Podcast appearances and mentions of Ronnie Spector

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  • 121PODCASTS
  • 156EPISODES
  • 55mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST
Ronnie Spector

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Best podcasts about Ronnie Spector

Latest podcast episodes about Ronnie Spector

Fresh Air
Remembering André Leon Talley / Ronnie Spector

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 46:43


André Leon Talley, titan of the fashion world, died this week at 73. He was Vogue editor-at-large from 1998 until 2013. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2018 about his journey from the Jim Crow South to Paris ateliers. Also, we remember Ronnie Spector, the leader of the '60s girl group the Ronettes, best-known for their hit "Be My Baby." She died last week at 78. Also, David Bianculli reviews the HBO series The Gilded Age.

The Hustle Season Podcast
The Hustle Season: Ep. 220 Extra Extra Large Magazine

The Hustle Season Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 60:35


Mad big ups to singer Ronnie Spector, songwriter Jon Lind and technician Alexander "Howard" Dumble.Music news includes Kanye gets confronted by weirdos, Kodak Black rants about regular ass problems, Right Said Fred is not sexy anymore, Vic Mensa tries to catch clout by catching a case, Every Time I Die is dead and more.Slaps include Muse, Spoon, Chris Brown and Envy of None.Does It Slap '22 - https://spoti.fi/3tLE2WZPatreon - http://patreon.com/thehustleseasonBandcamp - http://thehustleseason.bandcamp.comTHS YouTube -https://bit.ly/THSYouTubeChannelInstagram - http://instagram.com/thehustleseasonTwitter - http://twitter.com/thehustleseasonSpring (fmrly Teespring) - https://bit.ly/HustleSeasonMerchFacebook - http://bit.ly/HustleSeasonFBThe Hustle Season on Apple Podcasts - https://bit.ly/TheHSPodcastAppleThe Hustle Season on Spotify Podcasts - https://bit.ly/TheHSPodcastSpotify

Rolling Stone Music Now
How Ronnie Spector Broke Free: Her Brave Life and World-Shaking Music

Rolling Stone Music Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 39:32


Hear unearthed audio of Ronnie Spector on her life with Phil Spector and the birth of the Ronettes, and dive deep into her story, with Andy Greene, Angie Martoccio, and Rob Sheffield joining host Brian Hiatt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Getting lumped up with Rob Rossi
Rockshow special tribute to Ronnie Spector

Getting lumped up with Rob Rossi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 41:25


Tribute show to the great Ronnie Spector. RockerMike and Rob discuss the life and times of Ronnie Spector. Veronica Yvette Greenfield (née Bennett; August 10, 1943 – January 12, 2022), known professionally as Ronnie Spector, was an American singer. Referred to as the original "bad girl of rock and roll", she was the lead singer of the girl group the Ronettes. Ronnie formed a singing group, the Darling Sisters, with her elder sister, Estelle Bennett, and their cousin, Nedra Talley in the late 1950s. Later known as the Ronettes, they were signed to Phil Spector's Philles label and he produced the majority of their recording output. The Ronettes' had a string of hits in the 1960s, including "Be My Baby" (1963), "Baby, I Love You" (1963), "(The Best Part of) Breakin' Up" (1964) and "Walking in the Rain" (1964). https://www.ronniespector.com/ https://mobile.twitter.com/RonnieSpectorGS?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor https://www.instagram.com/ronniespectorthebadgirl/?hl=en https://apnews.com/article/ronnie-spector-dead-84c905db02a01ffa43a6052c3ce66920 #musicvideo #musicstudio #musiclover #musiclife #musicindustry #musiclovers #musiccover #musician #musicproducer #musicproduction #musicians #musicislife #musicartist #musicphotography #musicvideos #Music Please follow us on Youtube,Facebook,Instagram,Twitter,Patreon and at www.gettinglumpedup.com https://linktr.ee/RobRossi Get your T-shirt at https://www.prowrestlingtees.com/gettinglumpedup And https://www.bonfire.com/store/getting-lumped-up/ https://app.hashtag.expert/?fpr=roberto-rossi80 https://dc2bfnt-peyeewd4slt50d2x1b.hop.clickbank.net https://8bcded2xph1jdsb8mqp8th3y0n.hop.clickbank.net/?cbpage=nb Subscribe to the channel and hit the like button --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-rossi/support https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/getting-lumped-up-with-rob-rossi/id1448899708 https://open.spotify.com/show/00ZWLZaYqQlJji1QSoEz7a https://www.patreon.com/Gettinglumpedup --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-rossi/support

Murphy, Sam & Jodi
New home trend / Jodi's trick to get out of a slump / Sam's Music News

Murphy, Sam & Jodi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:51


The new kind of ROOM in your house you can escape into.Jodi's new "trick" to get out of a slump. It's not free, but it is cheap.In Music News, Sam will get us up to speed on the Ronnie Spector biopic.

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast
Remembering music legend Ronnie Spector

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022


WGN Radio's Dave Plier looks back on one of his conversation with music legend Ronnie Spector, the trail-blazing lead singer of the 1960s all-girl group The Ronettes, who passed away this week at age 78.

Breakfast All Day
Episode 236: News, Scream (2022), Eternals, Hotel Transylvania: Transformania

Breakfast All Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 55:25


Do you like scary movies? We've got one for you this week on Breakfast All Day, as Katie Walsh joins Christy to review the new “Scream,” the fifth film in the meta horror franchise. Also, Alonso finally watched “Eternals,” so we catch up with Chloe Zhao's Marvel entry, and we review the animated “Hotel Transylvania: Transformania,” the rare movie that has us extremely divided. In news, we discuss Bob Saget, Ronnie Spector, the Golden Globes, the Screen Actors Guild nominations, season three announcements for both “The Great” and “The Morning Show,” Jason Momoa and Lisa Bonet divorcing, and O.G. “American Idol” finalist Clay Aiken running for Congress, again. And over at our Patreon, we recap this week's episode of “The Book of Boba Fett” (which we're not really feeling yet) and revisit the delightfully zany “What's Up, Doc?” the Peter Bogdanovich movie our subscribers chose for the latest Off the Menu selection. Don't answer the phone! Listen to our podcast instead. And thanks for joining us.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Snail E-mail

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 165:21


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their thoughts on incentives and disincentives to raise vaccination rates, like free doughnuts or higher health insurance. Bill McKibben reviews the apocalyptic climate film “Don't Look Up,” and talked about the state of climate change as parts of the world see record temperatures. McKibben is co-founder of 350.org and the author of numerous books about climate change. His latest book is “Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?” Callie Crossley talks about Maya Angelou becoming the first Black woman to appear on a U.S. quarter, laws requiring beauticians to undergo domestic violence prevention training and Oreos turning 110 years old. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Andy Ihnatko explains a chip shortage affecting printer companies and allegations of bullying over green and blue chat bubbles on iPhones. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Christopher Muther shares tips on weighing the risks of travel with Omicron on the rise, the costs and benefits of travel insurance and why he loves Ronnie Spector. Muther is a Boston Globe travel columnist and travel writer. Sue O'Connell discusses Amy Schneider becoming the first woman to break $1 million on Jeopardy, and Buckingham Palace forcing Prince Andrew to relinquish military and honorific titles amid a sexual-abuse lawsuit and ties with Jeffrey Epstein. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Sue O'Connell on BPR | Jan. 14, 2022 We end the show by asking listeners for their thoughts on an email platform that intentionally slows down email delivery to provide a work-life balance.

Donna & Steve
Friday 1/14 Hour 3- Friday Slow Jam

Donna & Steve

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022


Zendaya to play Ronnie Spector, Steve checked out the new season of Cheer, Success rates of long distance relationships, Friday Slow Jam, Chainsmokers release satirical video

The Tony Kornheiser Show
“Just like Ronnie Sang”

The Tony Kornheiser Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 60:41


Tony opens the show by talking with Jeanne McManus about the passing of Ronnie Spector and the impact the Ronettes had on music and pop culture. Jason La Canfora of CBS Sports calls in to talk about NFL head coaching vacancies, and also to talk about which QB's will be under the most pressure in the upcoming Wild Card games, Jeff Ma phones in with his weekend picks, and Tony closes out the show by opening up the Mailbag. Songs : Jim Fleming “Too Many Words” ; Azro Cady “I Need a Win” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

It's Erik Nagel
Ep 361: Oaxaca Waka Waka

It's Erik Nagel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 121:07


SEGMENT 01 [1:31] Xia needs pants. ZOA drinks. Non-alcoholic Heineken. Totinos Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  Cricket killing cooking video. Sony botched PS5 shortage.  SEGMENT 02 [1:05:26] Movie/TV/Streaming updates. 'Muderville'. Bill Murray in the MCU. 'Impractical jokers' update. 'Fresh Prince of Bel-Air' trailer. Ronnie Spector. Assholes spoiling everything. 'The Gap' selling jerky.  FOLLOW 'IT'S ERIK NAGEL': TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | FACEBOOK | WEBSITE HEAR 'IT'S ERIK NAGEL' ON: IHEARTRADIO | SPOTIFY | APPLE PODCASTS | GOOGLE PODCAST | YOUTUBE

The Give Me Five Podcast: An Uncultured Look at Pop Culture and Nostalgia

Very weird episode tonight as there have been quite a few celebrity deaths (Betty White, Sidney Poitier, Bob Saget, Ronnie Spector) and a few of them MAY be linked to one of our hosts.  While sorting that out, we chat about Book of Boba Fett and Sing 2. Boba Fett is a bit controversial online with people critiquing its tone, setting and other elements of the show, but what do the important critics (us) think? Rob saw Sing 2 and gave us a report on the music, story and overall quality of this family film.  There's a quickie Give Me Five this week: Planets other than Tatooine that you would like to see explored on Disney + series. The Give Me Five Podcast is on Patreon. For just $5 you could join the fun in our patron only chat, and get early warning of our movie of the week and our top 5 list. There are other benefits too, so check it out here:  https://www.patreon.com/Givemefivepodcast Remember if you use our link (https://amzn.to/2KxR8OU) we get a little bit of money towards server costs at no extra cost to you. So go ahead and buy that Nicholas Cage Mermaid Pillow you definitely need.  Check out our website at givemefivepodcast.com We have a store! Check out our shirts, mugs, bags and phone cases here: Buy cool crap! We record using Squadcast. Squadcast is an easy to use, stable recording environment that allows you, your cohosts and any guests the ability to record out of the comfort of your own home. Just click the link and start talking with absolutely no lag. You can try it out using our link and it will help us out immensely. https://squadcast.fm/?ref=givemefive  And you can always reach us at givemefivepodcast@gmail.com or at our Facebook Page : https://www.facebook.com/givemefivepodcast/  Opening Theme Opening theme: GLOW by DJ Ten (feat LeBrock and ULTRABOSS )

Lori & Julia
1/13 Thurs Hr 2: Julia's Random Thoughts!

