Podcasts about Totem

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    Breaking Banks Fintech
    Episode 469: Seven Generations of Economic Opportunity

    Breaking Banks Fintech

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 58:20


    In honor of Native American Heritage Month and Day (11/25) we have an incredible episode hosted by Amber Buker and Jason Henrichs. First, Amber speaks with Dawson Her Many Horses, SVP & Head of Native American Banking about Wells Fargo's new report on Indian Country's Once-In-a-Seven Generation Opportunity. Wells Fargo is a leading provider of capital for the native american and Alaska native markets banking 4 out of 10 federally recognized tribes in the US, equating to roughly $3B in credit commitments and $3.9 billion in deposits. Incredible but often invisible opportunities exist to partner with tribal economies. Then Jason sits down with Amber to talk about what inspired her to start Totem. You need only listen to the founding story and Amber's interest in aligning opportunities with mission to understand. What better way to help others than by starting an identity-focused bank! Totem, a truly mission driven company, supporter and advocate for native culture with a goal to create pathways to financial inclusion for Native Americans through digital banking — closing gaps in service in this market, taking friction out of the system and creating value. Banking by and for Native Americans, the fastest growing racial demographic on the 2020 census (160% population jump vs. 2010). Yakoke (Thanks in Choctaw) for listening, enjoy the episode! https://youtu.be/-LUp03vgM4M

    SCP Un[REDACTED]
    Un[REDACTED] Sole Singularity: The Totem In Air

    SCP Un[REDACTED]

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 7:38


    Un[REDACTED] Sole Singularity: The Totem In AirFrom The Wanderers' LibraryThe Totem In Air located at http://wanderers-library.wikidot.com/sole-singularityCredit to the original author http://www.wikidot.com/user:info/elenee-fishtruckToss a coin to your narrator! Patreon: https://bit.ly/unredactedpatreonKo-Fi: https://bit.ly/unredactedko-fiFiverr (Yeah you can hire me!): https://bit.ly/unredactedfiverrUn[REDACTED] community links: YouTube: https://bit.ly/unredactedyoutubeSpotify: https://spoti.fi/3mNCLulDiscord: https://bit.ly/unredacteddiscordInsta: https://bit.ly/unredactedinstagramTwitter: https://bit.ly/unredactedtwitterCaptivate: https://bit.ly/unredactedcaptivateApple: https://apple.co/3FO8qTYSpecial thanks to my supporters:Halucygeno

    Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!
    Episode 436: The Skeptical Shaman with Rachel White

    Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 26:59


    In this episode of Oh My Heath ... There's HOPE! Jana talks with Rachel White.   Rachel White is The Skeptical Shaman. Here for the spiritually homeless, Rachel blends real-world pragmatism, her sense of humor, and ancient tools and techniques into her practice as a trained shaman, medium, energy practitioner, self-published author, and flower essence maker. As one client wrote in a Yelp review, Rachel White is the “Amy Schumer of shamanic practitioners.” She is equal parts blunt as she is spiritually unique, breaking every preconceived notion of the traditional image of what it means to live a spiritual life. She is, simply put, for the spiritually-curious but noncommittal who are looking for a more profound sense of meaning without feeling like they are joining a cult.   This 30-minute episode is on: * Learning to do what you love and not sacrifice what you need * What are Shamanic practitioners  * What is Totem and who is it for * Who should seek out a Shamanic Practitioner? * What are Flower essences and how do you use them    Get in touch with Ayla https://www.totemreadings.com/  https://www.instagram.com/totemrach/  https://www.facebook.com/totemrach/    Get Rachel's TOTEM Tarot deck on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/TOTEM-Tarot-Deck-Rachel-White/dp/0578980126/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3BU6ZWN98OA1S&keywords=totem+tarot+deck&qid=1654568392&sprefix=totem+ta%2Caps%2C369&sr=8-1   Read Rachels's Article in the November Issue of Best Holistic Life Magazine, Healing Momma Trauma With "My Dead Grandma." https://magazines.bestholisticlife.com/view/188476181/104    Get in touch with Jana and listen to more Podcasts: https://www.janashort.com/  Show Music ‘Hold On' by Amy Gerhartz https://www.amygerhartz.com/music.    Get Your Free Copy of Best Holistic Life Magazine! One of the fastest-growing independent magazines centered around holistic living. https://www.bestholisticlife.com/    Grab your gift today: https://www.janashort.com/becoming-the-next-influencers-download-offer/  Connect with Jana Short: https://www.janashort.com/contact/ 

    d4: D&D Deep Dive
    The Bear Totem Guardian: d4 #118

    d4: D&D Deep Dive

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 60:48


    Our D&D 5e character build this week is an attempt to make a "true" Tank out of the Bear Totem Barbarian. Are they as tough as everyone seems to think? Check out Established Titles here! https://www.establishedtitles.com/d4Promo Code: d4I'd appreciate it if you'd consider supporting the channel by becoming a member!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9jQ2IsZj_CAS0bZgA6O2pA/joinMerch Store! https://www.etsy.com/shop/d4DnDDeepDiveAlso: if you'd like to purchase D&D content through my Amazon affiliate link, it would be another way to help support the channel :) - https://www.amazon.com/shop/d4dddeepdive?listId=MFEYK9W51D9K&ref=idea_share_infFollow us here:https://www.reddit.com/r/DnDoptimized/https://www.facebook.com/dnddeepdivehttps://twitter.com/ColbyPoulsonCheck out Randall Hampton here:Twitter: https://twitter.com/Randall_HamptonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/randallhampton/Website: https://www.randallhamptonart.com/Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/randall_hamptonCharacter Concept:(0:00)Established Titles (sponsor):(7:03)Level 1:(9:47)Levels 2-6:(16:26)Levels 7-9:(33:24)Levels 10-13:(40:11)Levels 14-17:(46:39)Final Thoughts:(53:43)Outtakes:(58:05)Math/Graph for this episode: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1xGXrpU8b9WOeZNhA-CZ_PH6AlDygOlA9TsDMD0reRCo/edit?usp=sharingMaster Tank Comparison:https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/19XH-9FK6sPUGjOpFVg81-UXhb81cvg-zCnhbUi_Hxio/edit?usp=sharingThanks to LudicSavant for the amazing DPR calculator! https://forums.giantitp.com/showthread.php?582779-Comprehensive-DPR-Calculator-(v2-0))Music Credits:Achaidh Cheide - Celtic by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100340Artist: http://incompetech.com/Angevin 120 loop by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200111Artist: http://incompetech.com/Celtic Impulse - Celtic by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100297Artist: http://incompetech.com/Fiddles McGinty by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400051Artist: http://incompetech.com/Lord of the Land by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400022Artist: http://incompetech.com/Master of the Feast by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400019Artist: http://incompetech.com/

