Podcast appearances and mentions of Carly Simon

American singer-songwriter, musician and author

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Carly Simon

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Best podcasts about Carly Simon

Latest podcast episodes about Carly Simon

Monetize Your Voice
The Art of Confident Communication: The Power of What Part 4 Episode 25

Monetize Your Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 20:16


So here's the next question. What's ahead around the next curve? Anticipation. I think that was Carly Simon back in the 60's. That's a great song.... Anticipation. I guess the best way for me to answer this, what's ahead around that next curve is to pay attention to where you are. On the road of life right now, and if you look ahead in this case, an hour or two hours or three hours, and you see it's a straight line then why worry about the curve? Just like driving an automobile, there are normal signs. Curve ahead or slow down, 90-degree curve or slow down. There's a lot of zigzagging the road, just me, Anders left and in and out and so on and so forth. So we have the signs on the actual highways that we drive our vehicles on.....   Let's not run from opportunities to grow. Let's not point our fingers immediately that it's someone else's fault, someone else has caused this. Let's look at ourselves first. Let's dig deep into the mind of our soul, and I encourage you. Choose to feed your soul with some great food every day, just like you feed your tummy.

Como lo oyes
Como lo oyes - Tam Tam Go!... + Arroyo, Marini & Espinoza - 20/09/22

Como lo oyes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 58:31


Tam Tam Go! Ha reeditado su disco “After 30” que salió en medio del silencio de la s medidas de la pandemia. Sus grandes canciones en compañía de Mikel Izal, Txetxu Altube, Nina de Juan (Morgan), Yadam o Antonio Vega. Anuncian nuevas canciones para el próximo. Hoy charlan y tocan para nosotros. Y una visita muy, muy especial. Ramón Arroyo (Los Secretos) y Jeff Espinoza (ex-Red House) nos traen al legendario Lou Marini, saxofonista de los Blues Brothers principalmente pero también de Frank Zappa, Aerosmith, Cameo, Donald Fagen, Lou Reed, Carly Simon y, cómo no, James Taylor entre otro muchos, muchísimos artistas o grupos. DISCO 1 LOU MARINI & The Magic City Jazz Orchestra Lou’s Blues (ESCA) SALUDO A RAMÓN ARROYO, JEFF ESPINOZA & LOU MARIN DISCO 2 THE BLUES BROTHERS Everybody Needs Someday to Love (5)  ENTREVISTA A RAMÓN ARROYO, JEFF ESPINOZA & LOU MARIN DISCO 3 JAMES TAYLOR Knock On Wood (7) ENTREVISTA A RAMÓN ARROYO, JEFF ESPINOZA & LOU MARINI  + SALUDO A TAM TAM GO! DISCO 4 JEFF ESPINOZA Your Star Will Always Shine (7)  DISCO 5 TAM TAM GO! Espaldas Mojadas con MIKEL IZAL (4) ENTREVISTA A TAM TAM GO! DISCO 6 TAM TAM GO!  I Come For You con NINA DE JUAN (2) ENTREVISTA A TAM TAM GO! ACÚSTICO ENTREVISTA Y DESPEDIDA CON TAM TAM GO! DISCO 7 TAM TAM GO! Pasarán (11) Escuchar audio

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, When bullies and tyrants get a taste of their own medicine, they usually don't like it

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am a radical MAGA American extremist— AND I have heard enough! The radical Green New Dealers and those that think your gender is determined by the pants you wear or the color of your hair—are done here—we will prevail!   Here are three big things you need to know right now— ONE— Fact checking the truth about the IRS and who really gets targeted for audits and other abuse—and let me tell you something it's the little guy better than 5 to 1… TWO— While Joe Biden continues his Tone Deaf victory tour—3.7 million more kids slipped into poverty to start this year—pushing the rate to over 17% -- and Joe says this is a great economy? On what planet genius? THREE— When bullies and tyrants get a taste of their own medicine—they usually don't like it—that has been clear lately with ever louder and ever more shrill screaming from the left when a few illegal aliens end up in their make believe sanctuary cities and states—   You see when the Governors in Texas and Arizona started shipping illegals by bus to places like New York City—Washington DC and Chicago—they ask for federal help and declare states of emergency—and remember these are a tiny less than one percent fraction of the flood of humanity rolling into Texas and every other border state—   But it was the move by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis this week—that peeled away the socialist veneer and exposed these people for what and who they really are—   You see Governor DeSantis loaded up a pair of planes and sent about 100 illegals to the elitist playground for the Rich and Famous on Martha's Vineyard—a place where people like Barack Obama has a mansion along with other far left zealots like James Taylor, Rosie O'Donnell, David Letterman, Spike Lee, Carly Simon and Diane Sawyer—each and every one—wildly wealthy and wildly outspoken about the virtues of sanctuary status for lots of places—BUT apparently not their virtuous little slice of paradise—   No, in fact the Democrats in Massachusetts a place that voted overwhelmingly for Joe Biden and the dangerous open border policies—are calling Governor DeSantis—DeSatan—and screaming like smashed cats that he is evil and inhumane!   Really? He sent them to a wealthy island paradise—how on earth could that not be better than Brownsville, Laredo or even San Antonio? You would think with their yard signs supporting sanctuary status and claiming how welcoming they are—would jump up with open arms and celebrate the arrival of a few dozen folks from Venezuela—and some from a few other desperate places—   I mean the Vineyard only has about 17,000 year round residents—and the majority of the homes are just summer homes—so they must have plenty of places for people sho don't speak English and we know almost nothing about—   I mean what is the problem here folks? No person can be illegal right? So, let them in your house—in fact I think the people on Martha's Vineyard should just stop locking their doors—I mean what is the difference really between a unlocked door and an open border—except for scale?   But I have to report—despite the idea of sanctuary status being great—it just isn't sounding that way from the people in the Commonwealth—   One thing is certain—Governor DeSantis got the nations attention and certainly got the attention of the wealthy white liberals living on Martha's Vineyard—did I mention—less than 4 percent of the people living there—on the swanky island— are people of color—I mean talk about white privilege right? This is what they want to talk about on the left White Supremacy and White Nationalism—its what they have right now! And make no mistake they want to keep it that way!

The New Yorker Radio Hour
Dave Grohl's Tales of Life and Music

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 26:39 Very Popular


At The New Yorker Festival, Dave Grohl talked with Kelefa Sanneh about Grohl's recent book, “The Storyteller: Tales of Life and Music.” Grohl, who was the drummer for Nirvana before becoming the front man of the Foo Fighters, recalled one of his earliest experiences of taking music seriously: harmonizing with his mom to Carly Simon on the car radio. He also talked about what it was like to collaborate with Kurt Cobain, who was known for his capricious genius, and about stepping out from behind the drums to lead his own band. “After Kurt died, I was, like, I'm not playing music anymore—it's too painful,” he remembered. “And then I eventually realized that if music saved my life, my entire life, this is what's going to save my life again.” This segment was originally aired November 26, 2021.

Significant Lovers
5. When James Taylor Met Carly Simon

Significant Lovers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 117:43


We're headed back to the ‘70s to ride the rollercoaster of one of music's biggest power couples: James Taylor & Carly Simon. From hot starry nights in Martha's Vineyard to cold, bitter betrayals in secret love nests, it's hard not to get your heart absolutely shattered by this love story. Through their own revealing prose and lyrics, we seek to understand what turned these folk-rock lovers into an angry man & hungry woman. Why has James not spoken to Carly in nearly 40 years? Is reconciliation impossible? Significant Lovers is a historic relationships and celebrity couples podcast. You can contact us at significantlovers@gmail.com and follow us on Instagram and TikTok @significantlovers. Bonus episodes are every other week on Patreon! Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for ‘fair use' for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/significantlovers/support

1001 Songs That Make You Want To Die
You're So Vain - Carly Simon (With Nick Capper)

1001 Songs That Make You Want To Die

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 67:53 Transcription Available


With their combined powers, Mad Dog, Dan Southern and our good mate Nick Capper finally turn the table on Carly Simon and discover who is really the vain one! Watch Nicks new comedy special on YouTube now: https://youtu.be/-uaxk4AK310Check out The Phone Hacks podcast with Nick Capper, Mike Goldstein, and all of Nick's upcoming gigs HERE!If you enjoy our podcast and can afford to shoot some shrapnel our way we would be absolutely bloody stoked about it! You can sign up for as little as $2 a month and receive bonus episodes, extra content and even be a guest on the podcast if you're keen! Jump on our Patreon page now and sign up! Please tell your mates about the podcast and jump on Apple Podcasts/iTunes and give us a 5-star review!Blessington Support the podcast when you buy a Blessington watch! Use the promo code “1001songs” at checkout. Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

Interviewing the Legends: Rock Stars & Celebs
Elliott Randall Guitar Master Who Performed Solos on "Reelin' In The Years" and "Fame"

Interviewing the Legends: Rock Stars & Celebs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 85:23


Hello once again everyone I'm your host Ray Shasho and welcome to another edition of Interviewing the Legends. Brought to you by The Publicity Works Agency specializing in authors & musicians Remember We shine only when We make you shine! Call us today at 941-567-6193 for a free PR evaluation!  Elliott Randall's illustrious career has encompassed a wide and varied cross-section of World Musical forms. These include record production, composition, electronic research and development, lectures and teaching, and of course, a legendary contribution to popular guitar performance and recording. His guitar solos on Steely Dan's “Reelin' in The Years” and “Fame” (the motion picture) have entered Rock history annals. Elliott has recorded and performed with artists as diverse as The Doobie Brothers, Carly Simon, Seatrain, The Blues Brothers, Carl Wilson, Peter Wolf, Peter Frampton, James Galway, Richie Havens, The Rochester Philharmonic and The American Symphony Orchestra, among many others. In addition, he is a favorite of esteemed songwriters Jimmy Webb, George David Weiss, Don Covay and Laura Nyro. Other credits include music consultant for NBC Saturday Night Live and Oliver Stone, and projects with producers Jerry Wexler, Joel Dorn, Steve Lillywhite, Eddie Kramer among many others. In addition to artistic projects, Elliott has also played, produced, and composed advertisements (jingles) for television, radio and cinema. Please welcome legendary session guitarist and musician ELLIOTT RANDALL to Interviewing the Legends FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ELLIOTT RANDALL VISIT www.elliott-randall.com Official website https://twitter.com/elliottrandall Twitter www.facebook.com/elliottrandallmusic Facebook www.linkedin.com/in/elliottrandall?original_referer= Linkedin www.youtube.com/ejrandall YouTube https://elliottrandall1.bandcamp.com/ Elliott Randall Bandcamp     Discography Eric Mercury "Electric Black Man" 1969 Avco Randall's Island (1970) Polydor, catalogue number 2489 004 Rock 'n' Roll City (1973) Polydor Randall's New York (1977) Kirshner Still Reelin' (2007) Private Collection Records HeartStrings (2011) Private Collection Records Virtual Memory (2012) Private Collection Records   Soundtracks The Warriors (1979) The Blues Brothers: Music from the Soundtrack (1980) Fame (1980) Heart of Dixie (1989) Looking for an Echo (2000)   Also appears on (partial list) Can't Buy a Thrill (1972) – Steely Dan Frankie Dante & Orquesta Flamboyan Con Larry Harlow (1972) Satan – Sonny Stitt (Cadet, 1974) Ladies Love Outlaws (1974) - Tom Rush Katy Lied (1975) – Steely Dan Closeup (1975) - Frankie Valli Royal Scam (1976) – Steely Dan T Shirt (1976) - Loudon Wainwright III The Music Man (1977) - Paul Anka Gene Simmons (1978) – Gene Simmons Peter Criss (1978) – Peter Criss Live and Sleazy (1979) – Village People Connections (1980) – Richie Havens Rise Up (1980) - Peter Frampton It's Alright (I See Rainbows) (1982) – Yoko Ono Down On The Road by The Beach (1982) – Steve Hiett Hello Big Man (1983) – Carly Simon Youngblood (1983) - Carl Wilson Milk and Honey (1984) – John Lennon, Yoko Ono The Animals' Christmas (1986) – Art Garfunkel & Amy Grant Electric Landlady (1991) – Kirsty MacColl Walking on Thin Ice (1992) – Yoko Ono Walk the Dog and Light the Light (1993) – Laura Nyro Arena (1996) – Asia Spirit of Christmas (2009) – Northern Light Orchestra Left, (2016) - Monkey House       Support us!

