cousin, legendary jazz bassist Oscar Pettiford, who moved to Minnesota as a child and became part of a legendary family music ensemble in Minneapolis before moving to New York and helping transform American music after World War II. "You do start to realize when you don't feel welcome in your own home," said Jamela Pettiford. Pictures of the era show traveling musicians sleeping in Ira Pettiford's living room in Minneapolis — likely because area hotels wouldn't give Black people a room. "And it was difficult to perform for audiences where you had to go through the back or you had to sit by the kitchen. And for Blacks, at that time, in Europe, you were welcomed with open arms," Jamela Pettiford said. And that's where Oscar Pettiford is today, buried in a grave in Denmark. There's even a street named after him in Copenhagen. There's no such formal recognition in Minnesota. But his family, and fans of his enduring music, remember him still, today, a century after he was born.

Sofá Sonoro
AVANCE | La magia de Charlie Parker y Dizzy Gillespie

Sofá Sonoro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 8:19


Esta semana dedicamos el Sofá Sonoro a recordar Dizz & Bird, el disco que estos dos genios del jazz grabaron juntos en 1952 y que fue su última colaboración juntos. Manuel Recio nos explica los motivos para hacer esta joya del jazz. 

The Kitchen Sisters Present
198 - The Real Ambassadors: Dave Brubeck, Iola Brubeck, and Louis Armstrong

The Kitchen Sisters Present

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 36:14


The story of The Real Ambassadors, a jazz musical created by Dave Brubeck and Iola Brubeck for Louis Armstrong in the 1950/60s. The original show, featured Louis Armstrong, Carmen McCrae, Dave Brubeck and Lambert Hendricks and Bavan, and was performed live only once, at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1962. This year's Monterey Jazz Festival, September 23-25, 2022, is the 60th Anniversary of the performance. The musical is based on the Jazz Ambassadors Program established by President Eisenhower and the US State Department during the Cold War as an effort to win hearts and minds around the world. Jazz musicians were sent out to represent the freedom and creativity of America through their art form. The irony is that Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie and most of the other Jazz Ambassadors were Black—they were treated like royalty around the world, but could not stay in hotels or play in integrated bands in their own country. The Brubeck's musical was a chance for Louis Armstrong to speak out about his deep feelings about racism and segregation in this country — feelings he rarely expressed publicly. The story features original music, rare archival recorded letters back and forth between the Brubecks and Louis Armstrong about the project, rehearsal recordings and interviews with Dave and Iola Brubeck. Other voices include: the Brubeck's sons, Chris and Dan Brubeck; Keith Hatschek, author of newly released book, "The Real Ambassadors;” Ricky Riccardi, Director of Research Collections for the Louis Armstrong House Museum; and singer/actress Yolande Bavan, the last surviving performer involved in the project.  The Real Ambassadors is a poignant tale of cultural exchange, anti-racism, jazz history, and it's a love story—between life-long husband and wife partners, Iola and Dave Brubeck and their vision for a better world. The Peabody Award winning Kitchen Sisters, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, have created hundreds of stories for NPR, public media and their Webby Award-winning podcast “The Kitchen Sisters Present.” Brandi Howell is a member of The Kitchen Sisters team and the producer of The Echo Chamber, a podcast about music and its social impact. The Real Ambassadors was produced by The Kitchen Sisters (Nikki Silva and Davia Nelson) and Brandi Howell in collaboration with Jackson Spenner. Mixed by Jim McKee. Thanks to Keith Hatschek, Chris, Brubeck, Dan Brubeck,  Ricky Riccardi, Yolande Bavan;  Lisa Cohen; and Wynton Marsalis.   Special thanks to: The Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation and the Louis Armstrong House Museum; Michael Bellacosa and the Brubeck Collection, Wilton Library, Wilton, Connecticut; The Complete Louis Armstrong Columbia & RCA Victor Studio Sessions 1946-66 Mosaic Records 270; The Milken Family Foundation Archive Oral History Project; and The Library of Congress. 

Sky Wave Radio Hosted By Petko Turner
Jingo (Mr. Turner Edit) Free DL As Usual

Sky Wave Radio Hosted By Petko Turner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 1:08


Candido - Jingo Here You Dance - https://hypeddit.com/mrturner/jingomrturneredit Cándido Camero Guerra Cuban-born percussionist (mainly conga and bongo) who backed many Afro-Cuban and straight-ahead jazz acts starting in the 1950s. Born April 22, 1921 in Regla (Havana), Cuba. Died November, 7, 2020 in New York, USA. He started his career as a percussionist for various groups in Havana, performing at the nightclubs and radio stations. He moved to New York in 1946 and started recording with Machito and Dizzy Gillespie. During 1953-1954 he was in the Billy Taylor quartet and in 1954 he performed and recorded with Stan Kenton. He also enjoyed some hits during the disco era, most notably with his cover of Babatunde Olatunji's classic "Jingo", which he recorded for Salsoul Records.

Jazz Focus
Ben Webster in the 1940's - recordings with Benny Carter, Tony Scott, Al Hall and Teddy Wilson

Jazz Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 56:36


Ben Webster in the 1940's - matchless tenor sax player guesting with several groups from 1944-46 . . Tony Scott (with Dizzy Gillespie, Trummy Young), Benny Carter (Buck Clayton, Sid Catlett and Al Grey), Al Hall (Dick Vance, Clyde Hart) and Teddy Wilson (Buck Clayton). --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-clark49/support

Jazz Focus
Bebop Clarinets - Hank D'Amico, Aaron Sachs, Tony Scott and Buddy DeFranco

Jazz Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 57:31


Recordings from the mid to late 1940's led by clarinet players exploring the new Bebop sounds - Hank D'Amico (with Frankie Newton and Don Byas), Tony Scott (with Dizzy Gillespie, Trummy Young and Ben Webster), Aaron Sachs (with Gene DiNovi, Tiny Kahn, Clyde Lombardi and Terry Gibbs) and Buddy DeFranco (with Teddy Charles and Harvey Leonard) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-clark49/support

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 152: “For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