    SoundStage! Audiophile Podcast
    An Ultra-Mega Special Guest - Steve ”The Audiophiliac” Guttenberg | Dolby Atmos | SVS and Totem Acoustic Speakers

    SoundStage! Audiophile Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 68:17


    This week, hosts Brent Butterworth and Dennis Burger are joined by their old friend Steve Guttenberg—aka ”The Audiophiliac”—to discuss his recent interview with Professor Edgar Choueiri, the man behind the BACCH-SP Stereo Purifier (4:00 to 20:15).  Steve was also kind enough to stick around for the second segment (20:54 to 46:15) to discuss Dolby Atmos for music and movies alike, as well as some particularly disastrous surround sound mixes from the DVD-A/SACD era.  Wrapping things up this week (46:50 to 1:06:27), Brent and Dennis dig into two speaker-system reviews from Gordon Brockhouse on SoundStage! Simplifi: the new SVS Prime Wireless Pro, as well as the Totem Acoustic Kin Play Tower. Despite being superficially similar, in that they're both speakers with their own internal amplification, these are actually two quite different products likely to appeal to two very different consumers. Sources: "Professor Choueiri perfected SPATIAL (3D) AUDIO!" by Steve Guttenberg Audiophiliac: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZ484SKyOAc "SVS Prime Wireless Pro Active Loudspeaker System" by Gordon Brockhouse: https://www.soundstagesimplifi.com/index.php/equipment-reviews/217-svs-prime-wireless-pro-active-loudspeaker-system “Totem Acoustic Kin Play Tower Powered Loudspeaker System” by Gordon Brockhouse: https://www.soundstagesimplifi.com/index.php/equipment-reviews/216-totem-acoustic-kin-play-tower-powered-loudspeaker-system

    IJGC Podcast
    TOTEM Trial with Paolo Zola

    IJGC Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 33:51


    In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez is joined by Dr. Paolo Zola to discuss the TOTEM trial. For 20 years, Dr. Zola has been Chair of Gynaecological Oncology in the Department of Surgical Sciences of the University of Turin (Italy). Dr. Zola has conducted a large number of national and international randomized clinical trials in order to optimize the treatments for women diagnosed with gynaecological cancers. He has served as a member of the board of the EORTC Gynaecological Cancer Group and of the ESGO. Dr. Zola chairs the gynaecological cooperative group within the Oncological Network in Piedmont Region, and his research has been reported in more than 400 manuscripts published in peer reviewed literature. Highlights: - To perform the follow up in patients treated for endometrial cancer, the cornerstone is the clinical control. - In low-risk patients, surveillance every 6 months is appropriate. - In high-risk patients a clinical examination every 4 months for 2 years and then every 6 is recommended. - In addition, our data suggest taking a CT after 12 and 20 months after the primary treatment.

    SoulWhat
    Working with Your Animal Spirits

    SoulWhat

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 60:29


    How can you find out your animal spirit? And now that you know it, what are you supposed to do from there? Animals are energy beings just like anything else, so does that mean they're always pure?Roger and Michelle will be walking you through the animal spirits exercise from Michelle's new book "Spirits Unveiled" and you'll learn the ways to identify yours! Also stay tuned to the end because there just might be a giveaway!You can also listen to SoulWhat on @MichelleSoulTopia YouTube, iHeart Radio, iTunes, Spotify and Google Podcast.

    Lis-moi une histoire
    Saison 3 - 94. "La princesse Totem" : une histoire captivante

    Lis-moi une histoire

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 10:34


    June a grandi, préservée du vrai monde, élevée avec un destin tout tracé : devenir la Princesse Totem, liée pour toujours à son animal. En découvrant ce que l'on attend d'elle, elle va décider de suivre son intuition... Une héroïne à la fois sensible et puissante, portant un véritable message d'émancipation et de liberté. L'histoire est lue par Céline Bouju responsable de la Bibliothèque de La Chapelle Saint Aubin dans la Sarthe. Albin Michel Jeunesse, en partenariat avec RTL, ouvre sa grande bibliothèque. Dans cet épisode, nous vous proposons "La Princesse Totem" de Sébastien Perez et Justine Brax. "Lis-moi une histoire" est un podcast présenté par Laurent Marsick. Chaque épisode, vous propose une histoire passionnante, fascinante, instructive, lue par un ou une bibliothécaire. Tous les contes sélectionnés dans ce podcast sont publiés aux éditions Albin Michel Jeunesse.