Conversations with Calvin; WE the Species
POPPA JOHN BUG; Musician; Singer-Songwriter; NJ Icon; Photographer (Poppa-Razzi); New Album, ”Forgiven;” During this interview, PREMIERE of “Where is America” (music video); JAM Band; LIVE from Jersey

Conversations with Calvin; WE the Species

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 55:24


#jerseyshore #singersongwriter #richiehavens #photographer CONVERSATIONS WITH CALVIN WE THE SPECIES NEW: POPPA JOHN BUG; Musician; Singer-Songwriter;; New Album, ”Forgiven;” During interview, PREMIERE of “Where is America” (music video); JAM Band; LIVE from Jersey Shore SPECIAL MESSAGE:AT SIX MINUTE mark is the PREMIERE of music video “Where is America” from new album “Forgiven.” Video by Jeremiah Verdecias ** 174 Interviews. GLOBAL Reach. Earth Life. Amazing People. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE (You can almost find any subject you want) https://www.youtube.com/c/ConversationswithCalvinWetheSpecIEs ** ** POPPA JOHN BUG; Musician; Singer-Songwriter; NJ Icon; Photographer (Poppa-Razzi); New Album, ”Forgiven;” During this interview, PREMIERE of “Where is America” (music video); JAM Band; LIVE from Jersey Shore YouTube: SPECIAL MESSAGE: Here AT SIX MINUTE mark is the PREMIERE of music video “Where is America” from new album “Forgiven.” Video by Jeremiah Verdecias ** CONTACT: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/poppa-john-bug-9bb58623/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/poppa.j.bug Website (music) poppajohnbug.com ** BIO: "Poppa John Bug" has played Electric Bass professionally since 1973 when he interviewed with Richie Havens at the Electric Lady Studios in New York City. Richie had just introduced a new Gospel Rock group called Fresh Flavor on The Tonight Show, starring Johnny Carson and wanted to add a rhythm element and there was Bug, in the right place at the right time. While on tour with Flavor, he met the Godfather of British Blues, legendary Alexis Korner. After finishing his time with Flavor, Poppa met many of NY's fine musicians, including Eric Oxendine, Murray Weinstock of Manhattan Transfer, Rob Gerstein who played with Carly Simon and world-famous drummer Bernard Purdie of Aretha Franklin fame. John also worked with George Caldwell of CBS London. Hanging out in the Village John was inspired by jamming in many of the village's fine clubs including, The Bitter End, The Dug Out, The Village Gate & The Café Wha. Thirteen years ago, John decided to change his direction and go back to his roots, playing music, writing songs and just living again. Poppa teamed up with his New Jersey friends and are known as “The Jam Band” they are currently working in the Studio and Showcase circuit. After three years of recording at Shore Fire Studios with engineer Joseph D'Maio, his new CD “Before & After” reflects his music from ‘Before' & his music which is ‘Now' expressed on this CD!! Poppa got his guitar strumming influence from the one and only rhythm master Richie Havens. ** ** ALSO ON AUDIO: SPOTIFY http://spoti.fi/3bMYVYW GOOGLE PODCASTS http://bit.ly/38yH3yP edits by Claudine Smith- Email: casproductions01@gmail.com ** PLEASE SUBSCRIBE (You can almost find any subject you want) #animalwelfare #animalrescue #climatechange #ONEHEALTH #womenshealth #popculture #military #singersongwriter #clerks #GenZ #Nutrition #Comedy

The Mic High Club Luchtvaart Podcast
#179 Private jet special! Voor John, Nikkie en de koning

The Mic High Club Luchtvaart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 48:43


Nummer 179! Fly like a G6. Een special over private jets. Het speelgoed voor de superrijken der aarde. Zoals de Gulfstream, de Rolls Royce onder de private jets. Maar ook Bombardier, Cessna, Embraer en Boeing Business Jets (BBJ). De koning, John de Mol en Nikkie Plessen vliegen graag rond in hun eigen toestel. Zonder pottenkijkers. De naam zegt het al: een privéjet is privé. Veel zaken moeten geheim blijven. Ondertussen heeft een privéjet ook nadelen: grootheden als Taylor Swift komen in problemen door hun vlieggedrag. Luchtvaarthisteurie: een Nederlander had al in de jaren 30 zijn eigen vliegtuig. Hoe een private jet het begin was van het Lockheedschandaal, waardoor Prins Bernhard in grote problemen kwam. Het succes van onze Twitterbots. Veel mensen volgen de Falcon 900 van Max Verstappen op de voet. Nieuwe trends in de wereld van de private jets. Philip Dröge en Menno Swart vertellen ook over hun eigen avonturen in een privéjet. Muziek: "You're so vain" - Carly Simon, "Like a G6" - Far East Movement en "I Wanna Be A Private Jet" - The Private Jets. Ga naar http://luchtvaartplaat.nl voor 500+ vette vliegtuighits Tips en commentaar stuur je naar info@tmhc.nl Geef ons 5 sterren op Spotiy en Apple Podcasts. Een positieve review stellen we zeer op prijs. Michiel Koudstaal is onze voice-over. Voor al je stemmenwerk ga naar voxcast.nl THEN YOU FLEW YOUR LEARJET UP TO NOVA SCOTIA

Oh Brother, not another podcast
Sally Taylor, talented singer, songwriter, artist, teacher, creator

Oh Brother, not another podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 31:34


Sally Taylor, daughter of James Taylor and Carly Simon, is a talented singer-songwriter, artist, teacher, and creator & facilitator of the Consenses Project. With candor and humor, she discusses dyslexia, her songwriting process, becoming a vegetarian, surviving a plane crash, and meeting her husband on a nude beach, among other fascinating topics as only Sally can tell them.

La Gran Travesía
Beth Hart, Bonnie Raitt, Carly Simon, Alanis Morissette, Garbage... Más Voces Femeninas

La Gran Travesía

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 64:40


Hoy en La Gran Travesía podréis escuchar a Carly Simon, Garbage, Beth Hart, Bonnie Raitt, Wanda Jackson, Akanis Morissette, Marianne Faithfull y muchas más. Muchas gracias a todos por suscribiros, comentar, compartir, darle like... y en especial a los mecenas y patrocinadores de La Gran Travesía por su apoyo. Victor Bravo, Karlos Martínez, Juan Carlos González, Fonune, Ikatza, Eulogiko, Lourdes Pilar, Jose Diego, Dora, Miguel Angel Torres, Dani, Suibne, Jesús Miguel, Leticia, Sementalex, Guillermo Gutierrez, Zimmy, Enrique FG, Sergio Castillo, Aida, Mati, Elliot SF, Redneckman, Daniel A, Raul Andrés, Luis Miguel Crespo, Gonzalo Fernández, Vlado 74, Toni Sureda, Alvaro Pérez, Marcos París, Angel Hernandez, Edgar Cuevas, Okabe 16, Jit, Vicente DC, Francisco González, María Arán, javifer27, juancalero62 … y a los mecenas anónimos.

Having A Lyrical Breakdown
Ep. 31 - You're So Vain by Carly Simon: Who is Carly? Tressa is Listener

Having A Lyrical Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 64:33


In 1972, a lyrically genius-written song by the lovely (and beautiful) Carly Simon hit the world and it is STILL relevant and leaving us wondering "who is this song about?" People have paid good money, made deals, and come up with their reasonings as to whom (or whom +) Simon wanted the world to know as "so vain." Listener, this Ep is to share with you how vain Tressa is...in the funniest of ways of course. So be prepared for nothing to sound the same here because Tressa is in control. Joey is subject to trivia and well, he is not that great at it and Tressa is so proud to give him negative points (which he does not care at'tall). You WANT to listen, learn, and repeat this song we are telling you...it makes you smile, kinda chuckle, and absolutely have at least one person you know in mind. A new post rating number is revealed with this one friend and its origin comes from the same place of this song, vanity! And learn how we come full circle to the infamous "EVERYBODY'S BEST FRIEND" David Geffen from Ep 1.

Songcraft: Spotlight on Songwriters
Ep. 198 - JOHN HALL ("Still the One"

Songcraft: Spotlight on Songwriters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 66:14 Very Popular


SUMMARY:Our guest on this episode is John Hall, founder of the band Orleans and co-writer of the group's enduring hits "Dance with Me" and "Still the One." He chats with us about how Janis Joplin launched his songwriting career, co-writing Steve Wariner's #1 country hit "You Can Dream of Me," and how he ended up serving two terms as a US Congressman before returning to music.PART ONE:Paul and Scott chat about Orleans' legendary "naked" album cover, and band/artist names you're afraid to say out loud. If you've ever stressed about how to say Husker Du, Bon Iver, Chvrches, or Bjork, we've got you!  PART TWO:Our in-depth interview with John HallABOUT JOHN HALL:John Hall is a musician, songwriter, community activist, founder of the band Orleans, and former US Congressman. After forming the group Kangaroo, which shared house band duties with Bruce Springsteen's group The Castilles at Greenwich Village's legendary Café Wha, Hall worked extensively as a sideman. He toured and/or recorded as a guitarist with Seals & Crofts, Taj Mahal, Bonnie Raitt, Little Feat, Carly Simon, Jackson Brown, and others, but established himself as a songwriter when he and then-wife Johanna penned “Half Moon” on Janis Joplin's Pearl album. After John formed the group Orleans, he and Johanna continued to find success as songwriters with the band's hit singles “Dance with Me” and “Still the One.” The following decade, John became a chart-topping country writer when he co-wrote Steve Wariner's #1 single “You Can Dream of Me.” He's known for co-founding the organization Musicians United for Safe Energy with Jackson Brown, Bonnie Raitt, and Graham Nash. John helped organize the legendary 1979 No Nukes concerts at Madison Square Garden, and his song “Power” became the anthem for the event. In 2006, John was elected to the US House of Representatives, representing New York's 19th District. After serving two terms, he returned to making music. John's songs have been covered by Millie Jackson, Chaka Kahn, Ricky Skaggs, Taj Mahal, Jackson Browne, Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor, Levon Helm, Bobby McFerrin, Bonnie Raitt, Chet Atkins, New Grass Revival, Jose Feliciano, Bill Anderson, The Oak Ridge Boys, Patty Loveless, and more. His most recent solo album is called Reclaiming My Time. We spoke with him in June of 2021 when the album was brand new and when he was working on some Orleans projects that have since become available and can be found at johnhallmusic.com.        