Lori & Julia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 35:56


Lori and Julia discuss the life of Ronnie Spector! Hollywood Speak: Julia Fox continues to add to the Kanye saga. You will never believe what she said on a recent podcast. Britany Spears is rolling her eyes after her sister's interview on GMA!

The Chad Benson Show
Biden approval rating falls to 33%

The Chad Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 110:15


Biden approval rating falls to 33%. Inflation to add $3500 to living expenses. Universal voting rights. Racist homework. Latest jobless numbers. Army offering $50,000 sign on bonus. Ronnie Spector dies at 78.

Coverville: The Cover Music Show (AAC Edition)
Coverville 1387: Cover Stories for Kings of Leon and Prefab Sprout and a Tribute to Ronnie Spector

Coverville: The Cover Music Show (AAC Edition)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022


Covers for birthdays of Caleb Followill (of Kings of Leon) and Marty McAloon (of Prefab Sprout), and a special tribute to Ronnie Spector. (75 minutes) The post Coverville 1387: Cover Stories for Kings of Leon and Prefab Sprout and a Tribute to Ronnie Spector appeared first on Coverville | The Cover Music Podcast.

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast
From the archives: Dave Plier talks with Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Ronnie Spector

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022


Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Ronnie Spector died yesterday at age 78. In November, 2016, she joined Dave Plier to talk about her six decades on stage with the Ronettes and working with the likes of Darlene Love, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen, and The Rolling Stones.

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
January 13th, 2022 6am Alice Celebrity Trash

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 20:57


Ronnie Spector passed away after a battle with cancer, Pete Davidson's name is being tossed around as the next Oscar host, Kylie Jenner has the most Instagram followers, and John Cena loves to shop for antiques!   

The Lisa Wexler Show
1/13/22 - RIP Ronnie Spector And David Freidman

The Lisa Wexler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 49:11


1/13/22 - RIP Ronnie Spector And David Freidman by The Lisa Wexler Show

Global News Podcast
Germany convicts Syrian of crimes against humanity

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 31:58


The trial of Anwar Raslan was the world's first criminal case over state-led torture in Syria. Also: terrified Afghan teachers still hiding from Taliban and Be My Baby singer Ronnie Spector dies aged seventy-eight.

Mark Simone
Ronnie Spector Dies

Mark Simone

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 16:19


Mark's opening segment.

Newshour
German court convicts former Syrian colonel

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 47:19


It's been described as the world's first criminal case brought over state-led torture in Syria. A court in Koblenz, Germany, gave a life sentence to Anwar Raslan. He's a former Syrian colonel who'd been linked to crimes against humanity at a notorious prison in Damascus during his country's civil war. Raslan was found guilty of mass torture and killings at a detention centre known as Branch 251. Also in the programme: British and Dutch athletes heading to Beijing for next month's Winter Olympics have been warned about taking their own personal mobile phones with them over fears they could be spied on by the Chinese government; and Ronnie Spector, lead singer of the 1960s all-girl group The Ronettes, has died at the age of 78. (Photo: A woman reacts as she shows a picture of her relatives, who died in Syria, after the verdict against a former Syrian secret police officer, at the Higher Regional Court in Koblenz, Germany, 13 January 2022. In the world's first trial on Syrian state torture, Anwar Raslan has been sentenced to life imprisonment for crimes against humanity, 27 counts of murder and other offences. This was announced by the Higher Regional Court in Koblenz. Credit: EPA/Sascha Steinbach)

Jason & Alexis
1/13 THURS HOUR 1: New Girl Scout cookie, MGK and Megan Fox engaged and RIP Ronnie Spector

Jason & Alexis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 41:58


There's a new Girl Scout cookie and it sounds delicious! In other food news: NFL soil chips and a cereal mash-up. Machine Gun Kelly and Megan Fox got engaged in Puerto Rico and they drank each other's blood? We remember Ronnie Spector who dead at 78. How did "News from the Crabby Coffee Shop," Kenny, Dawn and John's podcast go yesterday?

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
GHS - Wiggy had a point to make... but he can't remember what it was

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 41:05


4th and final hour of today's Greg Hill Show kicks off with Wiggy, who has a great point to make about the last Pats vs. Bills game... but he can't remember quite what it was, or that he even had a point to make. Final hour wraps things up with plenty more Patriots chat, the shocking number of available tickets left in Buffalo, and an audio eulogy for Ronnie Spector.

Corso - Deutschlandfunk
Eine gewaltige Stimme: Ronettes-Frontfrau Ronnie Spector gestorben

Corso - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 6:19


Smarzoch, Raphaelwww.deutschlandfunk.de, CorsoDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

TODAY
January 13: Exclusive — Craig Melvin's one-on-one with Vice President Kamala Harris. Covid testing and schools. Inflation spike.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 31:48


Exclusive: Craig Melvin sits down with Vice President Kamala Harris — her take on the Covid crisis, 2024 and much more. Plus, free Covid tests will soon be headed to schools nationwide— the White House is promising five million rapid tests and 5 million PCR tests for K-12 schools in states that apply for them. Also, a closer look at how supply chain and labor shortages have led to the biggest inflation spike in nearly four decades.

Der Podcast für junge Anleger jeden Alters
Wiener Börse Plausch #53: Bawag, Goldentree, Andritz, Agrana, S&T, Ronnie Spector, Florian Heindl, Val Kilmer, V. Rhames

Der Podcast für junge Anleger jeden Alters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 10:52


Thu, 13 Jan 2022 11:35:17 +0000 https://jungeanleger.podigee.io/104-wiener-borse-plausch-53 1b68c11fcd086643e6166b7f9a443bd1 Team drajc, das sind die Börse Social Network Eigentümer Christian Drastil und Josef Chladek, quatscht in Wiener Börse Plausch #53 wieder über das aktuelle Geschehen in Wien. Heute reden über Bawag/Goldentree. It takes two, Andritz, Agrana, S&T, Ronnie Spector, Florian Heindl, Val Kilmer und Ving Rhames. Die Jänner-Folgen vom Wiener Börse Plausch sind präsentiert von Wienerberger, CEO Heimo Scheuch hat sich im Q4 ebenfalls unter die Podcaster gemischt: https://open.spotify.com/show/5D4Gz8bpAYNAI6tg7H695E . Risikohinweis: Die hier veröffentlichten Gedanken sind weder als Empfehlung noch als ein Angebot oder eine Aufforderung zum An- oder Verkauf von Finanzinstrumenten zu verstehen und sollen auch nicht so verstanden werden. Sie stellen lediglich die persönliche Meinung der Podcastmacher dar. Der Handel mit Finanzprod ukten unterliegt einem Risiko. Sie können Ihr eingesetztes Kapital verlieren. 104 full no Wiener Börse,Christian Baha,Florian Heindl,Agrana,Andritz,Bawag,Warimpex,S&T Christian Drastil & Josef Chladek, Börse Social Network

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 3 | An Ambassador's Paycheck @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 36:08


January new job / College / Tips for jobs // Ronnie Spector dies at 78 / Be my baby / Eddie Money // Restaurants hurting / Parents & students // Garcetti – Ambassador to India / Mayor WHIP

Tom Shattuck's Burn Barrel
Sherman's BBQ EP 428

Tom Shattuck's Burn Barrel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 46:35


The great Ronnie Spector of the Ronettes has passed away. She was a truly remarkable American and puts our dullard, cynical political class to shame. Find us at www.burnbarrelpodcast.com Email us: burnbarrelpodcast@gmail.com Follow on Parler: @burnbarrelpodcast On Gab: @burnbarrelpodcast Facebook: facebook.com/burnbarrelpodcast And Twitter: @burnbarrelpod Rumble: rumble.com/c/burnbarrelpodcast YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCWhLuhtutKdCmbHaWuGg_YQ Follow Tom on Twitter: @tomshattuck You can follow Alice too: @aliceshattuck More Tom stuff at www.tomshattuck.com Tom's "Insta" as the zoomers say: www.instagram.com/tomwshattuck/ Join us at Locals: burnbarrel.locals.com (subscriber based) Join us at Patreon: www.patreon.com/burnbarrel (subscriber based) The opening theme music is called Divine Intervention by Matthew Sweet. The closing theme music to this podcast C'est La Vie by Derek Clegg. Excelsior

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 3: Ronnie Spector passed away

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 35:13


BREAKING: Ronnie Spector dies // Inslee raising tax while most states are lowering // GUEST:  Diane, Renton mom whose 7 year old daughter was kicked out of theater class for not being vaccinated // Awesome Audio See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey, Remember the 80's?
Six Degrees of Diane Warren

Hey, Remember the 80's?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 43:08


Episode 141: Everybody's gotta start somewhere, and in this episode of HRT80's, Joe and Kari are taking a look at some of the earlier songs from legendary songwriter Diane Warren. She has written some of the biggest hits of all-time, like "How Do I Live," "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now" and "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing," but in the 80's, she wrote some songs that DIDN'T top the charts. She wrote songs for Barbara Mandrell, Melissa Manchester, and Ronnie Spector, among others. Some of these are really good! And for others, the top spot on the Hot 100 was a real moonshot. 