Episode 152 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “For What It's Worth”, and the short but eventful career of Buffalo Springfield. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" by Glen Campbell. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, there's a Mixcloud mix containing all the songs excerpted in the episode. This four-CD box set is the definitive collection of Buffalo Springfield's work, while if you want the mono version of the second album, the stereo version of the first, and the final album as released, but no demos or outtakes, you want this more recent box set. For What It's Worth: The Story of Buffalo Springfield by Richey Furay and John Einarson is obviously Furay's version of the story, but all the more interesting for that. For information on Steve Stills' early life I used Stephen Stills: Change Partners by David Roberts.  Information on both Stills and Young comes from Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young by David Browne.  Jimmy McDonough's Shakey is the definitive biography of Neil Young, while Young's Waging Heavy Peace is his autobiography. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before we begin -- this episode deals with various disabilities. In particular, there are descriptions of epileptic seizures that come from non-medically-trained witnesses, many of whom took ableist attitudes towards the seizures. I don't know enough about epilepsy to know how accurate their descriptions and perceptions are, and I apologise if that means that by repeating some of their statements, I am inadvertently passing on myths about the condition. When I talk about this, I am talking about the after-the-fact recollections of musicians, none of them medically trained and many of them in altered states of consciousness, about events that had happened decades earlier. Please do not take anything said in a podcast about music history as being the last word on the causes or effects of epileptic seizures, rather than how those musicians remember them. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things you notice if you write about protest songs is that a lot of the time, the songs that people talk about as being important or impactful have aged very poorly. Even great songwriters like Bob Dylan or John Lennon, when writing material about the political events of the time, would write material they would later acknowledge was far from their best. Too often a song will be about a truly important event, and be powered by a real sense of outrage at injustice, but it will be overly specific, and then as soon as the immediate issue is no longer topical, the song is at best a curio. For example, the sentencing of the poet and rock band manager John Sinclair to ten years in prison for giving two joints to an undercover police officer was hugely controversial in the early seventies, but by the time John Lennon's song about it was released, Sinclair had been freed by the Supreme Court, and very, very few people would use the song as an example of why Lennon's songwriting still has lasting value: [Excerpt: John Lennon, "John Sinclair"] But there are exceptions, and those tend to be songs where rather than talking about specific headlines, the song is about the emotion that current events have caused. Ninety years on from its first success, for example, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" still has resonance, because there are still people who are put out of work through no fault of their own, and even those of us who are lucky enough to be financially comfortable have the fear that all too soon it may end, and we may end up like Al begging on the streets: [Excerpt: Rudy Vallee, "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"] And because of that emotional connection, sometimes the very best protest songs can take on new lives and new meanings, and connect with the way people feel about totally unrelated subjects. Take Buffalo Springfield's one hit. The actual subject of the song couldn't be any more trivial in the grand scheme of things -- a change in zoning regulations around the Sunset Strip that meant people under twenty-one couldn't go to the clubs after 10PM, and the subsequent reaction to that -- but because rather than talking about the specific incident, Steve Stills instead talked about the emotions that it called up, and just noted the fleeting images that he was left with, the song became adopted as an anthem by soldiers in Vietnam. Sometimes what a song says is nowhere near as important as how it says it. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth"] Steve Stills seems almost to have been destined to be a musician, although the instrument he started on, the drums, was not the one for which he would become best known. According to Stills, though, he always had an aptitude for rhythm, to the extent that he learned to tapdance almost as soon as he had learned to walk. He started on drums aged eight or nine, after somebody gave him a set of drumsticks. After his parents got sick of him damaging the furniture by playing on every available surface, an actual drum kit followed, and that became his principal instrument, even after he learned to play the guitar at military school, as his roommate owned one. As a teenager, Stills developed an idiosyncratic taste in music, helped by the record collection of his friend Michael Garcia. He didn't particularly like most of the pop music of the time, but he was a big fan of pre-war country music, Motown, girl-group music -- he especially liked the Shirelles -- and Chess blues. He was also especially enamoured of the music of Jimmy Reed, a passion he would later share with his future bandmate Neil Young: [Excerpt: Jimmy Reed, "Baby, What You Want Me To Do?"] In his early teens, he became the drummer for a band called the Radars, and while he was drumming he studied their lead guitarist, Chuck Schwin.  He said later "There was a whole little bunch of us who were into kind of a combination of all the blues guys and others including Chet Atkins, Dick Dale, and Hank Marvin: a very weird cross-section of far-out guitar players." Stills taught himself to play like those guitarists, and in particular he taught himself how to emulate Atkins' Travis-picking style, and became remarkably proficient at it. There exists a recording of him, aged sixteen, singing one of his own songs and playing finger-picked guitar, and while the song is not exactly the strongest thing I've ever heard lyrically, it's clearly the work of someone who is already a confident performer: [Excerpt: Stephen Stills, "Travellin'"] But the main reason he switched to becoming a guitarist wasn't because of his admiration for Chet Atkins or Hank Marvin, but because he started driving and discovered that if you have to load a drum kit into your car and then drive it to rehearsals and gigs you either end up bashing up your car or bashing up the drum kit. As this is not a problem with guitars, Stills decided that he'd move on from the Radars, and join a band named the Continentals as their rhythm guitarist, playing with lead guitarist Don Felder. Stills was only in the Continentals for a few months though, before being replaced by another guitarist, Bernie Leadon, and in general Stills' whole early life is one of being uprooted and moved around. His father had jobs in several different countries, and while for the majority of his time Stills was in the southern US, he also ended up spending time in Costa Rica -- and staying there as a teenager even as the rest of his family moved to El Salvador. Eventually, aged eighteen, he moved to New Orleans, where he formed a folk duo with a friend, Chris Sarns. The two had very different tastes in folk music -- Stills preferred Dylan-style singer-songwriters, while Sarns liked the clean sound of the Kingston Trio -- but they played together for several months before moving to Greenwich Village, where they performed together and separately. They were latecomers to the scene, which had already mostly ended, and many of the folk stars had already gone on to do bigger things. But Stills still saw plenty of great performers there -- Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonius Monk in the jazz clubs, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, and Richard Pryor in the comedy ones, and Simon and Garfunkel, Richie Havens, Fred Neil and Tim Hardin in the folk ones -- Stills said that other than Chet Atkins, Havens, Neil, and Hardin were the people most responsible for his guitar style. Stills was also, at this time, obsessed with Judy Collins' third album -- the album which had featured Roger McGuinn on banjo and arrangements, and which would soon provide several songs for the Byrds to cover: [Excerpt: Judy Collins, "Turn, Turn, Turn"] Judy Collins would soon become a very important figure in Stills' life, but for now she was just the singer on his favourite record. While the Greenwich Village folk scene was no longer quite what it had been a year or two earlier, it was still a great place for a young talented musician to perform. As well as working with Chris Sarns, Stills also formed a trio with his friend John Hopkins and a banjo player called Peter Tork who everyone said looked just like Stills. Tork soon headed out west to seek his fortune, and