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natural gas pipelines under the Baltic Sea between Russia and Germany

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Latest podcast episodes about Nord Stream

Audio Mises Wire
Nord Stream 2: The Value of German-Russian Cooperation

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Hopefully, increased interdependence and overlapping interests will help to shape a future of stability in Europe and continue the precious absence of another major war on the continent. Original Article: "Nord Stream 2: The Value of German-Russian Cooperation" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

Mises Media
Nord Stream 2: The Value of German-Russian Cooperation

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Hopefully, increased interdependence and overlapping interests will help to shape a future of stability in Europe and continue the precious absence of another major war on the continent. Original Article: "Nord Stream 2: The Value of German-Russian Cooperation" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

The Critical Hour
Putin, Merkel, Macron Talk Normandy Format for Resolution of Issues; Imperialist Return to Africa

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 115:39


Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss the Iraqi elections. It appears that the influential Shi'ite cleric and nationalist Moqtada al-Sadr's party, Sairoun, is currently performing the best.Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net & CounterPunch and the author of "Danger to Society: Against Vaccine Passports," joins us to discuss Julian Assange. Kevin Gosztola argues that the recent information regarding Mike Pompeo's moves to kidnap and assassinate Julian Assange proves that the legal persecution of the publisher is driven by an unethical and illegal thirst for revenge. Also, we discuss the upcoming hearing at the end of October regarding a previous lower court decision. Dan Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss the Normandy Four. The leaders of Russia, Germany, and France are discussing the need to coordinate their efforts to deal with a myriad of international security issues in a format known as the "Normandy Four."Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss Africa. Dr. Horne analyzes the resurgence of coups and imperialist intervention in Africa. Recent events may show that the US empire and the French imperialists are on the move again in the resource-rich continent.K. J. Noh, peace activist, writer, and teacher, joins us to discuss China. Former Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott published a speech that he gave in Taiwan. The speech can be interpreted in several ways, but many see it as a message that the Chinese island should not look to the West for protection if a war starts. International security observers argue that the West is setting Taiwan up for a fall as they push them towards a crushing military defeat. Obi Egbuna, activist, and US Rep for The Zimbabwean Newspapers, joins us to discuss Libya. The US/NATO imperial regime-change operation has led to disastrous conditions in the African nation. Additionally, it has opened the gateway to African migration to Western Europe. Marjorie Cohn, professor of law at the Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego, joins us to discuss torture. The Biden administration is moving forward with an absurd argument that their highly publicized torture program is a state secret. This move comes to stop the court from compelling psychologists involved in the torture to testify. Mark Sleboda, Moscow-based international relations security analyst, joins us to discuss EU gas issues and the AUKUS submarine deal. There is talk of fast-tracking the Nord Stream 2 pipeline process as the EU faces a disastrous shortage of fuel.

BeursTalk
Hoge gasprijs is geen bedreiging voor de groei

BeursTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:09


De indices kregen even een flinke tik, als gevolg van de hoge aardgasprijs. Dat bleek uiteindelijk van korte duur en de experts van dienst deze week weten wel waarom. "Dit gaat hooguit een procent groei kosten", denkt Edin Mujagic van OHV Vermogensbeheer. Gezien de sterke post-coronagroei is dat wel te doen. "Opvallend is ook hoe snel overheden klaar staan om burgers te helpen", zegt Bob Homan van ING. Hij denkt ook dat Europa nu vaart zal maken met de extra gasleiding van Rusland naar Duitsland, Nordstream 2.Ook de crisis op de Chinese vastgoedmarkt slaat Edin en Bob niet uit het lood. Ja, de vastgoedgoedsector is 10 procent van de Chinese economie, maar de Chinese overheid doet er alles aan om besmetting te voorkomen. Geen reden tot grote zorgen dus.Aan het einde van de podcast hoor je een kort gesprek met Martijn Rozemuller van VanEckETF's, de partner van BeursTalk. Dat doen we elke twee weken, deze week gaan we in op ESG-beleggen in China en beleggen in zeldzame aardmetalen. Luisteren dus!De gepresenteerde informatie door VanEck Asset Management B.V. en de aan haar verbonden en gelieerde bedrijven (samen "VanEck") is enkel bedoeld voor informatie en advertentie doeleinden aan Nederlandse beleggers die Nederlands belastingplichtig zijn en vormt geen juridisch, fiscaal of beleggingsadvies. VanEck Asset Management B.V. is een UCITS beheerder. Loop geen onnodig risico. Lees de Essentiële Beleggersinformatie of het Essentiële-informatiedocument. Meer informatie? www.vanecketfs.nl

Spectator Radio
The Edition: Power grab

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 38:29


In this week's episode: with the energy crisis picking up pace who are set to be the winners and losers in this cold war for gas? Domestically we are seeing queues for petrol, rising gas prices all in the face of the Government's net-zero agenda. And internationally things are looking just as turbulent, with China buying up as much fuel as possible, America becoming more isolationist when it comes to its energy supply, and Russia feeling more powerful in its place thanks to its Nord Stream 2 pipeline. These are the issues that Seb Kennedy addresses in his cover piece this week for The Spectator. He speaks about his findings on the podcast along with Senior Reporter for Energy and Commodities for Bloomberg and co-author of The World for Sale, Jack Farchy. (00:50) Also this week: can the police reform with Cressida Dick still in charge? Leroy Logan writes in this week's Spectator that if the Met and police are to reform its subculture of racism and misogyny it can't be done with Cressida Dick still at the helm. He is joined on the podcast by Sharon Haye, a former officer and policing advocate. (14:06) And finally: what is the future for British butchery? Olivia Potts is learning butchery. And in this week's Spectator, she writes about her experiences as well as the state of the industry in the UK today. Nigel Jarvis is a fourth-generation butcher who has just retired after an unexpected boom in custom during lockdown. (28:52)  Hosted by Lara Prendergast  Produced by Sam Holmes

The Edition
Power grab: who's hoarding all the gas?

The Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 38:29


In this week's episode: with the energy crisis picking up pace who are set to be the winners and losers in this cold war for gas? Domestically we are seeing queues for petrol, rising gas prices all in the face of the Government's net-zero agenda. And internationally things are looking just as turbulent, with China buying up as much fuel as possible, America becoming more isolationist when it comes to its energy supply, and Russia feeling more powerful in its place thanks to its Nord Stream 2 pipeline. These are the issues that Seb Kennedy addresses in his cover piece this week for The Spectator. He speaks about his findings on the podcast along with Senior Reporter for Energy and Commodities for Bloomberg and co-author of The World for Sale, Jack Farchy. (00:50) Also this week: can the police reform with Cressida Dick still in charge? Leroy Logan writes in this week's Spectator that if the Met and police are to reform its subculture of racism and misogyny it can't be done with Cressida Dick still at the helm. He is joined on the podcast by Sharon Haye, a former officer and policing advocate. (14:06) And finally: what is the future for British butchery? Olivia Potts is learning butchery. And in this week's Spectator, she writes about her experiences as well as the state of the industry in the UK today. Nigel Jarvis is a fourth-generation butcher who has just retired after an unexpected boom in custom during lockdown. (28:52)  Hosted by Lara Prendergast  Produced by Sam Holmes

The Critical Hour
EUROPEAN UNION GAS PRICES EXPLODE

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 115:51


K. J. Noh, peace activist, writer, and teacher, joins us to discuss China. President Joe Biden has reportedly advised the Japanese Prime Minister that the US is willing to go to war with China over the Senkakus Islands. Also, Taiwan's leader has been arguing that her nation is at the forefront of democracy worldwide and must therefore be protected from China.RT European correspondent Peter Oliver joins us to discuss gas prices in Europe. Gas prices in Europe have skyrocketed to the highest numbers in a decade, as political wrangling over the Nord Stream 2 pipeline dampens hope for immediate relief. The pipeline project is complete and the system is ready to transport badly needed fuel to European households.Dr. Jack Rasmus, professor in economics and politics at St. Mary's College in California, joins us to discuss the economy. Democrats are working on the major spending bills, as indications from Capitol Hill spell major concessions from the left flank of the party. Also, President Biden is discussing the filibuster, and the discussion of minting a trillion-dollar coin has gained enough credibility for a mainstream discussion.Oscar Chacon, co-founder and executive director of Alianza Americas, joins us to discuss immigration. Immigrants and like-minded activists are gathering outside of the Brooklyn home of Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to pressure him for action on a comprehensive immigration reform bill. In the absence of comprehensive legislation, activists want a path to citizenship added to the current spending bill.Ajamu Baraka, 2016 US vice-presidential candidate for the Green Party, joins us to discuss Africom. The Black Alliance for Peace (BAP) has begun an "International Month of Action Against Africom." In their press release, the BAP explains that "The Black Alliance for Peace's International Month of Action Against AFRICOM aims to raise the public's awareness about the U.S. military's existence in Africa, and how the presence of U.S. forces exacerbates violence and instability throughout the continent."Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net & CounterPunch and the author of "Danger to Society: Against Vaccine Passports," joins us to discuss the John Durham investigation. The probe into the origins of the Russia-gate operation has revealed a tangled web of lies directly implicating the 2016 Clinton campaign. Is this investigation an honest inquiry or further insider dealings to cover the FBI's complicity in the project?Ted Rall, political cartoonist and syndicated columnist, joins us to discuss press freedom. Patrick Lawrence has a new article in consortiumnews.com in which he argues "in the failed corporate coverage of Steven Donziger and Julian Assange there is an imposition of darkness, ignorance inflicted on Americans with intent." Lawrence describes the way the news and information are controlled and corrupted in the US empire.Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss Iran. The US State Department has spoken with China in an attempt to reduce their purchases of oil from Iran. US attempts at crushing the Iranian economy have been thwarted consistently by Russia and China. The acceptance of the Islamic Republic into the Shanghai Cooperation Organization appears to signal little or no future cooperation with US sanctions.

The Critical Hour
Nord Stream 2 Prepares for Gas Transit to EU; China is Dead Serious

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 117:46


Chris Garaffa, web developer and technologist, joins us to discuss Facebook. Facebook has come back online after a major service disruption. There is suspicion as to the origin of the massive attack on the tech giant after "60 Minutes" ran an attack piece on the Silicon Valley powerhouse and nearly all major US media outlets followed suit just hours before the outage.Dan Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss the European Union's fuel crisis. The Nord Stream 2 pipeline has been charged with gas and is ready to send badly needed energy to the fuel-starved EU. However, despite this crisis, anti-Russian forces are working to disrupt the opening of the pipeline.Mark Sleboda, Moscow-based international relations security analyst, joins us to discuss Lithuania. The tiny Eastern European nation of Lithuania is building a military base in hopes that more US soldiers will fill the barracks. The US has a massive number of military bases around the world, and observers suspect that they will leap at the chance to create another opportunity to launder US treasury dollars through military operations.Roger Harris, human rights activist and board member for the 32-year-old anti-imperialist human rights organization, Task Force on the Americas, joins us to discuss Venezuela. The US empire is moving to extradite Venezuelan diplomat Alex Saab, and there are reports that he is already facing torture. Meanwhile, Forbes has run an article accusing the diplomat of being a criminal "money man."Jim Kavanagh, writer at thepolemicist.net & CounterPunch and the author of "Danger to Society: Against Vaccine Passports," joins us to discuss Julian Assange. In his latest consortiumnews.com article, Jonathan Cook argues that the US empire did not need to poison Julian Assange. He goes on to say that the so-called "legal" machinations that are being used are every bit as rogue and unjust as Mike Pompeo's gangster proposal for kidnapping and assassination.Professor Peter Kuznick, author and historian, and Professor Ken Hammond, professor of East Asian and global history at New Mexico State University and activist with Pivot to Peace, come together to discuss China. As the US fumbles through a ham-handed policy towards Taiwan, China is making it clear that they are deadly serious about their red lines. US neocons have shifted their war machine to Asia, but they may be playing a losing hand.Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss Iran. Iran has made it clear that they require the removal of sanctions for them to accept the US back into the JCPOA nuclear deal. Also, the Islamic Republic has been formally accepted into the Shanghai Cooperation Organization.Dr. Iyabo Obasanjo, professor, epidemiologist, veterinarian, and the daughter of former Nigerian President Mr. Olusegun Obasanjo, joins us to discuss Africa. The US empire is now working to expand its military operations in Africa and the oil-rich nation of Nigeria is ground zero for its proxy wars.