C86 Show - Indie Pop
Slinky Vagabond with Keanan Duffty

C86 Show - Indie Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 82:47


Slinky Vagabond with Keanan Duffty in conversation with David Eastaugh Slinky Vagabond is a concept band that originally formed in 2007 and became an integral part of the New York club scene and performed at celebrations for Joey Ramone's Birthday Bash alongside the New York Dolls, Fashion Week's Gen Art and Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp and Marc Bolan's 30th Anniversary Show alongside Patti Smith, Tom Morello, Joan Jett and Ronnie Spector. They release their album ‘King Boy Vandals' on December 6 that can be pre ordered at: slinkyvagabond@slinkyvagabond.net 

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn
Bullseye's 2021 Holiday Spectacular: Ronnie Spector, Sy Smith and Jane Lynch

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 53:47


The Bullseye Holiday Spectacular is here! We are revisiting some of our favorite Holiday interviews with different guests from over the years. First, we kick things off with Ronnie Spector. She talks with us about her work with The Ronnets and her fond love for Christmas music. We are then joined by singer/songwriter Sy Smith, who shares which classic holiday tune changed her life. We close things out by revisiting our interview with the one and only Jane Lynch. In 2016, she talked with us about her holiday album A Swingin' Little Christmas and some of her holiday traditions growing up. Happy Holidays!

DJ 50 Spänn
Natasha Azarmi: comebackpop, cancelopera och Kanye

DJ 50 Spänn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 75:18


Natasha Azarmi, musikkritiker/rockjournalist, svängde förbi studion med en bibba tiokronorsvinyl. Vi spelar en comebackplatta av Ronnie Spector, opera på cancelgränsen och Miriam Makebas lektion i kolonialismens histora medan vi pratar om Kanye och treplus-samhället.

But Ma That's My Favorite Movie
E065: Extra, Extra- [Page 6] Chronicle 2, Ronnie Spector Biopic, House of Gucci and The Eyes of Tammy Faye

But Ma That's My Favorite Movie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 30:57


(S2) In this episode we discuss movies that have been announced and I give my thoughts on some trailers! Want to join podbean? podbean.com/butmaTMFM Website: butmathatsmyfavoritemovie.com BMTMFM Survey Questions, comments or movie/theme suggestions contact us at "Butmathatsmyfavoritemovie@gmail.com" Social media:  Instagram @butmathatsmyfavmovie  Facebook @butmathatsmyfavoritemoviepodcast Twitter @ButmaTMFMP

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Performance Anxiety: Anne Husick (Band Of Susans, Ronnie Spector)

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 77:54


Anne Husick is our guest. She talks about growing up in New York but missing the entire early NYC punk scene because she went to Miami for college. She joined Band of Susans after being VERY persistent and almost immediately went on a European tour for six weeks with people she didn't know. She reminisces about playing in an incredibly loud band with 4 guitars! She eventually left Band Of Susans to play with Ronnie Spector, Joey Ramone, and Wicked Wilson Pickett, among others. She also lost her voice for six years! Recently she recorded Lulu's To Sir With Love with Rew Starr and the ReWlettes and getting the approval of Lulu herself and some other, unexpected people! Give Anne a follow @annehusick_music on Instagram. Follow us @PerformanceAnx on all the socials. We love coffee from ko-fi.com/performanceanxiety. Merch is found at performanceanx.threadless.com. Rate & review the show and check out the other great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcast network like Long May You Young, Let It Roll, & Highway Hi Fi. Now make some noise for Anne Husick on Performance Anxiety. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Performance Anxiety
Anne Husick (Band Of Susans, Ronnie Spector)

Performance Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 78:54


Anne Husick is our guest. She talks about growing up in New York but missing the entire early NYC punk scene because she went to Miami for college. She joined Band of Susans after being VERY persistent and almost immediately went on a European tour for six weeks with people she didn't know. She reminisces about playing in an incredibly loud band with 4 guitars! She eventually left Band Of Susans to play with Ronnie Spector, Joey Ramone, and Wicked Wilson Pickett, among others. She also lost her voice for six years! Recently she recorded Lulu's To Sir With Love with Rew Starr and the ReWlettes and getting the approval of Lulu herself and some other, unexpected people! Give Anne a follow @annehusick_music on Instagram. Follow us @PerformanceAnx on all the socials. We love coffee from ko-fi.com/performanceanxiety. Merch is found at performanceanx.threadless.com. Rate & review the show and check out the other great podcasts on the Pantheon Podcast network like Long May You Young, Let It Roll, & Highway Hi Fi. Now make some noise for Anne Husick on Performance Anxiety. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Johnny Gale Live On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 90:39


I knew I was about to be face-to-face with five-time Grammy Nominee, producer, composer, arranger, vocalist, and guitarist extraordinaire, Johnny Gale, for the first time in three-plus decades, when I was booking rock, and Johnny was playing it, back in the heady daze of the New York club scene. What I didn't know is that we actually met five decades ago. What?!? Earlier today, listening to an interview Johnny did recently, at the tail end, more than an hour and a half in, he mentioned his friend, Vinny Graffeo. I knew Johnny was from Queens. I lived in Queens. My boyfriend in 1970, Vinny Graffeo lived in Queens. Could there be another guitar/bass player at that time, in that place, with that name? I screen-shared some pics. Turns out no. We shared the same Vinny. Upon seeing the pics, Johnny recognized 15 year old me. What a way to kick off a conversation. The fun didn't stop. We talked the early days, the music he was listening to, his ascent to playing, the bands, the gigs, the players, from Vinny and Marty Miller (another crazy story) to Leslie West, Waddy Wachtel, Angel Rissoff, Gene Cornish, Phoebe Snow, Cyndi Lauper (he was her boyfriend), Ronnie Spector, Darlene Love, Elvis Costello, Ringo Starr, Little Steven, Aaron Carter (huh?), his own Gale Force (awarded Best Guitar Record of The Year by Guitar Shop Magazine, upon its release in '94), to music directing and playing on Boardwalk Empire, Vinyl, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, The Irishman, to A Bronx Tale on Broadway. We came full-circle back to Doo-Wop, the music which transfixed him as a kid, and has been one of his major gigs for the past 20 years, with Kenny Vance and The Planotones. What an amazing and varied career Johnny's fashioned, without once having a job/job or formally studying. He schooled and mastered his craft in the school of hard knocks, having plenty, alongside his many victories. As easy to talk to as an old friend… he kinda is one. From Bayside to Bleecker Street, we've shared air, friends, music, and memories. Mourning the loss of the stupendous Mike Finnigan this day, and learning of the premature passing of childhood beau, Vinny, it was warm, fun, and comforting to be in Johnny's great company. What a trip! Please give his stupendous Daddy Long Legs a listen. https://bit.ly/3lWD4TS Johnny Gale Live on Game Changers with Vicki Abelson Wed, 8/11/21, 5 pm PT, 8 pm ET Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here: https://bit.ly/3iFPnSM All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables,of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for tresses like the stars she coifs, and regular people, like me. I love my hair, and I love Nicole. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/ Blue Microphones and Kevin Walt

The Pat Walsh Show
Pat Walsh Show Aug 10 Hr 2

The Pat Walsh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 34:27


Pat opens up this hour talking about the college professor accused of arson for allegedly setting fires in the Dixie Fire area. Special guests Johnny Price and the Rhythm Riders drop by the studio to chat with Pat about their upcoming show at the Auburn State Theatre this Friday the 13th to celebrate the re-opening of the Theatre! Happy Birthday to Ronnie Spector!

Cousin Brucie's Saturday Night Rock & Roll Party
Cousin Brucie's Saturday Night Rock and Roll Party - Ronnie Spector of the Ronettes

Cousin Brucie's Saturday Night Rock & Roll Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 7:39


Cousin Brucie gets a big surprise when Ronnie Spector of The Ronettes calls in.  Listen as they reminisce and talk about the future.

Cousin Brucie's Saturday Night Rock & Roll Party
Cousin Brucie's Saturday Night Rock and Roll Party - 07-10-2021

Cousin Brucie's Saturday Night Rock & Roll Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 239:49


Join Cousin Brucie's Saturday Night Rock and Roll Party for the best music from the 50's, 60's and a touch of the 70's.  Tonight Cousin Brucie welcomes Bill Medley of the Righteous Brothers, Ronnie Spector and Tony Orlando.

The Career Musician
A Family of Career Musicians | Melanie Taylor, Terry Wollman, Althea Waites EP. 117

The Career Musician

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 72:13


Melanie Taylor was one of Bette Midler's legendary Harlettes for nearly a decade, and has performed on the Grammys, the Emmys, The Voice, and the Academy Awards, to name just a few notable appearances. She has worked with artists such as Steven Tyler, Jennifer Hudson, Barry Manilow, Steve Perry, Quincy Jones, David Foster, John Mayer, Joe Walsh, Stevie Wonder, Donna Summer, 30 Seconds to Mars, Chaka Khan, Ashford and Simpson, Billy Preston, Barbra Streisand, Elton John, Billy Joel, Sheryl Crow, Michael McDonald, Tears for Fears, Michael Bolton, Patti LaBelle, Ronnie Spector, Nickelback, Jeffrey Osborne, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Steve Tyrell, Brian Wilson, The Offspring, Dionne Warwick, Melissa Manchester, Dave Koz, Deepak Chopra, and she is the first female vocalist to sing with the legendary rock band Aerosmith on their "Music From Another Dimension" album and tour in 2012. Terry Wollman is a Billboard charting American Jazz/Pop musician, music director, guitarist, producer and composer. He has performed with an array of artists including Billy Preston, The 5th Dimension, Wilson Phillips, Al Jarreau, Joan Baez, Joe Walsh, Keb' Mo', Little Richard, Gerald Albright and Eartha Kitt. Terry's TV credits include stints on Scrubs, The Tonight Show, The Late Show, and The Byron Allen Show. Althea Waites is an internationally acclaimed concert pianist, praised by the Los Angeles Times for “superb technique and profound musicality.” Ms. Waites has a long and distinguished history of championing new music by American composers and has received several honors and commendations for her work. She has also been guest soloist for National Public Radio's Performance Today, KQED in San Francisco, KCET/Los Angeles, Walt Disney Concert Hall, the Geneva Conservatory of Music in Switzerland, Wigmore Hall in London, Merkin Hall in New York City, concerts for the UC/ San Diego World Music program in Indonesia, Phillips Gallery in Washington, D.C., and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to name a few. @therealmelanietaylor www.melanietaylorartist.com www.terrywollman.com www.altheawaites.com @thecareermusician @nomadsplace