then Stills got headhunted to join the Au Go Go Singers. This was a group that was being set up in the same style as the New Christy Minstrels -- a nine-piece vocal and instrumental group that would do clean-sounding versions of currently-popular folk songs. The group were signed to Roulette Records, and recorded one album, They Call Us Au-Go-Go Singers, produced by Hugo and Luigi, the production duo we've previously seen working with everyone from the Tokens to the Isley Brothers. Much of the album is exactly the same kind of thing that a million New Christy Minstrels soundalikes were putting out -- and Stills, with his raspy voice, was clearly intended to be the Barry McGuire of this group -- but there was one exception -- a song called "High Flyin' Bird", on which Stills was able to show off the sound that would later make him famous, and which became so associated with him that even though it was written by Billy Edd Wheeler, the writer of "Jackson", even the biography of Stills I used in researching this episode credits "High Flyin' Bird" as being a Stills original: [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "High Flyin' Bird"] One of the other members of the Au-Go-Go Singers, Richie Furay, also got to sing a lead vocal on the album, on the Tom Paxton song "Where I'm Bound": [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "Where I'm Bound"] The Au-Go-Go Singers got a handful of dates around the folk scene, and Stills and Furay became friendly with another singer playing the same circuit, Gram Parsons. Parsons was one of the few people they knew who could see the value in current country music, and convinced both Stills and Furay to start paying more attention to what was coming out of Nashville and Bakersfield. But soon the Au-Go-Go Singers split up. Several venues where they might otherwise have been booked were apparently scared to book an act that was associated with Morris Levy, and also the market for big folk ensembles dried up more or less overnight when the Beatles hit the music scene. But several of the group -- including Stills but not Furay -- decided they were going to continue anyway, and formed a group called The Company, and they went on a tour of Canada. And one of the venues they played was the Fourth Dimension coffee house in Fort William, Ontario, and there their support act was a rock band called The Squires: [Excerpt: The Squires, "(I'm a Man And) I Can't Cry"] The lead guitarist of the Squires, Neil Young, had a lot in common with Stills, and they bonded instantly. Both men had parents who had split up when they were in their teens, and had a successful but rather absent father and an overbearing mother. And both had shown an interest in music even as babies. According to Young's mother, when he was still in nappies, he would pull himself up by the bars  of his playpen and try to dance every time he heard "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie": [Excerpt: Pinetop Smith, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie"] Young, though, had had one crucial experience which Stills had not had. At the age of six, he'd come down with polio, and become partially paralysed. He'd spent months in hospital before he regained his ability to walk, and the experience had also affected him in other ways. While he was recovering, he would draw pictures of trains -- other than music, his big interest, almost an obsession, was with electric train sets, and that obsession would remain with him throughout his life -- but for the first time he was drawing with his right hand rather than his left. He later said "The left-hand side got a little screwed. Feels different from the right. If I close my eyes, my left side, I really don't know where it is—but over the years I've discovered that almost one hundred percent for sure it's gonna be very close to my right side … probably to the left. That's why I started appearing to be ambidextrous, I think. Because polio affected my left side, and I think I was left-handed when I was born. What I have done is use the weak side as the dominant one because the strong side was injured." Both Young's father Scott Young -- a very famous Canadian writer and sports broadcaster, who was by all accounts as well known in Canada during his lifetime as his son -- and Scott's brother played ukulele, and they taught Neil how to play, and his first attempt at forming a group had been to get his friend Comrie Smith to get a pair of bongos and play along with him to Preston Epps' "Bongo Rock": [Excerpt: Preston Epps, "Bongo Rock"] Neil Young had liked all the usual rock and roll stars of the fifties  -- though in his personal rankings, Elvis came a distant third behind Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis -- but his tastes ran more to the more darkly emotional. He loved "Maybe" by the Chantels, saying "Raw soul—you cannot miss it. That's the real thing. She was believin' every word she was singin'." [Excerpt: The Chantels, "Maybe"] What he liked more than anything was music that had a mainstream surface but seemed slightly off-kilter. He was a major fan of Roy Orbison, saying, "it's almost impossible to comprehend the depth of that soul. It's so deep and dark it just keeps on goin' down—but it's not black. It's blue, deep blue. He's just got it. The drama. There's something sad but proud about Roy's music", and he would say similar things about Del Shannon, saying "He struck me as the ultimate dark figure—behind some Bobby Rydell exterior, y'know? “Hats Off to Larry,” “Runaway,” “Swiss Maid”—very, very inventive. The stuff was weird. Totally unaffected." More surprisingly, perhaps, he was a particular fan of Bobby Darin, who he admired so much because Darin could change styles at the drop of a hat, going from novelty rock and roll like "Splish Splash" to crooning "Mack The Knife" to singing Tim Hardin songs like "If I Were a Carpenter", without any of them seeming any less authentic. As he put it later "He just changed. He's completely different. And he's really into it. Doesn't sound like he's not there. “Dream Lover,” “Mack the Knife,” “If I Were a Carpenter,” “Queen of the Hop,” “Splish Splash”—tell me about those records, Mr. Darin. Did you write those all the same day, or what happened? He just changed so much. Just kinda went from one place to another. So it's hard to tell who Bobby Darin really was." And one record which Young was hugely influenced by was Floyd Cramer's country instrumental, "Last Date": [Excerpt: Floyd Cramer, "Last Date"] Now, that was a very important record in country music, and if you want to know more about it I strongly recommend listening to the episode of Cocaine and Rhinestones on the Nashville A-Team, which has a long section on the track, but the crucial thing to know about that track is that it's one of the earliest examples of what is known as slip-note playing, where the piano player, before hitting the correct note, briefly hits the note a tone below it, creating a brief discord. Young absolutely loved that sound, and wanted to make a sound like that on the guitar. And then, when he and his mother moved to Winnipeg after his parents' divorce, he found someone who was doing just that. It was the guitarist in a group variously known as Chad Allan and the Reflections and Chad Allan and the Expressions. That group had relatives in the UK who would send them records, and so where most Canadian bands would do covers of American hits, Chad Allan and the Reflections would do covers of British hits, like their version of Geoff Goddard's "Tribute to Buddy Holly", a song that had originally been produced by Joe Meek: [Excerpt: Chad Allan and the Reflections, "Tribute to Buddy Holly"] That would later pay off for them in a big way, when they recorded a version of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' "Shakin' All Over", for which their record label tried to create an air of mystery by releasing it with no artist name, just "Guess Who?" on the label. It became a hit, the name stuck, and they became The Guess Who: [Excerpt: The Guess Who, "Shakin' All Over"] But at this point they, and their guitarist Randy Bachman, were just another group playing around Winnipeg. Bachman, though, was hugely impressive to Neil Young for a few reasons. The first was that he really did have a playing style that was a lot like the piano style of Floyd Cramer -- Young would later say "it was Randy Bachman who did it first. Randy was the first one I ever heard do things on the guitar that reminded me of Floyd. He'd do these pulls—“darrr darrrr,” this two-note thing goin' together—harmony, with one note pulling and the other note stayin' the same." Bachman also had built the first echo unit that Young heard a guitarist play in person. He'd discovered that by playing with the recording heads on a tape recorder owned by his mother, he could replicate the tape echo that Sam Phillips had used at Sun Studios -- and once he'd attached that to his amplifier, he realised how much the resulting sound sounded like his favourite guitarist, Hank Marvin of the Shadows, another favourite of Neil Young's: [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Man of Mystery"] Young soon started looking to Bachman as something of a mentor figure, and he would learn a lot of guitar techniques second hand