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice, or the Chords, or Jesse Belvin, or Vince Taylor who there's very little information about. And there are some coming up who there's far less information about than people in the last fifty episodes. But every episode since the Beatles has had a surfeit of information. There is one exception -- I wanted to do a full episode on "Rescue Me" by Fontella Bass, because it would be an interesting lens through which to look at how Chess coped with the change in Black musical styles in the sixties. But there was so little information available about her I ended up relegating it to a Patreon bonus episode, because she makes those earlier artists look well-documented. Which leads nicely into the next question. Nora Tillman asks "Forgive this question if you've answered it before: is there literally a list somewhere with 500 songs you've chosen? Has the list changed since you first composed it? Also, when did you first conceive of this list?" [Excerpt: John Reed and the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, "As Someday it May Happen"] Many people have asked this question, or variations upon it. The answer is yes and no. I made a list when I started that had roughly two hundred songs I knew needed to be on there, plus about the same number again of artists who needed to be covered but whose precise songs I hadn't decided on. To make the initial list I pulled a list out of my own head, and then I also checked a couple of other five-hundred-song lists -- the ones put out by Rolling Stone magazine and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -- not because I wanted to use their lists; I have very little time for rock critical orthodoxy, as most of my listeners will likely have realised by now, but because I wanted to double-check that I hadn't missed anything obvious out, and that if I was missing something off their lists, I knew *why* I was missing it. To take a ludicrous example, I wouldn't want to get to the end of the 1960s and have someone say "Wait a minute, what about the Beatles?" and think "I *knew* I'd forgotten something!" Then, at the start of each fifty-episode season, I put together a more rigorous list of the fifty songs coming up, in order. Those lists *can* still change with the research -- for example, very early on in the research for the podcast, I discovered that even though I was completely unfamiliar with "Ko Ko Mo" by Gene and Eunice, it was a hugely important and influential record at the time, and so I swapped that in for another song. Or more recently, I initially intended to have the Doors only have one episode, but when I realised how much I was having to include in that episode I decided to give them a second one. And sometimes things happen the other way -- I planned to do full episodes on Jackie Shane and Fontella Bass, but for both of them I couldn't find enough information to get a decent episode done, so they ended up being moved to Patreon episodes. But generally speaking that fifty-song list for a year's episodes is going to remain largely unchanged. I know where I'm going, I know what most of the major beats of the story are, but I'm giving myself enough flexibility to deviate if I find something I need to include. Connected with this, Rob Johnson asks how I can be confident I'll get back to some stories in later episodes. Well, like I say, I have a pretty much absolute idea of what I'm going to do in the next year, and there are a lot of individual episodes where I know the structure of the episode long before we get to it. As an example here... I don't want to give too much away, and I'm generally not going to be answering questions about "will artist X be appearing?", but Rob also asked about one artist. I can tell you that that artist is one who will not be getting a full episode -- and I already said in the Patreon episode about that artist that they won't -- but as I also said in that episode they *will* get a significant amount of time in another episode, which I now know is going to be 180, which will also deal with another artist from the same state with the same forename, even though it's actually about two English bands. I've had the structure of that episode planned out since literally before I started writing episode one. On the other hand, episode 190 is a song that wasn't originally going to be included at all. I was going to do a 1967 song by the same artist, but then found out that a fact I'd been going to use was disputed, which meant that track didn't need to be covered, but the artist still did, to finish off a story I'd started in a previous episode. Patrick asks:"I am currently in the middle of reading 1971: Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth and I'm aware that Apple TV have produced a documentary on how music changed that year as well and I was wondering what your opinion on that subject matter? I imagine you will be going into some detail on future podcasts, but until recently I never knew people considered 1971 as a year that brought about those changes." [Excerpt: Rod Stewart, "Angel"] I've not yet read Hepworth's book, but that it's named after an album which came out in 1972 (which is the album that track we just heard came from) says something about how the idea that any one year can in itself be a turning point for music is a little overstated -- and the Apple documentary is based on Hepworth's book, so it's not really multiple people making that argument. Now, as it happens, 1971 is one of the break points for the podcast -- episodes 200 and 201 are both records from July 1971, and both records that one could argue were in their own way signifiers of turning points in rock music history. And as with 1967 it's going to have more than its fair share of records, as it bridges the gap of two seasons. But I think one could make similar arguments for many, many years, and 1971 is  not one of the most compelling cases. I can't say more before I read Hepworth's book, which won't be for a few months yet. I'm instinctively dubious of these "this year was the big year that changed everything" narratives, but Hepworth's a knowledgeable enough writer that I wouldn't want to dismiss his thesis without even reading the book. Roger Pannell asks I'm a fairly recent joiner-in too so you may have answered this before. What is the theme tune to the podcast please. [Excerpt: The Boswell Sisters, “Rock and Roll”] The theme song to the podcast is "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters. The version I use is not actually the version that was released as a single, but a very similar performance that was used in the film Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round in 1931. I chose it in part because it may well be the first ever record to contain the phrase "rock and roll" (though as I've said many times there's no first anything, and there are certainly many records which talk about rocking and/or rolling -- just none I know of with that phrase) so it evokes rock and roll history, partly because the recording is out of copyright, and partly just because I like the Boswell Sisters. Several people asked questions along the lines of this one from Christopher Burnett "Just curious if there's any future episodes planned on any non-UK or non-North American songs? The bonus episodes on the Mops and Kyu Sakamoto were fascinating." [Excerpt: Kyu Sakamoto, "Sukiyaki"] Sadly, there won't be as many episodes on musicians from outside the UK and North America as I'd like. The focus of the podcast is going to be firmly on British, American, Irish, and Canadian musicians, with a handful from other Anglophone countries like Australia and Jamaica. There *are* going to be a small number of episodes on non-Anglophone musicians, but very few. Sadly, any work of history which engages with injustices still replicates some of those injustices, and one of the big injustices in rock history is that most rock musicians have been very insular, and there has been very little influence from outside the Anglophone world, which means that I can't talk much about influential records made by musicians from elsewhere.  Also, in a lot of cases most of the writing about them is in other languages, and I'm shamefully monolingual (I have enough schoolboy French not to embarrass myself, but not enough to read a biography without a dictionary to hand, and that's it). There *will* be quite a few bonus episodes on musicians from non-Anglophone countries though, because this *is* something that I'm very aware of as a flaw, and if I can find ways of bringing the wider story into the podcast I will definitely do so, even if it means changing my plans somewhat, but I'm afraid they'll largely be confined to Patreon bonuses rather than mainline episodes. Ed Cunard asks "Is there a particular set of songs you're not looking forward to because you don't care for them, but intend to dive into due to their importance?" [Excerpt: Jackie Shane, "Don't Play That Song"] There are several, and there already have been some, but I'm not going to say what they are as part of anything to do with the podcast (sometimes I might talk about how much I hate a particular record on my personal Twitter account or something, but I try not to on the podcast's account, and I'm certainly not going to in an episode of the podcast itself). One of the things I try to do with the podcast is to put the case forward as to why records were important, why people liked them at the time, what they got out of them. I can't do that if I make it about my own personal tastes. I know for a fact that there are people who have come away from episodes on records I utterly despise saying "Wow! I never liked that record before, but I do now!" and that to me shows that I have succeeded -- I've widened people's appreciation for music they couldn't appreciate before. Of course, it's impossible to keep my own tastes from showing through totally, but even there people tend to notice much more my like or dislike for certain people rather than for their music, and I don't feel anything like as bad for showing that. So I have a policy generally of just never saying which records in the list I actually like and which I hate. You'll often be able to tell from things I talk about elsewhere, but I don't want anyone to listen to an episode and be prejudiced not only against the artist but against the episode  by knowing going in that I dislike them, and I also don't want anyone to feel like their favourite band is being given short shrift. There are several records coming up that I dislike myself but where I know people are excited about hearing the episode, and the last thing I want to do is have those people who are currently excited go in disappointed before they even hear it. Matt Murch asks: "Do you anticipate tackling the shift in rock toward harder, more seriously conceptual moves in 1969 into 1970, with acts like Led Zeppelin, The Who (again), Bowie, etc. or lighter soul/pop artists such as Donna Summer, Carly Simon or the Carpenters? Also, without giving too much away, is there anything surprising you've found in your research that you're excited to cover? [Excerpt: Robert Plant, "If I Were a Carpenter"] OK, for the first question... I don't want to say exactly who will and won't be covered in future episodes, because when I say "yes, X will be covered" or "no, Y will not be covered", it invites a lot of follow-up discussion along the lines of "why is X in there and not Y?" and I end up having to explain my working, when the episodes themselves are basically me explaining my working. What I will say is this... the attitude I'm taking towards who gets included and who gets excluded is, at least in part, influenced by an idea in cognitive linguistics called prototype theory. According to this theory, categories aren't strictly bounded like in Aristotelian thought -- things don't have strict essences that mean they definitely are or aren't members of categories. But rather, categories have fuzzy boundaries, and there are things at the centre that are the most typical examples of the category, and things at the border that are less typical. For example, a robin is a very "birdy" bird -- it's very near the centre of the category of bird, it has a lot of birdness -- while an ostrich is still a bird, but much less birdy, it's sort of in the fuzzy boundary area. When you ask people to name a bird, they're more likely to name a robin than an ostrich, and if you ask them “is an ostrich a bird?” they take longer to answer than they do when asked about robins. In the same way, a sofa is nearer the centre of the category of "furniture" than a wardrobe is. Now, I am using an exceptionally wide definition of what counts as rock music, but at the same time, in order for it to be a history of rock music, I do have to spend more time in the centre of the concept than around the periphery. My definition would encompass all the artists you name, but I'm pretty sure that everyone would agree that the first three artists you name are much closer to the centre of the concept of "rock music" than the last three. That's not to say anyone on either list is definitely getting covered or is definitely *not* getting covered -- while I have to spend more time in the centre than the periphery, I do have to spend some time on the periphery, and my hope is to cover as many subgenres and styles as I can -- but that should give an idea of how I'm approaching this. As for the second question -- there's relatively little that's surprising that I've uncovered in my research so far, but that's to be expected. The period from about 1965 through about 1975 is the most over-covered period of rock music history, and so the basic facts for almost every act are very, very well known to people with even a casual interest. For the stuff I'm doing in the next year or so, like the songs I've covered for the last year, it's unlikely that anything exciting will come up until very late in the research process, the times when I'm pulling everything together and notice one little detail that's out of place and pull on that thread and find the whole story unravelling. Which may well mean, of course, that there *are* no such surprising things. That's always a possibility in periods where we're looking at things that have been dealt with a million times before, and this next year may largely be me telling stories that have already been told. Which is still of value, because I'm putting them into a larger context of the already-released episodes, but we'll see if anything truly surprising happens. I certainly hope it does. James Kosmicki asks "Google Podcasts doesn't seem to have any of the first 100 episodes - are they listed under a different name perhaps?" [Excerpt: REM, "Disappear"] I get a number of questions like this, about various podcast apps and sites, and I'm afraid my answer is always the same -- there's nothing I can do about this, and it's something you'd have to take up with the site in question. Google Podcasts picks up episodes from the RSS feed I provide, the same as every other site or app. It's using the right feed, that feed has every episode in it, and other sites and apps are working OK with it. In general, I suggest that rather than streaming sites like Google Podcasts or Stitcher or Spotify, where the site acts as a middleman and they serve the podcast to you from their servers, people should use a dedicated podcast app like RadioPublic or Pocketcasts or gPodder, where rather than going from a library of podcast episodes that some third party has stored, you're downloading the files direct from the original server, but I understand that sometimes those apps are more difficult to use, especially for less tech-savvy people. But generally, if an episode is in some way faulty or missing on the 500songs.com webpage, that's something I can do something about. If it's showing up wrong on Spotify or Google Podcasts or Stitcher or whatever, that's a problem at their end. Sorry. Darren Johnson asks "were there any songs that surprised you? Which one made the biggest change between what you thought you knew and what you learned researching it?" [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Goodbye Surprise"] Well, there have been a few, in different ways. The most surprising thing for me actually was in the most recent episode when I discovered the true story behind the "bigger than Jesus" controversy during my reading. That was a story I'd known one way for my entire life -- literally I think I first read about that story when I was six or seven -- and it turned out that not one thing I'd read on the subject had explained what had really happened. But then there are other things like the story of "Ko Ko Mo", which was a record I wasn't even planning on covering at first, but which turned out to be one of the most important records of the fifties. But I actually get surprised relatively little by big-picture things. I'll often discover fun details or new connections between things I hadn't noticed before, but the basic outlines of the story never change that much -- I've been reading about music history literally since I learned how to read, and while I do a deep dive for each episode, it's very rare that I discover anything that totally changes my perspective. There is always a process of reevaluation going on, and a change in the emphases in my thought, so for example when I started the project I knew Johnny Otis would come up a fair bit in the early years, and knew he was a major figure, but was still not giving him the full credit he deserved in my head. The same goes for Jesse Belvin, and as far as background figures go Lester Sill and Milt Gabler. But all of these were people I already knew were important, i just hadn't connected all the dots in my head. I've also come to appreciate some musicians more than I did previously. But there are very few really major surprises, which is probably to be expected -- I got into this already knowing a *LOT*, because otherwise I wouldn't have thought this was a project I could take on. Tracey Germa -- and I'm sorry, I don't know if that's pronounced with a hard or soft G, so my apologies if I mispronounced it -- asks: "Hi Andrew. We love everything about the podcast, but are especially impressed with the way you couch your trigger warnings and how you embed social commentary into your analysis of the music. You have such a kind approach to understanding human experiences and at the same time you don't balk at saying the hard things some folks don't want to hear about their music heroes. So, the question is - where does your social justice/equity/inclusion/suffer no fools side come from? Your family? Your own experiences? School/training?” [Excerpt: Elvis Costello and the Attractions, "Little Triggers"] Well, firstly, I have to say that people do say  this kind of thing to me quite a lot, and I'm grateful when they say it, but I never really feel comfortable with it, because frankly I think I do very close to the absolute minimum, and I get by because of the horribly low expectations our society has for allocishet white men, which means that making even the tiniest effort possible to be a decent human being looks far more impressive by comparison than it actually is. I genuinely think I don't do a very good job of this at all, although I do try, and that's not false modesty there. But to accept the premise of the question for a moment, there are a couple of answers. My parents are both fairly progressive both politically and culturally,  for the time and place where they raised me. They both had strong political convictions, and while they didn't have access to much culture other than what was on TV or in charting records or what have you -- there was no bookshop or record shop in our town, and obviously no Internet back then -- they liked the stuff out of that mix that was forward-thinking, and so was anti-racist, accepting of queerness, and so on. From a very early age, I was listening to things like "Glad to be Gay" by the Tom Robinson Band. So from before I really even understood what those concepts were, I knew that the people I admired thought that homophobia and racism were bad things. I was also bullied a lot at school, because I was autistic and fat and wore glasses and a bunch of other reasons. So I hated bullying and never wanted to be a bully. I get very, very, *very* angry at cruelty and at abuses of power -- as almost all autistic people do, actually. And then, in my twenties and thirties, for a variety of reasons I ended up having a social circle that was predominantly queer and/or disabled and/or people with mental health difficulties. And when you're around people like that, and you don't want to be a bully, you learn to at least try to take their feelings into consideration, though I slipped up a great deal for a long time, and still don't get everything right. So that's the "social justice" side of things. The other side, the "understanding human experiences" side... well, everyone has done awful things at times, and I would hope that none of us would be judged by our worst behaviours. "Use every man to his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" and all that. But that doesn't mean those worst behaviours aren't bad, and that they don't hurt people, and denying that only compounds the injustice. People are complicated, societies are complicated, and everyone is capable of great good and great evil. In general I tend to avoid a lot of the worst things the musicians I talk about did, because the podcast *is* about the music, but when their behaviour affects the music, or when I would otherwise be in danger of giving a truly inaccurate picture of someone, I have to talk about those things. You can't talk about Jerry Lee Lewis without talking about how his third marriage derailed his career, you can't talk about Sam Cooke without talking about his death, and to treat those subjects honestly you have to talk about the reprehensible sides of their character. Of course, in the case of someone like Lewis, there seems to be little *but* a reprehensible side, while someone like Cooke could be a horrible, horrible person, but even the people he hurt the most also loved him dearly because of his admirable qualities. You *have* to cover both aspects of someone like him if you want to be honest, and if you're not going to be honest why bother trying to do history at all? Lester Dragstedt says (and I apologise if I mispronounced that): "I absolutely love this podcast and the perspective you bring. My only niggle is that the sound samples are mixed so low. When listening to your commentary about a song at voice level my fingers are always at the volume knob to turn up when the song comes in." [Excerpt: Bjork, "It's Oh So Quiet"] This is something that gets raised a lot, but it's not something that's ever going to change. When I started the podcast, I had the music levels higher, and got complaints about that, so I started mixing them lower. I then