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American actor, film director and activist

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Marlon Brando

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Best podcasts about Marlon Brando

Latest podcast episodes about Marlon Brando

Your Brain on Facts
This Land is Our Land (ep 173)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:51


In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, and it's been downhill for New World peoples ever since.  Today we look at residential schools, the occupation of Alcatraz by Indians of All Tribes, the Oka crisis (aka the Mohawk resistance), and Sacheen Littlefeather's Oscar speech. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website. Late summer, 1990.  The protest had been going on for two months; tensions were escalating.  Soldiers had been dispatched to enforce the government's will, but the Kahnawake Mohawk weren't going to give up another inch of their land.  14 year old Waneek and her 4 year old sister Kaniehtiio were there with their activist mother when the violence started.  Waneek tried to get little Tio to safety when she saw a soldier who had taken her school books from her weeks prior...and he stabbed her in the chest.  My name's...   One of my goals with this podcast is to tell the stories that don't get told, the stories of people of color and women.  It's not always easy.  Pick a topic to research and it's white men all the way down.  But, even when I haven't been struggling with my chronic idiopathic pulmonary conditions, as I've been for the past three acute months, I've dropped the ball.  Mea culpa.  So let me try to catch up a little bit here as we close out November and Native American Heritage month.  And since the lungs are still playing up a bit, I'm tagging past Moxie in to help, though I've done with I can to polish her audio, even though I lost more than 100 episodes worth of work files when I changed computers and deleted the hard drive on my right rather than the hard drive on my left.     Today's episode isn't going to be a knee-slapping snark fest, but the severity of the stories is the precise reason we need to tell them, especially the ones that happened relatively recently but are treated like a vague paragraph in an elementary school textbook.  Come with me now, to the 1960's and the edge of California, to a rocky island in San Francisco bay.  Yes, that one, Alcatraz, the Rock.     After the American Indian Center in San Francisco was destroyed in a fire in October 1969, an activist group called “Indians of All Tribes” turned its attention to Alcatraz island and the prison which had closed six years earlier.  I'm going to abbreviate Indians of All Tribes to IAT, rather than shorten it to Indians, just so you know.  A small party, led by Mohawk college student Richard Oakes, went out to the island on Nov 9, but were only there one night before the authorities removed them.  That didn't disappoint Oakes, who told the SF Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   11 days later, a much larger group of Indians of All Tribes members, a veritable occupation force of 89 men, women and children, sailed to the island in the dead of night and claimed Alcatraz for all North America natives.  Despite warnings from authorities, the IAT set up house in the old guards' quarters and began liberally, vibrantly redecorating, spray-painting the forboding gray walls with flowers and slogans like “Red Power” and “Custer Had It Coming.”  The water tower read “Peace and Freedom. Welcome. Home of the Free Indian Land.”  And of course I put pictures of that in the Vodacast app.  Have you checked it out?  I'm still getting the hang of it...  The IAT not only had a plan, they had a manifesto, addressed to “The Great White Father and All His People,” in which they declared their intentions to use the island for a school, cultural center and museum.  Alcatraz was theirs, they claimed, “by right of discovery,” though the manifesto did offer to buy the island for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”—the price supposedly paid for the island of Manhattan.     Rather than risk a PR fall-out, the Nixon administration opted to leave the occupiers alone as long as things remained peaceful and just kinda wait the situation out.  The island didn't even have potable water; how long could the IAT stay there?  Jokes on you, politicians of 50 years ago, because many of the occupiers lived in conditions as bad on reservations.  They'd unknowingly been training for this their entire lives.  Native American college students and activists veritably swarmed the island and the population ballooned to more than 600 people, twice the official capacity of the prison.  They formed a governing body and set up school for the kids, a communal kitchen, clinic, and a security detail called “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs.”  Other activists helped move people and supplies to the island and supportive well-wishers send money, clothes and canned food.    Government officials would travel to the island repeatedly to try, and fail, to negotiate.  