from Bachman -- every time a famous musician came to the area, Bachman would go along and stand right at the front and watch the guitarist, and make note of the positions their fingers were in. Then Bachman would replicate those guitar parts with the Reflections, and Neil Young would stand in front of him and make notes of where *his* fingers were. Young joined a band on the local circuit called the Esquires, but soon either quit or was fired, depending on which version of the story you choose to believe. He then formed his own rival band, the Squires, with no "e", much to the disgust of his ex-bandmates. In July 1963, five months after they formed, the  Squires released their first record, "Aurora" backed with "The Sultan", on a tiny local label. Both tracks were very obviously influenced by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Squires, "Aurora"] The Squires were a mostly-instrumental band for the first year or so they were together, and then the Beatles hit North America, and suddenly people didn't want to hear surf instrumentals and Shadows covers any more, they only wanted to hear songs that sounded a bit like the Beatles. The Squires started to work up the appropriate repertoire -- two songs that have been mentioned as in their set at this point are the Beatles album track "It Won't Be Long", and "Money" which the Beatles had also covered -- but they didn't have a singer, being an instrumental group. They could get in a singer, of course, but that would mean splitting the money with another person. So instead, the guitarist, who had never had any intention of becoming a singer, was more or less volunteered for the role. Over the next eighteen months or so the group's repertoire moved from being largely instrumental to largely vocal, and the group also seem to have shuttled around a bit between two different cities -- Winnipeg and Fort William, staying in one for a while and then moving back to the other. They travelled between the two in Young's car, a Buick Roadmaster hearse. In Winnipeg, Young first met up with a singer named Joni Anderson, who was soon to get married to Chuck Mitchell and would become better known by her married name. The two struck up a friendship, though by all accounts never a particularly close one -- they were too similar in too many ways; as Mitchell later said “Neil and I have a lot in common: Canadian; Scorpios; polio in the same epidemic, struck the same parts of our body; and we both have a black sense of humor". They were both also idiosyncratic artists who never fit very well into boxes. In Fort William the Squires made a few more records, this time vocal tracks like "I'll Love You Forever": [Excerpt: The Squires, "I'll Love You Forever"] It was also in Fort William that Young first encountered two acts that would make a huge impression on him. One was a group called The Thorns, consisting of Tim Rose, Jake Holmes, and Rich Husson. The Thorns showed Young that there was interesting stuff being done on the fringes of the folk music scene. He later said "One of my favourites was “Oh Susannah”—they did this arrangement that was bizarre. It was in a minor key, which completely changed everything—and it was rock and roll. So that idea spawned arrangements of all these other songs for me. I did minor versions of them all. We got into it. That was a certain Squires stage that never got recorded. Wish there were tapes of those shows. We used to do all this stuff, a whole kinda music—folk-rock. We took famous old folk songs like “Clementine,” “She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain,” “Tom Dooley,” and we did them all in minor keys based on the Tim Rose arrangement of “Oh Susannah.” There are no recordings of the Thorns in existence that I know of, but presumably that arrangement that Young is talking about is the version that Rose also later did with the Big 3, which we've heard in a few other episodes: [Excerpt: The Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] The other big influence was, of course, Steve Stills, and the two men quickly found themselves influencing each other deeply. Stills realised that he could bring more rock and roll to his folk-music sound, saying that what amazed him was the way the Squires could go from "Cottonfields" (the Lead Belly song) to "Farmer John", the R&B song by Don and Dewey that was becoming a garage-rock staple. Young in turn was inspired to start thinking about maybe going more in the direction of folk music. The Squires even renamed themselves the High-Flying Birds, after the song that Stills had recorded with the Au Go Go Singers. After The Company's tour of Canada, Stills moved back to New York for a while. He now wanted to move in a folk-rock direction, and for a while he tried to persuade his friend John Sebastian to let him play bass in his new band, but when the Lovin' Spoonful decided against having him in the band, he decided to move West to San Francisco, where he'd heard there was a new music scene forming. He enjoyed a lot of the bands he saw there, and in particular he was impressed by the singer of a band called the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Somebody to Love"] He was much less impressed with the rest of her band, and seriously considered going up to her and asking if she wanted to work with some *real* musicians instead of the unimpressive ones she was working with, but didn't get his nerve up. We will, though, be hearing more about Grace Slick in future episodes. Instead, Stills decided to move south to LA, where many of the people he'd known in Greenwich Village were now based. Soon after he got there, he hooked up with two other musicians, a guitarist named Steve Young and a singer, guitarist, and pianist named Van Dyke Parks. Parks had a record contract at MGM -- he'd been signed by Tom Wilson, the same man who had turned Dylan electric, signed Simon and Garfunkel, and produced the first albums by the Mothers of Invention. With Wilson, Parks put out a couple of singles in 1966, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] And "Number Nine", a reworking of the Ode to Joy from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Number Nine"]Parks, Stills, and Steve Young became The Van Dyke Parks Band, though they didn't play together for very long, with their most successful performance being as the support act for the Lovin' Spoonful for a show in Arizona. But they did have a lasting resonance -- when Van Dyke Parks finally got the chance to record his first solo album, he opened it with Steve Young singing the old folk song "Black Jack Davy", filtered to sound like an old tape: [Excerpt: Steve Young, "Black Jack Davy"] And then it goes into a song written for Parks by Randy Newman, but consisting of Newman's ideas about Parks' life and what he knew about him, including that he had been third guitar in the Van Dyke Parks Band: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Vine Street"] Parks and Stills also wrote a few songs together, with one of their collaborations, "Hello, I've Returned", later being demoed by Stills for Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Steve Stills, "Hello, I've Returned"] After the Van Dyke Parks Band fell apart, Parks went on to many things, including a brief stint on keyboards in the Mothers of Invention, and we'll be talking more about him next episode. Stills formed a duo called the Buffalo Fish, with his friend Ron Long. That soon became an occasional trio when Stills met up again with his old Greenwich Village friend Peter Tork, who joined the group on the piano. But then Stills auditioned for the Monkees and was turned down because he had bad teeth -- or at least that's how most people told the story. Stills has later claimed that while he turned up for the Monkees auditions, it wasn't to audition, it was to try to pitch them songs, which seems implausible on the face of it. According to Stills, he was offered the job and turned it down because he'd never wanted it. But whatever happened, Stills suggested they might want his friend Peter, who looked just like him apart from having better teeth, and Peter Tork got the job. But what Stills really wanted to do was to form a proper band. He'd had the itch to do it ever since seeing the Squires, and he decided he should ask Neil Young to join. There was only one problem -- when he phoned Young, the phone was answered by Young's mother, who told Stills that Neil had moved out to become a folk singer, and she didn't know where he was. But then Stills heard from his old friend Richie Furay. Furay was still in Greenwich Village, and had decided to write to Stills. He didn't know where Stills was, other than that he was in California somewhere, so he'd written to Stills' father in El Salvador. The letter had been returned, because the postage had been short by one cent, so Furay had resent it with the correct postage. Stills' father had then forwarded the letter to the place Stills had been staying in San Francisco, which had in turn forwarded it on to Stills in LA. Furay's letter mentioned this new folk singer who had been on the scene for a while and then disappeared again, Neil Young, who had said he knew Stills, and had been writing some great songs, one of which Furay had added to his own set. Stills got in touch with Furay and told