The Money GPS
The Breaking Point Has Arrived

The Money GPS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 16:57


TOPICS AND TIMESTAMPS: The Unfolding 0:00 ENERGY CRISIS 0:54 MARGIN CALLS 10:07 HUGE SHIFTS 13:23 $GPS INSIGHTS #1 LOW INVENTORY, HIGH DEMAND, LOW SUPPLY, AND OUTAGES #2 INFLATION WILL REMAIN, LEAVING SAVERS DESTROYED #3 HEDGE AGAINST INFLATION AS BEST YOU CAN Oil at 7-year high after OPEC+ decides on cautious increase https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-pandemic-business-economy-prices-opec-54c606517408481b9f99895b168a07cb Bloomberg Commodities Index Hits Record High - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-04/commodities-index-hits-record-as-world-rebound-meets-shortages?srnd=premium-canada 1240x-1.png (1240×697) https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/i6mdjYc4EBUs/v2/pidjEfPlU1QWZop3vfGKsrX.ke8XuWirGYh1PKgEw44kE/1240x-1.png Dubai Port Operator DP World Sees Lasting Supply Disruptions - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-01/dubai-port-operator-dp-world-sees-lasting-supply-disruptions?srnd=markets-vp Power crunch looms in India as coal stocks reach crisis point | Financial Times https://www.ft.com/content/a3ca4eaa-9ecc-4a81-ad53-4902fae4bd61 bfm4DA5_0.jpg (1015×571) https://cms.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/bfm4DA5_0.jpg?itok=odsRxmhY Amazon (AMZN) Stock Turns Negative For Year - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-04/amazon-turns-negative-for-2021-as-higher-yields-add-to-pressure 1240x-1.png (1240×697) https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/il_Rs7oZAaac/v2/pidjEfPlU1QWZop3vfGKsrX.ke8XuWirGYh1PKgEw44kE/1240x-1.png Exclusive: Commodity traders face big margin calls as gas prices soar | Reuters https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/exclusive-commodity-traders-face-big-margin-calls-gas-prices-soar-2021-10-04/ Commodity traders face big margin calls as gas prices soar | Financial Post https://financialpost.com/pmn/business-pmn/commodity-traders-face-big-margin-calls-as-gas-prices-soar-2#:~:text=the%20sources%20said.-,Commodity%20traders%20face%20big%20margin%20calls%20as%20gas%20prices%20soar,their%20profits%2C%20the%20sources%20said. ARERA - Energy: Government intervention reduces the impact of increases, + 29.8% for electricity and + 14.4% for gas. Zero impact on families in difficulty https://www.arera.it/it/com_stampa/21/210928agg.htm Silicon's 300% Surge Throws Another Price Shock at the World - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-01/silicon-s-300-surge-throws-another-price-shock-at-the-world Texas Company Offers Truckers $14K a Week During Tough Times for the Trucking Industry | Engaging Car News, Reviews, and Content You Need to See – alt_driver https://altdriver.com/country/texas-company-offers-drivers-14k-a-week-during-truck-driver-shortage/ Nord Stream 2 operator starts gas filling of first string - Business & Economy - TASS https://tass.com/economy/1345509 Fed Prepares to Launch Review of Possible Central Bank Digital Currency - WSJ https://www.wsj.com/articles/fed-prepares-to-launch-review-of-possible-central-bank-digital-currency-11633339800 cbdcs.jpg (930×731) https://cms.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/cbdcs.jpg?itok=XN6TAl7Z Statement by Philip Lowe, Governor: Monetary Policy Decision | Media Releases | RBA https://www.rba.gov.au/media-releases/2021/mr-21-22.html