The IAT would settle for nothing less than the deed to Alcatraz Island, and the government maintained such a property transfer would be impossible.  The occupation was going better than anyone expected, at least for the first few months.  Then, many of the initial wave of residents had to go back to college and their places were taken by people more interested in no rent and free food than in any cause.  Drugs and alcohol, which were banned, were soon prevalent.  Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz after his stepdaughter died in a fall, and things began to unravel even more quickly.  By May, the sixth month of the occupation, the government dispensed with diplomatic efforts and cut all remaining power to Alcatraz.  Only a few weeks later, a fire tore across the island and destroyed several of Alcatraz's historic buildings.  Federal marshals removed the last occupiers in June of the second year, an impressive 19 months after they first arrived, six men, five women and four children.  This time, when laws were passed after an act of rebellion, they were *for the rebels, which many states enacting laws for tribal self rule.  When Alcatraz opened as a national park in 1973, not only had the graffiti from the occupation not been removed, it was preserved as part of the island's history.   People gather at Alcatraz every November for an “Un-Thanksgiving Day” celebrating Native culture and activism. RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL   The American government took tens of thousands of children from Native families and placed them in boarding schools with strict assimilation practices.  Their philosophy - kill the Indian to save the man.  That was the mindset under which the U.S. government Native children to attend boarding schools, beginning in the late 19th century, when the government was still fighting “Indian wars.”   There had been day and boarding schools on reservations prior to 1870, when U.S. cavalry captain, Richard Henry Pratt established the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania.  This school was not on a reservation, so as to further remove indigenous influences.  The Carlisle school and other boarding schools were part of a long history of U.S. attempts to either kill, remove, or assimilate Native Americans.  “As white population grew in the United States and people settled further west towards the Mississippi in the late 1800s, there was increasing pressure on the recently removed groups to give up some of their new land,” according to the Minnesota Historical Society. Since there was no more Western territory to push them towards, the U.S. decided to remove Native Americans by assimilating them. In 1885, Commissioner of Indian Affairs Hiram Price explained the logic: “it is cheaper to give them education than to fight them.”   Off-reservation schools began their assault on Native cultural identity as soon as students arrived, by first doing away with all outward signs of tribal life that the children brought with them.  The long braids worn by boys were cut off.  Native clothes were replaced with uniforms.  The children were given new Anglicized names, including new surnames.  Traditional Native foods were abandoned, as were things like sharing from communal dishes,  forcing students to use the table manners of white society, complete with silverware, napkins and tablecloths.  The strictest prohibition arguably fell on their native languages.  Students were forbidden to speak their tribal language, even to each other.  Some school rewarded children who spoke only English, but most schools chose the stick over the carrot and relied on punishment to achieve this aim.  This is especially cruel when you consider that many of the words the children were being forced to learn and use had no equivalent in their mother tongue.   The Indian boarding schools taught history with a definite white bias.  Columbus Day was heralded as a banner day in history and a beneficial event for Native people, as it was only after discovery did Native Americans become part of history.  Thanksgiving was a holiday to celebrate “good” Indians having aided the brave Pilgrim Fathers.  On Memorial Day, some students at off-reservation schools were made to decorate the graves of soldiers sent to kill their fathers.   Half of each school day was spent on industrial training. Girls learned to cook, clean, sew, care for poultry and do laundry for the entire institution.  Boys learned industrial skills such as blacksmithing, shoemaking or performed manual labor such as farming.  Not receiving much funding from the government, the schools were required to be as self-sufficient as possible, so students did the majority of the work.  By 1900, school curriculums tilted even further toward industrial training while academics were neglected.   The Carlisle school developed a “placing out system,” which put Native students in the mainstream community for summer or a year at a time, with the official goal of exposing them to more job skills.  A number of these programs were out-right exploitive.  At the Phoenix Indian School, girls became the major source of domestic labor for white families in the area, while boys were placed in seasonal harvest or other jobs that no one else wanted.   