Getting lumped up with Rob Rossi
Rockshow episode 121 Phil Spector

Getting lumped up with Rob Rossi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 111:44


RockerMike and Rob discuss Phil Spector. Harvey Phillip Spector was an American record producer, musician, and songwriter known for his innovative recording practices and entrepreneurship in the 1960s, followed decades later by his two trials and conviction for murder in the 2000s. Wikipedia Born: December 26, 1939, Bronx, New York, NY Died: January 16, 2021, French Camp, CA Children: Nicole Audrey Spector, Donte Phillip Spector, Gary Phillip Spector, Louis Phillip Spector, More Spouse: Rachelle Short (m. 2006–2019), Ronnie Spector (m. 1968–1974) https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/17/arts/music/phil-spector-dead.html https://philspector.com/ https://www.npr.org/2021/01/17/528954909/phil-spector-legendary-record-producer-and-convicted-murderer-has-died-at-81 https://www.biography.com/.amp/musician/phil-spector Please follow us on Youtube,Facebook,Instagram,Twitter,Patreon and at www.gettinglumpedup.com https://linktr.ee/RobRossi Get your T-shirt at https://www.prowrestlingtees.com/gettinglumpedup And https://www.bonfire.com/store/getting-lumped-up/ https://app.hashtag.expert/?fpr=roberto-rossi80 https://dc2bfnt-peyeewd4slt50d2x1b.hop.clickbank.net https://8bcded2xph1jdsb8mqp8th3y0n.hop.clickbank.net/?cbpage=nb Subscribe to the channel and hit the like button --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-rossi/support https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/getting-lumped-up-with-rob-rossi/id1448899708 https://open.spotify.com/show/00ZWLZaYqQlJji1QSoEz7a https://www.patreon.com/Gettinglumpedup #musician #musiclife #musicproduction #musicfestival #musicphotography #musicartist #musicismylife #musicvideo #musicproducer #musicislife #musicstudio #musicians #musiclover #musicindustry #musiclovers #musicphotographer #musicaltheatre #music --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-rossi/support

CooperTalk
Little Steven Van Zandt - Episode 853

CooperTalk

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 65:22


Steve Cooper talks with musician/writer/producer/actor Little Steven. Little Steven is best known for being a guitarist and Rock & Roll Hall of Fame member for Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band. After creating the “Jersey Shore” sound with the Asbury Jukes he became a founding member of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band, and went on to become a successful solo artist in his own right recording and performing solo with his band Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul. As a songwriter his songs have been performed by Jackson Browne, Pearl Jam, Margo Price, Damian Marley, Jimmy Cliff, Southside Johnny and The Asbury Jukes, Gary U.S. Bonds, Darlene Love, Nancy Sinatra, Brian Setzer, Black Uhuru, and more. He also-co-produced the seminal Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band albums The River, and Born in the U.S.A. and has produced albums for Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, Gary U.S. Bonds, Ronnie Spector, Demolition 23, Majek Fashek, Lords of the New Church, Arc Angels, The Chesterfield Kings, The Cocktail Slippers, The Breakers, and more. As an actor he co-starred in all 7 seasons of The Sopranos and starred in, co-wrote, executive produced the award winning series Lilyhammer.

Stereo Embers: The Podcast
Stereo Embers The Podcast : Eric Bazilian (The Hooters)

Stereo Embers: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 63:28


“Bach Is My Torah" The Philadelphia-born Eric Bazilian's dad was a psychiatrist but it was his concert pianist mother who likely influenced him to start playing the piano at age 5. Four years later he was playing guitar and seven years later at the age of 16 he had his first band, Evil Seed. While getting a B.S. in Physics at the University of Pennsylvania, Bazilian and his college pal Rob Hyman formed a band called Baby Grand and after that band called it a day with two albums under their belts, Bazilian and Hyman formed the Hooters. Over the course of their winning career, the Hooters put out six albums, had a handful of top 40 hits with songs like "Day By Day” and "And We Danced," they opened Live Aid in Philadelphia, the Amnesty International Concert at Giants Stadium in ’86 and the Roger Waters The Wall Concert in Berlin in 1990. Bazilian not only produced Joan Osborne’s Grammy Nominated Relish album, he wrote "One Of Us," which is one of the most memorable songs of the last 50 years. It was covered by "everyone from Prince to Seal and it was used as the theme song for the TV show "Joan of Arcadia," for which Bazilian won an ASCAP Film and Television Music Award. Over the course of his career he’s written and co written songs for and with a crazy list of talent. Here’s a partial list: Patty Smyth, Bon Jovi, BIf Naked, Ronnie Spector, Matt Nathanson, and Robbie Williams. In 2000 Bazilian was inducted into the Philadelphia Walk of Fame on the Avenue of the Arts and his new solo album Bazilian is a life-affirming blast of rootsy pop stomp that’s energizing, soulful and positively infectious. The Hooters are an ongoing proposition and they’re massively popular in Germany and Scandinavia, playing sell-out shows to adoring fans. In this chat, Bazilian talks to Alex about life in Sweden, why Bach is his Torah, and saying no to Bob Dylan... www.ericbazilian.com www.hootersmusic.com www.alexgreenonline.com www.bombshellradio.com

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour
Catching A Wave 05-10-21

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 57:03


Hear new and vintage tunes from Didi Wray, Southern Culture On The Skids, The Ventures, Bali Lamas, Surfnado Tiki Squad, The Seatopians, Dave Alvin, The Volcanics, The Monkees, The Hi-Risers (singing about The Monkees), 3 California tunes from The Crickets, The Runaways and Ronnie Spector and more!  Beth Riley once again brings a great tune from The Beach Boys in her Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break, we board the Catching A Wave Time Machine for the week ending June 5, 1965 and we drop a coin in the Jammin' James Jukebox!     Intro music bed "Catch A Wave"- The Beach Boys   Dave Alvin- "Boss" The Seatopians- "Manos The Hands Of Fate" Didi Wray- "Whiskey In The Jar" Surfnado Tiki Squad- "Cowboys From The Dwell" The Manakooras- "Exotic Blue Soul"   California theme: The Crickets- "California Sun" Ronnie Spector- "Ode To L.A." The Runaways- "California Paradise"   Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break- The Beach Boys- "Spring Vacation" Follow "Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break" HERE   Bali Lamas- "Coral Fixation" The Hi-Risers- "Watch The Monkees" The Monkees- "The Door Into Summer"   Catching A Wave Time Machine Week ending June 5, 1965: #5 The Beatles- "Ticket To Ride" #2 Sam The Sham & The Pharaohs- "Wooly Bully" #1 The Beach Boys- "Help Me Rhonda"   Jammin' James Jukebox selection of the week: The Belairs- "Mr. Moto"   Southern Culture On The Skids- "Billy's Board" The Ventures- "The Twist" The Volcanics- "Big Bossman"   Outro Music Bed:  The Beach Boys- "Do It Again"

Now Hear This Entertainment
NHTE 375 Fiona Silver and Brian Duke

Now Hear This Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 64:37


She is a singer, songwriter, producer, and guitar player who has toured with four-time GRAMMY winner Gary Clark, Jr. She has gotten airplay on SiriusXM, performed with Carlos Santana, and accompanied Gwen Stefani for NBC’s New Year’s Eve special and “Christmas in Rockefeller Center” special. She also counts Ronnie Spector among her personal mentors. He is a drummer who has toured nationwide and internationally. Since the pandemic he has been the in-house drum tech AND has been playing on sessions at a studio in Connecticut. He also operates a home studio, is an educator, and last fall started his own shop, called Music Box Vintage.

Name 3 Songs
The Most Exploitative Relationships in Music with Dunzo! Podcast

Name 3 Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 82:31


If you thought Justin Timberlake ruining Janet Jackson's or Britney Spears' career was bad, just wait till you hear this! Sadly, men taking advantage of young pop stars is a repeating theme throughout pop culture history – Phil and Ronnie Spector, Mariah Carey and Tommy Mottola, Mandy Moore and Ryan Adams. We're joined by pop culture expert Troy McEady from Dunzo Podcast to take a closer look at the men who have exploited pop stars in their relationships. From glass coffins to security cameras to revenge music videos, it's a wild ride! Find more from Dunzo: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Instagram | Patreon Enjoy this episode? Join our Patreon community or leave us a tip on PayPal! Want to talk more? Find us: @name3songs | @sara_feigin | @jenna_million This is a music commentary podcast based on pre-existing knowledge and facts cited at name3songs.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 117: "Don't Worry Baby" by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2021 36:00