him about this great band he was forming in LA, which he wanted Furay to join. Furay was in, and travelled from New York to LA, only to be told that at this point there were no other members of this great band, but they'd definitely find some soon. They got a publishing deal with Columbia/Screen Gems, which gave them enough money to not starve, but what they really needed was to find some other musicians. They did, when driving down Hollywood Boulevard on April the sixth, 1966. There, stuck in traffic going the other way, they saw a hearse... After Steve Stills had left Fort William, so had Neil Young. He hadn't initially intended to -- the High-Flying Birds still had a regular gig, but Young and some of his friends had gone away for a few days on a road trip in his hearse. But unfortunately the transmission on the hearse had died, and Young and his friends had been stranded. Many years later, he would write a eulogy to the hearse, which he and Stills would record together: [Excerpt: The Stills-Young Band, "Long May You Run"] Young and his friends had all hitch-hiked in different directions -- Young had ended up in Toronto, where his dad lived, and had stayed with his dad for a while. The rest of his band had eventually followed him there, but Young found the Toronto music scene not to his taste -- the folk and rock scenes there were very insular and didn't mingle with each other, and the group eventually split up. Young even took on a day job for a while, for the only time in his life, though he soon quit. Young started basically commuting between Toronto and New York, a distance of several hundred miles, going to Greenwich Village for a while before ending up back in Toronto, and ping-ponging between the two. In New York, he met up with Richie Furay, and also had a disastrous audition for Elektra Records as a solo artist. One of the songs he sang in the audition was "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", the song which Furay liked so much he started performing it himself. Young doesn't normally explain his songs, but as this was one of the first he ever wrote, he talked about it in interviews in the early years, before he decided to be less voluble about his art. The song was apparently about the sense of youthful hope being crushed. The instigation for it was Young seeing his girlfriend with another man, but the central image, of Clancy not singing, came from Young's schooldays. The Clancy in question was someone Young liked as one of the other weird kids at school. He was disabled, like Young, though with MS rather than polio, and he would sing to himself in the hallways at school. Sadly, of course, the other kids would mock and bully him for that, and eventually he ended up stopping. Young said about it "After awhile, he got so self-conscious he couldn't do his thing any more. When someone who is as beautiful as that and as different as that is actually killed by his fellow man—you know what I mean—like taken and sorta chopped down—all the other things are nothing compared to this." [Excerpt: Neil Young, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Elektra demo)"] One thing I should say for anyone who listens to the Mixcloud for this episode, that song, which will be appearing in a couple of different versions, has one use of a term for Romani people that some (though not all) consider a slur. It's not in the excerpts I'll be using in this episode, but will be in the full versions on the Mixcloud. Sadly that word turns up time and again in songs of this era... When he wasn't in New York, Young was living in Toronto in a communal apartment owned by a folk singer named Vicki Taylor, where many of the Toronto folk scene would stay. Young started listening a lot to Taylor's Bert Jansch albums, which were his first real exposure to the British folk-baroque style of guitar fingerpicking, as opposed to the American Travis-picking style, and Young would soon start to incorporate that style into his own playing: [Excerpt: Bert Jansch, "Angie"] Another guitar influence on Young at this point was another of the temporary tenants of Taylor's flat, John Kay, who would later go on to be one of the founding members of Steppenwolf. Young credited Kay with having a funky rhythm guitar style that Young incorporated into his own. While he was in Toronto, he started getting occasional gigs in Detroit, which is "only" a couple of hundred miles away, set up by Joni and Chuck Mitchell, both of whom also sometimes stayed at Taylor's. And it was in Detroit that Neil Young became, albeit very briefly, a Motown artist. The Mynah Birds were a band in Toronto that had at one point included various future members of Steppenwolf, and they were unusual for the time in that they were a white band with a Black lead singer, Ricky Matthews. They also had a rich manager, John Craig Eaton, the heir to the Eaton's department store fortune, who basically gave them whatever money they wanted -- they used to go to his office and tell him they needed seven hundred dollars for lunch, and he'd hand it to them. They were looking for a new guitarist when Bruce Palmer, their bass player, bumped into Neil Young carrying an amp and asked if he was interested in joining. He was. The Mynah Birds quickly became one of the best bands in Toronto, and Young and Matthews became close, both as friends and as a performance team. People who saw them live would talk about things like a song called “Hideaway”, written by Young and Matthews, which had a spot in the middle where Young would start playing a harmonica solo, throw the harmonica up in the air mid-solo, Matthews would catch it, and he would then finish the solo. They got signed to Motown, who were at this point looking to branch out into the white guitar-group market, and they were put through the Motown star-making machine. They recorded an entire album, which remains unreleased, but they did release a single, "It's My Time": [Excerpt: The Mynah Birds, "It's My Time"] Or at least, they released a handful of promo copies. The single was pulled from release after Ricky Matthews got arrested. It turned out his birth name wasn't Ricky Matthews, but James Johnson, and that he wasn't from Toronto as he'd told everyone, but from Buffalo, New York. He'd fled to Canada after going AWOL from the Navy, not wanting to be sent to Vietnam, and he was arrested and jailed for desertion. After getting out of jail, he would start performing under yet another name, and as Rick James would have a string of hits in the seventies and eighties: [Excerpt: Rick James, "Super Freak"] Most of the rest of the group continued gigging as The Mynah Birds, but Young and Palmer had other plans. They sold the expensive equipment Eaton had bought the group, and Young bought a new hearse, which he named Mort 2 – Mort had been his first hearse. And according to one of the band's friends in Toronto, the crucial change in their lives came when Neil Young heard a song on a jukebox: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Young apparently heard "California Dreamin'" and immediately said "Let's go to California and become rock stars". Now, Young later said of this anecdote that "That sounds like a Canadian story to me. That sounds too real to be true", and he may well be right. Certainly the actual wording of the story is likely incorrect -- people weren't talking about "rock stars" in 1966. Google's Ngram viewer has the first use of the phrase in print being in 1969, and the phrase didn't come into widespread usage until surprisingly late -- even granting that phrases enter slang before they make it to print, it still seems implausible. But even though the precise wording might not be correct, something along those lines definitely seems to have happened, albeit possibly less dramatically. Young's friend Comrie Smith independently said that Young told him “Well, Comrie, I can hear the Mamas and the Papas singing ‘All the leaves are brown, and the skies are gray …' I'm gonna go down to the States and really make it. I'm on my way. Today North Toronto, tomorrow the world!” Young and Palmer loaded up Mort 2 with a bunch of their friends and headed towards California. On the way, they fell out with most of the friends, who parted from them, and Young had an episode which in retrospect may have been his first epileptic seizure. They decided when they got to California that they were going to look for Steve Stills, as they'd heard he was in LA and neither of them knew anyone else in the state. But after several days of going round the Sunset Strip clubs asking if anyone knew Steve Stills, and sleeping in the hearse as they couldn't afford anywhere else, they were getting fed up and about to head off to San Francisco, as they'd heard there was a good music scene there, too. They were going to leave that day, and they were stuck in traffic on Sunset Boulevard, about to head off, when Stills and Furay came driving in the other direction. Furay happened to turn his head, to brush away a fly, and saw a hearse with Ontario license plates. He and Stills both remembered that Young drove a hearse, and so they assumed it must be him. They started honking at the hearse, then did a U-turn. They got Young's attention, and they all pulled into the parking lot at Ben Frank's, the Sunset Strip restaurant that