Conversion to Christianity was also deemed essential to the cause.  Curriculums included heavy emphasis of religious instruction, such as the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes and Psalms.  Sunday school meant lectures on sin and guilt.  Christianity governed gender relations at the schools and most schools invested their energy in keeping the sexes apart, in some cases endangering the lives of the students by locking girls in their dormitories at night.     Discipline within the Indian boarding schools was severe and generally consisted of confinement, corporal punishment, or restriction of food.  In addition to coping with the severe discipline, students were ravaged by disease exacerbated by crowded conditions at the boarding schools. Tuberculosis, influenza, and trachoma (“sore eyes”) were the greatest threats.  In December of 1899, measles broke out at the Phoenix Indian School, reaching epidemic proportions by January.  In its wake, 325 cases of measles, 60 cases of pneumonia, and 9 deaths were recorded in a 10-day period.  During Carlisle's operation, from 1879 and 1918, nearly 200 children died and were buried near the school.   Naturally, Indian people resisted the schools in various ways. Sometimes entire villages refused to enroll their children in white schools.  Native parents also banded together to withdraw their children en masse, encouraging runaways, and undermining the schools' influence during summer break.  In some cases, police were sent onto the reservations to seize children from their parents.  The police would continue to take children until the school was filled, so sometimes orphans were offered up or families would negotiate a family quota. Navajo police officers would take children assumed to be less intelligent, those not well cared for, or those physically impaired.  This was their attempt to protect the long-term survival of their tribe by keeping healthy, intelligent children at home.     It was not until 1978, within the lifetime of many of my gentle listeners. that the passing of the Indian Child Welfare Act that Native American parents gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.   Though the schools left a devastating legacy, they failed to eradicate Native American cultures as they'd hoped. Later, the Navajo Code Talkers who helped the U.S. win World War II would reflect on the strange irony this forced assimilation had played in their lives.  “As adults, [the Code Talkers] found it puzzling that the same government that had tried to take away their languages in schools later gave them a critical role speaking their languages in military service,” recounts the National Museum of the American Indian.   In addition to documentaries, I'd like to recommend the movie The Education of Little Tree, starring James Cromwell, Tantu Cardinal and Graham Green, about a part-Charokee boy who goes to live with his grandparents in the Tennessee mountains, but is then sent to an Indian school.   There are a number of off-reservation boarding schools in operation today.  Life in the schools is still quite strict, but now includes teaching Native culture and language rather than erasing it.  Though they cannot be separated from their legacy of oppression and cultural violence, for many modern children, they're a step to a better life.  Poverty is endemic to many reservations, which also see much higher than average rates of alcoholism, drug use, and suicide.    For the students, these schools are a chance to escape.   OKA   Some words are visceral reminders of collective historic trauma. “Selma” or “Kent State” recall the civil rights movement and the use of military force against U.S. citizens. “Bloody Sunday” evokes “the Troubles” of Northern Ireland. Within Indigenous communities in North America, the word is “Oka.”  That word reminds us of the overwhelming Canadian response to a small demonstration in a dispute over Mohawk land in Quebec, Canada, in 1990. Over the course of three months, the Canadian government sent 2,000 police and 4,500 soldiers (an entire brigade), backed by armored vehicles, helicopters, jet fighters and even the Navy, to subdue several small Mohawk communities.  What was at stake?  What was worth all this to the government?  A golf course and some condos.   The Kanesetake had been fighting for their land for centuries, trying to do it in accordance with the white man's laws, as far back as appeals to the British government in 1761. In 1851, the governor general of Canada refused to recognize their right to their land.  8 years later, the land was given to the Sulpicians, a Catholic diocese.  In 1868, the government of the nascent Dominion of Canada denied that the Mohawk's original land grant had even reserved land for them, so it wasn't covered under the Indian Act. In the 1910's, the he Mohawks of Kanesatake's appealed all the way to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, Canada's highest appeals court at the time, who ruled that official title to the land was held by the Sulpicians.  By the end of the Second World War, the Sulpicians had sold all of their remaining land and had left the area. Surely the Mohawk could have their land back now!  