got complaints about *that*, so I did a poll of my Patreon backers to see what they thought, and by about a sixty-forty margin they wanted the levels to be lower, as they are now, rather than higher as they were earlier. Basically, there seem to be two groups of listeners. One group mostly listens with headphones, and doesn't like it when the music gets louder, because it hurts their ears. The other group mostly listens in their cars, and the music gets lost in the engine noise. That's a gross oversimplification, and there are headphone listeners who want the music louder and car listeners who want the music quieter, but the listenership does seem to split roughly that way, and there are slightly more headphone listeners. Now, it's literally *impossible* for me to please everyone, so I've given up trying with this, and it's *not* going to change. Partly because the majority of my backers voted one way, partly because it's just easier to leave things the way they are rather than mess with them given that no matter what I do someone will be unhappy, and partly because both Tilt when he edits the podcast and I when I listen back and tweak his edit are using headphones, and *we* don't want to hurt our ears either. Eric Peterson asks "if we are basically in 1967 that is when we start seeing Country artists like Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings - the Man who Survived the Day the Music Died - start to bring more rock songs into their recordings and start to set the ground work in many ways for Country Rock ... how do you envision bringing the role they play in the History of Rock and Roll into the podcast?" [Excerpt: The Del McCoury Band, "Nashville Cats"] I will of course be dealing with country rock as one of the subgenres I discuss -- though there's only one real country-rock track coming up in the next fifty, but there'll be more as I get into the seventies, and there are several artists coming up with at least some country influence. But I won't be looking at straight country musicians like Jennings or Cash except through the lens of rock musicians they inspired -- things like me talking about Johnny Cash briefly in the intro to the "Hey Joe" episode. I think Cocaine and Rhinestones is already doing a better job of covering country music than I ever could, and so those people will only touch the story tangentially. Nili Marcia says: "If one asks a person what's in that room it would not occur to one in 100 to mention the air that fills it. Something so ubiquitous as riff--I don't know what a riff actually is! Will you please define riff, preferably with examples." Now this is something I actually thought I'd explained way back in episode one, and I have a distinct memory of doing so, but I must have cut that part out -- maybe I recorded it so badly that part couldn't be salvaged, which happened sometimes in the early days -- because I just checked and there's no explanation there. I would have come back to this at some point if I hadn't been thinking all along that I'd covered it right at the start, because you're right, it is a term that needs definition. A riff is, simply, a repeated, prominent, instrumental figure. The term started out in jazz, and there it was a term for a phrase that would be passed back and forth between different instruments -- a trumpet might play a phrase, then a saxophone copy it, then back to the trumpet, then back to the saxophone. But quickly it became a term for a repeated figure that becomes the main accompaniment part of a song, over which an instrumentalist might solo or a singer might sing, but which you remember in its own right. A few examples of well-known riffs might include "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Smoke on the Water"] "I Feel Fine" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] "Last Train to Clarksville" by the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Last Train to Clarksville"] The bass part in “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie: [Excerpt: Queen and David Bowie, “Under Pressure”] Or the Kingsmen's version of "Louie Louie": [Excerpt: The Kingsmen, "Louie Louie"] Basically, if you can think of a very short, prominent, instrumental idea that gets repeated over and over, that's a riff. Erik Pedersen says "I love the long episodes and I suspect you do too -- thoroughness. of this kind is something few get the opportunity to do -- but have you ever, after having written a long one, decided to cut them significantly? Are there audio outtakes you might string together one day?" [Excerpt: Bing Crosby and Les Paul, "It's Been a Long, Long Time"] I do like *having* done the long episodes, and sometimes I enjoy doing them, but other times I find it frustrating that an episode takes so long, because there are other stories I want to move on to. I'm trying for more of a balance over the next year, and we'll see how that works out. I want to tell the story in the depth it deserves, and the longer episodes allow me to do that, and to experiment with narrative styles and so on, but I also want to get the podcast finished before I die of old age. Almost every episode has stuff that gets cut, but it's usually in the writing or recording stage -- I'll realise a bit of the episode is boring and just skip it while I'm recording, or I'll cut out an anecdote or something because it looks like it's going to be a flabby episode and I want to tighten it up, or sometimes I'll realise that because of my mild speech impediments a sentence is literally unspeakable, and I'll rework it. It's very, very rare that I'll cut anything once it's been recorded, and if I do it's generally because when I listen back after it's been edited I'll realise I'm repeating myself or I made a mistake and need to cut a sentence because I said the wrong name, that sort of thing. I delete all the audio outtakes, but even if I didn't there would be nothing worth releasing. A few odd, out of context sentences, the occasional paragraph just repeating something I'd already said, a handful of actual incorrect facts, and a lot of me burping, or trying to say a difficult name three times in a row, or swearing when the phone rings in the middle of a long section. Lucy Hewitt says "Something that interests me, and that I'm sure you will cover is how listeners consume music and if that has an impact. In my lifetime we've moved from a record player which is fixed in one room to having a music collection with you wherever you go, and from hoping that the song you want to hear might be played on the radio to calling it up whenever you want. Add in the rise of music videos, and MTV, and the way in which people access music has changed a lot over the decades. But has that affected the music itself?" [Excerpt: Bow Wow Wow "C30 C60 C90 Go!"] It absolutely has affected the music itself in all sorts of ways, some of which I've touched on already and some of which I will deal with as we go through the story, though the story I'm telling will end around the time of Napster and so won't involve streaming services and so forth. But every technology change leads to a change in the sound of music in both obvious and non-obvious ways. When AM radio was the most dominant form of broadcasting, there was no point releasing singles in stereo, because at that time there were no stereo AM stations. The records also had to be very compressed, so the sound would cut through the noise and interference. Those records would often be very bass-heavy and have a very full, packed, sound. In the seventies, with the rise of eight-track players, you'd often end up with soft-rock and what would later get termed yacht rock having huge success. That music, which is very ethereal and full of high frequencies, is affected less negatively by some of the problems that came with eight-track players, like the tape stretching slightly. Then post-1974 and the OPEC oil crisis, vinyl became more expensive, which meant that records started being made much thinner, which meant you couldn't cut grooves as deeply, which meant you lost bass response, which again changed the sound of records – and also explains why when CDs came out, people started thinking they sounded better than records, because they *did* sound better than the stuff that was being pressed in the late seventies and early eighties, which was so thin it was almost transparent, even though they sounded nowhere near as good as the heavy vinyl pressings of the fifties and sixties. And then the amount of music one could pack into a CD encouraged longer tracks... A lot of eighties Hi-NRG and dance-pop music, like the records made by Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, has almost no bass but lots of skittering high-end percussion sounds -- tons of synthesised sleighbells and hi-hats and so on -- because a lot of disco equipment had frequency-activated lights, and the more high-end stuff was going on, the more the disco lights flashed... We'll look at a lot of these changes as we go along, but every single new format, every new way of playing an old format, every change in music technology, changes what music gets made quite dramatically. Lucas Hubert asks: “Black Sabbath being around the corner, how do you plan on dealing with Heavy Metal? I feel like for now, what is popular and what has had a big impact in Rock history coincide. But that kind of change with metal, no? (Plus, prog and metal are more based on albums than singles, I think.)” [Excerpt: Black Sabbath, “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”] I plan on dealing with metal the same way I've been dealing with every other subgenre. We are, yes, getting into a period where influence and commercial success don't correlate quite as firmly as they did in the early years -- though really we've already been there for quite some time. I've done two episodes so far on the Byrds, a group who only had three top-twenty singles in the US and two in the UK, but only did a bonus episode on Herman's Hermits, who had fourteen in the US and seventeen in the UK. I covered Little Richard but didn't cover Pat Boone, even though Boone had the bigger hits with Richard's songs. In every subgenre there are going to be massive influences who had no hits, and people who had lots of hits but didn't really make much of a wider impact on music, and I'll be dealing with the former more than the latter. But also, I'll be dealing most with people who were influential *and* had lots of hits -- if nothing else because while influence and chart success aren't a one-to-one correlation, they're still somewhat correlated. So it's unlikely you'll see me cover your favourite Scandinavian Black Metal band who only released one album of which every copy was burned in a mysterious fire two days after release, but you can expect most of the huge names in metal to be covered. Though even there, simply because of the number of subgenres I'm going to cover, I'm going to miss some big ones. Related to the question about albums, Svennie asks “This might be a bit of a long winded question so just stick with me here. As the music you cover becomes more elaborate, and the albums become bigger in scale, how do you choose a song which you build the story around while also telling the story of that album? I ask this specifically with the White Album in mind, where you've essentially got four albums in one. To that end, what song would you feel defines the White Album?” [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Revolution #9”] Well, you'll see how I cover the White Album in episode one hundred and seventy-two -- we're actually going to have quite a long stretch with no Beatles songs covered because I'm going to backfill a lot of 1967 and then we're getting to the Beatles again towards the end of 1968, but it'll be another big one when we get there. But in the general case... the majority of albums to come still had singles released off them, and a lot of what I'm going to be looking at in the next year or two is still hit singles, even if the singles are by people known as album bands. Other times, a song wasn't a single, but maybe it was covered by someone else -- if I know I'm going to cover a rock band and I also know that one of the soul artists who would do rock covers as album tracks did a version of one of their songs, and I'm going to cover that soul artist, say, then if I do the song that artist covered I can mention it in the episode on the soul singer and tie the two episodes together a bit. In other cases there's a story behind a particular track that's more interesting than other tracks, or the track is itself a cover version of someone else's record, which lets me cover both artists in a single episode, or it's the title track of the album. A lot of people have asked me this question about how I'd deal with albums as we get to the late sixties and early seventies, but looking at the list of the next fifty episodes, there's actually only two where I had to think seriously about which song I chose from an album -- in one case, I chose the title track, in the other case I just chose the first song on the album (though in that case I may end up choosing another song from the same album if I end up finding a way to make that a more interesting episode). The other forty-eight were all very, very obvious choices. Gary Lucy asks “Do you keep up with contemporary music at all? If so, what have you been enjoying in 2022 so far…and if not, what was the most recent “new” album you really got into?” [Excerpt: Stew and the Negro Problem, "On the Stage of a Blank White Page"] I'm afraid I don't. Since I started doing the podcast, pretty much all of my listening time has been spent on going back to much older music, and even before that, when I was listening to then-new music it was generally stuff that was very much inspired by older music, bands like the Lemon Twigs, who probably count as the last new band I really got into with their album Do Hollywood, which came out in 2016 but which I think I heard in 2018. I'm also now of that age where 2018 seems like basically yesterday, and when I keep thinking "what relatively recent albums have I liked?" I think of things like The Reluctant Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, which is from 2010, or Ys by Joanna Newsom, which came out in 2006. Not because I haven't bought records released since then, but because my sense of time is so skewed that summer 1994 and summer 1995 feel like epochs apart, hugely different times in every way, but every time from about 2005 to 2020 is just "er... a couple of years ago? Maybe?" So without going through every record I've bought in the last twenty years and looking at the release date I couldn't tell you what still counts as contemporary and what's old enough to vote. I have recently listened a couple of times to an album by a band called Wet Leg, who are fairly new, but other than that I can't say. But probably the most recent albums to become part of my regular listening rotation are two albums which came out simultaneously in 2018 by Stew and the Negro Problem, Notes of a Native Song, which is a song cycle about James Baldwin and race in America, and The Total Bent, which is actually the soundtrack to a stage musical, and which I think many listeners to the podcast might find interesting, and which is what that last song excerpt was taken from. It's basically a riff on the idea of The Jazz Singer, but set in the Civil Rights era, and about a young politically-radical Black Gospel songwriter who writes songs for his conservative preacher father to sing, but who gets persuaded to become a rock and roll performer by a white British record producer who fetishises Black music. It has a *lot* to say about religion, race, and politics in America -- a couple of the song titles, to give you some idea, are "Jesus Ain't Sitting in the Back of the Bus" and "That's Why He's Jesus and You're Not, Whitey". It's a remarkable album, and it deals with enough of the same subjects I've covered here that I think any listeners will find it interesting. Unfortunately, it was released through the CDBaby store, which closed down a few months later, and unlike most albums released through there it doesn't seem to have made its way onto any of the streaming platforms or digital stores other than Apple Music, which rather limits its availability. I hope it comes out again soon. Alec Dann says “I haven't made it to the Sixties yet so pardon if you have covered this: what was the relationship between Sun and Stax in their heyday? Did musicians work in both studios?” [Excerpt: Booker T. and the MGs, "Green Onions"] I've covered this briefly in a couple of the episodes on Stax, but the short version is that Sun was declining just as Stax was picking up. Jim Stewart, who founded Stax, was inspired in part by Sam Phillips, and there was a certain amount of cross-fertilisation, but not that much. Obviously Rufus Thomas recorded for both labels, and there were a few other connections -- Billy Lee Riley, for example, who I did an episode on for his Sun work, also recorded at the Stax studio before going on to be a studio musician in LA, and it was actually at a Billy Lee Riley session that went badly that Booker T and the MGs recorded "Green Onions". Also, Sun had a disc-cutting machine and Stax didn't, so when they wanted to get an acetate cut to play for DJs they'd take it to Sun -- it was actually Scotty Moore, who was working for Sun as a general engineer and producer as well as playing RCA Elvis sessions by 1962, who cut the first acetate copy of "Green Onions". But in general the musicians playing at Stax were largely the next generation of musicians -- people who'd grown up listening to the records Sam Phillips had put out in the very early fifties by Black musicians, and with very little overlap. Roger Stevenson asks "This project is going to take the best part of 7 years to complete. Do you have contingency plans in case of major problems? And please look after yourself - this project is gong to be your legacy." [Excerpt: Bonzo Dog Doodah Band, "Button Up Your Overcoat"] I'm afraid there's not much I can do if major problems come up -- by major problems I'm talking about things that prevent me from making the podcast altogether, like being unable to think or write or talk. By its nature, the podcast is my writing and my research and my voice, and if I can't do those things... well, I can't do them. I *am* trying to build in some slack again -- that's why this month off has happened -- so I can deal with delays and short-term illnesses and other disruptions, but if it becomes impossible to do it becomes impossible to do, and there's nothing more I can do about it. Mark Lipson asks "I'd like to know which episodes you've released have been the most & least popular? And going forward, which episodes do you expect to be the most popular? Just curious to know what music most of your listeners listen to and are interested in." [Excerpt: Sly and the Family Stone, "Somebody's Watching You"] I'm afraid I honestly don't know. Most podcasters have extensive statistical tools available to them, which tell them which episodes are most popular, what demographics are listening to the podcast, where they are in the world, and all that kind of thing. They use that information to sell advertising spots, which is how they make most of their money. You can say "my podcast is mostly listened to by seventy-five year-olds who google for back pain relief -- the perfect demographic for your orthopedic mattresses" or "seven thousand people who downloaded my latest episode also fell for at least one email claiming to be from the wallet inspector last year, so my podcast is listened to by the ideal demographic for cryptocurrency investment". Now, I'm lucky enough to be making enough money from my Patreon supporters' generosity that I don't have to sell advertising, and I hope I never do have to. I said at the very start of the process that I would if it became necessary, but that I hoped to keep it ad-free, and people have frankly been so astonishingly generous I should never have to do ads -- though I do still reserve the right to change my mind if the support drops off. Now, my old podcast host gave me access to that data as standard. But when I had to quickly change providers, I decided that I wasn't going to install any stats packages to keep track of people. I can see a small amount of information about who actually visits the website, because wordpress.com gives you that information – not your identities but just how many people come from which countries, and what sites linked them. But if you're downloading the podcast through a podcast app, or listening through Spotify or Stitcher or wherever, I've deliberately chosen not to access that data. I don't need to know who my audience is, or which episodes they like the most -- and if I did, I have a horrible feeling I'd start trying to tailor the podcast to be more like what the existing listeners like, and by doing so lose the very things that make it unique. Once or twice a month I'll look at the major podcast charts, I check the Patreon every so often to see if there's been a massive change in subscriber numbers, but other than that I decided I'm just not going to spy on my listeners (though pretty much every other link in the chain does, I'm afraid, because these days the entire Internet is based on spying on people). So the only information I have is the auto-generated "most popular episodes" thing that comes up on the front page, which everyone can see, and which shows the episodes people who actually visit the site are listening to most in the last few days, but which doesn't count anything from more than a few days ago, and which doesn't count listens from any other source, and which I put there basically so new listeners can see which ones are popular. At the moment that's showing that the most listened episodes recently are the two most recent full episodes -- "Respect" and "All You Need is Love" -- the most recent of the Pledge Week episodes, episodes one and two, so people are starting at the beginning, and right now there's also the episodes on "Ooby Dooby", "Needles and Pins", "God Only Knows", "She Loves You" and "Hey Joe". But in a couple of days' time those last five will be totally different. And again, that's just the information from people actually visiting the podcast website. I've deliberately chosen not to know what people listening in any other way are doing -- so if you've decided to just stream that bit of the Four Tops episode where I do a bad Bob Dylan impression five thousand times in a row, you can rest assured I have no idea you're doing it and your secret is totally safe. Anyway, that's all I have time for in this episode. In a week or so I'll post a similar-length episode for Patreon backers only, and then a week or two after that the regular podcast will resume, with a story involving folk singers, jazz harmony, angelic visitations and the ghost of James Dean. See you then.