    Your Woo Woo Best Friend
    Skeptical & Spiritual: Using Shamanic Tools In Life & Business With Rachel White, The Skeptical Shaman

    Your Woo Woo Best Friend

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 51:18


    Meet an energy worker who's been called the “Amy Schumer of shamanic practitioners.” Rachel White, the Skeptical Shaman, is known to be equally blunt and spiritually unique, breaking every preconceived notion of the traditional image of what it means to live a spiritual life. Rachel blends real-world pragmatism, her sense of humor, and ancient tools and techniques into her practice as a trained shaman, medium, energy practitioner, self-published author, and flower essence maker. She is, simply put, for the spiritually-curious but noncommittal who are looking for a more profound sense of meaning without feeling like they are joining a cult. In this episode, you'll learn: How to leverage shamanic tools, technologies, and processes to drive real ROI in intrapreneurial or entrepreneurial business Why it's okay to be spiritual AND skeptical simultaneously How intuition is a superpower that offers us better data than our rational mind alone can offer us How “magic” is just technology we don't fully understand yet   In the episode, we discuss: Rachel's transition from high-level corporate VP to energy practitioner Why it's important to create structure around your side hustle Rachel's path to shamanism Making sure that your spiritual teachers and gurus aren't actually cult leaders Rachel's first tarot deck and choosing a deck for you Being called the “Amy Schumer of shamanic practitioners” How to use shamanic tools and technologies in our business and life What it means if you pull "bad" tarot cards How shamanic practices support our quest for abundance How to be both skeptical and spiritual at the same time The intersection of science, magic, and the woo Designing the Totem deck and making flower essences   Learn more about Rachel and this episode on the podcast blog Want to chat about this episode? Text me

    The Times of Israel Podcasts
    'Stranger Things' music editor discusses journey from Russia to Hollywood