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Constraining Putin's Russia

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Thomas Graham, distinguished fellow at CFR, leads a conversation on constraining Putin's Russia. FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Thomas Graham with us to talk about Putin's Russia. Mr. Graham is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior advisor at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He is cofounder of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program at Yale University, and is also a research fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale. He previously served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and director for Russian affairs from 2002 to 2004. His résumé is very distinguished. I will just also say that he is a U.S. diplomat who served two tours of duty in Moscow, where he worked on political affairs. So, Mr. Graham, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought you could get us started by talking about the primary interests at stake in U.S.-Russia relations. GRAHAM: Great. Thank you very much, Irina, for that introduction, and it's a real pleasure to be with all of you here today. I want to start with three broad points that will frame the rest of our discussion. The first is that the problem that the United States faces is not simply with Putin; it is with Russia more generally speaking. The last seven years of very difficult, challenging adversarial relationship is really not an aberration in the history of the relationship between our two countries. In fact, from the moment the United States emerged as a major power on the global stage at the very end of the nineteenth century, we have had a rivalry with Russia. And the issues that divide us today are the ones that divided us 125, 150 years ago: We have opposing worldviews. We have different geopolitical interests. And clearly, we have different systems of values that inform our domestic political systems. This rivalry has intensified, ebbed and flowed during the twentieth century. But the effort we made at partnership after the breakup of the Soviet Union up until 2014, marked by the eruption of the crisis in Ukraine, is really the aberration in the history of relations between our two countries and one that was founded very much on the fact that Russia endured a period of strategic weakness. So the issue we have to deal with Russia and how we're going to deal with Russia well into the future, even after Putin departs—which he will, obviously, at some point, if only for biological reasons. The second point that I would make is that Russia is not going to go away. We hear a lot in the public debate in the United States about Russian decline, about the population/demographic problems it has, about its stagnating economy, and so forth. None of this is necessarily untrue, but I think it tends to exaggerate the problems that Russia faces. It ignores the problems that all other major countries face—including China, the United States, and many major European countries—but it also overlooks the very great strengths that Russia has had for decades that are going to make it a player and an important player on the global stage, nuclear weapons to begin with. We should never forget that Russia remains the only country that can destroy the United States as a functioning society in thirty minutes. Russia has the largest natural endowment of any country in the world, a country that can pretend to self-sufficiency and, in fact, is better placed than most other countries to deal with a breakdown in globalization in the decades to come if that, indeed, happens. It has a veto on the U.N. Security Council, which makes it an important player on issues of importance to the United States, and it has a talented population that has fostered a scientific community that, for example, is capable of taking advances in technology and developing the military applications from them. Just look at the strength that Russia exhibits in cyberspace, for example—again, a major challenge for the United States. So Russia is going to continue to be a challenge. One other thing that I should have mentioned here is that the Russian state throughout history and Putin's Russia today has demonstrated a keen ability to mobilize the resources of their own society for state purposes. So even if in relative terms they may be weaker and weakening vis-à-vis China and the United States, in some ways that political will, that ability to mobilize, allows Russia to play a much larger role than mere indicators of its economic size and population size would suggest. Now, Russia clashes with the United States across a whole range of issues, and as I said that is going to continue for some time. And this brings me to my third point: How we should think about American foreign policy, what our guidelines should be in dealing with Russia. And here there are three, I think, key elements to this. First, the United States needs to preserve strategic stability. We need to have that nuclear balance between us (sic) and the United States. This is an existential question. And as I already mentioned, Russia does have a tremendous nuclear capability. Second, the United States should seek to manage its competition with Russia responsibly. We want to avoid or reduce the risk of a direct military conflict that could escalate to the nuclear level. This is—also, I think, recognizes that the United States is not going to be able to compel Russia to capitulate on issues that are of interest to us, nor are we going to be able to radically change the way they think about their own national interests. So it's a competitive relationship and we need to manage that responsibly. And finally, given the complex world that we live in today—the very real transnational challenges we face: climate change, pandemic diseases, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction—the United States should seek, to the extent possible, ways to cooperate with Russia in dealing with these issues. We should recognize that Russia is not necessarily the only player nor necessarily the most important player in dealing with these challenges, but it does have a role to play along with other major powers in handling these transnational issues. So those, I think, are three sort of broad points that help set the stage for our discussion. Now let me turn sort of very briefly to the questions about U.S. policy. How do we deal with this Russia? What are sort of—the way we should think about American foreign policy? And here the point I would make is that we should think of the policy in terms of what I would call the three Ds: defense, deterrence, and dialogue. Now, defense and deterrence in many ways go together. If you have a very good defense, if you demonstrate an ability and willingness to defend your interests effectively and deliberately, then you tend to deter another power. They have less reason to want to attack you. But if deterrence fails, you very much need to be able to defend yourself—to disrupt Russian operations in cyberspace, for example, or disrupt military operations by the Russians that you find problematic in some way. So defense and deterrence go together, and we need to think about that. Now, you build these elements on a number of other things that we're all familiar with. A strong military—strong, capable military—is, obviously, an element of both defense and deterrence, and something that we have managed quite well in the past and I imagine will manage quite well going into the future. Cyber defenses are also an important element of constraining Russia on the global stage. Now, here the United States really has much room for improvement. We built our internet, our cyberspace largely for the accessibility, the ability to pass information from one entity to another, and we spent much less attention to the security of that system. As cyberspace has become more important to our socioeconomic and political lives, we really need to devote much more attention to cybersecurity, hardening our commuter—computer networks, for example, making sure we have strong passwords and so forth, something that I think we now recognize but we need to put a much greater effort into doing that. Third area of defense and deterrence is strong alliances. When we're thinking about Russia, this is clearly the transatlantic community, NATO, our relations with our other European partners. And here, we need to develop the types of military/defense cooperation that we need to demonstrate quite clearly that the United States, along with the rest of the NATO allies, is ready and prepared to meet its Article 5 guarantees to collective security should the Russians do something that is untoward in our neighborhood. And then, finally, and I think of increasing importance, is the question of national unity. National unity, national resilience, has really become a key element in defense and deterrence at this point. We need to demonstrate to the Russians that we have sufficient national unity to clearly identify what our interests are and pursue them on the international stage. One of Putin's close colleagues several years ago said that what Putin is doing is messing with the Americans' minds, and certainly we've seen that over the past several years. Putin hasn't sowed the discord in the United States, but he certainly has tried to exploit it for Russian purposes. And this is something that he's going to concentrate on in the future, in part because he recognizes the dangers of military confrontation with the United States. So great-power competition, from the Kremlin's standpoint, is going to move very, very quickly from the kinetic realm to the cyber realm, and we need to be able to deal with that. So building national unity at home, overcoming our polarization, is really perhaps one of the key steps in constraining Russia on the global stage. And then, finally, some very brief words about dialogue. We tend to downplay this in our national discussion. Many believe that diplomatic relations are—should not be branded as a reward for bad behavior. But I think if you look at this objectively, you'll see that diplomatic relations are very important as a way of defending and advancing our national concerns. It's a way that we can convey clearly to the Russians what our expectations are, what our goals are, what our redlines are, and the responses that we're capable of taking if Russia crosses them. At the same time, we can learn from the Russians what their goals are, what their motivations are, what their redlines are, and we can factor that into our own policy. This is a major element of managing the competition between our two countries responsibly. You'll see that we have begun to engage in negotiations and diplomacy with the Russians much more under President Biden than we did under President Trump. We've already launched strategic stability talks with the aim of coming up with a new concept of strategic stability that's adequate to the strategic environment of the present day and the near future. We've engaged in cybersecurity talks, which my understanding is have, in fact, had some success over the past several weeks. Where we, I think, have lagged is in the discussion of regional issues—Europe, Ukraine, the Middle East, for example. These are areas where there is still potential for conflict, and the United States and Russia ought to be sitting down and talking about these issues on a regular basis. So three Ds—defense, deterrence, and diplomacy or dialogue—are the ways that we should be thinking about our relationship with Russia. And obviously, we'll need to adjust each of these three elements to the specific issue at hand, whether it be in Europe, whether it be in the nuclear realm, cyberspace, and so forth. Now, with that as a way—by way of introduction, I am very pleased to entertain your questions. FASKIANOS: Tom, thanks very much for that terrific overview and analysis. We're going to go to all of you now for your questions. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the icon, and I will call on you, and you can tell us what institution you are with; or you can type your question in the Q&A box, although if you want to ask it you can raise your hand. We encourage that. And if you're typing your question, please let us know what college or university you're with. So I'm going to take the first raised-hand question from Babak Salimitari. And unmute yourself. Q: Can you guys hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hello. I'm a third-year UCI student, economics. I have a question. I'm going to sound a bit like Sean Hannity here, so please forgive me, but I have a question about that Nord Stream 2 pipeline that you constantly hear on the news, and it just doesn't make that much sense for me of why this pipeline was allowed to be completed into the heart of Europe considering Russia's strength with natural gases and the leverage that they have over Europe with that pipeline. Why was that allowed to be completed? GRAHAM: Well, I think from the standpoint of the Biden administration this was a matter of what we call alliance management. Germany is clearly a key ally for the United States in Europe, and the Germans were very committed to the completion of that pipeline, starting with Chancellor Angela Merkel down through I think both the leading political parties and the German business community. So I think they made the decision for that. But let me step back because I'd like to challenge a lot of the assumptions about the Nord Stream 2 project here in the United States, which I think misconceive it, misframe the question, and tend to exaggerate the dangers that is poses. The first point that I would make is that Europe now and in the future will have and need Russian gas. It's taken a substantial amount in the past—in the past decades, and even as it moves forward towards a green revolution it will continue to take considerable amounts of Russian gas. It can't do without that gas. So the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, contrary to what you hear in the United States or at the U.S. Congress, I don't think poses an additional threat to Europe's energy security, no larger than the threat that was posed before that pipeline was completed. The Europeans, I think are aware of the problems that that poses, and they've taken steps over the past several years to integrate the gas—the gas distribution network in Europe, to build facilities to import liquified natural gas, all as a way of eroding the leverage that Gazprom might have had over energy markets in Europe. And that has been quite successful over the past—over the past several years. Now, I think, you know, the other issue that comes up in the discussion in the United States is Ukraine, because Nord Stream 2 clearly provides Russia with a way to import the gas into Europe and bypass Ukraine at the—at the same time. And Ukraine is going to suffer a significant loss in budgetary revenue because of the decline in transit fees that it gets from the transportation of Russian gas across its territory. You know, that is a problem, but there are ways of dealing with that: by helping Ukraine fill the budgetary gap, by helping Ukraine transition away from a reliance on gas to other forms of energy, of helping Ukraine develop the green-energy resources that will make it a much more important partner in the European energy equation than it is now. And then finally, you know, it strikes me as somewhat wrongheaded for Ukraine to put itself in a position where it is reliant on a country that is clearly a belligerent for a significant part of its federal revenue. So we need to think hard with the Ukrainians about how they deal with this issue, how they wean themselves off Russian transit fees, and then I think we have a situation where we can help Ukraine, we can manage the energy-security situation in Europe, we can reduce any leverage that Russia might have, and that Nord Stream 2 really doesn't pose a significant risk to the United States or our European allies over the long run. FASKIANOS: Thank you. We're going to take the next question from the written queue from Kenneth Mayers, who's at St Francis—sorry, that just popped away; oh, sorry—St. Francis College. Thinking beyond this triangular framework, what pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually, even globally, beneficial ways? GRAHAM: What triangular relationship are we talking about? FASKIANOS: His—thinking beyond this triangular framework and— GRAHAM: Oh, OK. So I think it's defense, deterrence, and diplomacy is the— FASKIANOS: Correct. GRAHAM: OK. Can you repeat the final part of the question, then? FASKIANOS: What pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually beneficial ways? GRAHAM: Well, there are a number of areas in which we can work together beneficially. If you think about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, for example, the United States and Russia over the past two decades have played a major role in both securing weapons that were located in Russia, but also in securing highly-enriched uranium that was in Soviet-designed reactors throughout the former Soviet space. We have taken a lead together in setting down rules and procedures that reduce the risk of nuclear material—fissile material getting into the hands of terrorist organizations. And we have played a role together in trying to constrain the Iranian nuclear program. Russia played an instrumental role in the conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that we signed in 2015 that the Trump administration walked away with, but they will continue to play a role in constraining Iranians' nuclear ambitions going forward. And we've also worked in a cooperative fashion in dealing with the North Korean nuclear program. So there are areas in nonproliferation where the two countries can work together. On climate change, I mean, I think the big challenge for the United States is actually persuading Russia that climate change is a significant threat to their own security. They're slowly beginning to change that view, but as they come around to recognizing that they have to deal with climate change there are a number of areas where the two countries can cooperate. One of the things that climate is doing is melting the permafrost. That is destabilizing the foundation of much of Russia's energy infrastructure in areas where gas and oil are extracted for export abroad. The United States has dome technologies that the Russians might find of interest in stabilizing that infrastructure. They suffer from problems of Siberian fires—peat-bog fires, forest fires—an area that, obviously, is of concern to the United States as well. And there may be room for cooperation there, two. And then, finally, you know, the United States and Russia have two of the leading scientific communities in the entire world. We ought to be working together on ways that we can help mitigate the consequences of climate change going forward. So I see an array of areas where the two countries could cooperate, but that will depend on good diplomacy in Washington and a receptivity on the part of the Russians which we haven't seen quite yet. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Jeffrey Ko. You can unmute yourself. Thank you. Q: Hi. So I'm Jeffrey Ko. I'm an international relations master's student at Carnegie Mellon. And my question has to deal with these private military forces, and especially the Wagner Group. And so I would like to know, you know, how does this play into our security strategy regarding Russia in countries that have seen proxy warfare? And how does this—how difficult will it be to engage with Russia either diplomatically or militarily on the use of these gray-zone tactics, and specifically utilizing the Wagner Group as an informal branch of Russia's military? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, I do think that we need, one, to sit down and have a discussion with Russia about the use of these private military forces, particularly the Wagner firm, which has played a significant role in a number of conflicts across the globe in the Middle East, Africa, and in Latin America. But we also ought to help the countries that are of interest to us deal with the problems that the Wagner Group causes. You know, the United States had to deal with the Wagner Group in Syria during the Syrian civil war. You know, despite the fact that we had a deconfliction exercise with the Russians at that point, tried to prevent military conflicts between our two militaries operating in close proximity, when the Wagner forces violated those strictures and actually began to attack a U.S. facility, we had no hesitation about using the force that we had to basically obliterate that enemy. And the Wagner Group suffered casualties numbering in the hundreds, one to two hundred. I think the Russians got the message about that, that you don't—you don't mess with the United States military, certainly not while using a private military company like Wagner. You know, in places like Libya, where Wagner is quite active, I think the United States needs a major diplomatic effort to try to defuse the Libyan crisis. And part of the solution to that would be negotiating an agreement that calls for the withdrawal of all foreign military forces and certainly private military groups from Libyan territory, and lean on the Russians to carry that through. In any event, you know, this is not going to be an easy issue to resolve. I think we deal with this by—country by country, and we focus our attention on those countries where our national interests are greatest. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Jill Dougherty, who's at Georgetown University. The Putin administration appears to be hardening its control of Russia's society with the purpose of keeping Putin in power at least until 2036. Most recent example is the Duma elections that just took place. Will this crackdown domestically affect or damage U.S.-Russia relations? GRAHAM: Thank you, Jill. Always a good question and always a difficult question to answer. You know, I think the issue here is the extent to which the Biden administration wants to make the domestic political situation in Russia a key item on its agenda with Russia over the next—over the next few years. You know, my impression from the conversations I've had with people in the administration—in and around the administration is that President Biden is not going to focus on this. You know, his focus really is going to be China, and what he wants to do is maintain something of a status quo in the relationship with Russia. You will notice that the second round of sanctions that the United States levied with regard to the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, something that was mandated by U.S. law, were actually quite mild—much less extreme, much less punitive than the legislation allowed—I think a signal that the Biden administration was not going to let domestic political issues in Russia overwhelm the agenda that the United States has, which is going to be focused on strategic stability, cyber issues, and so forth. So my immediate reaction is that the Duma election is really not going to have a dramatic impact on the state of the relationship between our two countries. We accept the fact that Russia is an authoritarian system. It is becoming more authoritarian. We will continue to try to find ways to support those elements of civil society we can, but always being careful not to do it in ways that causes the Russian government to crack down even harder on those individuals. This is a very sort of difficult needle to thread for the United States, but I think that's the way we'll go and you won't see this as a major impediment to the improvement of relations—which, as we all know, are at a very low level at this point in any event. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. Let's go next to Sujay Utkarsh. Q: Hi, yeah. Can you hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. So, regarding the issue about cyber warfare, I was wondering if you can go into more detail about what advantages the Russians have in cyberspace and what the United States can do to compete with those advantages. GRAHAM: A good question and a difficult question for people outside the government to answer, since we're not privy to all the information about Russian cyber capabilities nor are we privy to the information about American cyber capabilities. Both countries cloak those programs in a great deal of secrecy. You know, it seemed to me that one of the advantages that perhaps Russia has is that it's a much more closed society than the United States. Now, I'm thinking simply in terms of the way societies can be disrupted through cyberspace. We're a much more open society. It's easier to access our internet. We are—just as I mentioned before, we are a polarized society right now. That allows Russia many avenues into our domestic political system in order to exacerbate the tensions between various elements in our society. The United States can't reply in the same way in dealing with Russia. You know, second, Russia, in building its own internet, its own cyberspace, has paid much more attention to security than the United States has. So, you know, I would presume that its computer systems are somewhat harder to penetrate than American systems are at this point, although another factor to take into account here is that much of the initial effort in building up cyberspace—the Web, the computer networks—in Russia was built with American technology. You know, the Googles, the Intels, and others played an instrumental role in providing those types of—that type of equipment to the Russians. So I wouldn't exaggerate how much stronger they are there. And then, finally, I think what is probably one of the strengths, if you want to call it that, is that Russia is probably a little more risk-prone in using its cyber tools than the United States is at this point, in part because we think as a society we're more vulnerable. And that does give Russia a slight advantage. That said, this shouldn't be a problem that's beyond the capability of the United States to manage if we put our minds to it. We have done a lot more over the past several years. We are getting better at this. And I think we'll continue to improve in time and with the appropriate programs, the appropriate education of American society. FASKIANOS: Thank you. The next question is a written one from Kim-Leigh Tursi, a third-year undergraduate at Temple University. Where do you see Russia in relation to the rise of China, and how does that affect how the U.S. might approach foreign policy toward Russia? GRAHAM: Well, you know, that's an important question, obviously one that a lot of people have focused on recently. You know, Russia and China have developed a very close working strategic relationship over the—over the past several years, but I think we should note that the Russian effort to rebuild its relations with China go back to the late Soviet period to overcome the disadvantages that then the Soviet Union felt they had because of the poor relationship with China and the ability of the United States to exploit that relationship to Moscow's detriment. So relations have been improving for the past twenty-five, thirty years; obviously, a dramatic acceleration in that improvement after 2014 and the breakdown in relations between Russia and the West. Now, there are a number of reasons for this alignment at this point. One, the two countries do share at a very general level a basic view of for—a basic dislike of what they see as American ambitions to dominate the global—the global security and economic environment. They don't like what they consider to be American hegemonic goals. Second, the economies seem to be complementary at this point. Russia does have a wealth of natural resources that the Chinese need to fuel their robust economic growth. You have similar domestic political systems. And all of this, I think, is reinforced by what appears to be a very good personal relationship between President Putin and President Xi Jinping. These two leaders have met dozens of times over the past five to seven years and have maintained, I think, very robust contact even during the—during the pandemic. So there are very good strategic reasons why these two countries enjoy good relations. They are going to step those up in the near term. The Russians are continuing to provide the Chinese with significant sophisticated military equipment. They've also undertaken to help the Chinese build an early warning system for ballistic missiles, and when that's completed it will make China only the third country in the world to have such a system along with Russia and the United States. Now, I would argue that this strategic alignment does pose something of a challenge to the United States. If you look at American foreign policy or American foreign policy tradition, one of the principles that has guided the United States since the end of the nineteenth century, certainly throughout the twentieth century, was that we needed to prevent the—any hostile country or coalition of hostile countries from dominating areas of great strategic importance, principally Europe, East Asia, and more recently the Middle East. A Russian-Chinese strategic alignment certainly increases the chances of China dominating East Asia. Depending on how close that relationship grows, it also could have significant impact on Europe and the way Europe relates to this Russian-Chinese bloc, and therefore to the United States as a whole. So we should have an interest in trying to sort of attenuate the relationship between the two countries. At a minimum, we shouldn't be pursuing a set of policies that would push Russia closer to China. Second, I think we ought to try to normalize our diplomatic relationship with the Russians. Not that we're necessarily going to agree on a—on a range of issues at this point, but we need to give the Russians a sense that they have other strategic options than China going forward—something that would, I think, enhance their bargaining position with the Chinese going forward and would complicate China's own strategic calculus, which would be to our advantage. I think we also should play on Russia's concerns about strategic autonomy, this idea that Russia needs to be an independent great power on the global stage, that it doesn't want to be the junior partner or overly dependent on any one country as a way, again, of attenuating the tie with China. The one thing that I don't think we can do is drive a wedge between those two countries, in part because of the strategic reasons that I've mentioned already that bring these two countries together. And any very crude, I think, effort to do that will actually be counterproductive. Both Beijing and Moscow will see through that, quite clearly, and that will only lead to a closing of the ranks between those two countries, which as I said is a strategic challenge for the United States going forward. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Holli Semetko, who's at Emory University. Polarization is something we must overcome, as you said, but those of us working on social media have some evidence to suggest that social media has fostered political polarization in the U.S. Yuri Milner, a Russian Israeli entrepreneur, invested in an early round of Facebook funding with help from VTB, a Russian state-controlled bank, as well as his investment in Jared Kushner's real estate firm. What is the level of FDI from Russia in the U.S. and do you see it as a threat to national security? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, the actual level of Russian FDI in the United States is quite small. You know, you have some few, I think, good examples of it—the one that you've mentioned with Yuri Milner, for example. There was some investment in a steel factory some years ago. But by and large, there hasn't been a significant amount of Russian foreign direct investment in the United States. I think our growing concerns about Russia have made us even more leery of allowing Russian investment, particularly in sectors that we consider critical to American national security. So I'm not deeply concerned about that going forward. I think we probably face a much greater challenge from the Chinese in that regard. Of course, you've seen efforts by the United States to deal more harshly or look more closely at Chinese investment in the United States over the past several years. Let me just make one sort of final point on social media since it's come up. You know, Russia is a problem. We need to pay attention to Russia in that space. But again, I don't think that we should exaggerate Russia's influence, nor should we focus simply on Russia as the problem in this area. There is a major problem with disinformation in social media in the United States, much of that propagated by sources within the United States, but there are a host of other countries that also will try to affect U.S. public opinion through their intrusions into American social media. You know, given our concerns about First Amendment rights, freedom of speech and so forth, you know, I think we have problems in sort of really clamping down on this. But what we need to do, certainly, is better educate the American public about how to deal with the information that crosses their electronic devices day in and day out. Americans need to be aware of how they can be manipulated, and they need to understand and know where they can go to find reliable information. Again, given the political polarization in our country today, this is a very real challenge and difficult one. But I think if we think long term about this problem, the key really is educating the American public. An educated American public is going to be the best defense against foreign countries, other hostile forces trying to use social media to undermine our national unity and exacerbate the politics of our country. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Eoin Wilson-Manion, who's raised his hand. Q: Hello. Can you hear me now? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. Well, thank you. I just wanted to ask if you could touch a little bit more on Russia's presence in Syria and what that means for U.S. interests in Syria and I guess the larger Middle East. I'm Eoin from Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks very much. GRAHAM: Well, you know, the Russians entered Syria in 2015 militarily largely to save Assad from what they thought was imminent overthrow by what they considered a radical Islamic force, a group of terrorists that they thought would challenge Russian interests not only in Syria but would fuel extremist forces inside Russia itself, particularly in the North Caucasus but farther afield than that—even into Moscow, into areas that were Muslim-dominated inside Russia itself. So they had very good national security reasons for going in. Those ran—I mean, the Russian presence in Syria clearly has run counter to what the United States was trying to do at that point since we clearly aligned against Assad in favor of what we considered moderate reformist forces that were seeking a more sort of democratic future for Syria as part of this broader Arab Spring at that time. So there was a clear conflict at that point. You know, subsequently and in parallel with its continued presence in Syria, the Russians have extended their diplomatic—their diplomatic effort to other countries in the region. Russia enjoys a fairly robust diplomatic relationship with Israel, for example, that has been grounded in counterterrorism cooperation, for example. They have a sort of strange relationship, largely positive, with Turkey that they have pursued over the past several years. We know of the ties that they've had in Tehran, in Iran for some time. They have reached out to the Saudis and the Saudis have bought some military equipment from them. We see them in Egypt and Libya, for example. So they're a growing presence, a growing diplomatic presence in the Middle East, and this does pose some problems for the United States. From the middle of the 1970s onward, one of the basic thrusts of American foreign policy was to limit the role the Russians played in the Middle East. We sidelined them in the negotiations between the Arabs and the Israelis in the 1970s and in the 1980s. We limited their diplomatic contacts to countries that we considered critical partners and allies in that part of the world. Now I think the geopolitical situation has changed. Our own interest in the Middle East has diminished over time, in part because of the fracking revolution here in the United States. Gas and oil, we've got close to being independent in that area. We're not as dependent on the Middle East as we once were for energy sources. And also, as, you know, the Biden administration has been clear, we do want to pivot away from the Middle East and Europe to focus more of our energies on what we see as the rising and continuing strategic challenge posed by China. So I think that means that going forward the United States is going to have to deal with Russia in a different fashion in the Middle East than in the past. We're going to have to recognize them as a continuing presence. We're not going to be able to push them out, in part because we're not prepared to devote the resources to it. We have countries that are still important to us—Saudi Arabia, Israel for example—that do want a Russian presence in the Middle East. And so what we ought to do, it seems to me, is to begin that discussion about how we're going to manage the rivalry in the Middle East. Now, it's not all simply competition. There are areas for cooperation. We can cooperate in dealing with Iran, for example, the Iran nuclear dossier, as we have had in the past. Neither country has an interest in Iran developing nuclear weapons. Second, I think the two countries also would like to see a Middle East that's not dominated by a single regional power. So despite the fact that the Russians have worked together quite closely with the Iranians in Syria, they don't share Iranian ambitions elsewhere in the Middle East. And if you look at the diplomatic ties that the Russians have nurtured over the past with Turkey, with Israel, Saudi Arabia for example, none of these are friends of Iran, to put it mildly. So we can talk, I think, to the Russians of how our—you know, we can conduct ourselves so as to foster the development of a regional equilibrium in the Middle East that tends to stabilize that region, makes it less of a threat to either country, less of a threat to America's European allies, and use this as a basis for, again, sort of not escalating the tension in the region but moderating it in some ways that works to the long-term advantage of the United States. FASKIANOS: Next question from Michael Strmiska, who's a professor at Orange County Community College in New York state. Do you see any hope of persuading Russia to abandon its occupation of Crimea in the near term? Or do you think this is like the occupation of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia after World War II, where a very long timespan was needed before any liberation was realistically possible? GRAHAM: Well, I guess my answer to those two questions would be yes and no, or no and yes. On Crimea, you know, I see no sort of near-term scenario that would lead to the Russians agreeing to the return of Crimea to Ukraine. Quite the contrary, Russia has taken steps since 2014 they continue at this point to further integrate Crimea into the Russian Federation politically, economically, socially, and so forth. The Russians have also built up their military presence in Crimea as a way of enhancing their domination or their influence in the greater Black Sea region. So I see no set of circumstances that would change that, certainly not in the—in the near term. And I think, you know, the Ukrainian effort to focus attention on Crimea is not going to, in fact, gain a great deal of traction with Europe nor with the United States going forward, though we will maintain the principled position of not recognizing Russia's incorporation or annexation of Crimea. You know, I don't think that the Crimean and Baltic situations are necessarily analogous. You know, in the Baltic states there was a significant indigenous element, governments in exile, that supported the independence of those countries. There was a fulcrum that the United States or a lever that the United States could use over time to continue pressure on the Soviets that eventually led to the independence of those countries as the Soviet Union broke down and ultimately collapsed at the end of the 1980s into 1991. I don't see any significant indigenous element in Crimea nor a movement of inhabitants of Crimea outside Crimea that wants Crimea to be returned to Ukraine. I think we need to remember that a significant part of the population in Ukraine is Russian military, retired Russian military, that feels quite comfortable in—within the Russian Federation at this point. So if I were being quite frank about this, although I think the United States should maintain its principled position and not recognize annexation of Crimea, I don't see anything over the long term, barring the collapse of Russia itself, that will change that situation and see Ukraine (sic; Crimea) reincorporated into the Ukrainian state. FASKIANOS: So there are a couple questions in the chat about Russia's economy: What is their economy like today? And what are the effects of the sanctions? And from Steve Shinkel at the Naval War College: How do you assess the tie between Russia's economy and being able to continue to modernize its military and ensure a stable economy? And will economic factors and Russia's demographic challenges be a future constraining factor? So if you could— GRAHAM: Yeah. No, no, just take the economy. Obviously, a big issue, and it will be a constraining factor. I mean, the Russian economy is stagnating and it has for some—for some time. They enjoyed—the Russian economy enjoyed a very rapid period of growth during President Putin's first presidential—two presidential terms in the 2000s, but since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 Russia has run into very difficult economic times. In fact, it's never really recovered from that crisis. If you look at the past ten years, barely any growth in the Russian economy at all. If you look at the impact that that has had on Russians themselves, there's basically been no growth in real disposable income; rather, a decline over the past six or seven years. I think the Russians recognize that. The question is whether they can come up with a set of policies that actually will reverse that and that lead to a more robustly growing economy. Now, what the Kremlin has tried to do is not so much reform the economy—which I think is necessary if they're going to enjoy robust economic growth—as much as professionalize the economy; that is—that is, bring in a younger sort of cadre who are well educated, many of them educated in the West, who understand how modern economies function and can keep the economy stable at least at the macro level. And this is one of the reasons that Western sanctions have not had nearly the impact on Russian behavior that many had hoped for or anticipated back in 2014 when we began to turn repeatedly to this tool in response to Russian activities and operations against Ukraine. You know, it has had some impact. I think the IMF would say that it's probably taken a percentage point off—or, not a percentage point, but a tenth of a percentage point off of Russia's GDP growth over the past several years. That certainly hasn't been enough to change Russian behavior. But it hasn't been more, in fact, because the governors of the—of the central bank have dealt quite adeptly with that, and maintain said Russian macroeconomic stability and some sort of foundation for the economy to grow going forward. I imagine that's going to continue into the—into the future as well. So it is a constraining factor. Then I would end with what I—with a point that I made in my introduction. Russia does have a tremendous ability to mobilize its resources for state purposes, to extract what it needs from society at large to modernize the military, to maintain certainly Russia's defenses and also some capability to project power abroad. So I wouldn't write them off because of that. I think it's going—still going to be a serious power, but not nearly as great a challenge to the United States as if it, in fact, solved its demographic problems, its economic problems, and had a robustly growing economy, greater resources that it could devote to a whole range of things that would improve its standing on the global stage vis-à-vis the United States and vis-à-vis China. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we are at the end of our time. And I apologize to everybody. We had over twenty written questions still pending and raised hands. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you, but we do try to end on time. So, Thomas Graham, thank you very much for sharing your insights and analysis with us today. We appreciate it. And to all of you for your terrific questions and comments, we appreciate it. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, October 6, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. And we will focus on the Indo-Pacific with Dhruva Jaishankar, who is the executive director of the Observer Research Foundation America and nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute. And in the meantime, I encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. So, Tom, thank you very much. GRAHAM: Thank you. Good luck to all of you. (END)