attracted such a hip crowd the Monkees' producers had asked for "Ben Frank's types" in their audition advert. Young introduced Stills and Furay to Palmer, and now there *was* a group -- three singing, songwriting, guitarists and a bass player. Now all they needed was a drummer. There were two drummers seriously considered for the role. One of them, Billy Mundi, was technically the better player, but Young didn't like playing with him as much -- and Mundi also had a better offer, to join the Mothers of Invention as their second drummer -- before they'd recorded their first album, they'd had two drummers for a few months, but Denny Bruce, their second drummer, had become ill with glandular fever and they'd reverted to having Jimmy Carl Black play solo. Now they were looking for someone else, and Mundi took that role. The other drummer, who Young preferred anyway, was another Canadian, Dewey Martin. Martin was a couple of years older than the rest of the group, and by far the most experienced. He'd moved from Canada to Nashville in his teens, and according to Martin he had been taken under the wing of Hank Garland, the great session guitarist most famous for "Sugarfoot Rag": [Excerpt: Hank Garland, "Sugarfoot Rag"] We heard Garland playing with Elvis and others in some of the episodes around 1960, and by many reckonings he was the best session guitarist in Nashville, but in 1961 he had a car accident that left him comatose, and even though he recovered from the coma and lived another thirty-three years, he never returned to recording. According to Martin, though, Garland would still sometimes play jazz clubs around Nashville after the accident, and one day Martin walked into a club and saw him playing. The drummer he was playing with got up and took a break, taking his sticks with him, so Martin got up on stage and started playing, using two combs instead of sticks. Garland was impressed, and told Martin that Faron Young needed a drummer, and he could get him the gig. At the time Young was one of the biggest stars in country music. That year, 1961, he had three country top ten hits, including a number one with his version of Willie Nelson's "Hello Walls", produced by Ken Nelson: [Excerpt: Faron Young, "Hello Walls"] Martin joined Faron Young's band for a while, and also ended up playing short stints in the touring bands of various other Nashville-based country and rock stars, including Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, and the Everly Brothers, before heading to LA for a while. Then Mel Taylor of the Ventures hooked him up with some musicians in the Pacific Northwest scene, and Martin started playing there under the name Sir Raleigh and the Coupons with various musicians. After a while he travelled back to LA where he got some members of the LA group Sons of Adam to become a permanent lineup of Coupons, and they recorded several singles with Martin singing lead, including the Tommy Boyce and Steve Venet song "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day", later recorded by the Monkees: [Excerpt: Sir Raleigh and the Coupons, "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day"] He then played with the Standells, before joining the Modern Folk Quartet for a short while, as they were transitioning from their folk sound to a folk-rock style. He was only with them for a short while, and it's difficult to get precise details -- almost everyone involved with Buffalo Springfield has conflicting stories about their own careers with timelines that don't make sense, which is understandable given that people were talking about events decades later and memory plays tricks. "Fast" Eddie Hoh had joined the Modern Folk Quartet on drums in late 1965, at which point they became the Modern Folk Quintet, and nothing I've read about that group talks about Hoh ever actually leaving, but apparently Martin joined them in February 1966, which might mean he's on their single "Night-Time Girl", co-written by Al Kooper and produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: The Modern Folk Quintet, "Night-Time Girl"] After that, Martin was taken on by the Dillards, a bluegrass band who are now possibly most famous for having popularised the Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith song "Duellin' Banjos", which they recorded on their first album and played on the Andy Griffith Show a few years before it was used in Deliverance: [Excerpt: The Dillards, "Duellin' Banjos"] The Dillards had decided to go in a country-rock direction -- and Doug Dillard would later join the Byrds and make records with Gene Clark -- but they were hesitant about it, and after a brief period with Martin in the band they decided to go back to their drummerless lineup. To soften the blow, they told him about another band that was looking for a drummer -- their manager, Jim Dickson, who was also the Byrds' manager, knew Stills and his bandmates. Dewey Martin was in the group. The group still needed a name though. They eventually took their name from a brand of steam roller, after seeing one on the streets when some roadwork was being done. Everyone involved disagrees as to who came up with the name. Steve Stills at one point said it was a group decision after Neil Young and the group's manager Frazier Mohawk stole the nameplate off the steamroller, and later Stills said that Richey Furay had suggested the name while they were walking down the street, Dewey Martin said it was his idea, Neil Young said that he, Steve Sills, and Van Dyke Parks had been walking down the street and either Young or Stills had seen the nameplate and suggested the name, and Van Dyke Parks says that *he* saw the nameplate and suggested it to Dewey Martin: [Excerpt: Steve Stills and Van Dyke Parks on the name] For what it's worth, I tend to believe Van Dyke Parks in most instances -- he's an honest man, and he seems to have a better memory of the sixties than many of his friends who led more chemically interesting lives. Whoever came up with it, the name worked -- as Stills later put it "We thought it was pretty apt, because Neil Young is from Manitoba which is buffalo country, and  Richie Furay was from Springfield, Ohio -- and I'm the field!" It almost certainly also helped that the word "buffalo" had been in the name of Stills' previous group, Buffalo Fish. On the eleventh of April, 1966, Buffalo Springfield played their first gig, at the Troubadour, using equipment borrowed from the Dillards. Chris Hillman of the Byrds was in the audience and was impressed. He got the group a support slot on a show the Byrds and the Dillards were doing a few days later in San Bernardino. That show was compered by a Merseyside-born British DJ, John Ravenscroft, who had managed to become moderately successful in US radio by playing up his regional accent so he sounded more like the Beatles. He would soon return to the UK, and start broadcasting under the name John Peel. Hillman also got them a week-long slot at the Whisky A-Go-Go, and a bidding war started between record labels to sign the band. Dunhill offered five thousand dollars, Warners counted with ten thousand, and then Atlantic offered twelve thousand. Atlantic were *just* starting to get interested in signing white guitar groups -- Jerry Wexler never liked that kind of music, always preferring to stick with soul and R&B, but Ahmet Ertegun could see which way things were going. Atlantic had only ever signed two other white acts before -- Neil Young's old favourite Bobby Darin, who had since left the label, and Sonny and Cher. And Sonny and Cher's management and production team, Brian Stone and Charlie Greene, were also very interested in the group, who even before they had made a record had quickly become the hottest band on the circuit, even playing the Hollywood Bowl as the Rolling Stones' support act. Buffalo Springfield already had managers -- Frazier Mohawk and Richard Davis, the lighting man at the Troubadour (who was sometimes also referred to as Dickie Davis, but I'll use his full name so as not to cause unnecessary confusion in British people who remember the sports TV presenter of the same name), who Mohawk had enlisted to help him. But Stone and Greene weren't going to let a thing like that stop them. According to anonymous reports quoted without attribution in David Roberts' biography of Stills -- so take this with as many grains of salt as you want -- Stone and Greene took Mohawk for a ride around LA in a limo, just the three of them, a gun, and a used hotdog napkin. At the end of the ride, the hotdog napkin had Mohawk's scrawled signature, signing the group over to Stone and Greene. Davis stayed on, but was demoted to just doing their lights. The way things ended up, the group signed to Stone and Greene's production company, who then leased their masters to Atlantic's Atco subsidiary. A publishing company was also set up for the group's songs -- owned thirty-seven point five percent by Atlantic, thirty-seven point five percent by Stone and Greene, and the other twenty-five percent split six ways between the group and Davis, who they considered their sixth member. Almost immediately, Charlie Greene started playing Stills and Young off against each other, trying a divide-and-conquer strategy on the group. This was quite easy, as both men saw themselves as natural