    The Times of Israel Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 35:16


    This week's Times Will Tell introduces Lena Glikson, the Russian-born, Jewish music editor who was part of the 2022 Emmy-winning editing team for Netflix's hit series, "Stranger Things." Lena speaks about her work in Season 4's scene featuring Kate Bush's "Running Up That Hill," editing the music to picture and helping slingshot the 80s song into a viral hit. She talks about her journey from Russia to the US a decade ago, the distance from her family and friends, and experiencing the onset of Putin's war against Ukraine from afar. She also examines the development of her own Jewish identity as a teenager, discovering and exploring her Jewish roots and facing a turning tide of anti-Semitism in her native land as she left for the US. Glikson talks about Israel, her hopes to work on Israeli films and productions, and her efforts to study Hebrew as part of her own personal journey. The following transcript has been very lightly edited. The Times of Israel: Lena, welcome. We're so happy to have you here with us. Lena Glikson: Thank you, Jessica, for having me. It's such a pleasure to be a part of your podcast. I think we're going to have to start with Stranger Things. Tell us when and how you joined the Stranger Things music crew and a little about development of music for this show. So, season four of Stranger Things is my first season on the show. I've been working as a music editor in Hollywood for the past six years at this point. Receiving this email from David Claude, the music editor for all the seasons of the show, was kind of surprising. And I couldn't even believe it because I actually was a big fan of the show and I watched all these seasons and I was one of the people googling the release date for season four. I literally saw that and thought it was a junk email. That's funny. And, yeah, it was real. And apparently the Duffer brothers were looking for the second music editor because the episodes in season four are so long, many different processes were happening in parallel. So while one episode was dubbed, meaning the sound for the episode was mixed, the Duffer brothers were already cutting and working on the following episode. So poor David, the music editor, would have to be in two places simultaneously. And the Duffer Brothers needed someone who would be actually working with them in the cutting room every single day. And that person was me. And it was just an amazing experience. I was spending a lot of time with the Duffer Brothers and we were working very closely on the music, both the score and the source pieces. And of course, “Running Up That Hill” was one of the songs that we worked closely on and it was just amazing. And they gave me so much creative freedom and just things to experiment with. And they trust me to a point where they can just bring up a few pieces from the previous seasons and tell me, can you cut this one over here or is that one over there? I kind of had to take pre-existing piece of music and then place it in a new scene and actually make it work in that context, which is always a very, very fun thing to do. And the entire crew is just so lovely and amazing. And the vibes you're getting from the show, it's so interesting because these positive, friendly vibes, they actually live in the cutting room, which is a very unique thing, I think, even from my experience. Talk to us a little bit about how the music gets chosen. What is it like to work as part of the music editing team and to make the decisions about various songs? Many of the songs are already scripted. At some point it becomes about licensing. How much money do we have to spend on the music and where can we save a bit if we can pick certain alternatives for some of the songs? But when it comes to big songs, I think most of them are kind of predetermined and it's a combination of director's work and showrunner's work. And we also have our amazing music supervisor, Nora Felder, who helps us providing alternatives for certain songs. And also she does all the licensing for the show. And in terms of picking and choosing songs, basically if we need some options, then Nora would come up with a number of different songs and I would be the person cutting them into the scene. Basically, and showing them to the Duffer Brothers because obviously all the songs are different tempo, different length. And my job, just as a music editor in general, is to make a particular piece of music work syncwise and dramatically within a certain scene and make it all very musical so that it develops beautifully and works with a picture. And then sometimes we're just narrowing down the choice to two or three different pieces and then go from there. I'd like to dig in a little bit to Running Up That Hill from Kate Bush. We're going to listen for a moment to a snapshot of the scene in season four in which Max, played by Sadie Sink, is able to overcome the powerful curse, spoiler alert for those who have not gotten to season four yet. And she's able to overcome the curse by hearing her favorite song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bV0RAcuG2Ao It becomes such an indelible moment in the season. I know that that was supposed to be a very, very big moment. And when I saw the song for the very first time, it was instructed and told that, okay, so this is the scene, this is our feature song. Please be super careful about cutting it. Make sure that it all works. And the way it works, really, in the movie world, is that the songs and the music is being cut to picture, and very rarely it works vice versa. So the song always has to be adjusted in one way or the other. And to be honest, there are so many different stories about how the song was picked for the series. One of them is that it was scripted. The other one is that the director of that particular episode, Sean Levy, brought it in. But the way it was originally cut, it was cut by Dean Zimmerman, our picture editor. And it was just a very kind of rough shape of the song. And my job was basically just making it work within the scene and making it develop in a certain way. And we actually even had to adjust the picture a little bit to kind of make the song shine, which happens very, very rarely. It just tells you about how important this song was for the episode and for the season. And for me personally, the other interesting experience was cutting the same song in episode nine during this big epic montage where it's not just the main version of the song, but it's the remix by the artist Totem. And that one was fun because originally in that scene, we were supposed to have the score and then the Duffer brothers just brought it in and said, oh, we have this cool version of the Kate Bush song and it's a remix and let's try cutting it in. And basically I had all the separate instruments and elements for the remix. So just assembling such an epic version of that song for that scene was amazing. And when the Duffer brothers saw it, they really loved it and it was just such a happy moment for me when they actually fell in love with something that I did and I was the first person who kind of tried doing it. So it was very, very cool. And that sequence actually also lives on YouTube, I believe, as a separate video, because, again, it's a very rare thing, I think, when a song and the sequence, the video sequence, they live together and you can actually watch them separately from the episode, which kind of shows that people also like that one and were interested and it was cool reading the comments on YouTube. Let's turn to you now. You trained in piano and voice and did a lot of classical music training, and then made your way to sound editing. Was that always your goal? Well, as a child, my dream was actually to become a professional singer. And I think I started playing piano mostly because I wanted to be a singer and there was no official way of studying voice back in Russia. And I was always doing the two things in parallel and also because there was nowhere to study jazz vocals or pop vocals when it came to choosing like a career path when I was still living back in Russia. It's surprising and it's a bit weird, but out of all the options that I had, I picked classical music theory. And I think partially it's because my parents are programmers. And there was something about that, just like the specific way my brain works and kind of the logical component to the artistic component. And just that particular major appealed to me simply because it was a combination of both. But my goal was still to become a singer. So that's how I discovered Berklee College of Music in Boston. How many years ago did you come from Russia to the US? Ten years ago. Ten years ago? So not that long. Yeah, but that's still the third of my life. Okay, so most of your education was in Russia, and where in Russia did you live? Voronezh. It's a city really, really close to Ukraine. It's pretty much on the border with Ukraine. I was also considering a Rimon School of Music in Israel and kind of choosing between the two in a way, but also kind of thinking that maybe after a couple of years at Rimon, I would probably be able to go to Berklee. But the thing was that I didn't speak Hebrew, and I thought that that was kind of a bigger issue. I spoke English, so that was one of the main reasons why I actually went to Berklee, just to be able to absorb as much knowledge as I could. Well, what I realized at Berklee was that my dream of becoming a singer was a lovely dream, but I just had way too much classical background to kind of forget about that and only concentrate on performance. And because Berklee has to offer a number of very unique majors, and one of those was film scoring, I felt like that would be an amazing way of combining my more technical and logical side with a very, very creative, orchestral writing and just kind of using all my knowledge, basically. And that's why I came to Los Angeles, because with such a degree, this is kind of the number one place. And because music editing was one of the classes that we had to take as film scoring students, I considered it as one of the options for myself. And the first internship that I found was with the music editor, Nick South. And I already had kind of all the knowledge about creating a score for movies and how it all works and who is involved and had the basic technical skills. But I needed those specific skills for music editing. And my mentor, Nick, taught me pretty much everything he knew and he was just amazing in terms of explaining not only the technicalities, but also the political side of the job because that's another very, very important side of it. What is the political side? A music editor is a person who lives between all the parties involved in creating the music. And we act as some sort of a bridge between the director and the composer and the studio. Our job is to save the