The Critical Hour
Congress Debates Two Fiscal Spending Bills; Afghan War Continues With Drones

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 114:55


Marjorie Cohn, professor of law at the Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego, joins us to discuss Afghanistan. Professor Cohn has written an extensive article in which she posits that the exit of troops from Afghanistan is not an end to the conflict. She argues that the Biden administration will continue the violence using illegal drone warfare.Nick Davies, peace activist and author of "Blood on Our Hands: The American Invasion of Iraq," joins us to discuss Pentagon spending. Corruption in Congress glares as investigative reporters have determined that many of the House members who strongly support increased Pentagon spending are receiving large donations from weapons manufacturers. Also, is the Democratic party hamstrung by its right-wing or are they used as foils to intentionally kill progressive legislation?George Koo, journalist, social activist, international business consultant, and chemical engineer, joins us to discuss China. As the Chinese real estate giant Evergrande faces fiscal challenges, the Chinese government looks at the US using housing as a speculatory vehicle for profit and decides to move in a different direction. We discuss economist Michael Hudson's interview on this subject.Margaret Flowers, pediatrician, health reform activist, and co-director at Popular Resistance, joins us to discuss the murder rate increase. The US pandemic disaster has also precipitated a dramatic increase in crime. The homeland of the US empire is experiencing a nearly 30 percent increase in violent crime.Jack Rasmus, professor in economics and politics at St. Mary's College in California, joins us to discuss the two fiscal bills in the US Congress. There appears to be a pitched partisan congressional battle over the two major fiscal bills in Congress. However, Dr. Rasmus argues that the fiscal battle in Congress is really between the corporate wing of the Democrats and the wing that sees the passage of both bills in their current form as necessary to ensure a sustained economic recovery.Nino Pagliccia, activist and writer, joins us to discuss the Global South. The US Empire puppets of the Juan Guaido's "Popular Will" party have plundered hundreds of millions of dollars in Venezuela's foreign assets. This discussion is happening in light of the US client state Colombia's announcement that they will steal Venezuela's PDVSA assets in their nation.Michelle Witte, co-host of Political Misfits, joins us to discuss German elections. Michelle joins us from Germany, where she is covering the results of the German elections. There is much wrangling over the Nord Stream 2 project, as anti-Russia forces move to block it, but fuel prices are skyrocketing. Will the government act to smite the Russians even though the business and working people will suffer?Ajamu Baraka, 2016 US vice presidential candidate for the Green Party, joins us to discuss the US empire. Our guest joins us to discuss the possible decline of the US empire. As other world powers such as Russia and China are rising, the US still maintains significant economic and military horsepower. However, the ballooning debt and internal divisiveness may point to a precipitous decrease in US hegemonic aspiration.

Bible in the News
Russia's Cold Iron Grip Chokes Europe

Bible in the News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 7:26


On September 22, the UK Telegraph had the headline: "Putin’s iron grip on energy leaves Europe increasingly vulnerable”. The article began by noting that, "Vladimir Putin has his finger hovering over Europe’s light switch.” The article then goes on the explain that typically over the summer the Russian company Gazprom pumps a lot of gas into Europe’s storage facilities ready for winter. This has not happened this year. Russia is putting pressure on Europe to approve the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline, which the Telegraph states is, "finally ready to pump gas into Europe but is awaiting approval from German regulators.” The Telegraph notes that in regards to the pipeline Germany has been caught between Moscow and Washington. While the pipeline would facilitate bringing more gas into Europe in the future, it would not fill this years shortage and would ultimately make Europe even more reliant on Russian energy — which is why it has been opposed by Washington. Energy prices are soaring, which is threatening any pandemic recovery. If Europe has a cold winter there are difficult times ahead. The article concludes: "Winter is coming and a cold chill is set to descend on households and governments across Europe.”