Nope.  The Mohawk of Kanesatake were now confined to about 2.3mi sq/6 km sq, known as The Pines, less than 1/10th of the land they once held.  The Mohawk people of Kahnawake, Kanesetake and Akwesasne asserted Aboriginal title to their ancestral lands in 1975, but their claim was rejected on the most BS possible reason -- that they had not held the land continuously from time immemorial.  And on and on.   So you can understand why they'd be a little miffed when plans were announced to expand a golf course that had been built in 1961, expanding onto land that was used for sacred and ceremonial purposes and included a graveyard.  Again, the Mohawk tried to use the proper legal channels and again they got royally fucked over.  That March, their protests and petitions were ignored by the City Council in Oka.  They had to do something the city couldn't ignore.  They began a blockade of a small dirt road in The Pines and they maintained it for a few months.  The township of Oka tried to get a court injunction to order its removal.  On July 11, 1990, the Quebec provincial police sent in a large heavily armed force of tactical officers armed with m16s and tear gas and such-like to dismantle this blockade.  The Mohawks met this show of force with a show of their own.  Behind the peaceful protestors, warriors stood armed and ready.     Let me try to give this story some of the air time it deserves.  April 1, 1989, 300 Kanesatake Mohawks marched through Oka to protest against Mayor Jean Ouellette's plan to expand the town's golf course.  On March 10, 1990, --hey, that's my birthday!  the day, not the year-- After Oka's municipal council voted to proceed with the golf course expansion project, a small group of Mohawks barricades the access road.  With a building.  They drug a fishing shack into the Pines and topped it with a banner that read “Are you aware that this is Mohawk territory?” and the same again in French, because Quebec.  There's a picture on the Vodacast app, naturally, as well as a photo called Face to Face is a photograph of Canadian Pte. Patrick Cloutier and Anishinaabe warrior Brad Larocque staring each other down during the Oka Crisis. It was taken on September 1, 1990 by Shaney Komulainen, and has become one of Canada's most famous images.  It really should be more famous outside of Canada, like the lone protestor blocking tanks in Tiananmen Square or 1968 Summer Olympics, Tommie Smith and John Carlos staged a protest and displayed a symbol of Black power during their medal ceremony.  Check it out on Vodacast and let me know if you agree, soc. med.   during the summer of 1990 the Mohawk warrior society engaged in the 78 day armed standoff with the s.q Provincial Police and the Canadian Armed Forces in order to protect an area of their territory from development known as the pines near the town of oka.   This area was used as a tribal cemetery along with other tribal activities important to the Mohawks.  The oka crisis or also known as the Mohawk resistance was a defensive action that gained international attention,  taken by Mohawks of the Kanna Satake reserve along with other Mohawks from the nearby communities of Kanna waka as well as the Aquosasne on a reservation on the American side of the u.s. Canadian colonial border.  It was one of the most recent examples of Native armed resistance that was successful in stopping construction and development on to tribal lands.  So what was being developed that led to this armed confrontation leading to the death of an sq SWAT officer during that hot summer?  Golf.  The town of oka and investors wanted to expand a nine-hole golf course at the Open Golf Club into an 18-hole course as well as build around 60 condominiums into Mohawk territory.  Since 1989 the Mohawks had been protesting these plans for development by the town of oka and investors of the Golf Course expansion.  Seeing that the local courts were not of any help in recognizing Mohawk claims of the land under development, Mohawk protesters and community members held marches rallies and signed petitions.   Eventually the Mohawks set up a barricade blocking access to the development site on a gravel road.  Later on it was occupied mainly by Mohawk women and children OCA's mayor jean wallet one of the nine hole golf course expanded and filed the injunction against the Mohawks. He went into hiding during the oka crisis. [sfx clip] I will occupy this land for what it takes he has to prove it to me that it's his and I will prove it to him that's mine.  Oak is mayor had stated the land in question actually belonged to the town of oka and did not back down from the issue, but instead filed an injunction one of many that had been issued prior to remove the Mohawks from the area and take down the barricades by force if necessary.  if I have to die for Mohawk territory I will but I ain't going alone are you armed no the Creator will provide in anticipation of the raid by the sq mohawks of knesset Aki sent out a distress call to surrounding communiti.  In the Mohawk warrior society from the Aquos austenite reservation and the American side of the Mohawk reserve as well as kana waka have begun filtering into the barricade area with camping gear communications equipment food and weapons.  