composer from being fired or save the movie from all the music being thrown away. And it has a lot to do with just understanding people, feeling the room, making sure you are protecting everyone that needs to be protected, making sure that we stay on schedule, communicating with a movie studio, communicating with the director. And sometimes the composer, let's say, sends me a piece of score. And I know that the director is in a really, really bad mood and I know that I can show that piece of score to the director at the moment. So I need to figure out a way to find the best time to do that. And it's a lot of figuring out what you can say, what you cannot say, how to save this person, how to protect that person, and problem-solving, troubleshooting and just resolving conflicts. I imagine there is a sense of satisfaction from what you do now, even though it is a long road from where you began. Is there? For sure. Of course. I kind of miss the performance element a bit because I just don't have the time to do that anymore. But I feel like there are no skills that are completely abandoned and unused because in one way or the other, even my singing skills, because I often work in musicals and, for instance, now I work on a remake of The Color Purple and there are many, many songs in that movie. So just having that background, knowing about vocal position, knowing about just how to use your voice helps me a lot as a music editor when I'm working on musicals, and of course, all my classical background helps me with the editing bit of it. And yes, it's been a very interesting journey, and I probably could never imagine working in Hollywood and doing what I do when I was little and when I was dreaming of being on stage and performing, but it's still very exciting. There's been a lot of upheaval in the last months, with the war in Ukraine. Where has that put you in terms of your own personal life and what you're thinking about both in terms of career and home? For me, what happened on February 24 when Russia attacked Ukraine was a personal tragedy in a way. I do not have family in Ukraine, but just the fact that the city where I was born is so close to the border with Ukraine and you know, especially in my town, it's actually very hard to say, oh, this person is 100% Russian and that person is 27% Ukrainian. It's all very, very mixed. And I have many friends from Ukraine, and I thought, okay, so now the Russians are going to actually see what happened and what our government is like. But that did not happen. And that made me feel devastated, to be honest. Like the whole world started crashing and burning. And when I was living in Russia. I was kind of suffering a bit with my identity because I was born with my Dad's Jewish last name, which is Glikson. But when I turned three years old, my mom changed her last name and my last name to her maiden name, which sounds way more Slavic. And that's actually still the last name that I have in my passport. Mostly because swastikas were all over the city and antisemitism was kind of flourishing. So I was growing up with this idea that I was Jewish, but I kind of had to hide that from everyone, living in a pretty conservative society where the Russian Orthodox Church is still kind of a big thing, and all the kids in my class were wearing crosses, and kids would ask me, so have you ever been baptized? And I've never been baptized. And it just felt very uncomfortable. And I had this feeling that, okay, I need to hide my identity. And when I became a teenager, that was already in the late 2000s, the climate in the society started changing a bit, and the Jewish community in my hometown started having different activities and celebrating high holidays. So it started to feel like it's not as dangerous as it used to be to be Jewish and to be kind of open about it, but it was still very difficult because we had so many decades of that part of who we are kind of being hidden. And the generation of my grandparents was the first generation who started experiencing that and started hiding their Jewish identity because they couldn't really celebrate any high holidays. That's why the generation of my parents grew up completely Soviet as opposed to having their ethnicities kind of cherished and respected. And when I started feeling more Jewish, that's when I started discovering more things about my Jewish heritage and learning more about the Holocaust, because that's an important part of my family history. My grandfather, he left Poland in 1939, and his family was exterminated in one of the first extermination camps in Poland. So for me, that was this generational trauma that was living very, very deep inside. And for many years, I was reading a lot about it, was reading a lot about the Holocaust, trying to understand that. Circling back to February 24, just from my personal experience, knowing so much about the war, knowing so much about what happened with the Jews and even living in Russia. It's not just me. I have my personal story with the Jewish heritage in the background. But going through the Second World War for all the Russian families was also devastating. And everyone has ancestors who died in the Second World War and served in the army. And it's this huge tragedy, and people all of a sudden were manipulating into saying that, okay, we have such a great past, and we won over the Nazis in 1945, and now we're going to do the same thing again. And for me, the two dots, they don't connect. The Nazis they were fighting against in 1941 to 1945 are not the same Nazis they're fighting against today. And the fact that it was so easy for the society to believe this huge, huge, huge lie just made me feel like I don't feel connected to the place where I was born anymore. Your parents are there? Yes. My dad passed away a couple of years ago, but my mom still lives there. And for me, it's very difficult because, you know, even during the pandemic, it was very, very hard for me to travel just because I'm not a US citizen. I'm here on a work visa. And Russia has a horrible relationship with the United States, so getting a visa in Russia is impossible. All the other countries in the world would only issue visas to their own citizens. And when my dad passed away, I wasn't even able to go back home for his funeral. And just I always feel stuck between all these different factors. And again, like this war in Ukraine, there are so many things that I don't support that have something to do with the politics, of course, and with the government and I can't be associating myself with that place anymore. And because I have so many ties to my Jewish heritage and I've always been thinking about becoming a part of Israel because again, it's a very important part of who I am and my identity. And only when I came to the United States, I felt like, okay, I can finally be more open about being Jewish. When I was at Berklee, most of my recitals were actually me singing Jewish music and Ashkenazi music. Wow. And I would never be able to do that in Russia. And for me, this was an incredible opportunity, just exploring who I am, exploring the music, and I feel very, very connected with that music. You've had a lot of different journeys, this professional journey and a very personal, familial and individual journey. Where does that put you personally and professionally? Right now, I'm kind of at this place with my career where everything keeps changing and I keep seeing different opportunities and everything keeps developing so, so fast. Of course, long term, I would love to work on an Israeli movie as well. I think language is a very big thing, and I am learning Hebrew right now, even though I'm not in Israel. But I do feel like it's a very important thing and it's something that, again, brings me back to my roots and connects me to my ancestors, even though my grandparents, they spoke Yiddish. But still I feel like it's just an important part of who I am. And as soon as my Hebrew basically turns into something that I can use professionally, then it would be much, much easier and more convenient for me and the filmmakers to work on, let's say, Israeli movie. And I know that there are many Israelis working in Hollywood, and I would love to get to know them and potentially collaborate on a project that would actually be amazing. Right now, the world is just changing so fast, and every day something new happens and I'm trying to kind of protect myself, protect my family where I can, and just basically watching the world change every single second. So I hope that very, very soon we'll come to a point where things will stabilize and hopefully the war in Ukraine will stop as soon as possible. And I will be able to kind of take a breather and just absorb everything that's going on and plan accordingly. Right now, everything feels like chaos. Yes. It's hard to avoid that feeling these days. Let's turn back to the beginning of the conversation a little bit and tell us a little bit about your musical dreams. Finding that balance between work that's very, very crazy and very intense and art. Before the war in Ukraine, I also used to write music for a local theater in my hometown, which was an amazing way of just self-expression and artistry. And I do miss that. I don't think it's possible to do the same thing, keep doing it. And especially, again, considering everything else that's going on in the world at the moment, it's just unsafe for both parties, me and the theater I used to work with, to collaborate. But doing something like that and finding the time for it is definitely an amazing thing. And I was also recording songs for those theater productions. And this is kind of the dream job in a way, where you don't have to do it for the money. You can just do it for the sake of artistic pleasure, basically. And, you know, in terms of the movies, of course I can work even on bigger shows. And yes, I definitely have certain topics. Like, for instance, Schindler's List is one of my favorite movies and working with, let's say, Steven Spielberg or working on a movie about Holocaust. Because as I already mentioned, it's a very, very, very important part of my identity. And it's a very unique type of music and type of score that a movie like that requires. And maybe not necessarily even editing the music for a movie like that, maybe writing music for a movie like that, that would definitely be a big dream for me. Lena Glikson, we hope that you get to fulfill these dreams. And final question, next season of Stranger Things, are you working on it yet? Have my fingers crossed! Times Will Tell podcasts are available for download on iTunes, TuneIn, Pocket Casts, Stitcher, PlayerFM or wherever you ghttps://vimeo.com/751681395et your podcasts. IMAGE: Lena Glikson, music editor for "Stranger Things" (Courtesy)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    In The Growth Space
    S2 E11 Helen Frewin - How to Have Confidence in Yourself and in Your Work