El sótano
El sótano - Rolling Stones en 1972; más allá de Exile on Main Street - 26/07/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 58:53


El fanzine "Yesterday's papers" está dedicado exclusivamente a la zona de sombras del inabarcable universo de The Rolling Stones. En su último número (nº 23) repasa la trayectoria de los británicos en 1972, situando el punto de mira en las decenas de personajes que orbitaron o se cruzaron con la banda en aquel mágico año. Carlos Rodríguez Duque, director de esta publicación, se pone a los fogones del Sótano con una deliciosa y elaborada selección de curiosidades musicales. Playlist; (sintonía) THE ROLLING STONES “Yesterday’s papers” THE ROLLING STONES “Criss Cross Man aka Save me” THE ROLLING STONES “Ventilator Blues” THE ROLLING STONES “Exile On Main St. Blues” FANNY “Blind Alley” (live) YOKO ONO “Is winter here to stay” MARTHA REEVES “Let me fall in love with you” THE ROLLING STONES and STEVIE WONDER “Uptight/Satisfaction” RON WOD “Shirley” CARLY SIMON “You're so vain” JOHN LENNON “Do The Oz” Escuchar audio

Mark And Sarah Talk About Songs
The Lilith Fair 40, Episode 01: The First 5

Mark And Sarah Talk About Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 37:46 Very Popular