Jung & Naiv
Größter Speicher - 24. September 2021 - RegPK

Jung & Naiv

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 52:29


Regierungspressekonferenz in der Bundespressekonferenz Naive Fragen zu: - Seehofer & Idar-Oberstein - Enteignung für Nord Stream 2 - Klimastreik - Afghanen in Ramstein - WHO-Chef Tedros Bitte unterstützt unsere Arbeit finanziell: Konto: Jung & Naiv IBAN: DE854 3060 967 104 779 2900 GLS Gemeinschaftsbank PayPal ► http://www.paypal.me/JungNaiv

Business Daily
World gas prices surge

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 17:28


Today small energy firms among those struggling to stay afloat as world gas prices spiral. Ed Butler hears from Peter McGirr, who runs Green energy, a UK gas and electricity firm supplying about a quarter of a million households. Higher energy prices could lead to all types of additional business challenges. Sven Holester is the Norwegian President and CEO of Yara, Europe's second largest producer of commercial fertiliser. He says the spike in energy prices has already affected his firm's production. The cost of higher gas is affecting food prices, fertiliser, even abattoirs. But is it all Russia's fault? We ask Dieter Helm, professor of economic policy at the University of Oxford. Producer: Benjie Guy (Picture: The Slavyanskaya compressor station, the starting point of the Nord Stream 2 offshore natural gas pipeline.)

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
9/17/21 Weimin Chen on Why the Approaching Completion of the Nord Stream 2 Pipeline Is Great News

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 25:31


Scott talks with Weimin Chen about his recent article on the Nord Stream 2 Pipeline. The pipeline will transport natural gas from Russia to Germany. Chen explains that these two countries have a long history of conflict, so we should see increased economic engagement as a triumph. But of course, that's not how many in the U.S. government see it. Chen explains that those involved with the project have had to deal with U.S. sanctions since the Obama Administration. Washington has opposed the project both in the name of protecting American gas companies from competition and as a way to avoid giving Russia leverage over Europe. However, the Biden Administration has stopped the sanctions, signaling a change in the American position. Some Europeans themselves oppose the pipeline on environmental grounds. And others are upset they'll make less collecting fees on gas traveling through their borders. But both Scott and Chen agree that all sides need to consider the risk of thermonuclear war when advocating against economic engagement.  Discussed on the show: “Nord Stream 2: The Value of German-Russian Cooperation” (Austrian Economics Center) Weimin Chen is a research assistant at the Austrian Economics Center and is a manager and project/events coordinator at the International Student Center's Arts for Peace Initiative in New York City. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
9/17/21 Weimin Chen on Why the Approaching Completion of the Nord Stream 2 Pipeline Is Great News

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 25:31


Scott talks with Weimin Chen about his recent article on the Nord Stream 2 Pipeline. The pipeline will transport natural gas from Russia to Germany. Chen explains that these two countries have a long history of conflict, so we should see increased economic engagement as a triumph. But of course, that's not how many in the U.S. government see it. Chen explains that those involved with the project have had to deal with U.S. sanctions since the Obama Administration. Washington has opposed the project both in the name of protecting American gas companies from competition and as a way to avoid giving Russia leverage over Europe. However, the Biden Administration has stopped the sanctions, signaling a change in the American position. Some Europeans themselves oppose the pipeline on environmental grounds. And others are upset they'll make less collecting fees on gas traveling through their borders. But both Scott and Chen agree that all sides need to consider the risk of thermonuclear war when advocating against economic engagement.  Discussed on the show: “Nord Stream 2: The Value of German-Russian Cooperation” (Austrian Economics Center) Weimin Chen is a research assistant at the Austrian Economics Center and is a manager and project/events coordinator at the International Student Center's Arts for Peace Initiative in New York City. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
La (vieille) querelle justice-politique / Quel leader aura été Angela Merkel ? / n°211 / 19 septembre 2021

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 65:13


Une émission de Philippe Meyer, enregistrée au studio l'Arrière-boutique le 17 septembre 2021.Avec cette semaine :Nicolas Baverez, essayiste et avocat.Jean-Louis Bourlanges, président de la commission des affaires étrangères de l'Assemblée Nationale.Michaela Wiegel, correspondante à Paris de la Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.LA (VIEILLE) QUERELLE JUSTICE-POLITIQUELe 10 septembre, Agnès Buzyn a été mise en examen dans le dossier de la gestion de l'épidémie de Covid-19 pour « mise en danger de la vie d'autrui ». Elle a été placée sous le statut plus favorable de témoin assisté pour « abstention de combattre un sinistre ». En cause : le rôle central de l'ancienne ministre de la Santé dans le dispositif gouvernemental entre janvier 2020 et sa démission le 16 février 2020 quand de premiers cas déclarés puis des décès apparaissaient en Chine et dans le monde. Les plaignants lui reprochent son inaction ou d'avoir menti sur l'utilité des masques dans le seul objectif d'en dissimuler la pénurie. Seize plaintes ont été jugées recevables sur plus de 14.000 déposées. Pour le premier délit, Agnès Buzyn encourt un an de prison et 15.000 euros d'amende. Pour le second, deux ans de prison et 30.000 euros d'amende. Cette décision de mise en examen est le fait de la Cour de justice de la République (CJR), juridiction créée en 1993 à la suite du drame du sang contaminé, seule habilitée à juger des ministres pour des actes commis dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions. Elle est composée de 12 parlementaires et 3 magistrats.Si la création de la CJR constituait « au départ un progrès », il ne faudrait pas « qu'il se retourne contre la justice elle-même », fait valoir Pierre Egéa, professeur de droit public et avocat, relayant une inquiétude assez largement partagée. Il pointe notamment le « flou complet » des infractions pénales en cause : « "Mise en danger de la vie d'autrui", c'est très large et permet à peu près tout. Incidemment, on place le juge répressif en position d'évaluer une politique publique. C'est un problème sur le plan de la séparation des pouvoirs. » Avant d'autres probables auditions, de l'ancien Premier ministre Édouard Philippe et de l'actuel ministre de la Santé, Olivier Véran, les responsables politiques s'interrogent sur un risque de judiciarisation de la vie publique, au risque d'une « paralysie » de l'action politique, selon le mot de Jean Castex. À l'Élysée, le chef de l'État s'est ému en privé du sort réservé à Agnès Buzyn, estimant que « cela fait peser un risque sur l'essence même du politique, à savoir : décider ». Comme une façon de délégitimer la Cour de justice de la République (il avait promis de la supprimer en 2017), il estime que « le juge souverain, c'est le peuple ». Trois autres affaires sont à l'instruction auprès de cette cour : les modalités, décidées par Éric Woerth, de l'imposition de Bernard Tapie après l'arbitrage de 2008 ; l'affaire concernant Kader Arif (ex-secrétaire d'État aux Anciens Combattants) pour atteinte à la liberté d'accès et à l'égalité des candidats dans des marchés publics ; enfin, l'affaire de la prise illégale d'intérêts dont se serait rendu coupable le Garde des Sceaux, Éric Dupond-Moretti en saisissant l'Inspection générale de la justice dans le dossier des « fadettes ».Ailleurs dans le monde plusieurs dirigeants sont sous le coup d'enquêtes judiciaires pour mauvaise gestion de la crise sanitaire, comme en Italie ou au Brésil. En revanche, au Royaume-Uni, une enquête indépendante (non judiciaire) a été ouverte.***QUEL LEADER AURA ÉTÉ ANGELA MERKEL ? La chancelière allemande quittera le pouvoir avec une popularité au zénith après 16 années à la tête du pays. Pour les citoyens européens, Angela Merkel est la dirigeante qui inspire le plus confiance. Selon un sondage réalisé dans 12Etats-membres de l'UE, par le centre de réflexion European Council on ForeignRelations à la question « s'il y avait une élection pour la présidence de l'Europe et qu'il vous fallait choisir entre Angela Merkel et Emmanuel Macron, pour qui voteriez-vous ? », 41 % des personnes interrogées ont indiqué leur préférence pour la chancelière, contre 14 % pour le président français. « Avec son style de leadership technocrate, elle inspire plus confiance que Macron avec ses discours visionnaires », commentent les organisateurs du sondage. Originaire d'Allemagne de l'Est, fille de pasteur luthérien, Angela Merkel est selon Marion Van Renterghem, auteur de « C'était Merkel », « une conservatrice progressiste. Elle a peur du changement et n'aime pas brusquer les choses. Elle ne suit pas de stratégie ; elle est plutôt guidée par sa structure morale. » L'ère Merkel n'a été entachée d'aucune affaire de corruption ou de népotisme.Les crises en revanche n'ont pas manqué : de la crise financière de 2008 à la pandémie de Covid-19 lors de laquelle ses interventions sobres et pédagogiques et les bons résultats obtenus dans les premiers mois de l'épidémie restent en mémoire ; en passant par le sauvetage de l'euro et son intransigeance à l'égard d'Athènes ; l'accueil de réfugiés syriens et irakiens en 2015 qui restera sans doute comme sa décision emblématique avec sa formule : « Wir schaffendas » (« Nous y arriverons ») ; ainsi que le réchauffement climatique, sujet sur lequel Mme Merkel a surpris en décidant brutalement en 2011 d'en finir avec l'énergie nucléaire après la catastrophe de Fukushima. Sous sa direction, l'Allemagne est devenue un acteur de la scène internationale. Le pays assume de plus en plus ses responsabilités de grande puissance, comme en témoigne son budget militaire qui n'a cessé d'augmenter depuis 2014 et atteint en 2021 près de 47 milliards d'euros, contre 33 milliards il y a 7 ans. « Mais il manque une ligne directrice à sa politique extérieure qui reste compartimentée et dominée par ses intérêts industriels, énergétiques ou stratégiques », critique un récent rapport de l'Institut Montaigne « Quelle Allemagne après Merkel ? ». Ainsi, la chancelière allemande a insisté pour que l'UE signe un accord rapidement avec la Chine et a soutenu jusqu'au bout le projet de gazoduc Nord Stream 2 avec la Russie. Si l'Allemagne était considérée comme l'« homme malade » de l'UE au début des années 2000, elle est redevenue la première puissance économique du continent, fondée sur des excédents commerciaux et une gestion budgétaire rigoureuse. Le taux de chômage a fondu en 16 ans, de 11,2% à 5,7% en juillet, dans un marché encore fortement fragilisé par la pandémie. De fortes disparités demeurent toutefois entre ouest et est, avec des Länder d'ex-RDA souvent tenus à distance du miracle économique allemand. Les élections de 2017, ont été marquée par l'entrée inédite du parti d'extrême droite Alternative pour l'Allemagne (AfD) au parlement.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Grey Zone
Ep. 175; Scars

The Grey Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 43:57


De regreso tras una breve pausa, con un episodio dedicado básicamente a temas de la Federación Rusa

The Duran Podcast
Renzi, Nord Stream 2 and passport mandates in Italy [Geopolitics Focus]

The Duran Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 58:02


Renzi, Nord Stream 2 and passport mandates in Italy [Geopolitics Focus] - Episode 8

The Critical Hour
Baltic Russophobes Continue Nord Stream 2 Battle; Gavin Newsom Wins California Recall

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 116:27


Greg Palast, investigative reporter, joins us to discuss the California recall election and the Democrats' new election bill. California Governor Gavin Newsom easily defeated Republican challenger Larry Elder in a recall election. Also, will the Democrats bypass the filibuster to enact their signature legislation? Dan Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss the Nord Stream 2 pipeline. The Nord Stream 2 pipeline has been completed and the last obstacle is to obtain the proper certifications. The Russophobic leaders in the Baltic States are working to thwart the operation. In response to the issue, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov recently stated "I was once again convinced that they are trying to adapt the entire policy of the European Union to the views, tastes, and manners of this Russophobic minority,"Scott Ritter, former UN weapon inspector in Iraq, joins us to discuss General Milley and former President Trump. A new book states that General Mark Milley was concerned over the possibility of President Trump attacking China and took significant steps to frustrate the possibility of that outcome. Was this a valiant act of heroism or an illegal coup? Did Milley also use this opportunity to stop the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan as Trump had ordered?Kathy Kelly, American peace activist, joins us to discuss Pentagon spending. According to recent reports, upwards of 14 trillion dollars was spent by the Pentagon since 9/11. At least half of that sum was sucked up by contractors, with corporate giants such as Lockheed Martin and Raytheon gobbling up the lion's share.Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss US sanctions and China. China is dealing a significant blow to the sanctions policy of the US empire. A major blow to the sanctions against Venezuela seems to be in the offing as China seems poised to revive the oil industry of the Bolivarian republic.Ajamu Baraka, former VP candidate for the Green Party, joins us to discuss the recent earthquake in Haiti and the issue of the international response bringing neoliberal economic pain to the people of the island nation. Dr. Gigi El-Bayoumi, professor of medicine at George Washington University Hospital and founding director at Rodham Institute at GWU, joins us to discuss vaccine hesitancy. Dr. El-Bayoumi discusses some of the reasons for vaccine hesitancy and whether these obstacles can be overcome. Also, the team discusses what the surveys show as the main reasons for people refusing the vaccine.Dr. Linwood Tauheed, associate professor of economics at the University of Missouri- Kansas City, joins us to discuss North Korea. North and South Korea have both fired missiles into the sea recently, as the two Peninsula nations may be falling back into a downward spiral of relations.