    In The Growth Space

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 47:55


    Welcome to In The Growth Space. If you're a business leader with a hunger for growth, this podcast is for you!  This week David is joined by Helen Frewin, a business psychologist, executive coach, speaker and facilitator. Helen has worked in-house and as a consultant for 20 years, advising companies on how to select talent, then develop and engage people to be at their best. Now a director at consulting firm Totem, Helen's client list includes Disney, Warner Brothers Discovery, Intercontinental Hotels Group and various global law firms and banks. She's also the author of “Better Than Confidence” which was published in November of 2021. In this episode, you'll hear David & Helen discuss: Defining what confidence is/isn't The myth of confidence Mitigating anxiety in leadership Emotional Intelligence  Sign up for Inner Circle Summit 2022 here! Check out our Inner Circle Groups info here! Click here for access to my free ebook Check out https://www.davidmcglennen.com/podcasts/in-the-growth-space-2 for links, transcript, and more details

    TOTEM INFO SOIR
    TOTEM SPORT du 15-10-2022 à 07h14

    TOTEM INFO SOIR

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022


    L'actualité sportive vue de nos régions.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS BRIVE ET BASSIN DE LA DORDOGNE
    EDITION CORREZE ET BASSIN DORDOGNE du 14-10-2022 à 12h30

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS BRIVE ET BASSIN DE LA DORDOGNE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information à Tulle, Brive, dans le Nord du Lot et le pays sarladais avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS QUERCY-ROUERGUE
    EDITION AVEYRON-TARN-FIGEAC du 14-10-2022 à 06h00

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS QUERCY-ROUERGUE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information dans l'Aveyron, le Tarn et le pays de Figeac avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 19h01

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 18h01

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 12h30

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 12h00

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 08h31

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 08h00

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 07h30

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 07h00

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 06h30

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE
    EDITION LOZERE du 14-10-2022 à 06h00

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS LOZERE

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES
    EDITION ALES ET CEVENNES du 14-10-2022 à 19h01

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère, à Alès et dans les Cévennes avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM - LE JARDIN SECRET
    TOTEM - LE JARDIN SECRET du 14-10-2022 à 09h37

    TOTEM - LE JARDIN SECRET

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Chaque jour à 9h35 sur TOTEM, une célébrité se dévoile à vous au micro de David Martin.Retrouvez les meilleurs moments le samedi de 9h à 10h

    TOTEM - TELE ZAP
    TOTEM - TELE MOREAU du 14-10-2022 à 09h19

    TOTEM - TELE ZAP

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Chaque jour à 9h10 sur TOTEM, audiences, coup de coeur télé pour votre soirée et infos sur l'univers des médias avec Thierry Moreau

    TOTEM - LA RECRE DE 9H
    TOTEM - LA RECREATION du 14-10-2022 à 09h04

    TOTEM - LA RECRE DE 9H

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    L'info souriante de David Martin pour vous mettre de bonne humeur chaque matin.

    TOTEM - C'EST JUSTE MON AVIS
    TOTEM - TOUT EST PLUS CLAIR du 14-10-2022 à 07h18

    TOTEM - C'EST JUSTE MON AVIS

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    L'éclairage de Dominique Bahl sur un sujet qui fait l'actualité.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES
    EDITION ALES ET CEVENNES du 14-10-2022 à 18h01

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère, à Alès et dans les Cévennes avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM - SERVICE COMPRIS
    TOTEM - SERVICE COMPRIS du 14-10-2022 à 10h09

    TOTEM - SERVICE COMPRIS

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Avec David Martin, les conseils de nos experts et spécialistes pour simplifier votre quotidien.

    TOTEM - TELE ZAP
    TOTEM - TELE MOREAU du 14-10-2022 à 09h11

    TOTEM - TELE ZAP

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Chaque jour à 9h10 sur TOTEM, audiences, coup de coeur télé pour votre soirée et infos sur l'univers des médias avec Thierry Moreau

    TOTEM - SERVICE COMPRIS
    TOTEM - SERVICE COMPRIS du 14-10-2022 à 10h19

    TOTEM - SERVICE COMPRIS

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Avec David Martin, les conseils de nos experts et spécialistes pour simplifier votre quotidien.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES
    EDITION ALES ET CEVENNES du 14-10-2022 à 06h00

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère, à Alès et dans les Cévennes avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES
    EDITION ALES ET CEVENNES du 14-10-2022 à 06h30

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère, à Alès et dans les Cévennes avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES
    EDITION ALES ET CEVENNES du 14-10-2022 à 07h30

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère, à Alès et dans les Cévennes avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES
    EDITION ALES ET CEVENNES du 14-10-2022 à 08h00

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère, à Alès et dans les Cévennes avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES
    EDITION ALES ET CEVENNES du 14-10-2022 à 08h31

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère, à Alès et dans les Cévennes avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES
    EDITION ALES ET CEVENNES du 14-10-2022 à 12h30

    TOTEM INFO - EDITIONS ALES ET CEVENNES

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


    Ecoutez sur Totem l'information en Lozère, à Alès et dans les Cévennes avec les reportages de nos journalistes sur le terrain.

    Through the Balcony
    Episode 70: Reborn From Ashes

    Through the Balcony

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 145:10


    The trial of the spirit of Summer, Heyal, continues. Hopefully the trials so far have prepared the adventurers of 2.4.1 Drinks, and Bits of a Tealeaf, to prove themselves. Should they succeed all that is left is to combine the Totem of Summer with the Totems of Fall and Spring. One step closer... Music in this episode is: "Teller of Tales" by Kevin MacLeod, Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License, Incompetech; "Blade of the Lost" by Royalty Free Zone, Licensed under Creative Commons: Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, Royalty Free Zone; "Mystic Force" by Kevin MacLeod, Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License, Incompetech; "Ashen" by Misha Dioxin, Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, Free Music Archives; "Lush World" by TabletopAudio, Licensed under Creative Commons: Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, TabletopAudio; "Rites" by Misha Dioxin, Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, Free Music Archives; "Hope" by Alex Mason and the Minor Emotion, Licensed under Creative Commons: Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, Free Music Archives; "Northern Lullaby" by Sergey Cherimisinov, Licensed under Creative Commons: Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, Free Music Archives; "Long Note One" by Kevin MacLeod, Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License, Incompetech; "Without Redemption" by Kai Engel, Licensed under Creative Commons: Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, Free Music Archives; "Snowfall Intro" by Kai Engel, Licensed under Creative Commons: Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, Free Music Archives; "Monomyth - The Distant Sun" by Scott Buckley, Licensed under Creative Commons: Attibution-NonCommercial 4.0 International, ScottBuckley.com.au; "Virtutes Instrumenti" by Kevin MacLeod, Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License, Incompetech;