leaders, though Stills was regarded by everyone as the senior partner -- the back cover of their first album would contain the line "Steve is the leader but we all are". Stills and Young were the two stars of the group as far as the audience were concerned -- though most musicians who heard them play live say that the band's real strength was in its rhythm section, with people comparing Palmer's playing to that of James Jamerson. But Stills and Young would get into guitar battles on stage, one-upping each other, in ways that turned the tension between them in creative directions. Other clashes, though were more petty -- both men had very domineering mothers, who would actually call the group's management to complain about press coverage if their son was given less space than the other one. The group were also not sure about Young's voice -- to the extent that Stills was known to jokingly apologise to the audience before Young took a lead vocal -- and so while the song chosen as the group's first A-side was Young's "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", Furay was chosen to sing it, rather than Young: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"] On the group's first session, though, both Stills and Young realised that their producers didn't really have a clue -- the group had built up arrangements that had a complex interplay of instruments and vocals, but the producers insisted on cutting things very straightforwardly, with a basic backing track and then the vocals. They also thought that the song was too long so the group should play faster. Stills and Young quickly decided that they were going to have to start producing their own material, though Stone and Greene would remain the producers for the first album. There was another bone of contention though, because in the session the initial plan had been for Stills' song "Go and Say Goodbye" to be the A-side with Young's song as the B-side. It was flipped, and nobody seems quite sure why -- it's certainly the case that, whatever the merits of the two tracks as songs, Stills' song was the one that would have been more likely to become a hit. "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" was a flop, but it did get some local airplay. The next single, "Burned", was a Young song as well, and this time did have Young taking the lead, though in a song dominated by harmonies: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Burned"] Over the summer, though, something had happened that would affect everything for the group -- Neil Young had started to have epileptic seizures. At first these were undiagnosed episodes, but soon they became almost routine events, and they would often happen on stage, particularly at moments of great stress or excitement. Several other members of the group became convinced -- entirely wrongly -- that Young was faking these seizures in order to get women to pay attention to him. They thought that what he wanted was for women to comfort him and mop his brow, and that collapsing would get him that. The seizures became so common that Richard Davis, the group's lighting tech, learned to recognise the signs of a seizure before it happened. As soon as it looked like Young was about to collapse the lights would turn on, someone would get ready to carry him off stage, and Richie Furay would know to grab Young's guitar before he fell so that the guitar wouldn't get damaged. Because they weren't properly grounded and Furay had an electric guitar of his own, he'd get a shock every time. Young would later claim that during some of the seizures, he would hallucinate that he was another person, in another world, living another life that seemed to have its own continuity -- people in the other world would recognise him and talk to him as if he'd been away for a while -- and then when he recovered he would have to quickly rebuild his identity, as if temporarily amnesiac, and during those times he would find things like the concept of lying painful. The group's first album came out in December, and they were very, very, unhappy with it. They thought the material was great, but they also thought that the production was terrible. Stone and Greene's insistence that they record the backing tracks first and then overdub vocals, rather than singing live with the instruments, meant that the recordings, according to Stills and Young in particular, didn't capture the sound of the group's live performance, and sounded sterile. Stills and Young thought they'd fixed some of that in the mono mix, which they spent ten days on, but then Stone and Greene did the stereo mix without consulting the band, in less than two days, and the album was released at precisely the time that stereo was starting to overtake mono in the album market. I'm using the mono mixes in this podcast, but for decades the only versions available were the stereo ones, which Stills and Young both loathed. Ahmet Ertegun also apparently thought that the demo versions of the songs -- some of which were eventually released on a box set in 2001 -- were much better than the finished studio recordings. The album was not a success on release, but it did contain the first song any of the group had written to chart. Soon after its release, Van Dyke Parks' friend Lenny Waronker was producing a single by a group who had originally been led by Sly Stone and had been called Sly and the Mojo Men. By this time Stone was no longer involved in the group, and they were making music in a very different style from the music their former leader would later become known for. Parks was brought in to arrange a baroque-pop version of Stills' album track "Sit Down I Think I Love You" for the group, and it became their only top forty hit, reaching number thirty-six: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down I Think I Love You"] It was shortly after the first Buffalo Springfield album was released, though, that Steve Stills wrote what would turn out to be *his* group's only top forty single. The song had its roots in both LA and San Francisco. The LA roots were more obvious -- the song was written about a specific experience Stills had had. He had been driving to Sunset Strip from Laurel Canyon on November the twelfth 1966, and he had seen a mass of young people and police in riot gear, and he had immediately turned round, partly because he didn't want to get involved in what looked to be a riot, and partly because he'd been inspired -- he had the idea for a lyric, which he pretty much finished in the car even before he got home: [Excerpt: The Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The riots he saw were what became known later as the Riot on Sunset Strip. This was a minor skirmish between the police and young people of LA -- there had been complaints that young people had been spilling out of the nightclubs on Sunset Strip into the street, causing traffic problems, and as a result the city council had introduced various heavy-handed restrictions, including a ten PM curfew for all young people in the area, removing the permits that many clubs had which allowed people under twenty-one to be present, forcing the Whisky A-Go-Go to change its name just to "the Whisk", and forcing a club named Pandora's Box, which was considered the epicentre of the problem, to close altogether. Flyers had been passed around calling for a "funeral" for Pandora's Box -- a peaceful gathering at which people could say goodbye to a favourite nightspot, and a thousand people had turned up. The police also turned up, and in the heavy-handed way common among law enforcement, they managed to provoke a peaceful party and turn it into a riot. This would not normally be an event that would be remembered even a year later, let alone nearly sixty years later, but Sunset Strip was the centre of the American rock music world in the period, and of the broader youth entertainment field. Among those arrested at the riot, for example, were Jack Nicholson and Peter Fonda, neither of whom were huge stars at the time, but who were making cheap B-movies with Roger Corman for American International Pictures. Among the cheap exploitation films that American International Pictures made around this time was one based on the riots, though neither Nicholson, Fonda, or Corman were involved. Riot on Sunset Strip was released in cinemas only four months after the riots, and it had a theme song by Dewey Martin's old colleagues The Standells, which is now regarded as a classic of garage rock: [Excerpt: The Standells, "Riot on Sunset Strip"] The riots got referenced in a lot of other songs, as well. The Mothers of Invention's second album, Absolutely Free, contains the song "Plastic People" which includes this section: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Plastic People"] And the Monkees track "Daily Nightly", written by Michael Nesmith, was always claimed by Nesmith to be an impressionistic portrait of the riots, though the psychedelic lyrics sound to me more like they're talking about drug use and street-walking sex workers than anything to do with the riots: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] But the song about the riots that would have the most lasting effect on popular culture was the one that Steve Stills wrote that night. Although how much he actually wrote, at least of