WSJ Minute Briefing
Kroger, Instacart Team Up to Target 30-Minute Grocery Delivery

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 2:18


Apple issues a security update for iPhones after researchers said they found a software flaw that was being exploited to infect the devices. Apple is expected to reveal new offerings at its annual fall launch event today. Senate Republicans threaten to block Treasury nominations until the company managing Russia's Nord Stream 2 pipeline project is sanctioned. California Gov. Gavin Newsom faces a recall vote today. Keith Collins hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Money GPS
Fed Will Taper in November and Stop Printing Money in 2022

The Money GPS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 14:56


TOPICS AND TIMESTAMPS: Moment We've Been Waiting For 0:00 FED TAPER 0:40 STIMULUS 7:03 ECONOMIC MADNESS 10:19 $GPS INSIGHTS #1 THE FED MAY JOIN THE REST OF THE WORLD AND TAPER #2 INFLATION IS OUT OF CONTROL AND THEY NEED TO CONTROL IT #3 PERFECTION IS PRICED INTO MARKETS SO REDUCE HIGH RISK BETS (7) Nick Timiraos on Twitter: "The Fed appears on track to use their meeting on Sept. 21-22 to tee up the start of the reduction in their asset purchases for their November meeting https://t.co/4w07z8J7fG" / Twitter https://twitter.com/NickTimiraos/status/1436285303472410653?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet Fed Officials Prepare for November Reduction in Bond Buying - WSJ https://www.wsj.com/articles/fed-officials-prepare-for-november-reduction-in-bond-buying-11631266200?mod=hp_lead_pos12 largest US fiscal stimulus of all time.jpg (877×533) https://cms.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/largest%20US%20fiscal%20stimulus%20of%20all%20time.jpg?itok=5uWx1EvR sept stimulus.jpg (681×510) https://cms.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/sept%20stimulus.jpg?itok=5i9m2Reg sept key events.jpg (663×557) https://cms.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/sept%20key%20events.jpg?itok=7LP2hkb2 pace of global central bank purchases.jpg (607×435) https://cms.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/pace%20of%20global%20central%20bank%20purchases.jpg?itok=H6oOIMqM SNB's Zurbruegg Says Negative Rates Key to Prevent Rise in Franc - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-09-11/snb-s-zurbruegg-says-negative-rates-key-to-prevent-rise-in-franc?srnd=premium-canada tapering nov 2011_0.jpg (1015×624) https://cms.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/tapering%20nov%202011_0.jpg?itok=awrtejxB It's Not Just Used Cars. Even Wrecked Cars Are Getting More Expensive - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-09-09/it-s-not-just-used-cars-even-wrecked-cars-are-getting-more-expensive?sref=RJ2RlMrh Los Angeles Port Logjam Tops 50 Ships; Wait Exceeds Eight Days - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-09-11/los-angeles-port-logjam-tops-50-ships-wait-exceeds-eight-days?sref=RJ2RlMrh Bloomberg - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/canada Snag_3252856a.png (976×801) https://cms.zerohedge.com/s3/files/inline-images/Snag_3252856a.png?itok=R8cNMnOi Gazprom announces that its Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline to Germany is finished https://www.france24.com/en/europe/20210910-gazprom-announces-that-its-nord-stream-2-gas-pipeline-to-germany-is-finished Stablecoins Face Crackdown as U.S. Discusses Risk Council Review - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-09-11/stablecoins-face-crackdown-as-u-s-discusses-risk-council-review?srnd=premium-canada

Global News Podcast
Gazprom confirms that controversial Nordstream Two gas pipeline is complete

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 27:02


Russian state-run gas giant Gazprom says long-delayed pipeline is now ready for use. We examine why it's caused huge tensions within Europe. Also, woman who was former MP in Afghan parliament tells us she fled to escape being killed by Taliban, and how New Yorkers are coping - as 20th anniversary of 9/11 approaches.

Was jetzt?
Update: ein neuer Richtwert für die Pandemie

Was jetzt?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 9:50


Als neuen Maßstab für Pandemieeinschränkungen hat der Bundesrat beschlossen, dass die Zahl der Corona-Patientinnen und -Patienten in den Krankenhäusern ausschlaggebend ist. Im Podcast erläutert ZEIT-ONLINE-Datenexperte Christian Endt die sogenannte Hospitalisierungsrate – und kritisiert die Berechnung. Die Corona-Impfung wird von der Ständigen Impfkommission nun auch für Schwangere und Stillende empfohlen. ZEIT-ONLINE-Gesundheitsredakteur Ingo Arzt ordnet die begrenzte Datenlage dazu ein. Außerdem im Podcast: Der Bau der umstrittenen Gaspipeline Nord Stream 2 ist nach russischen Angaben fertig. Was noch? Equal Pay im irischen Fußball Moderation und Produktion: Rita Lauter Mitarbeit: Alma Dewerny Fragen, Kritik, Anregungen? Sie erreichen uns unter wasjetzt@zeit.de Weitere Links zur Folge: Corona-Politik: Bundestag stimmt für Hospitalisierung als neuen Richtwert (https://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2021-09/corona-politik-hospitalisierungsrate-indikator-beschraenkungen-bundestag-beschluss) Coronavirus: Stiko empfiehlt Corona-Impfung für Schwangere und Stillende (https://www.zeit.de/gesundheit/2021-09/stiko-empfiehlt-corona-impfung-fuer-schwangere-und-stillende) Pressemitteilung der Stiko: Aktualisierung der COVID-19-Impfempfehlung für Schwangere und Stillende (10.9.2021) (https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/Kommissionen/STIKO/Empfehlungen/PM_2021-09-10.html) Ostseepipeline: Bau von Nord Stream 2 ist abgeschlossen (https://www.zeit.de/politik/ausland/2021-09/nord-stream-2-gaspipeline-gazprom-bau-abschluss) Nord Stream 2: In Moskau kann man sich freuen (https://www.zeit.de/politik/ausland/2021-07/nord-stream-2-kompromiss-usa-russland-einschraenkungen) Was noch: Irlands Fußballer teilen Prämie mit Kolleginnen (https://www.diepresse.com/6028726/equal-pay-irlands-fussballer-teilen-pramien-mit-kolleginnen)

In 4 Minuti
Mercoledì, 8 settembre

In 4 Minuti

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 4:12


L'apertura del gasdotto Nord Stream 2, la terza dose di vaccino in Italia e la condanna dell'Onu alla legge contro l'aborto del Texas

Jung & Naiv
#532 - Michael Sack, CDU-Spitzenkandidat in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Jung & Naiv

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 92:57


Wir sind zu Gast in Demmin und treffen Michael Sack, Spitzenkandidat der CDU zur Landtagswahl in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern am 26. September 2021. Michael ist Landrat vom Kreis Vorpommern-Greifswald, seit August 2020 CDU-Landesvorsitzender in MV und will Manuela Schwesig als Ministerpräsident ablösen. Wir sprechen über Michaels CDU, Abgrenzung zur AfD und den Linken, seinen Werdegang, sein politisches Weltbild, den ungewöhnlichen Weg an die Spitze des CDU-Landesverbandes, Philipp Amthor, Lobbyismus & Korruption, Klimaschutz, Nord Stream 2, Lorenz Caffier uvm. + eure Fragen! 0:00 Intro 1:31 Beginn 5:31 CDU in der bisherigen MV-Landesregierung 8:58 AfD 10:46 Ex-AfDler in der CDU 12:18 AfD rechtsextrem? 16:01 Linke in MV - extrem? 17:48 CDU als DDR-Blockarbeit 18:57 Werdegang & Biografie (Förster, Lehrer) 35:05 Bildungsminister Sack? 38:51 Warum CDU? Karriereweg 43:17 Politisches Weltbild 48:49 Wie wird man CDU-Landesvorsitzender? 50:02 Amthor, Korruption & Lobbyismus 53:47 Amthor als Spitzenkandidat in Bundestag?! 56:33 Michaels Nebeneinkünfte & Nebentätigkeiten 58:21 Spendet er Nebeneinkünfte? 1:01:24 Schuldenbremse als Fetisch 1:05:01 Caffiers Waffe vom Rechtsextremen 1:07:36 Leere Worte beim Klimaschutz 1:12:24 Keine Maßnahmen für 1,5 Grad Ziel 1:14:56 Glasfaserausbau 1:16:09 Publikumsfragen mit Hans 1:16:29 Fischbröten gegen Rechtsradikale Das Wahlprogramm der CDU zum Nachlesen: https://www.cdu-mecklenburg-vorpommern.de/fileadmin/redaktion/pdf/programme/CDU_MV_Wahlprogramm.pdf Das Interview wurde am 2. September in Demmin aufgezeichnet. Der AfD-Spitzenkandidat hatte ursprünglich zugesagt, gibt uns aber keinen Termin. Bitte unterstützt unsere Arbeit finanziell: Konto: Jung & Naiv IBAN: DE854 3060 967 104 779 2900 GLS Gemeinschaftsbank PayPal ► http://www.paypal.me/JungNaiv

Jung & Naiv
#531 - Gregor Gysi (Die Linke)

Jung & Naiv

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 100:51


Erstmals zu Gast im Studio (vorher stets im Bundestag): Gregor Gysi (Die Linke) über die Klimapolitik der Linken vs. Unterstützung für Nord Stream 2, das Bedingungslose Grundeinkommen, den Berliner Volksentscheid zur Enteignung von Immobilienkonzernen, DDR als "Unrechtsstaat", die Causa "IM Notar", Rotrotgrün, Sahra Wagenknecht uvm. + eure Fragen Vorherige Jung & Naiv Folgen mit Gregor Gysi: 234, 240, 256, 323, 414 Bitte unterstützt unsere Arbeit finanziell: Konto: Jung & Naiv IBAN: DE854 3060 967 104 779 2900 GLS Gemeinschaftsbank PayPal ► http://www.paypal.me/JungNaiv

The Critical Hour
Biden Meets Zelensky in Washington; Post 9/11 Wars Cost $8 Trillion

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 115:10


Daniel Lazare, investigative journalist and author of "The Velvet Coup," joins us to discuss Ukraine. Ukrainian President Zelensky met with Joe Biden in DC and was promised additional military assistance. Biden also made hollow promises regarding NordStream 2, but held back from ensuring the Eastern European nation a NATO membership and crossing Russia's red line.Julie Varughese, solidarity network coordinator for Black Alliance for Peace, joins us to discuss Afghanistan. White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain said that he was unsure if the US will ever recognize the Taliban as the legitimate government of Afghanistan. Also, a top general said that the US may coordinate with the Taliban to battle Daesh-K (ISIS-K).Steve Poikonen, national organizer for Action4Assange, joins us to discuss the US media. Our guest joins us to discuss the Western media's love affair with Joe Biden that washed ashore when he decided to withdraw troops from Afghanistan. Also, we discuss Gareth Porter's Consortium News article about the corporate media's fealty to the permanent war state.Teresa Lundy, principal of TML Communications, a leading minority public relations, communications and advocacy firm in Pennsylvania, joins us to discuss the Texas abortion law. The US Supreme Court has refused to block Texas's restrictive abortion law. Also, President Biden stated that he believes the law blatantly violates the Constitution. Is Roe v. Wade on the chopping block?Professor Peter Kuznick, author and historian, joins us to discuss US military spending. A recent evaluation of military spending post-9/11 puts the cost of the so-called "War on Terror" at over 8 trillion dollars. Also, Alan Macleod's Mintpress News article reviews new documents and testimonies about the profligate spending in Afghanistan.Robert Fantina, journalist and Palestine activist, joins us to discuss Israel. Palestinian children have recently faced horrific abuses, including stoning and car-ramming from Jewish settlers in Masafer Yatta. Also, Presidents Biden and Bennett reportedly renewed an agreement on Israel's covert nuclear program.John Burris, civil rights attorney, joins us to discuss the January 6th investigation. There are new controversies over the congressional investigation of the January 6th protests, as a House committee asks telecom companies to retain phone records related to the event. Meanwhile, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R- CA) has threatened action against companies that comply with the request.Dr. Jemima Pierre, associate professor of Black studies and anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles, joins us to discuss Haiti. The American Red Cross is working to raise money for the Haiti earthquake, but their performance after the tragedy of 2010 has critics urging people to avoid the organization.