    New Books Network
    Jane Satterfield, "Letter to Emily Brontë," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 41:22


    Jane Satterfield speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her poem “Letter to Emily Brontë,” which appears in The Common's spring issue. Jane talks about her longstanding interest in the Brontë sisters, and why this pandemic poem is directed to Emily in particular. She also discusses letter-writing as a structure for poetry, and reads another poem published in The Common, “Totem,” which reflects on a childhood memory through more adult understanding. Jane Satterfield's most recent book is Apocalypse Mix, which was awarded the Autumn House Poetry Prize selected by David St. John. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts poetry fellowship, the 49th Parallel Award for Poetry from Bellingham Review, the Ledbury Poetry Festival Prize, and more. New poetry and essays appear in DIAGRAM, Ecotone, Orion, Literary Matters, The Missouri Review, The Pinch, Tupelo Quarterly, and elsewhere. She is married to poet Ned Balbo and lives in Baltimore, where she is a professor of writing at Loyola University Maryland. ­­Read Jane's poems and other writing in The Common at thecommononline.org/tag/Jane-Satterfield. Read more from Jane at janesatterfield.org. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She is a 2022 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in Poetry
    Jane Satterfield, "Letter to Emily Brontë," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

    New Books in Poetry

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 41:22


    Jane Satterfield speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her poem “Letter to Emily Brontë,” which appears in The Common's spring issue. Jane talks about her longstanding interest in the Brontë sisters, and why this pandemic poem is directed to Emily in particular. She also discusses letter-writing as a structure for poetry, and reads another poem published in The Common, “Totem,” which reflects on a childhood memory through more adult understanding. Jane Satterfield's most recent book is Apocalypse Mix, which was awarded the Autumn House Poetry Prize selected by David St. John. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts poetry fellowship, the 49th Parallel Award for Poetry from Bellingham Review, the Ledbury Poetry Festival Prize, and more. New poetry and essays appear in DIAGRAM, Ecotone, Orion, Literary Matters, The Missouri Review, The Pinch, Tupelo Quarterly, and elsewhere. She is married to poet Ned Balbo and lives in Baltimore, where she is a professor of writing at Loyola University Maryland. ­­Read Jane's poems and other writing in The Common at thecommononline.org/tag/Jane-Satterfield. Read more from Jane at janesatterfield.org. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She is a 2022 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

    The Common Magazine
    Jane Satterfield, "Letter to Emily Brontë," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

    The Common Magazine

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 41:22


    Jane Satterfield speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her poem “Letter to Emily Brontë,” which appears in The Common's spring issue. Jane talks about her longstanding interest in the Brontë sisters, and why this pandemic poem is directed to Emily in particular. She also discusses letter-writing as a structure for poetry, and reads another poem published in The Common, “Totem,” which reflects on a childhood memory through more adult understanding. Jane Satterfield's most recent book is Apocalypse Mix, which was awarded the Autumn House Poetry Prize selected by David St. John. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts poetry fellowship, the 49th Parallel Award for Poetry from Bellingham Review, the Ledbury Poetry Festival Prize, and more. New poetry and essays appear in DIAGRAM, Ecotone, Orion, Literary Matters, The Missouri Review, The Pinch, Tupelo Quarterly, and elsewhere. She is married to poet Ned Balbo and lives in Baltimore, where she is a professor of writing at Loyola University Maryland. ­­Read Jane's poems and other writing in The Common at thecommononline.org/tag/Jane-Satterfield. Read more from Jane at janesatterfield.org. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She is a 2022 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    New Books in Literature
    Jane Satterfield, "Letter to Emily Brontë," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

    New Books in Literature

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 41:22


    Jane Satterfield speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her poem “Letter to Emily Brontë,” which appears in The Common's spring issue. Jane talks about her longstanding interest in the Brontë sisters, and why this pandemic poem is directed to Emily in particular. She also discusses letter-writing as a structure for poetry, and reads another poem published in The Common, “Totem,” which reflects on a childhood memory through more adult understanding. Jane Satterfield's most recent book is Apocalypse Mix, which was awarded the Autumn House Poetry Prize selected by David St. John. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts poetry fellowship, the 49th Parallel Award for Poetry from Bellingham Review, the Ledbury Poetry Festival Prize, and more. New poetry and essays appear in DIAGRAM, Ecotone, Orion, Literary Matters, The Missouri Review, The Pinch, Tupelo Quarterly, and elsewhere. She is married to poet Ned Balbo and lives in Baltimore, where she is a professor of writing at Loyola University Maryland. ­­Read Jane's poems and other writing in The Common at thecommononline.org/tag/Jane-Satterfield. Read more from Jane at janesatterfield.org. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She is a 2022 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

    New Books in Literary Studies
    Jane Satterfield, "Letter to Emily Brontë," The Common magazine (Spring, 2022)