the music, is somewhat open to question. Earlier that month, Buffalo Springfield had spent some time in San Francisco. They hadn't enjoyed the experience -- as an LA band, they were thought of as a bunch of Hollywood posers by most of the San Francisco scene, with the exception of one band, Moby Grape -- a band who, like them had three guitarist/singer/songwriters, and with whom they got on very well. Indeed, they got on rather better with Moby Grape than they were getting on with each other at this point, because Young and Stills would regularly get into arguments, and every time their argument seemed to be settling down, Dewey Martin would manage to say the wrong thing and get Stills riled up again -- Martin was doing a lot of speed at this point and unable to stop talking, even when it would have been politic to do so. There was even some talk while they were in San Francisco of the bands doing a trade -- Young and Pete Lewis of Moby Grape swapping places -- though that came to nothing. But Stills, according to both Richard Davis and Pete Lewis, had been truly impressed by two Moby Grape songs. One of them was a song called "On the Other Side", which Moby Grape never recorded, but which apparently had a chorus that went "Stop, can't you hear the music ringing in your ear, right before you go, telling you the way is clear," with the group all pausing after the word "Stop". The other was a song called "Murder in my Heart for the Judge": [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Murder in my Heart for the Judge"] The song Stills wrote had a huge amount of melodic influence from that song, and quite a bit from “On the Other Side”, though he apparently didn't notice until after the record came out, at which point he apologised to Moby Grape. Stills wasn't massively impressed with the song he'd written, and went to Stone and Greene's office to play it for them, saying "I'll play it, for what it's worth". They liked the song and booked a studio to get the song recorded and rush-released, though according to Neil Young neither Stone nor Greene were actually present at the session, and the song was recorded on December the fifth, while some outbursts of rioting were still happening, and released on December the twenty-third. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The song didn't have a title when they recorded it, or so Stills thought, but when he mentioned this to Greene and Stone afterwards, they said "Of course it does. You said, 'I'm going to play the song, 'For What It's Worth'" So that became the title, although Ahmet Ertegun didn't like the idea of releasing a single with a title that wasn't in the lyric, so the early pressings of the single had "Stop, Hey, What's That Sound?" in brackets after the title. The song became a big hit, and there's a story told by David Crosby that doesn't line up correctly, but which might shed some light on why. According to Crosby, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" got its first airplay because Crosby had played members of Buffalo Springfield a tape he'd been given of the unreleased Beatles track "A Day in the Life", and they'd told their gangster manager-producers about it. Those manager-producers had then hired a sex worker to have sex with Crosby and steal the tape, which they'd then traded to a radio station in return for airplay. That timeline doesn't work, unless the sex worker involved was also a time traveller,  because "A Day in the Life" wasn't even recorded until January 1967 while "Clancy" came out in August 1966, and there'd been two other singles released between then and January 1967. But it *might* be the case that that's what happened with "For What It's Worth", which was released in the last week of December 1966, and didn't really start to do well on the charts for a couple of months. Right after recording the song, the group went to play a residency in New York, of which Ahmet Ertegun said “When they performed there, man, there was no band I ever heard that had the electricity of that group. That was the most exciting group I've ever seen, bar none. It was just mind-boggling.” During that residency they were joined on stage at various points by Mitch Ryder, Odetta, and Otis Redding. While in New York, the group also recorded "Mr. Soul", a song that Young had originally written as a folk song about his experiences with epilepsy, the nature of the soul, and dealing with fame. However, he'd noticed a similarity to "Satisfaction" and decided to lean into it. The track as finally released was heavily overdubbed by Young a few months later, but after it was released he decided he preferred the original take, which by then only existed as a scratchy acetate, which got released on a box set in 2001: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Mr. Soul (original version)"] Everyone has a different story of how the session for that track went -- at least one version of the story has Otis Redding turning up for the session and saying he wanted to record the song himself, as his follow-up to his version of "Satisfaction", but Young being angry at the idea. According to other versions of the story, Greene and Stills got into a physical fight, with Greene having to be given some of the valium Young was taking for his epilepsy to calm him down. "For What it's Worth" was doing well enough on the charts that the album was recalled, and reissued with "For What It's Worth" replacing Stills' song "Baby Don't Scold", but soon disaster struck the band. Bruce Palmer was arrested on drugs charges, and was deported back to Canada just as the song started to rise through the charts. The group needed a new bass player, fast. For a lipsynch appearance on local TV they got Richard Davis to mime the part, and then they got in Ken Forssi, the bass player from Love, for a couple of gigs. They next brought in Ken Koblun, the bass player from the Squires, but he didn't fit in with the rest of the group. The next replacement was Jim Fielder. Fielder was a friend of the group, and knew the material -- he'd subbed for Palmer a few times in 1966 when Palmer had been locked up after less serious busts. And to give some idea of how small a scene the LA scene was, when Buffalo Springfield asked him to become their bass player, he was playing rhythm guitar for the Mothers of Invention, while Billy Mundi was on drums, and had played on their second, as yet unreleased, album, Absolutely Free: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Call any Vegetable"] And before joining the Mothers, Fielder and Mundi had also played together with Van Dyke Parks, who had served his own short stint as a Mother of Invention already, backing Tim Buckley on Buckley's first album: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And the arrangements on that album were by Jack Nitzsche, who would soon become a very close collaborator with Young. "For What it's Worth" kept rising up the charts. Even though it had been inspired by a very local issue, the lyrics were vague enough that people in other situations could apply it to themselves, and it soon became regarded as an anti-war protest anthem -- something Stills did nothing to discourage, as the band were all opposed to the war. The band were also starting to collaborate with other people. When Stills bought a new house, he couldn't move in to it for a while, and so Peter Tork invited him to stay at his house. The two got on so well that Tork invited Stills to produce the next Monkees album -- only to find that Michael Nesmith had already asked Chip Douglas to do it. The group started work on a new album, provisionally titled "Stampede", but sessions didn't get much further than Stills' song "Bluebird" before trouble arose between Young and Stills. The root of the argument seems to have been around the number of songs each got on the album. With Richie Furay also writing, Young was worried that given the others' attitudes to his songwriting, he might get as few as two songs on the album. And Young and Stills were arguing over which song should be the next single, with Young wanting "Mr. Soul" to be the A-side, while Stills wanted "Bluebird" -- Stills making the reasonable case that they'd released two Neil Young songs as singles and gone nowhere, and then they'd released one of Stills', and it had become a massive hit. "Bluebird" was eventually chosen as the A-side, with "Mr. Soul" as the B-side: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Bluebird"] The "Bluebird" session was another fraught one. Fielder had not yet joined the band, and session player Bobby West subbed on bass. Neil Young had recently started hanging out with Jack Nitzsche, and the two were getting very close and working on music together. Young had impressed Nitzsche not just with his songwriting but with his arrogance -- he'd played Nitzsche his latest song, "Expecting to Fly", and Nitzsche had said halfway through "That's a great song", and Young had shushed him and told him to listen, not interrupt. Nitzsche, who had a monstrous ego himself and was also used to working with people like Phil Spector, the Rolling Stones and Sonny Bono, none of them known for a lack of faith in their own abilities, was impressed. Shortly after that, Stills had asked Nitzsch

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