Visegrad Insight Podcast
Russian gas and migration crisis – hybrid war hits Central Europe

Visegrad Insight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 26:20


Yesterday Joe Biden and Volodymyr Zelensky met in Washington, the first visit of Ukraine's president's to DC in 4 years. Ukraine's concerns over Nord Stream 2 were one of the topics on the agenda. In today's podcast episode, we asked Wojciech Jakóbik, energy analyst and editor-in-chief of Biznes Alert, about gas shortages, GAZPROM's record earnings, controversial Nord Stream 2 pipeline, and their implications for energy security in CEE. Meanwhile, Poland introduces a state of emergency on the border with Belarus to block migrants from the Middle East from entering the country. Marta Górczyńska, human rights lawyer, walks us through what's actually going on in the border town of Usnarz Gorny, and explains how the Polish government derogates international rights of refugees currently stuck at the Polish-Belarusian border.

RT
Boom Bust: Zelensky visits the White House & Biden touts end of ‘nation-building'

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 26:12


Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky is in Washington, DC as part of a visit to discuss the Nord Stream 2 pipeline with US leaders. Boom Bust's Ben Swann shares his insight on the visit and the issues being covered in the talks. The meeting comes just one day after President Biden announced that the US is done with nation-building. Professor Richard Wolff analyzes the fallout from the conflict and just how much the US has spent on the war. And OPEC+ members have convened virtually to discuss future moves by the cartel. Boom Bust's Christy Ai and David McAlvany of McAlvany Financial analyze the latest in the sector.

Podcasty Radia Wnet / Warszawa 87,8 FM | Kraków 95,2 FM | Wrocław 96,8 FM / Białystok 103,9 FM
Wojciech Jakóbik – analityk portalu BiznesAlert.pl | Poranek WNET | 02.09.2021 r., czwartek

Podcasty Radia Wnet / Warszawa 87,8 FM | Kraków 95,2 FM | Wrocław 96,8 FM / Białystok 103,9 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 10:48


Wojciech Jakóbik mówi o środowym spotkaniu Joe Bidena z Wołodomyrem Zełenskim. Przełomu w sprawie Nord Stream 2 nie ma. Aczkolwiek Stany Zjednoczone wyraziły wolę zbudowania na Ukrainie amerykańskich reaktorów jądrowych. Tym samym USA pragnie dyplomatycznie manewrować między Niemcami a Rosją. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/radiownet/message

SWR2 Wissen
Nord Stream 2 – Der Streit um Gas aus Russland

SWR2 Wissen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 27:54


Auch ohne die Gaspipeline hätte Europa genug Erdgas. Mit der neuen Ostseepipeline Nord Stream 2 könnte sich der Anteil bald noch erhöhen. Osteuropäische EU-Staaten, die USA und einige Militärexperten sind strikt dagegen. Umweltorganisationen befürchten, dass große Mengen an billigem Gas die Energiewende ausbremsen. Doch bei Nordstream 2 geht es längst nicht nur um Energiesicherheit. Von Dirk Asendorpf. | Manuskript und mehr zur Sendung: http://swr.li/nord-stream-zwei | Bei Fragen und Anregungen schreibt uns: wissen@swr2.de | Folgt uns auf Twitter: @swr2wissen

Decouple
A Natural Gas Masterclass feat. Mark Nelson

Decouple

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 66:09


Natural gas occupies a strange place in the climate debate. By helping to phase out coal, it has led modest decarbonization efforts in the United States and elsewhere, but it continues to emit climate change-causing CO2. Environmental NGO's have switched between loving it and hating it. In this episode, returning guest Mark Nelson joins us to deepen our understanding of natural gas, fracing [sic], its economics, and more. We touch on the chemistry of hydrocarbons; the immense infrastructure needed to enable natural gas use; the Fracing Revolution; why we are building more natural gas even as we attempt to decarbonize; public perceptions of natural gas and their causes; Nord Stream 2; Germany's energy folly; and the unsettling economic future of gas. Mark Nelson holds degrees in mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, as well as Russian language and literature. He is Managing Director of Radiant Energy Fund, and was formerly an analyst at Environmental Progress. Decouple YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DecouplePodcast Boiling point of methane: -259.6ºF = -162ºC

Jung & Naiv
#528 - Simone Oldenburg, Linke-Spitzenkandidatin in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Jung & Naiv

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 114:59


Wir sind zu Gast in Schwerin und treffen Simone Oldenburg, Spitzenkandidatin von DIE LINKE zur Landtagswahl in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern am 26. September 2021. Simone ist seit 2011 Mitglied des Landtages in MV, seit 2016 Vorsitzende der MV-Linksfraktion in der Opposition und seit 2018 stellv. Bundesvorsitzende der Linken. Vor ihrer professionellen politischen Karriere war sie Lehrerin und Schulleiterin. Wir sprechen über Simones Werdegang, die DDR, die Probleme in der Bildungspolitik, notwendige Veränderungen für MeckPomm aus Sicht der Linken, Windkraft, Nord Stream 2 uvm. + eure Fragen Das Wahlprogramm der Linken MV zum Nachlesen: https://www.originalsozial.de/wahlen-2021/landtagswahl/wahlprogramm/ Das Interview wurde am 19. August in der Schweriner Landesgeschäftsstelle der Linken aufgezeichnet. Interviews mit den Spitzenkandidat*innen der Grünen, SPD und CDU folgen. Der AfD-Spitzenkandidat hatte ursprünglich zugesagt, gibt uns aber keinen Termin. Bitte unterstützt unsere Arbeit finanziell: Konto: Jung & Naiv IBAN: DE854 3060 967 104 779 2900 GLS Gemeinschaftsbank PayPal ► http://www.paypal.me/JungNaiv

Energy Week
Episode 168 - Oil jumps, for now | Is oil headed towards $80? | California needs oil and gas

Energy Week

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 48:25


Oil jumps 4% on weaker dollar after seven days of losseshttps://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/23/oil-markets-covid-dollar.htmlCrude Oil Surges; Rebounding After Torrid Weekhttps://finance.yahoo.com/news/crude-oil-surges-rebounding-torrid-092802254.html- Can oil really hit $80 by the end of the year?- Last week's selloff was overdone, so oil is rebounding now.- Plenty of reasons to see demand suffering due to coronavirus- Sentiment is a real thing with the oil market. Perception of how coronavirus will impact demand has a real impact.California's clean grid may lean on oil, gas to avoid summer blackoutshttps://www.reuters.com/business/energy/californias-clean-grid-may-lean-oil-gas-avoid-summer-blackouts-2021-08-11/- Irony of building "temporary" natural gas plants to keep the lights on in California, which claims to have a "clean" grid- could the governor recall impactUS nears proposal of biofuel targets for 2021-22https://www.argusmedia.com/en/news/2246546-us-nears-proposal-of-biofuel-targets-for-202122- biofuel mandates could be lowered for 2021 and 2022- is the RFS really worthwhile at this point?Hydrogen lobbyist quits, slams oil companies' “false claims” about blue hydrogenhttps://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/08/ex-lobbyist-slams-blue-hydrogen-says-it-would-lock-in-fossil-fuel-dependence/- Blue hydrogen is only less carbon intensive if carbon is captured at every step of the way, and that is unlikely.- just because you don't see the pollution at the end result doesn't mean its not a carbon intensive processCarbon taxes could hurt Russia more than sanctions, says oil tsarhttps://www.reuters.com/business/energy/carbon-taxes-could-hurt-russia-more-than-sanctions-says-oil-tsar-kommersant-2021-08-23/- border adjustment taxes for carbon on aluminum, iron ore, pipes, electricity, cement could have major impact on Russian exports.Nord Stream 2: Russia must not use gas pipeline as weapon, says Merkelhttps://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-58301099- Is the concern over Russia's threat to the EU overblown? Is Europe really afraid of Russia?- Is it mostly a Ukrainian-Russian issue and western Europe isn't concerned?- If the EU is confident about doing businesses with Russia to the extent that they are willing to rely on Russia for 40% of their natural gas, then why is the US afraid of Russia?

The Kim Monson Show
Current Events and Energy

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 53:45


Leslie Manookian, President and Founder of Health Freedom Defense Fund, will be speaking throughout the Colorado Front Range at the end of the week:  Thursday, 8/26/2021, at Message of Life Ministries, 605 18th St. SW, Loveland, 6-8pm (tickets: https://bit.ly/LM-Loveland); Friday, 8/27/2021, at Deep Space, 11020 S. Pikes Peak Dr., Parker, 6-8pm (https://tickets:  bit.ly/LM-Parker) and; Saturday, 8/28/2021, at Central Christian Church, 3690 East Cherry Creek South Dr., Denver, 6-8pm (tickets:  https://bit.ly/LM-Denver).  Doors open at 5:30pm each night. The FBI found no evidence of coordination between people at the Capitol on January 6th.  The officer who killed Ashli Babbit is cleared of any wrongdoing.  Kim notes that eyewitnesses reported that there were instigators for violence in the crowd and the crowd did not respond.  The founding of America is based on the principle that all men are created equal.  Lindsay Moore, candidate for School Board District #20 (northern half of Colorado Springs) wants to “conserve” this principle.  It is our duty to take control of local boards in order to stop the anti-American assault that our children experience every day.  LEAP, Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress, which would be run by an unelected, unaccountable “Authority” is another big government program to take control of our children.  LEAP is not the proper role of government and must be defeated.  We must set our children up for success by teaching them the basics of reading, writing, arithmetic, science, history and critical thinking skills.  Lindsay congratulates those who stood at Douglas County School Board headquarters protesting the mask mandate.  To learn more about Lindsay and assist in her campaign visit:  lindsaymooreford20.com.  Kimberlee Bell, owner of Kunjani Coffee, updates us with special events, including Friday night live music and Saturday lessons learning to play chess.  Thursday through Saturday, Kunjani is open until 9:00pm with happy hour from 4-7pm.  Visit Kunjani's website to learn more:  https://kunjanicoffee.com/. Bob Boswell, CEO of Laramie Energy, joins Kim to discuss current events and its influence on energy.  Bob thinks it is ironic that Biden closes the Keystone pipeline and then asks OPEC to produce more oil while at the same time giving the green light for Russia's Nord Stream 2 which provides oil for Germany.  Obtaining federal and state oil and gas leases and permits is proving difficult, including here in Colorado.  Renewable energy is a supplement, not a replacement.  California will now build natural gas plants to bring “energy stability” to the state.  Additionally, power lines have not been maintained, causing more energy chaos for California.  The state of affairs in Afghanistan will influence energy policy in the Middle East and come to the shores of America.  It has been reported that $1-3 trillion of rare earth minerals are in Afghanistan, a key ingredient for electric vehicles.  People forget that fossil fuels are affordable, efficient, abundant and reliable for our cars and for our homes.  China has the highest fossil fuel emissions in the world at 14.3% of global emissions as a result of dirty coal production.  Saudi Arabian Oil Company is ranked second with Russia coming in at number three.  China spent more than $65 million in the U.S. to influence foreign operations, per Open Secrets.  Elections matter, there are consequences.  Lincoln said:  “The ballot is more important than the bullet.”