Episode one hundred and seventeen of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Don't Worry Baby" by the Beach Boys, and how the years 1963 and 1964 saw a radical evolution in the sound and subject matter of the Beach Boys' work. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "You're No Good" by the Swinging Blue Jeans. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- ERRATA: I say that the Surfin' USA album was released only four months after Surfin' Safari. It was actually over five months. Also, for some reason I pronounce Nik Venet's name as if he were French here. I believe that's incorrect and his name is actually pronounced “Vennit”, though I'm not 100% sure. More importantly, I say that "Sweet Little Sixteen" wasn't a big hit, when of course it made number two on the charts.    Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode, most of which will be used in future Beach Boys episodes too. It's difficult to enumerate everything here, because I have been an active member of the Beach Boys fan community for twenty-four years, and have at times just used my accumulated knowledge for this. But the resources I list here are ones I've checked for specific things. Becoming the Beach Boys by James B. Murphy is an in-depth look at the group's early years, up to the end of 1963. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe's Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins' The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. Stebbins also co-wrote The Lost Beach Boy, David Marks' autobiography. And Philip Lambert's Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson's music from 1962 through 67. The Beach Boys' Morgan recordings and all the outtakes from them can be found on this 2-CD set. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys' music, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it. Transcript Today, we're going to take our second look at the Beach Boys, and we're going to look at their evolution through 1963 and 1964, as they responded to the threat from the Beatles by turning to ever more sophisticated music, even as they went through a variety of personal crises. We're going to look at a period in which they released four albums a year, had three lineup changes, and saw their first number one – and at a song which, despite being a B-side, regularly makes lists of the best singles of all time. We're going to look at “Don't Worry Baby”: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Worry Baby"] When we left the Beach Boys, they had just secured a contract with Capitol Records, and released their first national hit, "Surfin' Safari" backed with "409". Since then we've also seen Brian Wilson working with several songwriting collaborators to write hits for Jan and Dean. But now we need to double back and look at what Brian was doing with his main band in that time.  After "Surfin' Safari" was a hit, in one of the many incomprehensible decisions made in the Beach Boys' career, Capitol decided to follow it up with an album track that Brian and Gary Usher had written, "Ten Little Indians". That track, a surf-rock version of the nursery rhyme with the group chanting "Kemo sabe" in the backing vocals, made only number forty-nine on the charts, and frankly didn't deserve to do even that well. Some have suggested, in fact that the record was released at the instigation of Murry Wilson, who was both Brian, Carl, and Dennis Wilson's father and the group's manager, as a way of weakening Usher's influence with the group, as Murry didn't want outsiders interfering in what he saw as a family business.  After realising the folly of deviating from the formula, the group's next single followed the same pattern as their first hit. The B-side was "Shut Down", a car song co-written by Brian and Roger Christian, who you may remember from the episode on "Surf City" as having been brought in to help Brian with car lyrics. "Shut Down" is most notable for being one of the very small number of Beach Boys records to feature an instrumental contribution from Mike Love, the group's lead singer. His two-note saxophone solo comes in for some mockery from the group's fans, but actually fits the record extremely well: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Shut Down"]  "Shut Down" was a top thirty hit, but it was the A-side that was the really big hit. Just as their first hit had had a surf song on the A-side and a car song on the B-side, so did this single. Brian Wilson had been inspired by Chuck Berry's "Sweet Little Sixteen", and in particular the opening verse, which had just listed a lot of places: [Excerpt: Chuck Berry, "Sweet Little Sixteen"] He might well also have been thinking of Chubby Checker's minor hit, "Twistin' USA", which listed places in America where people might be twisting: [Excerpt: Chubby Checker, "Twistin' USA"] Brian had taken Berry's melody and the place-name recitation, and with the help of his girlfriend's brother, and some input from Mike Love, had turned it into a song listing all the places that people could be surfing -- at least, they could "if everybody had an ocean": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Surfin' USA"] "Surfin' USA" became a huge hit, reaching number two on the charts, and later being named by Billboard as the biggest hit of 1963, but unfortunately for Brian that didn't result in a financial windfall for him as the songwriter. As the song was so close to "Sweet Little Sixteen", Chuck Berry got the sole songwriting credit -- one of the only times in rock music history where a white artist has ripped off a Black one and the Black artist has actually benefited from it. And Berry definitely did benefit -- "Sweet Little Sixteen", while a great record, had never been a particularly big hit, while "Surfin' USA" is to this day regularly heard on oldies radio and used in commercials and films. But that success meant extra work, and a lot of it. "Surfin' USA" was the title song of the group's second album, released in March 1963 only four months after their first, and they would release two more albums before the end of the year -- Surfer Girl in September and Little Deuce Coupe in October. Not only were they having to churn out a quite staggering amount of product -- though Little Deuce Coupe featured four songs recycled from their earlier albums -- but Brian Wilson, as well as writing or co-writing all their original material, started producing the records as well, as he was unhappy with Nik Venet's production on the first album. Not only that, but as well as making the Beach Boys' records, Wilson was also writing for Jan and Dean, and he had also started making records on the side with Gary Usher, doing things like making a "Loco-Motion" knock-off, "The Revolution", released under the name Rachel and the Revolvers: [Excerpt: Rachel and the Revolvers, "The Revolution"] According to some sources, Usher and Wilson found the singer for that track by the simple expedient of driving to Watts and asking the first Black teenage girl they saw if she could sing. Other sources say they hired a professional session singer -- some say it was Betty Everett, but given that that's the name of a famous singer from the period who lived in the Mid-West, I think people are confusing her for Betty Willis, another singer who gets named as a possibility, who lived in LA and who certainly sounds like the same person: [Excerpt: Betty Willis, "Act Naturally"] Wilson was also in the process of breaking up with his girlfriend and starting a relationship with a young woman named Marilyn Rovell. Rovell, along with her sister Diane, and their cousin, Ginger Blake, had formed a girl group, and Brian was writing and producing records for them as well: [Excerpt: The Honeys, "The One You Can't Have"] As well as making all these records, the Beach Boys were touring intensively, to the point that on one day in June the group were actually booked in for four shows in the same day.  Unsurprisingly, Brian decided that this was too much for one person, and so in April 1963, just after the release of "Surfin' USA", he decided to quit touring with the group. Luckily, there was a replacement on hand. Alan Jardine had been a member of the Beach Boys on their very first single, but had decided to quit the group to go off to university. A year later, that seemed like a bad decision, and when Brian called him up and asked him to rejoin the band, he eagerly agreed. For now, Alan was not going to be a proper member of the group, but he would substitute for Brian on the group's tour of the Midwest that Spring, and on many of the shows they performed over the summer -- he could play the bass, which was the instrument that Brian played on stage, and he could sing Brian's parts, and so while the Beach Boys still officially consisted of Brian, Carl, and Dennis Wilson, Mike Love, and David Marks, the group that was on tour was Carl, Dennis, Mike, David, and Alan, though Brian would sometimes appear for important shows. Jardine also started recording with the group, though he would not get credited on the covers of the first couple of albums on which he appeared. This made a huge change to the sound of the Beach Boys in the studio, as Jardine playing bass allowed Brian Wilson to play keyboards, while Jardine also added to the group's vocal harmonies. And this was a major change. Up to this point, the Beach Boys' records had had only rudimentary harmonies. While Brian was an excellent falsetto singer, and Mike a very good bass, the other three members of the group were less accomplished. Carl would grow to be one of the great vocalists of all time, but at this point was still in his early teens and had a thin voice. Dennis' voice was also a little thin at this point, and he was behind the drum kit, which meant he didn't get to sing live, and David Marks was apparently not allowed to sing on the records at all, other than taking a single joint lead with Carl on the first album. With the addition of Jardine, Brian now had another singer as strong as himself and Love, and the Surfer Girl album, the first one on which Jardine appears, sees Brian expanding from the rather rudimentary vocal arrangements of the first two albums to something that incorporates a lot more of the influence of the Four Freshmen. You can hear this most startlingly on "In My Room". This is one of the first songs on which Jardine took part in the studio, though he's actually not very audible in the vocal arrangement, which instead concentrates on the three brothers. "In My Room" is a major, major, step forward in the group's sound, in the themes that would appear in their songwriting for the next few years, and in the juxtaposition of the lyrical theme and the musical arrangement.  The song's lyrics, written by Gary Usher but inspired by Wilson's experiences, are about solitude, and the song starts out with Brian singing alone, but then Brian moves up to the third note of the scale and Carl comes in under him, singing the note Brian started on. Then they both move up again, Brian to the fifth and Carl to the third, with Dennis joining in on the note that Brian had started on, before Mike and Alan finally also join in. Brian is singing about being alone, but he has his family with him, supporting him:  [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "In My Room"] This new lineup of the group, with Alan augmenting the other five, might even have lasted, except for a chain of events that started on David Marks' fifteenth birthday. Murry Wilson, who was still managing the group at this point, had never liked the idea of someone from outside the family being an equal member, and was particularly annoyed at David because Murry had tried to have an affair with David's mother, which hadn't worked out well for him.  But then on Marks' fifteenth birthday, he and Dennis Wilson both caught a sexually transmitted infection from the same sex worker, and when Murry Wilson found this out -- as he had to, as he needed to pay their doctor's bills -- he became furious and started screaming at the whole group.  At that point, David had had enough. His mother had been telling him that he was the real talent in the group and he didn't need those Wilsons, and as a fifteen-year-old kid he didn't have the understanding to realise that this might not be entirely true. He said "OK, I quit". At first, the rest of the group thought that he was joking, and even he wasn't at all sure that he wanted to leave the group altogether. He remained in the band for the next month, but Murry Wilson kept reminding his sons that Marks had quit and that they'd all heard him, and refused to speak directly to him -- anything that Murry wanted to say to David, he said to Carl, who passed the message on.  And even though the rest of the group definitely wanted David to stay -- especially Brian, who liked having the freedom not to go out on tour, and Carl, who had been the one who'd lobbied to bring his friend into the group in the first place -- David was still, as the youngest member, the only one who didn't sing, and the only one not part of the family, regarded by the others as somewhat lesser than the rest of the band.  