It's the first "real" episode of the Lilith Fair 40: Dar Williams, Meredith Brooks, Frente!, Suzanne Vega, and The Corrs inaugurate our chart, with help from the MCSL "listies" mixtape, greasy-haired sad boys, how to sing about a building collapse, incomplete subversion of the male gaze, and sibling bands to fall asleep to. All this, and Mark may have identified his overall #1 song -- in the first five minutes! Put on an extra layer of crystal deodorant, because we're on a journey here, people. Our intro is by Laura Barger and Jack Baldelli, and our outro is by Carly Simon. To contact us or buy our books, visit MarkAndSarahTalkAboutSongs.com. To become a patron of the show, visit patreon.com/mastas. SHOW NOTES The Lilith Fair 40 homepage Episode 125: Abba-sode! with Adam Grosswirth Episode 135: Shakira, "She-Wolf" "[expletive deleted]"

TRUTH IN RHYTHM
TRUTH IN RHYTHM Podcast - Tawatha Agee (Mtume, Sessions Singer), Part 2 of 2

TRUTH IN RHYTHM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 54:33


** PLEASE SUBSCRIBE ** Brought to you by FUNKNSTUFF.NET and hosted by Scott "DR GX" Goldfine — musicologist and author of “Everything Is on THE ONE: The First Guide of Funk” ― “TRUTH IN RHYTHM” is the interview show that gets DEEP into the pocket with contemporary music's foremost masters of the groove. Become a TRUTH IN RHYTHM Member through YouTube or at https://www.patreon.com/truthinrhythm. Featured in TIR Episode 250 (Part 2 of 2): R&B, funk and pop vocalist and composer Tawatha Agee. First establishing herself in the late 1970s with the band Mtume, she would go on to work with James Mtume-Reggie Lucas produced acts like Stephanie Mills and Phyllis Hyman before blazing her own trail as one of the music industry's most in-demand session singers.  During the past several decades, she has collaborated with Narada Michael Walden, J. Geils Band, Luther Vandross, Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin, Carly Simon, Dionne Warwick, Kashif, Roxy Music, Scritti Politti, LeVert, Phillip Bailey, Roy Ayers, Al Jarreau, Eric Clapton, Whitney Houston, Jeffrey Osborne, David Bowie, Joe Cocker, Patti LaBelle, the Talking Heads, the B-52's, Al Green, Roberta Flack, Celine Dion, Steely Dan, the O'Jays, Bob James, Foreigner, David Lee Roth, the Black Crowes, Sting, the Dave Mathews Band and many more. Those sessions include some of the biggest hits and best-known music those acts have ever recorded. She toured the world with some of them as well. R&B lovers know her best for the No. 1 smash with Mtume, “Juicy Fruit,” and she released her lone solo album, “Welcome to My Dream,” in 1987. Now, 35 years later she shares her life's story with TRUTH IN RHYTHM. RECORDED JUNE 2022 LEGAL NOTICE: All video and audio content protected by copyright. Any use of this material is strictly prohibited without expressed consent from original content producer and owner Scott Goldfine, dba FUNKNSTUFF. For inquiries, email info@funknstuff.net. TRUTH IN RHYTHM is a registered U.S. Trademark (Serial #88540281). Get your copy of "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk" today! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1541256603/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1541256603&linkCode=as2&tag=funknstuff-20&linkId=b6c7558ddc7f8fc9fe440c5d9f3c400

TRUTH IN RHYTHM
TRUTH IN RHYTHM Podcast - Tawatha Agee (Mtume, Sessions Singer), Part 1 of 2

TRUTH IN RHYTHM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 53:54


** PLEASE SUBSCRIBE ** Brought to you by FUNKNSTUFF.NET and hosted by Scott "DR GX" Goldfine — musicologist and author of “Everything Is on THE ONE: The First Guide of Funk” ― “TRUTH IN RHYTHM” is the interview show that gets DEEP into the pocket with contemporary music's foremost masters of the groove. Become a TRUTH IN RHYTHM Member through YouTube or at https://www.patreon.com/truthinrhythm. Featured in TIR Episode 250 (Part 1 of 2): R&B, funk and pop vocalist and composer Tawatha Agee. First establishing herself in the late 1970s with the band Mtume, she would go on to work with James Mtume-Reggie Lucas produced acts like Stephanie Mills and Phyllis Hyman before blazing her own trail as one of the music industry's most in-demand session singers.  During the past several decades, she has collaborated with Narada Michael Walden, J. Geils Band, Luther Vandross, Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin, Carly Simon, Dionne Warwick, Kashif, Roxy Music, Scritti Politti, LeVert, Phillip Bailey, Roy Ayers, Al Jarreau, Eric Clapton, Whitney Houston, Jeffrey Osborne, David Bowie, Joe Cocker, Patti LaBelle, the Talking Heads, the B-52's, Al Green, Roberta Flack, Celine Dion, Steely Dan, the O'Jays, Bob James, Foreigner, David Lee Roth, the Black Crowes, Sting, the Dave Mathews Band and many more. Those sessions include some of the biggest hits and best-known music those acts have ever recorded. She toured the world with some of them as well. R&B lovers know her best for the No. 1 smash with Mtume, “Juicy Fruit,” and she released her lone solo album, “Welcome to My Dream,” in 1987. Now, 35 years later she shares her life's story with TRUTH IN RHYTHM. RECORDED JUNE 2022 LEGAL NOTICE: All video and audio content protected by copyright. Any use of this material is strictly prohibited without expressed consent from original content producer and owner Scott Goldfine, dba FUNKNSTUFF. For inquiries, email info@funknstuff.net. TRUTH IN RHYTHM is a registered U.S. Trademark (Serial #88540281). Get your copy of "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk" today! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1541256603/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1541256603&linkCode=as2&tag=funknstuff-20&linkId=b6c7558ddc7f8fc9fe440c5d9f3c400

The DLR Cast
Episode 66: DLR's Cringe-Worthy Quotes, No EVH Tribute + An Interview With Marc LaFrance

The DLR Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 69:41


Darren and Steve debate Dave's very short response to the recent article at Rolling Stone about Eddie Van Halen, and Wolfgang's recent interview with Rolling Stone. Plus, the tribute concert: The one question that hasn't been asked? Various speculation and information, and...has Dave been recording very recently? Then, Darren speaks with vocalist and musician Marc LaFrance. If that name sounds familiar its because Marc sang background vocals on Dave's "A Little Ain't Enough" album and on a vertiable ton of music by Loverboy, Alice Cooper, Motley Crue, Bon Jovi, Cher, Carly Simon, Blue Murder, The Cult, The Scorpions, Poison and more, plus music by Scholastica Books. He has also been part of countless commercials and advertising campaigns! Marc tells why "Dave was amazing to work with" at Little Mountain Studios, Dave's climbing wall there, "wafts of herb" via the Diamond One and other good stuff. For more on all that Marc does, please visit MarcLaFrance.com.

Roadie Free Radio
302: DOUG WIMBISH/Bass player, Composer/Living Colour, Mick Jagger, Sugar Hill Records

Roadie Free Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 101:04


iTunes         Spotify         Youtube     Patreon   “I'm not just a Bass Player, I'm a Sound System” As bassist for the legendary rap label Sugarhill Records backing Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five to the pioneering Living Colour, Doug Wimbish has lent his innovative and creative bass grooves and sounds to a roster of world-renowned musicians. Considered a pioneer in Hip-Hop bass playing and in the use of bass effects, alternate tunings and extended hand techniques, Doug's mastery of the bass is unparalled. As one of the most versatile session and touring bassists in the industry, Doug moves readily from pop and mainstream rock to hip-hop, funk, metal, symphonic metal, reggae, R&B, electronic, world and experimental music. Doug Wimbish is probably best known as the cutting edge lead bassist in the Grammy Award-winning hard rock band Living Colour, but looking beyond the obvious, one quickly sees that Doug's influence and impact on the world's musical culture is much more vast and significant than often written or realized.  Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five's “The Message”, listed by Rollingstone.com as the #1 Greatest Hip Hop Song of all time, featured Doug's bass lines as do many other Sugarhill Records classics including “Apache”, “8th Wonder” and “White Lines”. Wimbish wrote the bass line on The Sequence's “Funk You Up”. To get an idea of the respect Doug has earned within the music industry, consider that in one week in 1991, Doug received personal phone calls from Living Colour, Bruce Springsteen and Seal, all asking him to work with them. Doug made the decision to work with Living Colour and joined the band, becoming its permanent bassist. He actively records and tours today with his band mates Vernon Reid, Corey Glover and Will Calhoun. The group's latest album, “Shade”, was released in September of 2017. In addition to his work with Living Colour, Doug's highly regarded career spanning all musical genres has also included recording, producing and touring with many world renowned artists including The Rolling Stones, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck, Joe Satriani, Herb Albert, Annie Lennox, Madonna, Carly Simon, Seal, Al Green, Billy Idol, George Clinton, Depeche Mode, Talib Kweli, Kanye West, James Brown, Mos Def, Tarja Turunen, Ronnie Wood, Freddie Jackson, Michael Bolton, Schiller, Cheb Khaled, Hari Haran and Peter Wolf, to name a few. From his early days as one of Hip-Hop's earliest architects in the Original Sugarhill Records Rhythm Section, to his long-time membership in Living Colour, TackHead, Little Axe, Jungle Funk, HeadFake, and then on to more recent collaborations including DMD the Vibes with Daru Jones & Marcus Machado, Doug continues to prove himself as one of the world's finest, versatile and most sought after bass guitarists.   Special Mentions: Doug Wimbish Official Site, Hell on Wheels: A Tour Stories Compilation, Becky Pell - Yoga Journey: A Contemporary Guide to a Timeless Tradition, Claire Murphy - Girl on the Road: How to Break into Touring from a Female Perspective, Steve Walsh Gofund Me, Roadie Free Radio Merch, RFR Podcast Bundle, Follow Your Drishti Yoga Podcast, roadiecare.com, musicares.org, Roswell Pro Audio Mini K87, Soundgirls.org  

SOUNDS LIKE RADIO
Vol 105 Leroy Playin' Football? Maybe.

SOUNDS LIKE RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 51:42


On Volume 105 of Sounds Like Radio we find Leroy in today's Great Gildersleeve episode (October 4, 1950) wanting to get out and play football. But suddenly for some unknown reason Leroy decides he's not going to be playing in the big game. Why asks everyone in the Gildy family? Well, we're going to find out. And helping Your Humble Host to root out Leroy's problem will be Tony Bennett, Rosemary Clooney, Bing Crosby, Dean Martin, Carly SImon, Perry Como and even Helen O'Connell will be singing one of my all time favorite Helen songs. Oh, this is a goodie, filled with a few laughs, a few gulps, and even more great music.

Inside MusiCast
Jim Keltner

Inside MusiCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 71:26 Very Popular


Jim Keltner's career in music has been nothing short of iconic. For those who go deep into discographies and liner notes, you know that the name Keltner is associated with a litany of some of the biggest names in the world of music, including George Harrison, John Lennon, Ringo Starr, Joe Cocker, Carly Simon, Eric Clapton, Steely Dan, Seals & Crofts, Randy Newman, The Bee Gees, The Traveling Wilburys, Brian Wilson and so many more. From his early beginnings with Gary Lewis and the Playboys, to the Concert for Bangladesh, to Steely Dan's “Josie” and so much more, we're here to talk to a musician who's seen it all and played it all. Inside MusiCast is pleased to welcome Jim Keltner.