Kommentar - Deutschlandfunk
Merkel und die Ukraine - Eine zerbrechliche Freundschaft

Kommentar - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 4:16


Die deutsche Bundeskanzlerin stand wie ein Fels an der Seite der Ukraine als Russland die Krim annektieren ließ, kommentiert Sabine Adler. Doch mit der Gasröhre Nord Stream 2 habe Merkel der Ukraine geschadet. Die Freundschaft zu dem Land sei aber im europäischen Interesse und müsse gepflegt werden. Von Sabine Adler www.deutschlandfunk.de, Kommentare und Themen der Woche Hören bis: 31.10.2021 18:05 Direkter Link zur Audiodatei

Trumpet Hour
#623: Week in Review: How Afghanistan’s Fall Changes the World, and Much More

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 56:38


America's retreat and the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan is a historic event that will have major effects globally that reverberate for years to come. Iran benefits from this Islamofascist regime driving America out of Afghanistan and taking over billions of dollars' in armaments. This destroys America's credibility within NATO and among European allies, and it has European leaders speaking of the need for greater military independence. Russia and China will benefit, not only by making lucrative deals with a Taliban-led government but also in how it strengthens their plans to absorb territory currently safeguarded by the U.S. America's evacuation dealt a terrible blow to the brotherhood between the U.S. and the United Kingdom. We also talk about how the American military has been combating white supremacy and seeking greater diversity in gender identity, the strategic Nord Stream 2 pipeline finally being completed, a defiant announcement from Hezbollah in Lebanon, and an investigation into election fraud in Colorado that could have much larger implications. Links [00:40] Afghanistan: Iran (12 minutes) [12:35] Afghanistan: Europe (11 minutes) “Germany Betrayed in Afghan ‘Fiasco'” “Germany: Transformed by Crises” [23:05] Afghanistan: Russia and China (7 minutes) “The Climax of Man's Rule Over Man” [30:30] Afghanistan: U.S. and UK (6 minutes) “The Real Rift Caused by the Royal Couple” [36:00] U.S. Military's Focus (7 minutes) “The Wolves Are Circling” “The Vanishing ‘Man of War'” “Why Family?,” Chapter 3 of Isaiah's End-Time Vision [43:20] Nord Stream 2 (4 minutes) “Germany and Russia's Secret War Against America” VIDEO: “The Dangers of the Nord Stream Pipelines” [47:00] Hezbollah in Lebanon (4 minutes) “WSJ Joins Propaganda Media in Gunning for Israel” [51:10] Colorado Election Investigation (5 minutes) “What Will Happen After Trump Regains Power”

New Books Network
Margarita M. Balmaceda, "Russian Energy Chains: The Remaking of Technopolitics from Siberia to Ukraine to the European Union" (Wilson Center, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 49:40


Margarita Balmaceda's Russian Energy Chains: The Remaking of Technopolitics from Siberia to Ukraine to the European Union (Columbia University Press, 2021) is a meticulous exploration of a complex system of energy supplies involving Russia, Ukraine, and the European Union. While originating in Russia, energy supplies, as the author asserts, undergo changes and transformations when being delivered to various destinations. What do these changes inform about the nature of both energy resources and power? Offering an insightful framework in which the two concepts can be understood, Russian Energy Chains complicates the issue of energy supplies that are inextricable from the dynamics of power relations on the interstate level. In addition to acute commentaries on the current role and status of Russia in the energy market, Margarita Balmaceda offers references to various time periods to illustrate how politically and geographically entangled energy systems are. Russian Energy Chains provides a detailed account of the development of the energy power that Russia seems to both offer and usurp; the book guides the reader through the complexity of power relations that include Ukraine and the European Union and helps better understand the current debate about Nord Stream-2. On a larger level, Margarita Balmaceda invites the discussion of the future of the energy market in terms of domestic and international policies. Nataliya Shpylova-Saeed is a PhD candidate in the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, Indiana University Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
8/4/21 Daniel Larison: What Nord Stream 2 Means for NATO Expansion

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 18:21


Scott and Daniel Larison discuss the Nord Stream 2 pipeline and what it means for America's stance toward Eastern Europe. The main issue with the German pipeline, Larison explains, is that it will allow Western Europe to buy Russian natural gas without having to deal with Ukrainian transit fees. Ukraine has portrayed the pipeline—and the fact that the U.S. is allowing it to happen—as a betrayal by the West, and has lobbied for sanctions on Germany. Larison is relieved that the U.S. government is backing down from its opposition to the pipeline, because he sees it as a sign that it won't risk jeopardizing its relationships with countries like Germany and France in the future for the sake of the much more significant issue of Ukraine's NATO membership, which Germany and France oppose. Discussed on the show: "What Nord Stream 2 Means for NATO Expansion" (Antiwar.com) "Ukraine Is Part of the West" (Foreign Affairs) "Ukraine crisis: Transcript of leaked Nuland-Pyatt call" (BBC News) Daniel Larison is a contributing editor at Antiwar.com, contributor at the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft and former senior editor at The American Conservative magazine. Follow him on Twitter @DanielLarison or on his blog, Eunomia. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://youtu.be/59Bwq8rRdqg

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
8/4/21 Daniel Larison: What Nord Stream 2 Means for NATO Expansion

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 18:21


Scott and Daniel Larison discuss the Nord Stream 2 pipeline and what it means for America's stance toward Eastern Europe. The main issue with the German pipeline, Larison explains, is that it will allow Western Europe to buy Russian natural gas without having to deal with Ukrainian transit fees. Ukraine has portrayed the pipeline—and the fact that the U.S. is allowing it to happen—as a betrayal by the West, and has lobbied for sanctions on Germany. Larison is relieved that the U.S. government is backing down from its opposition to the pipeline, because he sees it as a sign that it won't risk jeopardizing its relationships with countries like Germany and France in the future for the sake of the much more significant issue of Ukraine's NATO membership, which Germany and France oppose. Discussed on the show: "What Nord Stream 2 Means for NATO Expansion" (Antiwar.com) "Ukraine Is Part of the West" (Foreign Affairs) "Ukraine crisis: Transcript of leaked Nuland-Pyatt call" (BBC News) Daniel Larison is a contributing editor at Antiwar.com, contributor at the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft and former senior editor at The American Conservative magazine. Follow him on Twitter @DanielLarison or on his blog, Eunomia. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://youtu.be/59Bwq8rRdqg

Trumpet Hour
#619: Week in Review: As Lebanon Collapses, Hezbollah Attacks Israel, and Much More

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 57:22


Lebanon is suffering catastrophic economic collapse and Hezbollah is deeply unpopular. Now the terrorist group is firing missiles into northern Israel. Russian President Vladimir Putin said Ukraine does not truly exist as a separate, sovereign nation—intensifying a conflict with Europe immediately after the Nord Stream 2 pipeline was green-lighted for completion. France passed a law to keep its Muslim population under control, but it gives the state unprecedented powers over religious affairs, an outcome with troubling prophetic implications. We also talk about Dominion Voting Systems refusing to cooperate with an audit of its machines and records of the 2020 U.S. presidential elections, Germany cracking down on coronavirus protests, China's inroads into Cuba that helped to put down protests against the Communist regime, a new report exposing the man-made origins of COVID-19, and Iran attacking another oil tanker in the Persian Gulf. Links [00:40] Lebanon (11 minutes) “The Beirut Blast: Catalyst for Biblical Prophecy” [11:45] Putin on Ukraine (8 minutes) “The Crimean Crisis Is Reshaping Europe!” “Germany and Russia's Secret War Against America” [19:55] France's New Religious Law (5 minutes) “France Passes New Law to Control Religions” The Holy Roman Empire in Prophecy [25:35] Dominon Defies Arizona Senate (8 minutes) “Dominon Voting System Defies Arizona Subpoena” [34:00] Europe Protests Coronavirus Restrictions (5 minutes) “German Vaccination Protesters Clash With Police” “Coronavirus and the Holy Roman Empire” “Germany: Transformed by Crises” [39:15] China in Cuba (6 minutes) “China's Empowerment of the Cuban Regime Boosts Its Ability to Block American Ports” “Preparing to Storm America's Castle” [45:10] COVID-19 Origins (5 minutes) “New Report Exposes Wuhan Institute of Virology as Epicenter of Pandemic” [50:35] Iran in Gulf of Oman (6 minutes) “Iran Gets a Stranglehold on the Middle East”

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
HOME OF THE BRAVE?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 54:15


In this episode, Dinesh invokes the Biden administration's cancellation of the Keystone Pipeline along with his approval of Putin's Nord Stream 2 Pipeline as proof that Biden, not Trump, is the one colluding with Russia. While Republicans want to use the threat of repealing Section 230 to force digital moguls to abandon censorship, Dinesh reveals how the Democrats are making the exact same threat, but in their case to get more censorship of their political opponents. In an exclusive interview, his first before the camera, a January 6 defendant joins Dinesh to give the inside story of life as a political prisoner in Biden's America. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Wright Show
The Necessity and Uncertainty of Vaccination (Robert Wright & Mickey Kaus)

The Wright Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 60:00


Bob and Mickey enter the Cone of Silence ... Mickey: The narrative about vaccination has collapsed ... Should Bob worry about Eric Weinstein's latest weird tweet? ... Are we stuck with Covid forever? ... Mickey: If Americans start to see work as optional, migrants will replace them ... The Child Tax Credit's surprisingly bad polling ... Appraising the Cleveland baseball team's new name ... A new Gallup opinion poll has some bad news about race relations ... Mickey doesn't buy Bob's take on the Pegasus spyware expose ... The inquiries and (alleged) conspiracies of January 6 ... Why blame Tom Barrack when you could blame Jared? ... Biden screws Ukraine over the Nord Stream 2 pipeline ... Parrot Room preview: What bad buses in Philly teach us about government overreach, the California recall, Jeffrey Goldberg in hot water, Nick Kristof eyes a run for office, Sean Hannity's bowel problems—and ours, Eric Weinstein's tweet, game theory among ethnic elites, and the January 6 prosecutions ...

The John Batchelor Show
1528: 2/2 Kiev and Warsaw doubt the US-Germany-Russia deal on Nordstream2. Anatol Lieven, Quincy Institute, @LievenAnatol

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 8:00


Photo:  A piece of Nord Stream pipe on public display in Kotka, Finland. 2/2  Kiev and Warsaw doubt the US-Germany-Russia deal on Nordstream2. Anatol Lieven, Quincy Institute, @LievenAnatol   https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/us-germany-deal-nord-stream-2-pipeline-draws-ire-lawmakers-both-countries-2021-07-21/ Permissions: 21 October 2017, 16:53:59 / Source | Own work  /  Author | Vuo I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publish it under the following license: w:en:Creative Commons attribution share alike  This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.          You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the work Under the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

By Any Means Necessary
Dr. Jared Ball Dissects Academia, Black Capitalism & Cult of Celebrity

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 112:00


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, host Sean Blackmon & Jaqueline Luqman are joined by Frank Chapman, Director of the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression, and author of the book, “Marxist-Leninist Perspectives on Black Liberation and Socialism,” to discuss the new civilian oversight board being established over the Chicago Police Department, the furious reaction from the police union in Chicago, and why advocates for community control over policing view the board as an important victory over “police tyranny.”In the second segment, Sean & Jaqueline are joined by Richard Becker, author of “Palestine, Israel and the U.S. Empire,” to discuss the recent decision by Ben & Jerry's to end sales of its ice cream in Occupied Palestinian Territory, the outraged response from both liberal and conservative Zionists in the US and Israel, and why the move points to a “huge change” away from associating with Israeli apartheid among the Jewish population in the US and the international peace activist community.In the third segment, Sean & Jaqueline are joined by international affairs and security analyst Mark Sleboda to discuss the new agreement between the United States and Germany by which the former will allow its ostensible ally to complete the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline, the bizarre accusation by the Ukrainian regime that the Russian government represents a threat to the global energy supply, and why Ukraine is so eager to prevent Russia from trading freely with the rest of Europe.Later in the show, Sean & Jaqueline are joined by Dr. Jared Ball, a father, husband, Professor of Communication Studies at Morgan State University in Baltimore, MD, the curator of imixwhatilike.org and author of the new book, “The Myth and Propaganda of Black Buying Power,” to discuss a new article in the Chronicle of Higher Education called “The Pernicious Fantasy of the Nikole Hannah-Jones Saga,” how rappers like Jay-Z have been used to inject reactionary politics into Black consciousness, and why crypto-currency is unlikely to liberate many working people anytime soon.

By Any Means Necessary
US Graciously 'Allows' Germany To Complete Join Russian Gas Pipeline

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 15:16


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by international affairs and security analyst Mark Sleboda to discuss the new agreement between the United States and Germany by which the former will allow its ostensible ally to complete the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline, the bizarre accusation by the Ukrainian regime that the Russian government represents a threat to the global energy supply, and why Ukraine is so eager to prevent Russia from trading freely with the rest of Europe.

The John Batchelor Show
1523: The Nordstream2 deal is a win for the Kremlin. @Felix_Light @CBSNews.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 6:25


Photo: Nordstream 1 (blue) & Nordstream 2 (red) CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Nordstream2 deal is a win for the Kremlin. @Felix_Light @CBSNews. https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2021/07/21/putin-merkel-satisfied-with-near-completion-of-nord-stream-2-a74580  

The John Batchelor Show
1524: Kiev was not at the table for the Nordstream2 deal. James Brooke, Ukraine Business News.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 11:20


Photo:   The Cathedral of the Ascension of the Virgin, Pecherskoi Monastery, Kief, Russia. Kiev was not at the table for the Nordstream2 deal. James Brooke, Ukraine Business News.      U.S., Germany strike Nord Stream 2 pipeline deal to push back on Russian 'aggression' https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/us-germany-deal-nord-stream-2-pipeline-draws-ire-lawmakers-both-countries-2021-07-21/

Intelligence Matters
The Link Between Energy and National Security: Expert Frank Verrastro

Intelligence Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 39:25


In this episode of Intelligence Matters, host Michael Morell speaks with Frank Verrastro, senior advisor on energy issues at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Verrastro offers insights into how shifts in energy supplies and consumption affect national security, and how the trend toward decarbonization may affect dynamics and diplomacy among key global powers. Verrastro and Morell discuss ongoing deliberations with Iran and involving the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, as well as the Biden administration's push to modernize American energy infrastructure. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.