    New Books in Literary Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 41:22


    Jane Satterfield speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her poem “Letter to Emily Brontë,” which appears in The Common's spring issue. Jane talks about her longstanding interest in the Brontë sisters, and why this pandemic poem is directed to Emily in particular. She also discusses letter-writing as a structure for poetry, and reads another poem published in The Common, “Totem,” which reflects on a childhood memory through more adult understanding. Jane Satterfield's most recent book is Apocalypse Mix, which was awarded the Autumn House Poetry Prize selected by David St. John. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts poetry fellowship, the 49th Parallel Award for Poetry from Bellingham Review, the Ledbury Poetry Festival Prize, and more. New poetry and essays appear in DIAGRAM, Ecotone, Orion, Literary Matters, The Missouri Review, The Pinch, Tupelo Quarterly, and elsewhere. She is married to poet Ned Balbo and lives in Baltimore, where she is a professor of writing at Loyola University Maryland. ­­Read Jane's poems and other writing in The Common at thecommononline.org/tag/Jane-Satterfield. Read more from Jane at janesatterfield.org. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She is a 2022 Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellow. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

    Other Voices
    Indigenous ways of knowing are a totem for Sarah Walsh

    Other Voices

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 38:10


    When Sarah Walsh was working with indigenous people in Canada, she experienced a national Thanksgiving address.“It is a way of acknowledging every piece of the Earth … and to center yourself in your role as a human being in the Earth, not on the Earth, but in the Earth, and how it influences who you are and how life happens,” she says in this week's Enterprise podcast.Walsh is now the associate director of the Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy where she oversees an initiative to honor the indigenous history of the Bozen Kill Conservation Corridor. On Friday, a ceremony was held to celebrate new kiosk signs at the Bozen Kill and Wolf Creek Falls Preserves to inform visitors of the land's history.https://altamontenterprise.com/09252022/indigenous-ways-knowing-are-totem-sarah-walsh Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Electronic music radioshows
    l'empelt feat. John Talabot feat. juns feat. oma totem feat. Meritxell Bonastre (Original Mix)

    Electronic music radioshows

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 4:43


    l'empelt feat. John Talabot feat. juns feat. oma totem feat. Meritxell Bonastre (Original Mix) by La Confiserie Sonore

    The Kaleidosphere
    Episode 28: Trees and Totems

    The Kaleidosphere

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 94:19


    Having reached an agreement with Jantor, the party allows him to attune to the Totem of Tiggal, allowing them to travel north much more quickly. Having defeated the gnolls only hours ago, the party sets out through the Dagharalish Mountains and the Erohavian North in search of the Eye of the Norns.

    il posto delle parole
    Maria Laura Bergamaschi "Kum! Festival"

    il posto delle parole

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 32:53


    Maria Laura Bergamaschi"Kum! Festival"https://www.kumfestival.it/Il tema del fine vita chiude un ciclo aperto a suo tempo con l'edizione del festival dedicata a L'origine della vita.La crisi pandemica che ha colpito le nostre società non ha fatto che rendere più drammatica un'esperienza che interroga da sempre la vita umana. Come e più di tutte le soglie che la nostra avventura attraversa, l'ultima si carica di significati molteplici e proietta la sua ombra potente sulle precedenti.Ma il fine vita è ancora un momento della vita, un passaggio in cui è possibile fare qualcosa di sé, un'occasione in cui dare testimonianza di un'esistenza e raccogliere la testimonianza di chi l'ha accompagnata e la accompagna. Ecco perché il tempo della fine è un tempo enigmatico, apre domande etiche, scuote la politica, divide l'opinione pubblica, suscita controversie giuridiche, interroga le pratiche mediche e i saperi scientifici, sfida le più antiche tradizioni religiose.Così il festival allargherà lo sguardo per cerchi concentrici, estendendo l'interrogazione alla fine delle grandi narrazioni storiche, al tramonto di mondi culturali e assetti geopolitici, alla catastrofe climatica che sembra procedere inarrestabile, alla nascita e alla morte delle stelle e degli universi.Federico Leoni, Massimo RecalcatiVenerdì 14 ottobre 2022, ore 18:30Evento Speciale"Il faticoso rapporto dell'uomo con la fine"Frammenti di lettura da La freccia ferma di Elvio FachinelliMaria Laura Bergamaschi, Monica Carestia, Pino Pitasi, Paolo BorinMaria Laura BergamaschiMaria Laura Bergamaschi vive a Milano, dove pratica la psicoanalisi nel tentativo di farne un lavoro “senza fissa dimora”.Socio jonas PAVIA e Ancona. Socia di società pavese di psicoanalisi.Nel 2018 ha pubblicato per la collana tyche di Mimesis“Adolescenti migranti e nuovi mondo”.Elvio Fachinelli"La freccia ferma"Tre tentativi di annullare il tempoAdelphihttps://www.adelphi.it/«In una grande città moderna, un uomo tenta di annullare il tempo, di rendere non avvenuto quanto gli accade. La sorpresa che ciò provoca suscita una ricerca, che si muove su più piani. Il tentativo di annullamento risulta collegato con un problema di rinnegamento della morte, secondo una configurazione caratteristica che però si ritrova anche altrove: per esempio, nella trasformazione arcaica dei morti in antenati e in un evento tipico di questo secolo, il fascismo.«Da quest'esame si profila una possibilità: non già quella di uguagliare una vicenda individuale a quella di interi gruppi o società (come tentò Freud in Totem e tabù), ma quella di fondare la differenza, ineliminabile, tra individuo e società nella diversa distribuzione di posizioni comuni.«Ne risultano anche alcune questioni chiave, che riguardano: il problema del sacro pre-divino e post-divino; la storia, intesa non soltanto come “somma di tutte le storie possibili” (Braudel), ma anche come somma di quelle impossibili; infine l'idea di un sapere sull'uomo che abbia come asse centrale comune l'elaborazione temporale (cronotipia)». Così Fachinelli stesso presentava questo libro, quando lo pubblicò presso la sua casa editrice L'erba voglio nel 1979.Oggi lo leggiamo come una di quelle rare indagini che sanno intrecciare e mescolare con naturalezza l'analisi delle potenze psichiche che reggono un singolo e il singolo con quella sulle potenze che operano nella storia.IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEAscoltare fa Pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/