Second Act Stories
Jeff “Skunk” Baxter's Coda: A Doobie Brother Focuses on Counter Terrorism

Second Act Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 38:15


Jeff “Skunk” Baxter is a rock and roll legend. He was the founding lead guitarist in Steely Dan, and he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Doobie Brothers. As a hired gun, he's played with a who's who of music royalty, including Linda Ronstadt, Donna Summer, Elton John, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr, Dolly Parton, Carly Simon… the list goes on and on. From the time he was a child, the mechanically inclined Baxter loved taking things apart to see how they worked and putting them back together. He became an expert guitar repair technician and built custom guitars. He traded a custom white Fender Stratocaster he built in the 1960s to Jimi James, who would later re-emerge as the legendary Jimi Hendrix. In the 1980s, Skunk parlayed his more-than-casual interest in all things technical into a career as a missile defense consultant. After writing a paper that was quickly classified, he received the necessary clearances and now regularly consults with the U.S. government, the Pentagon and the Joint Chiefs on topics including counterterrorism and wargaming. Skunk just released a new solo album, his first, called Speed of Heat. Please enjoy our exciting deep dive into the second act of one of rock's greatest guitarists. Photo credit for main image: Joel Manduke

thefakeshow
Fakeshow - Ep 538 Carly Simon

thefakeshow

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 8:25


Carly Simon joins host Jim Tofte on the Fake Show podcast...enjoy!!!

History & Factoids about today
June 25th-Catfish, George Michael, Carly Simon, Virginia, Korean War Began, Jimmie Walker, Gen. Custer

History & Factoids about today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 10:40


catfish, pop culture 1967, custers last stand, korean war began, virginia, carly simon, george michael, june lockhart, tim finn, jimmie walker, george orwell

Music History Today
Music History Today podcast - June 25

Music History Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 10:48


On the June 25 edition of the Music History Today podcast, it's all about icons. An iconic album to an iconic movie from an iconic performer debuts, two iconic songs are recorded on the same day, and an iconic king passes away. Plus, it's the iconic George Michael's and the iconic Carly Simon's birthdays. See? Icons. ALL MY LINKS - https://allmylinks.com/musichistorytoday --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musichistorytodaypodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/musichistorytodaypodcast/support

Dan Caplis
Ryan's Riffs, 6/22: Tom Petty, Van Halen, Stevie Wonder, Carly Simon, Ten Years After, Jewel

Dan Caplis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 26:25


The Waiting - Tom Petty, Right Now - Van Halen, Happy Birthday - Stevie Wonder, Anticipation - Carly Simon, I'd Love to Change the World - Ten Years After, Who Will Save Your Soul - Jewel

Book Vs Movie Podcast
The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) Roger Moore, Barbara Bach, Richard Kiel, & Ian Fleming

Book Vs Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 54:56


Book Vs. Movie: The Spy Who Loved MeThe 1962 Novel Vs the 1977 James Bond FilmThe Margos love a good spy novel and James Bond usually makes for a fun, exciting read. We found out that this novel, The Spy Who Loved Me, written very quickly by Ian Fleming at his estate “Goldeneye” in January & February of 1961 turned out to be in the words of his biographer Andrew Lycett, his “most sleazy and most violent story ever.” It was so bad that Fleming received the worst reviews of his career and he tried to eradicate it from his list of work. The story is at first told in the first person by the character Vivian Michel, a woman who has it ROUGH in this story until James Bond comes to save her. We will get into the tawdry details in the show and then gladly move on to the 1977 film adaptation starring Roger Moore as our Bond. Much of the book was left out of the screenplay and the character of “Jaws” was an evil highlight. The theme song by Carly Simon was written by Marvin Hamlish and Carol Bayer Sager. So between the two, which did we like more? The novel or the movie? (Big hint--not even close here!) This episode is sponsored by Kensington Books and Unforgiven by Rebecca Zanetti“Zanetti is a master of romantic suspense.” –Kirkus Reviews Run: Gemma Falls never expected to use her game theory expertise to outrun a killer. But for years, that skill is all that kept her one step ahead of a deadly stalker. When Gemma gets the chance to teach at D.C. University, she hopes she and her young daughter have found a safe harbor. The only flaw is the arrogant philosophy professor who's always underfoot giving unwanted advice—in his sexy British accent . . .Hide: Jethro Hanson has blood on his hands. He's working within ivy-covered university halls now, but he knows that his work with the Deep Ops team and the deadly acts he once committed for the sake of Queen and country place him beyond forgiveness—until he meets Gemma . . .Seek: Soon, the passion between them stuns them both. But when Jethro discovers a threat is fast overtaking her, he must choose between the redemption he seeks—and releasing the ever-present killer inside . . .Rebecca Zanetti has published over 50 books and has been featured in Entertainment Weekly, Woman's World, and Woman's Day magazines. She has ridden in a locked Chevy truck, has asked the unfortunate delivery guy to unlock her handcuffs, and has discovered the best silver mines to hide a human body! You can find her at www.RebeccaZanetti.com & on social media @RebecaaZanetti. In this ep the Margos discuss:The extraordinary life of Ian FlemingThe history of James Bond filmsThe biggest differences between the book and the movieCarly Simon's amazing theme songThe cast: Roger Moore (James Bond/007,) Barbara Bach (Anya Amasova/XXX,) Curt Jurgens (Karl Stromberg,) Richard Kiel (Jaws,) Caroline Munro (Namoi,) Geoffrey Keen (Sir Frederick Gray,) Edward de Souza (Shiekh Hosein,) George Baker (Captain Benson,) Lois Maxwell (Miss Moneypenny,) Walter Gotell (General Gogol,) Vernon Dobtcheff as Max Kalba,) Desmond Llewelyn (Q,) and Bernard Lee as M. Clips used:Introduction of James BondThe Spy Who Loved Me trailerBond fights with Jaws007 and XXX in the submarine sceneStromberg reveals his plansBond kills StrombergMusic by Marvin HamlischBook Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts. Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.comEmail us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.comMargo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine

The Q Interview
Don Was has figured out what all the great musicians have in common

The Q Interview

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 49:36


Don Was has worked with some pretty incredible artists. Here's just a few: Bob Dylan, Garth Brooks, The Rolling Stones, Aaron Neville, John Mayer, Iggy Pop, Bonnie Raitt, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. He's also the president of Blue Note Records, one of the most prestigious record labels in the world, and he wrote and performed that song Walk the Dinosaur. So after you talk to Don Was about his career, you're left with a few questions: what were those artists like to work with? How do you make sure your fandom doesn't get in the way of making a great record? And most importantly, what do all of those legendary artists have in common? Don Was has answers for all those questions.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Who Cares About the Rock Hall?: Why 1983 Was a Huge Year for the 2022 Inductees w/ Chris Molanphy

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 78:11


Chris Molanphy (Slate's Hit Parade) joins Joe & Kristen for a discussion all about the year 1983. There is no point that year when a 2022 inductee isn't strongly represented on the Hot 100. From the breakthroughs of Duran Duran and Eurythmics to the #1 hits from Lionel Richie and Dolly Parton and beyond. Pat Benatar, Jimmy Iovine, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Carly Simon, Judas Priest, even artists from Sylvia Robinson's Sugar Hill Records label all put out music this year. Listen in as we break it all down. This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Who Cares About the Rock Hall?: Why 1983 Was a Huge Year for the 2022 Inductees w/ Chris Molanphy

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 79:41


Chris Molanphy (Slate's Hit Parade) joins Joe & Kristen for a discussion all about the year 1983. There is no point that year when a 2022 inductee isn't strongly represented on the Hot 100. From the breakthroughs of Duran Duran and Eurythmics to the #1 hits from Lionel Richie and Dolly Parton and beyond. Pat Benatar, Jimmy Iovine, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Carly Simon, Judas Priest, even artists from Sylvia Robinson's Sugar Hill Records label all put out music this year. Listen in as we break it all down. This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Who Cares About the Rock Hall?
Why 1983 Was a Huge Year for the 2022 Inductees w/ Chris Molanphy

Who Cares About the Rock Hall?

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 80:11


Chris Molanphy (Slate's Hit Parade) joins Joe & Kristen for a discussion all about the year 1983. There is no point that year when a 2022 inductee isn't strongly represented on the Hot 100. From the breakthroughs of Duran Duran and Eurythmics to the #1 hits from Lionel Richie and Dolly Parton and beyond. Pat Benatar, Jimmy Iovine, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Carly Simon, Judas Priest, even artists from Sylvia Robinson's Sugar Hill Records label all put out music this year. Listen in as we break it all down. This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Who Cares About the Rock Hall?
Why 1983 Was a Huge Year for the 2022 Inductees w/ Chris Molanphy

Who Cares About the Rock Hall?

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 78:11


Chris Molanphy (Slate's Hit Parade) joins Joe & Kristen for a discussion all about the year 1983. There is no point that year when a 2022 inductee isn't strongly represented on the Hot 100. From the breakthroughs of Duran Duran and Eurythmics to the #1 hits from Lionel Richie and Dolly Parton and beyond. Pat Benatar, Jimmy Iovine, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Carly Simon, Judas Priest, even artists from Sylvia Robinson's Sugar Hill Records label all put out music this year. Listen in as we break it all down. This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts.

Broadway to Main Street
I Have Confidence

Broadway to Main Street

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 54:01


Modesty is not a virtue here, showcasing more than a dozen Broadway characters with VERY healthy egos: Songs from Camelot, The Sound of Music, The Producers, and more--plus a special Carly Simon tribute!

Movies That Made Us Gay
147. Working Girl with special guest Moranne Klassen

Movies That Made Us Gay

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 115:17


 We finally got the Mike Nichols feminist classic “Working Girl”, and like its lead heroine Tess we have got a head for business, and a bod for sin  We are joined by our good friend, and fellow working girl Moranne Klassen @mokee to discuss the overall influences and empowerment the film delivered to a 1980s audience. A career making lead performance by Melanie Griffith, a truly inspiring song by Carly Simon, scene stealing Oscar nominated performances by Sigourney Weaver, and Joan Cusack:  Working Girl has it all.  Imagine the Aquanet budget alone! Leeeeet the Riiiiiver Ruuuuuun!  Thanks for listening and don't forget to subscribe, rate and review us on Apple Podcasts! www.patreon.com/moviesthatmadeusgay Facebook/Instagram: @moviesthatmadeusgay Twitter: @MTMUGPod Scott Youngbauer: Twitter @oscarscott / Instagram @scottyoungballer Peter Lozano: Twitter/Instagram @peterlasagna

Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast
Talking Rock Hall Of Fame Inductees and Non Inductees Thru The Lens Of Two Voters

Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 88:23


Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast
MixTape 13. Talking The 2022 Rock N Roll Hall Of Fame Inductees And Other Music Topics

Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 82:18


Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Frances, Crossley-Fortier & Hedwig 5/10/2022

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 71:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/E7zIgjSP0PY CHARLOTTE CROSSLEY, nicknamed "Charlo", is an American singer and actress, best known for her roles in the musical theatrical productions of Hairspray, The Color Purple, Jesus Christ Superstar, as a member of the Harlettes in Bette Midler's Clams On The Half-Shell Revue, and for her appearance in 20 Feet from Stardom. https://www.instagram.com/charlofortierhttps://www.facebook.com/charlo.crossleyfortier.7 AVA NICOLE FRANCES is an award winning, 18 - year old singer, actress, and cabaret veteran. Singing professionally since age 10, Ava has wowed audiences in San Francisco, Los Angeles and NYC. Her most recent show Mutual Admiration (with Charlo Crossley) will premiere in NYC on May 1 at 54Below and Ava is proud to announce her London debut on May 17 in Triple Threats at The Crazy Coqs. ULA HEDWIG has an amazing career that has covered every aspect of the entertainment industry from TV to film to theater to concerts and recordings. She has shared the stage with some of the greatest artists of the entertainment industry. She has been part of Redd, Hedwig and Crossley and lead singer of Bette Midler's infamous Harlettes. Her backup vocals can be heard on the following recordings Mascara: See You In LA Lead singer w/Luther Vandross and David Lasley, Darlene Love, Carly Simon, Judy Collins: Phoebe Phoebe Snow: Blondie, Olivia Newton John: The Rumor Rosanne Cash, Boz Scaggs: Tim Curry, Bernadette Peters, Melissa Manchester, Gary US Bonds: Dedication, Weather Girls: Big Girls Don't Cry Noel Paul Stookey, David Lasley: Raindance and more!