David became increasingly frustrated, especially when they were recording the Little Deuce Coupe album. That album was made up entirely of songs about cars, and the group were so short of material that the album ended up being filled out with four songs from earlier albums, including two from the Surfer Girl album released only the previous month. Yet when David tried to persuade Brian to have the group record his song "Kustom Kar Show", Brian told David that he wasn't ready to be writing songs for the group.  All this, plus pressure from David's parents to make him more of a focal point of the group, led to his resignation eventually being accepted, and backdated to the original date he quit. He played his last show with the group on October the fifth 1963, and then formed his own band, the Marksmen, who signed to A&M:  [Excerpt: Dave and the Marksmen, "Kustom Kar Show"] There have been rumours that Murry Wilson threatened DJs that the Beach Boys wouldn't co-operate with them if they played Marksmen records, but in truth, listening to the records the Marksmen made during their two years of existence, it's quite obvious why they weren't played -- they were fairly shoddy-sounding garage rock records, with little to commend them. Indeed, they actually sound somewhat better now than they would have done at the time -- some of Marks' flatter and more affectless vocals prefigure the sound of some punk singers, but not in a way that would have had any commercial potential in 1963. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys continued, with Alan Jardine buying a Stratocaster and switching to rhythm guitar, and Brian Wilson resigning himself to having to perform live, at least at the moment, and returning to his old role on the bass. Jardine was now, for publicity purposes, a full member of the group, though he would remain on a salary rather than an equal partner for many years -- Murry Wilson didn't want to make the same mistake with him that he had with Marks. And there was still the constant need for new material, which didn't let up. Brian's songwriting was progressing at a furious pace, and that can be seen nowhere better than on "The Warmth of the Sun", a song he wrote, with Love writing the lyrics, around the time of the Kennedy assassination -- the two men have differed over the years over whether it was written the night before or the night after the assassination. "The Warmth of the Sun" is quite staggeringly harmonically sophisticated. We've talked before in this podcast about the standard doo-wop progression -- the one, minor sixth, minor second, fifth progression that you get in about a million songs: [demonstrates] "The Warmth of the Sun" starts out that way -- its first two chords are C, Am, played in the standard arpeggiated way one expects from that kind of song: [demonstrates] You'd expect from that  that the song would go C, Am, Dm, G or C, Am, F, G. But instead of moving to Dm or F, as one normally would, the song moves to E flat, and *starts the progression over*, a minor third up, so you have: [demonstrates] It then stops that progression after two bars, moves back to the Dm one would expect from the original progression, and stays there for twice as long as normal, before moving on to the normal G -- and then throwing in a G augmented at the end, which is a normal G chord but with the D note raised to E flat, so it ties in to that original unexpected chord change. And it does all this *in the opening line of the song*: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "The Warmth of the Sun"] This is harmonic sophistication on a totally different order from anything else that was being done in teen pop music at the time -- it was far closer to the modern jazz harmonies of the Four Freshmen that Brian loved than to doo-wop. The new five-piece lineup of the group recorded that on January the first, 1964, and on the same day they recorded a song that combined two of Brian's other big influences. "Fun Fun Fun" had lyrics by Mike Love -- some of his wittiest -- and starts out with an intro taken straight from "Johnny B. Goode": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Fun Fun Fun"] But while the rest of the track keeps the same feel as the Chuck Berry song, the verse goes in a different harmonic direction, and actually owes a lot to "Da Doo Ron Ron". Instead of using a blues progression, as Berry normally would, the verse uses the same I-IV-I-V progression that "Da Doo Ron Ron"'s chorus does, but uses it to very different effect: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Fun Fun Fun"] That became the group's fourth top ten hit, and made number five on the charts -- but the group suddenly had some real competition. At numbers one, two, and three were the Beatles. Brian Wilson realised that he needed to up his game if he was going to compete, and he did. In April 1964 he started working on a new single. By this time, while the Beach Boys themselves were still playing most of the instruments, Brian was bringing in additional musicians to augment them, and expanding his instrumental palette. The basic track was the core members of the band -- Carl playing both lead and rhythm guitar, Alan playing bass, and Dennis playing drums, with Brian on keyboards -- but there were two further bass players, Glen Campbell and Ray Pohlman, thickening the sound on six-string bass, plus two saxophones, and Hal Blaine adding percussion.  And the main instrument providing chordal support wasn't guitar or organ, as it usually had been, but a harpsichord, an instrument Brian would use a lot over the next few years: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "I Get Around (backing track)"] The recording session for that backing track was also another breaking point for the band. Murry Wilson, himself a frustrated songwriter and producer, was at the session and kept insisting that there was a problem with the bassline. Eventually, Brian had enough of his father's interference, and fired him as the band's manager. Murry would continue to keep trying to interfere in his children's career, but this was the point at which the Beach Boys finally took control over their own futures. A few days later, they reconvened in the studio to record the vocals for what would become their first number one hit: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "I Get Around"] It's fascinating to see that even this early in the group's career, and on one of their biggest, summeriest hits, there's already a tension in the lyrics, a sense of wanting to move on -- "I'm getting bugged driving up and down the same old strip/I've got to find a new place where the kids are hip". The lyrics are Love's, but as is so often the case with Brian Wilson's collaborations, Love seems to have been expressing something that Wilson was feeling at the time. The Beach Boys had risen to the challenge from the Beatles, in a way that few other American musicians could, and "I Get Around" was good enough that it made the top ten in the UK, and became a particular favourite in the Mod subculture in London. The group would only become more popular over the next few years in the UK, a new place where the kids were hip. "I Get Around" is a worthy classic, but the B-side, "Don't Worry Baby", is if anything even better. It had been recorded in January, and had already been released on their Shut Down vol 2 album in March. It had originally been intended for the Ronettes, and was inspired by "Be My Baby", which had astonished Brian Wilson when it had been released a few months earlier. He would later recall having to pull over to the side of the road when he first heard the drum intro to that record: [Excerpt: The Ronettes, "Be My Baby"] Brian would play that record over and over, on repeat, for days at a time, and would try to absorb every nuance of the record and its production, and he tried to come up with something that could follow it. Wilson took the basic rhythm and chord sequence of the song, plus melodic fragments like the line "Be my little baby", and reworked them into a song that clearly owes a lot to its inspiration, but which stands on its own: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Worry Baby"] Phil Spector turned the song down, and so the Beach Boys recorded it themselves, and I have to say that this was only a good thing -- Ronnie Spector recorded a solo version of it many decades later, and it's a fine performance, but the lyric misses something when it's sung by a woman rather than a man. That lyric was by Roger Christian, and in it we see the tension between the more emotional themes that Wilson wanted to explore and the surf and car lyrics that had made up the majority of their singles to this point. The lyric is ostensibly about a car race, and indeed it seems to be setting up precisely the kind of situation that was common in teen tragedy records of the period. The protagonist sings "I guess I should have kept my mouth shut when I started to brag about my car,  but I can't back down now because I pushed the other guys too far", and the whole lyric is focused on his terror of an upcoming race.  This seems intended to lead to the kind of situation that we see in "Dead Man's Curve", or “Tell Laura I Love Her”, or in another teen tragedy song we'll be looking at in a couple of weeks, with the protagonist dead in a car crash. But instead, this is short-circuited. The protagonist's fears are allayed by his girlfriend: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Worry Baby"] What we have here is someone trying to deal with a particular kind of anxiety brought about by what we now refer to as toxic masculinity. The protagonist has been showing off about his driving skills in front of his peers, and has now found himself in a situation that he can't cope with. He's saved by a figure we'll see a lot more of in Brian's songs, whoever the lyricist, the supernaturally good woman who understands the protagonist and loves him despite, or because of, his faults, even though she's too good for him. Obviously, one can point to all sorts of reasons why this figure might be considered problematic -- the idea that the man is unable to deal with his own emotional problems without a woman fixing him -- but there's an emotional truth to it that one doesn't get in much music of the era, and even if it's a somewhat flawed view of gender relations, it speaks to a very particular kind of insecurity at the inability to live up to traditional masculine roles, and is all the more affecting when it's paired with the braggadocio of the A-side. The combination means we see the bragging and posturing on the A-side as just a facade, covering over the real emotional fragility of the narrator. Each side reinforces the other, and the combination is one of the most perfect pairings ever released as a single. "Don't Worry Baby", released as "I Get Around”'s B-side, made the charts in its own right peaking at number twenty-four. The B-side to the next single further elaborated on the themes of "Don't Worry Baby": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "She Knows Me Too Well"] This repurposing of the emotional and musical style of girl-group songs to deal with the emotional vulnerability that comes from acknowledging and attempting to process toxic masculinity is something that few other songwriters were capable of at this point – only some of John Lennon's work a couple of years later comes close to dealing with this very real area of the emotional landscape, and Lennon, like Wilson, often does so by using the figure of the perfect woman who will save the protagonist. In 1964, the group once again released four albums – Shut Down vol.2, All Summer Long, a live album, and a Christmas album – and they also did most of the work on yet another album, The Beach Boys Today!, which would be released in early 1965. As these recordings progressed, Brian Wilson was more and more ambitious, both in terms of the emotional effect of the music and his arrangements, increasingly using session musicians to augment the group, and trying for a variant on Phil Spector's production style, but one which emphasised gentle fragility rather than sturm und drang. Possibly the greatest track he created in 1964 ended up not being used by the Beach Boys, though, but was given to Glen Campbell: [Excerpt: Glen Campbell, "Guess I'm Dumb"] Campbell got given that track because of an enormous favour he'd done the group. The mental strain of touring had finally got too much for Brian, and in December, on a plane to Texas, he'd had a breakdown, screaming on the plane and refusing to get off. Eventually, they coaxed him off the plane, and he'd managed to get through that night's show, but had flown back to LA straight after. Campbell, who was a session guitarist who had played on a number of the Beach Boys' recordings, and had a minor career as a singer at this point, had flown out at almost no notice and for the next five months he replaced Brian on stage for most of their shows, before the group got a permanent replacement in. Brian Wilson had retired from the road, and the hope was that by doing so, he would reduce the strain on himself enough that he could keep writing and producing for the group without making his mental health worse. And for a while, at least, that seemed to be how it worked out. We'll take a look at the results in a few weeks' time.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 117: “Don’t Worry Baby” by the Beach Boys