Famous Lost Words
R&R Hall of Fame Special - Carly Simon

Famous Lost Words

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 12:19


As we wind up our tribute to the recent Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame inductees, we present an excellent series of interview clips with Carly Simon.  Just as she is in her songwriting, Carly is direct, honest and sensitive. She talks about how critics can be terribly hurtful (and how one review set her off), her inspiration for writing, her relationship with then-husband James Taylor and why she occasionally took her fans out to lunch. It's an entertaining interview!

Music Notes with Jess
Ep. 134 - Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Inductees

Music Notes with Jess

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 18:19


The Rock & Roll of Fame announced this year's inductees on 5/4. I discuss each inductee's bio and achievements: Duran Duran, rapper Eminem, classic rocker Pat Benatar, pop duo Eurythmics, country's Dolly Parton, singer/songwriter Carly Simon, and R&B's Lionel Richie. In addition, others affiliated in the music industry will be acknowledged in special categories: heavy metal band Judas Priest, production duo James Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame founder & entertainment lawyer Allen Grubman, recording engineer and philanthropist Jimmy Iovine, posthumous awards to R&B/hip-hop CEO Sylvia Robinson and folk musician Elizabeth Cotten, and music political influencer Harry Belafonte. The ceremony is scheduled for November 5th.Theme Song: "Dance Track", composed by Jessica Ann CatenaThe Rock & Roll Hall of Fame: rockhall.com

RAD Radio
Rob's Soapbox - The Worst Hall Of Fame

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 6:42


With so much “bad” happening right now, ranging from the Invasion of Ukraine to the rage over abortion again taking center stage in America, let's escape for a few minutes and talk about something less important, seemingly trivial, yet necessary to confront.The Major League Baseball and National Football League Hall of Fames are the most coveted and noteworthy Halls in all of America. There's a Hall for almost every interest, ranging from croquet to paper. I'm not sure why we need an Insurance Hall of Fame, but I sure am glad there's the AVN Hall of Fame, which honors the best of the best in the porn industry. I suppose there's a reason why the Mascot Hall exists, so too the Quilters, Scuba Divers, and Internet Halls of Fame.All of which makes the most embarrassing Hall of Fame of them all so shameful.You see, the Basketball Hall of Fame actually inducts people that have something to do with the game; either as a player, coach, or even referee of the game of basketball.The AVN Hall of Fame includes porn stars, directors, and even companies that directly play a role in making world class pornography.The debate over what exactly a genre of music is defined as has raged since the first caveman uttered out the original version of Ooooooga-Booooga. Just recently on the RAD show, we debated what exactly defines “Classic Rock,” music; is it age? Feel? Sound? Can Grunge be Classic Rock since Grunge, at its' height, was played endlessly on every mainstream rock station in America? Are hair bands classic rock? What about bands like Linkin Park, who were at their peak 20 years ago?One thing that was never debated was whether or not Janet Jackson belongs to the category. Do you know why? Because she clearly has nothing at all whatsoever to do with rock music. Oh sure, occasionally a rock artist will find their way to the pop category with a certain song, or specific sound. Aerosmith has charted on the Billboard Hot 100 more than once, Journey a dozen times, and the aforementioned Linkin Park a half dozen times, all while also being played on Rock stations. But never have you once turned on a self-respecting rock station, whether it be classic, mainstream, grunge, or anything in between and heard Madonna.And yet, somehow, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame includes both Janet Jackson and Madonna amongst its' inductees. Not to mention James Taylor, Abba, Donna Summer, Run DMC, Bill Withers, Public Enemy, and NWA. Jesus jumped-up Christ.I realize this complaint is neither unique nor new; people have been arguing about how in the world pop and rap stars are in any way deserving of being enshrined alongside the inarguables like Zeppelin, The Beatles, Pink Floyd and the like since the Hall began. And of course, there's the annual list of bands that aren't in the Hall, which, when compared to knowing Abba and NWA are in, makes the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame lose all credibility. Somehow, Madonna and Donna Summer are in, but Iron Maiden, Motley Crue, Pantera, Stone Temple Pilots and even Ozzy Freaking Osbourne (as a solo artist) aren't!Nothing has been more embarrassing and telling than the 2022 inductees for the shear whiplash you get from imaging how the extremes on each side could ever possibly be uttered in the same sentence as “rock and roll.” The only acts that belong amongst this year's inductees are Judas Priest and Pat Benatar. The absurdity of Harry Belafonte, Carly Simon, Duran Duran, and The Eurythmics speak for themselves. But the three points on the triangle that level waste to this garbage hall are Eminem, Lionel Richie, and Dolly Parton. Yes, Dolly Parton, whose only association with this genre of music is a lyric in one of her songs in which she says “I'm a little bit country, a little bit rock and roll,” which she sang in a COUNTRY song (and it was a remake of Donny and Marie's biggest hit…also, not rock and roll artists).All of this would be a non-issue if they would have named the Hall what it clearly is; The Musical Performers Hall of Fame. There's nothing at all “Rock and Roll” about so many of the inductees that it's both an insult to the genre, and a slap in the face at some of the greatest musical performers of all time who AREN'T in. After all, if somehow NWA and Public Enemy are in the Hall, how is Snoop Dogg not? Or Mariah Carey, for that matter?And don't get me started on the fact that what is supposed to be the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is in one of America's worst cities, Cleveland, and for no legitimate reason at all whatsoever. Juts because Drew Carey sang “Cleveland Rocks,” doesn't make it true. Other than Nine Inch Nails and Joe Walsh, nothing resembling rock has come out of that sewer by the Cuyahoga River, unless of course you consider Tracey Chapman and her depressing ass “fast Car,” Rock and Roll, which the Hall of Fame probably will soon. Pathetic.See? Wasn't that a fun few minutes? Isn't it nice to occasionally get all ginned up over something meaningless, yet not?Now, you may resume worrying about soaring prices, Roe versus Wade, Covid, masks, the legitimacy of the 2020 election, the current President's mental state, war in Europe, the baby formula shortage, hepatitis in children, the soaring crime rate, record-high illegal immigration, The Johnny Depp/Amber Heard cringeworthy trial, the popularity of Doctor Strange and what it says about our society, and why the UFC scale wasn't working properly this weekend. Enjoy!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

THE MISTERman's Take
#Carly Simon haven't got time for the pain

THE MISTERman's Take

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 4:19


#Carly Simon haven't got time for the pain # one of the greatest artists ever over the past 50 years,singer, songwriter musician # classic song and vocals # songwriters Carly Simon and Jacob Brackman# respect --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mr-maxxx/support

Ray Appleton
Hour 3 - Dolly Parton, Eminem, Richie Get Into Rock Hall Of Fame. Chappelle Attacked During Show. EU Proposes Gradual Ban On Russian Oil. Just 18% Of Parents willing To Vaccinate Their Kids.

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 37:02


Eminem, Lionel Richie, Carly Simon, Eurythmics, Duran Duran and Pat Benatar have been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, a list that also includes Dolly Parton, who initially resisted the honor. Comedian Dave Chappelle was attacked on stage by an audience member armed with a fake gun that had a real knife inside Tuesday night at the Hollywood Bowl, authorities said. The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, on Wednesday put forward new sanctions against the Kremlin, which will include a six-month phase out of Russian crude imports. With young children under 5 now the only group not yet eligible for vaccination against COVID-19, many parents have been vocal about their frustration pertaining to the delayed authorization process and rollout. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jrodconcerts: The Podcast
Rock & Roll Hall of Fame 2022 Inductees: Analysis LIVE From Cleveland With Jason Hanley and Mandy Smith

Jrodconcerts: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 16:08


Joined live from Cleveland, Ohio with Jason Hanley, Vice President of Education and Visitor Engagement at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum as well as Mandy Smith, Director of education to discuss the nominees. 2022 Inductees include: Performer Category Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo Duran Duran Eminem Eurythmics Dolly Parton Lionel Richie Carly Simon Musical Excellence Award Judas Priest Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis Early Influence Award Harry Belafonte Elizabeth Cotten Ahmet Ertegun Award Allen Grubman Jimmy Iovine Sylvia Robinson To be eligible, artists are required to have released their first record 25 years prior to Induction. Eminem, Duran Duran, Dolly Parton, Lionel Richie, and Carly Simon were on the ballot for the first time. This is Eminem's first year of eligibility. This is the first year in the Hall's 37-year history that six female acts will be inducted in one class. The 37th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will take place on Saturday, November 5, 2022 at Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, California. The Induction Ceremony will air at a later date on HBO and stream on HBO Max, along with a radio simulcast on SiriusXM's Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Radio channel 310 and SiriusXM's Volume channel 106.

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!
Chuck Rainey - Studio Musician Extraordinaire. Worked With Aretha, Steely Dan, The Jackson 5, Roberta Flack, Quincy Jones, Lena Horne And Many More!

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 45:26


Chuck Rainey is one of the greatest electric bassists of all time and a studio musician extraordinaire. He's played on over a thousand recording sessions resulting in dozens of hit records. He's revered for his legendary work in the ‘60s and ‘70s with artists like Aretha Franklin, Steely Dan, The Jackson 5, Roberta Flack and Quincy Jones. He talks about and we play hits from all of these artists and we also discuss Donnie Hathaway, Carly Simon, Motown, Elliott Randall, Gabor Szabo and others.My featured song in this episode is “Catch You Later” from the Spring Dance album by my band Project Grand Slam. Spotify link HERE.--------------------------------------------   Chuck and I discuss the following:Starting out on the trumpetWorking with Aretha and the team from Atlantic RecordsRecording with The Jackson 5Recording and touring with Roberta FlackWorking with Quincy Jones on records, sitcoms and filmsHis first jazz session with Lena Horne In the Songfest we play and discuss these songs:“Rock Steady”“Peg” “Dancing Machine”“Reverend Lee”  “Summer In The City” “The Streetbeater” - Sanford & Son Theme “Watch What Happens”  If you enjoyed the show, please Subscribe, Rate, and Review. Just Click Here. “The Shakespeare Concert” is the new album by Robert's band, Project Grand Slam. It's been praised by famous musicians including Mark Farner of Grand Funk Railroad, Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March, Joey Dee of Peppermint Twist fame, legendary guitarist Elliott Randall, and celebrated British composer Sarah Class. The music reviewers have called it “Perfection!”, “5 Stars!”, “Thrilling!”, and “A Masterpiece!”. The album can be streamed on Spotify, Apple and all the other streaming services. You can watch the Highlight Reel HERE. And you can purchase a digital download or autographed CD of the album HERE.  Robert's “Follow Your Dream Handbook” is an Amazon #1 Bestseller. It's a combination memoir of his unique musical journey and a step by step how-to follow and succeed at your dream. Available on Amazon and wherever books are sold. Get your Complimentary DREAM ROADMAP with Robert's 5 steps to pursue and succeed at YOUR dream. Just click here: https://www.followyourdreampodcast.com/DreamRoadmap Connect with Chuck at:https://chuckrainey.com Connect with the Follow Your Dream Podcast:Website: www.followyourdreampodcast.comFacebook: www.facebook.com/FollowYourDreamPodcastEmail Robert: robert@followyourdreampodcast.com Follow Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, and his music:Website: https://www.projectgrandslam.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/projectgrndslamStore: https://www.thepgsstore.com/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/PGSjazzFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/projectgrandslam/Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/04BdGdJszDD8WtAFXc9skWApple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/project-grand-slam/274548453Email: pgs@projectgrandslam.com