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2021


Episode one hundred and seventeen of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Don’t Worry Baby” by the Beach Boys, and how the years 1963 and 1964 saw a radical evolution in the sound and subject matter of the Beach Boys’ work. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “You’re No Good” by the Swinging Blue Jeans. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—- ERRATA: I say that the Surfin’ USA album was released only four months after Surfin’ Safari. It was actually over five months. Also, for some reason I pronounce Nik Venet’s name as if he were French here. I believe that’s incorrect and his name is actually pronounced “Vennit”, though I’m not 100% sure. More importantly, I say that “Sweet Little Sixteen” wasn’t a big hit, when of course it made number two on the charts.    Resources There is no Mixcloud this week, because there were too many Beach Boys songs in the episode. I used many resources for this episode, most of which will be used in future Beach Boys episodes too. It’s difficult to enumerate everything here, because I have been an active member of the Beach Boys fan community for twenty-four years, and have at times just used my accumulated knowledge for this. But the resources I list here are ones I’ve checked for specific things. Becoming the Beach Boys by James B. Murphy is an in-depth look at the group’s early years, up to the end of 1963. Stephen McParland has published many, many books on the California surf and hot-rod music scenes, including several on both the Beach Boys and Gary Usher.  His books can be found at https://payhip.com/CMusicBooks Andrew Doe’s Bellagio 10452 site is an invaluable resource. Jon Stebbins’ The Beach Boys FAQ is a good balance between accuracy and readability. Stebbins also co-wrote The Lost Beach Boy, David Marks’ autobiography. And Philip Lambert’s Inside the Music of Brian Wilson is an excellent, though sadly out of print, musicological analysis of Wilson’s music from 1962 through 67. The Beach Boys’ Morgan recordings and all the outtakes from them can be found on this 2-CD set. As a good starting point for the Beach Boys’ music, I would recommend this budget-priced three-CD set, which has a surprisingly good selection of their material on it. Transcript Today, we’re going to take our second look at the Beach Boys, and we’re going to look at their evolution through 1963 and 1964, as they responded to the threat from the Beatles by turning to ever more sophisticated music, even as they went through a variety of personal crises. We’re going to look at a period in which they released four albums a year, had three lineup changes, and saw their first number one – and at a song which, despite being a B-side, regularly makes lists of the best singles of all time. We’re going to look at “Don’t Worry Baby”: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “Don’t Worry Baby”] When we left the Beach Boys, they had just secured a contract with Capitol Records, and released their first national hit, “Surfin’ Safari” backed with “409”. Since then we’ve also seen Brian Wilson working with several songwriting collaborators to write hits for Jan and Dean. But now we need to double back and look at what Brian was doing with his main band in that time.  After “Surfin’ Safari” was a hit, in one of the many incomprehensible decisions made in the Beach Boys’ career, Capitol decided to follow it up with an album track that Brian and Gary Usher had written, “Ten Little Indians”. That track, a surf-rock version of the nursery rhyme with the group chanting “Kemo sabe” in the backing vocals, made only number forty-nine on the charts, and frankly didn’t deserve to do even that well. Some have suggested, in fact that the record was released at the instigation of Murry Wilson, who was both Brian, Carl, and Dennis Wilson’s father and the group’s manager, as a way of weakening Usher’s influence with the group, as Murry didn’t want outsiders interfering in what he saw as a family business.  After realising the folly of deviating from the formula, the group’s next single followed the same pattern as their first hit. The B-side was “Shut Down”, a car song co-written by Brian and Roger Christian, who you may remember from the episode on “Surf City” as having been brought in to help Brian with car lyrics. “Shut Down” is most notable for being one of the very small number of Beach Boys records to feature an instrumental contribution from Mike Love, the group’s lead singer. His two-note saxophone solo comes in for some mockery from the group’s fans, but actually fits the record extremely well: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “Shut Down”]  “Shut Down” was a top thirty hit, but it was the A-side that was the really big hit. Just as their first hit had had a surf song on the A-side and a car song on the B-side, so did this single. Brian Wilson had been inspired by Chuck Berry’s “Sweet Little Sixteen”, and in particular the opening verse, which had just listed a lot of places: [Excerpt: Chuck Berry, “Sweet Little Sixteen”] He might well also have been thinking of Chubby Checker’s minor hit, “Twistin’ USA”, which listed places in America where people might be twisting: [Excerpt: Chubby Checker, “Twistin’ USA”] Brian had taken Berry’s melody and the place-name recitation, and with the help of his girlfriend’s brother, and some input from Mike Love, had turned it into a song listing all the places that people could be surfing — at least, they could “if everybody had an ocean”: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “Surfin’ USA”] “Surfin’ USA” became a huge hit, reaching number two on the charts, and later being named by Billboard as the biggest hit of 1963, but unfortunately for Brian that didn’t result in a financial windfall for him as the songwriter. As the song was so close to “Sweet Little Sixteen”, Chuck Berry got the sole songwriting credit — one of the only times in rock music history where a white artist has ripped off a Black one and the Black artist has actually benefited from it. And Berry definitely did benefit — “Sweet Little Sixteen”, while a great record, had never been a particularly big hit, while “Surfin’ USA” is to this day regularly heard on oldies radio and used in commercials and films. But that success meant extra work, and a lot of it. “Surfin’ USA” was the title song of the group’s second album, released in March 1963 only four months after their first, and they would release two more albums before the end of the year — Surfer Girl in September and Little Deuce Coupe in October. Not only were they having to churn out a quite staggering amount of product — though Little Deuce Coupe featured four songs recycled from their earlier albums — but Brian Wilson, as well as writing or co-writing all their original material, started producing the records as well, as he was unhappy with Nik Venet’s production on the first album. Not only that, but as well as making the Beach Boys’ records, Wilson was also writing for Jan and Dean, and he had also started making records on the side with Gary Usher, doing things like making a “Loco-Motion” knock-off, “The Revolution”, released under the name Rachel and the Revolvers: [Excerpt: Rachel and the Revolvers, “The Revolution”] According to some sources, Usher and Wilson found the singer for that track by the simple expedient of driving to Watts and asking the first Black teenage girl they saw if she could sing. Other sources say they hired a professional session singer — some say it was Betty Everett, but given that that’s the name of a famous singer from the period who lived in the Mid-West, I think people are confusing her for Betty Willis, another singer who gets named as a possibility, who lived in LA and who certainly sounds like the same person: [Excerpt: Betty Willis, “Act Naturally”] Wilson was also in the process of breaking up with his girlfriend and starting a relationship with a young woman named Marilyn Rovell. Rovell, along with her sister Diane, and their cousin, Ginger Blake, had formed a girl group, and Brian was writing and producing records for them as well: [Excerpt: The Honeys, “The One You Can’t Have”] As well as making all these records, the Beach Boys were touring intensively, to the point that on one day in June the group were actually booked in for four shows in the same day.  Unsurprisingly, Brian decided that this was too much for one person, and so in April 1963, just after the release of “Surfin’ USA”, he decided to quit touring with the group. Luckily, there was a replacement on hand. Alan Jardine had been a member of the Beach Boys on their very first single, but had decided to quit the group to go off to university. A year later, that seemed like a bad decision, and when Brian called him up and asked him to rejoin the band, he eagerly agreed. For now, Alan was not going to be a proper member of the group, but he would substitute for Brian on the group’s tour of the Midwest that Spring, and on many of the shows they performed over the summer — he could play the bass, which was the instrument that Brian played on stage, and he could sing Brian’s parts, and so while the Beach Boys still officially consisted of Brian, Carl, and Dennis Wilson, Mike Love, and David Marks, the group that was on tour was Carl, Dennis, Mike, David, and Alan, though Brian would sometimes appear for important shows. Jardine also started recording with the group, though he would not get credited on the covers of the first couple of albums on which he appeared. This made a huge change to the sound of the Beach Boys in the studio, as Jardine playing bass allowed Brian Wilson to play keyboards, while Jardine also added to the group’s vocal harmonies. And this was a major change. Up to this point, the Beach Boys’ records had had only rudimentary harmonies. While Brian was an excellent falsetto singer, and Mike a very good bass, the other three members of the group were less accomplished. Carl would grow to be one of the great vocalists of all time, but at this point was still in his early teens and had a thin voice. Dennis’ voice was also a little thin at this point, and he was behind the drum kit, which meant he didn’t get to sing live, and David Marks was apparently not allowed to sing on the records at all, other than taking a single joint lead with Carl on the first album. With the addition of Jardine, Brian now had another singer as strong as himself and Love, and the Surfer Girl album, the first one on which Jardine appears, sees Brian expanding from the rather rudimentary vocal arrangements of the first two albums to something that incorporates a lot more of the influence of the Four Freshmen. You can hear this most startlingly on “In My Room”. This is one of the first songs on which Jardine took part in the studio, though he’s actually not very audible in the vocal arrangement, which instead concentrates on the three brothers. “In My Room” is a major, major, step forward in the group’s sound, in the themes that would appear in their songwriting for the next few years, and in the juxtaposition of the lyrical theme and the musical arrangement.  The song’s lyrics, written by Gary Usher but inspired by Wilson’s experiences, are about solitude, and the song starts out with Brian singing alone, but then Brian moves up to the third note of the scale and Carl comes in under him, singing the note Brian started on. Then they both move up again, Brian to the fifth and Carl to the third, with Dennis joining in on the note that Brian had started on, before Mike and Alan finally also join in. Brian is singing about being alone, but he has his family with him, supporting him:  [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “In My Room”] This new lineup of the group, with Alan augmenting the other five, might even have lasted, except for a chain of events that started on David Marks’ fifteenth birthday. Murry Wilson, who was still managing the group at this point, had never liked the idea of someone from outside the family being an equal member, and was particularly annoyed at David because Murry had tried to have an affair with David’s mother, which hadn’t worked out well for him.  But then on Marks’ fifteenth birthday, he and Dennis Wilson both caught a sexually transmitted infection from the same sex worker, and when Murry Wilson found this out — as he had to, as he needed to pay their doctor’s bills — he became furious and started screaming at the whole group.  At that point, David had had enough. His mother had been telling him that he was the real talent in the group and he didn’t need those Wilsons, and as a fifteen-year-old kid he didn’t have the understanding to realise that this might not be entirely true. He said “OK, I quit”. At first, the rest of the group thought that he was joking, and even he wasn’t at all sure that he wanted to leave the group altogether. He remained in the band for the next month, but Murry Wilson kept reminding his sons that Marks had quit and that they’d all heard him, and refused to speak directly to him — anything that Murry wanted to say to David, he said to Carl, who passed the message on.  And even though the rest of the group definitely wanted David to stay — especially Brian, who liked having the freedom not to go out on tour, and Carl, who had been the one who’d lobbied to bring his friend into the group in the first place — David was still, as the youngest member, the only one who didn’t sing, and the only one not part of the family, regarded by the others as somewhat lesser than the rest of the band.  David became increasingly frustrated, especially when they were recording the Little Deuce Coupe album. That album was made up entirely of songs about cars, and the group were so short of material that the album ended up being filled out with four songs from earlier albums, including two from the Surfer Girl album released only the previous month. Yet when David tried to persuade Brian to have the group record his song “Kustom Kar Show”, Brian told David that he wasn’t ready to be writing songs for the group.  All this, plus pressure from David’s parents to make him more of a focal point of the group, led to his resignation eventually being accepted, and backdated to the original date he quit. He played his last show with the group on October the fifth 1963, and then formed his own band, the Marksmen, who signed to A&M:  [Excerpt: Dave and the Marksmen, “Kustom Kar Show”] There have been rumours that Murry Wilson threatened DJs that the Beach Boys wouldn’t co-operate with them if they played Marksmen records, but in truth, listening to the records the Marksmen made during their two years of existence, it’s quite obvious why they weren’t played — they were fairly shoddy-sounding garage rock records, with little to commend them. Indeed, they actually sound somewhat better now than they would have done at the time — some of Marks’ flatter and more affectless vocals prefigure the sound of some punk singers, but not in a way that would have had any commercial potential in 1963. Meanwhile, the Beach Boys continued, with Alan Jardine buying a Stratocaster and switching to rhythm guitar, and Brian Wilson resigning himself to having to perform live, at least at the moment, and returning to his old role on the bass. Jardine was now, for publicity purposes, a full member of the group, though he would remain on a salary rather than an equal partner for many years — Murry Wilson didn’t want to make the same mistake with him that he had with Marks. And there was still the constant need for new material, which didn’t let up. Brian’s songwriting was progressing at a furious pace, and that can be seen nowhere better than on “The Warmth of the Sun”, a song he wrote, with Love writing the lyrics, around the time of the Kennedy assassination — the two men have differed over the years over whether it was written the night before or the night after the assassination. “The Warmth of the Sun” is quite staggeringly harmonically sophisticated. We’ve talked before in this podcast about the standard doo-wop progression — the one, minor sixth, minor second, fifth progression that you get in about a million songs: [demonstrates] “The Warmth of the Sun” starts out that way — its first two chords are C, Am, played in the standard arpeggiated way one expects from that kind of song: [demonstrates] You’d expect from that  that the song would go C, Am, Dm, G or C, Am, F, G. But instead of moving to Dm or F, as one normally would, the song moves to E flat, and *starts the progression over*, a minor third up, so you have: [demonstrates] It then stops that progression after two bars, moves back to the Dm one would expect from the original progression, and stays there for twice as long as normal, before moving on to the normal G — and then throwing in a G augmented at the end, which is a normal G chord but with the D note raised to E flat, so it ties in to that original unexpected chord change. And it does all this *in the opening line of the song*: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “The Warmth of the Sun”] This is harmonic sophistication on a totally different order from anything else that was being done in teen pop music at the time — it was far closer to the modern jazz harmonies of the Four Freshmen that Brian loved than to doo-wop. The new five-piece lineup of the group recorded that on January the first, 1964, and on the same day they recorded a song that combined two of Brian’s other big influences. “Fun Fun Fun” had lyrics by Mike Love — some of his wittiest — and starts out with an intro taken straight from “Johnny B. Goode”: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “Fun Fun Fun”] But while the rest of the track keeps the same feel as the Chuck Berry song, the verse goes in a different harmonic direction, and actually owes a lot to “Da Doo Ron Ron”. Instead of using a blues progression, as Berry normally would, the verse uses the same I-IV-I-V progression that “Da Doo Ron Ron”‘s chorus does, but uses it to very different effect: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “Fun Fun Fun”] That became the group’s fourth top ten hit, and made number five on the charts — but the group suddenly had some real competition. At numbers one, two, and three were the Beatles. Brian Wilson realised that he needed to up his game if he was going to compete, and he did. In April 1964 he started working on a new single. By this time, while the Beach Boys themselves were still playing most of the instruments, Brian was bringing in additional musicians to augment them, and expanding his instrumental palette. The basic track was the core members of the band — Carl playing both lead and rhythm guitar, Alan playing bass, and Dennis playing drums, with Brian on keyboards — but there were two further bass players, Glen Campbell and Ray Pohlman, thickening the sound on six-string bass, plus two saxophones, and Hal Blaine adding percussion.  And the main instrument providing chordal support wasn’t guitar or organ, as it usually had been, but a harpsichord, an instrument Brian would use a lot over the next few years: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “I Get Around (backing track)”] The recording session for that backing track was also another breaking point for the band. Murry Wilson, himself a frustrated songwriter and producer, was at the session and kept insisting that there was a problem with the bassline. Eventually, Brian had enough of his father’s interference, and fired him as the band’s manager. Murry would continue to keep trying to interfere in his children’s career, but this was the point at which the Beach Boys finally took control over their own futures. A few days later, they reconvened in the studio to record the vocals for what would become their first number one hit: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “I Get Around”] It’s fascinating to see that even this early in the group’s career, and on one of their biggest, summeriest hits, there’s already a tension in the lyrics, a sense of wanting to move on — “I’m getting bugged driving up and down the same old strip/I’ve got to find a new place where the kids are hip”. The lyrics are Love’s, but as is so often the case with Brian Wilson’s collaborations, Love seems to have been expressing something that Wilson was feeling at the time. The Beach Boys had risen to the challenge from the Beatles, in a way that few other American musicians could, and “I Get Around” was good enough that it made the top ten in the UK, and became a particular favourite in the Mod subculture in London. The group would only become more popular over the next few years in the UK, a new place where the kids were hip. “I Get Around” is a worthy classic, but the B-side, “Don’t Worry Baby”, is if anything even better. It had been recorded in January, and had already been released on their Shut Down vol 2 album in March. It had originally been intended for the Ronettes, and was inspired by “Be My Baby”, which had astonished Brian Wilson when it had been released a few months earlier. He would later recall having to pull over to the side of the road when he first heard the drum intro to that record: [Excerpt: The Ronettes, “Be My Baby”] Brian would play that record over and over, on repeat, for days at a time, and would try to absorb every nuance of the record and its production, and he tried to come up with something that could follow it. Wilson took the basic rhythm and chord sequence of the song, plus melodic fragments like the line “Be my little baby”, and reworked them into a song that clearly owes a lot to its inspiration, but which stands on its own: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “Don’t Worry Baby”] Phil Spector turned the song down, and so the Beach Boys recorded it themselves, and I have to say that this was only a good thing — Ronnie Spector recorded a solo version of it many decades later, and it’s a fine performance, but the lyric misses something when it’s sung by a woman rather than a man. That lyric was by Roger Christian, and in it we see the tension between the more emotional themes that Wilson wanted to explore and the surf and car lyrics that had made up the majority of their singles to this point. The lyric is ostensibly about a car race, and indeed it seems to be setting up precisely the kind of situation that was common in teen tragedy records of the period. The protagonist sings “I guess I should have kept my mouth shut when I started to brag about my car,  but I can’t back down now because I pushed the other guys too far”, and the whole lyric is focused on his terror of an upcoming race.  This seems intended to lead to the kind of situation that we see in “Dead Man’s Curve”, or “Tell Laura I Love Her”, or in another teen tragedy song we’ll be looking at in a couple of weeks, with the protagonist dead in a car crash. But instead, this is short-circuited. The protagonist’s fears are allayed by his girlfriend: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “Don’t Worry Baby”] What we have here is someone trying to deal with a particular kind of anxiety brought about by what we now refer to as toxic masculinity. The protagonist has been showing off about his driving skills in front of his peers, and has now found himself in a situation that he can’t cope with. He’s saved by a figure we’ll see a lot more of in Brian’s songs, whoever the lyricist, the supernaturally good woman who understands the protagonist and loves him despite, or because of, his faults, even though she’s too good for him. Obviously, one can point to all sorts of reasons why this figure might be considered problematic — the idea that the man is unable to deal with his own emotional problems without a woman fixing him — but there’s an emotional truth to it that one doesn’t get in much music of the era, and even if it’s a somewhat flawed view of gender relations, it speaks to a very particular kind of insecurity at the inability to live up to traditional masculine roles, and is all the more affecting when it’s paired with the braggadocio of the A-side. The combination means we see the bragging and posturing on the A-side as just a facade, covering over the real emotional fragility of the narrator. Each side reinforces the other, and the combination is one of the most perfect pairings ever released as a single. “Don’t Worry Baby”, released as “I Get Around”’s B-side, made the charts in its own right peaking at number twenty-four. The B-side to the next single further elaborated on the themes of “Don’t Worry Baby”: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, “She Knows Me Too Well”] This repurposing of the emotional and musical style of girl-group songs to deal with the emotional vulnerability that comes from acknowledging and attempting to process toxic masculinity is something that few other songwriters were capable of at this point – only some of John Lennon’s work a couple of years later comes close to dealing with this very real area of the emotional landscape, and Lennon, like Wilson, often does so by using the figure of the perfect woman who will save the protagonist. In 1964, the group once again released four albums – Shut Down vol.2, All Summer Long, a live album, and a Christmas album – and they also did most of the work on yet another album, The Beach Boys Today!, which would be released in early 1965. As these recordings progressed, Brian Wilson was more and more ambitious, both in terms of the emotional effect of the music and his arrangements, increasingly using session musicians to augment the group, and trying for a variant on Phil Spector’s production style, but one which emphasised gentle fragility rather than sturm und drang. Possibly the greatest track he created in 1964 ended up not being used by the Beach Boys, though, but was given to Glen Campbell: [Excerpt: Glen Campbell, “Guess I’m Dumb”] Campbell got given that track because of an enormous favour he’d done the group. The mental strain of touring had finally got too much for Brian, and in December, on a plane to Texas, he’d had a breakdown, screaming on the plane and refusing to get off. Eventually, they coaxed him off the plane, and he’d managed to get through that night’s show, but had flown back to LA straight after. Campbell, who was a session guitarist who had played on a number of the Beach Boys’ recordings, and had a minor career as a singer at this point, had flown out at almost no notice and for the next five months he replaced Brian on stage for most of their shows, before the group got a permanent replacement in. Brian Wilson had retired from the road, and the hope was that by doing so, he would reduce the strain on himself enough that he could keep writing and producing for the group without making his mental health worse. And for a while, at least, that seemed to be how it worked out. We’ll take a look at the results in a few weeks’ time.