It's difficult to pin down just who makes up the Warriors society. the leaders an organization you each depending on the circumstances.  the member roles are  treated like a military secret, which is fitting since many or most of the Warriors were veterans, with a particular persistance of Vietnam Marines.   why the Warriors exist is easier to answer   mohawk have closed off the Mercier bridge sparking a traffic nightmare.  Provincial police arrived at dawn secure position in case of Mohawk until 8:00 to clear out.  The natives stood their ground the battle for the barricade started just before nine o'clock on one side heavily armed provincial police bob tear gas and stun grenade power [sfx reporter] a 20-minute gun battle ensued dozens of rounds of ammunition were shot off and then the inevitable someone was hit a police officer took a bullet in the face which proved fatal that seems to turn the tide the police has been advancing until then turned tail and fled leaving six of their vehicles behind.  The Mohawk celebrated when the police left celebrated what they called a victory over the qpm.  Most of the Mohawks each shot that the raid had taken place they said they were angry - angry that a dispute over a small piece of land had ended in violence.  [sfx this clip but earlier] I mean the non-indians that initiated this project of a golf course and then and then trying to take the land away because it's Mohawk clan it's our land there's a little bit left they're sucking the marrow out of our bones.  [sfx this clip, little earlier] we've kept talking in and saying you know what kind of people are you there's children here and you're shooting tear gas at us we're not we're on armed and you're aiming your weapons at us what kind of people are you.     The police retreated, abandoning squad cars and a front-end loader, basically a bulldozer.  They use the loader to crash the vehicles and they push them down the road, creating two new barricades, blocking highway 344.  The Mohawk braced for a counterattack and vowed to fire back with three bullets for every bullet fired at them.  due to the inability of the SQ to deal with the heavily armed Mohawks   The Canadian government called in the Royal Canadian Armed Forces to deal with the Mohawks. As the army pushed further into the Mohawk stronghold there was a lot of tension with Mohawk warriors staring down soldiers getting in their faces taunting them challenging them to put down their weapons and engage in hand-to-hand combat.   this is how the remainder of the siege would play out between the Warriors and Army as there were thankfully no more gun battles. [Music] as the seige wore on and came to an end most of the remaining Warriors as well as some women and children took refuge in a residential treatment center.   instead of an orderly surrender as the army anticipated warriors simply walked out of the area where they were assaulted by waiting soldiers and the police.  50 people taken away from the warrior camp including 23 warriors, but that means right over half the people taken into custody were non-combatants.   by 9:30 that night the army began to pull out, at the end of their two and a half months seige  a number of warriors were later charged by the sq.  5 warriors were convicted of crimes included assault and theft although only one served jail time.  during the standoff the Canadian federal government purchased the pines in order to prevent further development, officially canceling the expansion of the golf course and condominiums.  Although the government bought additional parcels of land for connoisseur taka there has been no organized transfer of the land to the Mohawk people. investigations were held after the crisis was over and revealed problems with the way in which the SQ handled the situation which involved command failures and racism among sq members.   Ronald (Lasagna) Cross and another high-profile warrior, Gordon (Noriega) Lazore of Akwesasne, are arraigned in Saint-Jérôme the day after the last Mohawks ended their standoff. In all, about 150 Mohawks and 15 non-Mohawks were charged with various crimes. Most were granted bail, and most were acquitted. Cross and Lazore were held for nearly six months before being released on $50,000 bail. They were later convicted of assault and other charges. After a community meeting, it was the women who decided that they would walk out peacefully, ending the siege. With military helicopters flying low, spotlights glaring down and soldiers pointing guns at them, Horn-Miller carried her young sister alongside other women and children as they walked to what they thought was the safety of the media barricades.  They didn't make it far before violence broke out. People started running, soldiers tackled warriors, fights broke out and everyone scrambled to get to safety. Up until that point Horn-Miller said she was able to keep her older sister calm by singing a traditional song to her.   LITTLEFEATHER on the night of 27 March 1973. This was when she took the stage at the 45th Academy Awards to speak on behalf of Marlon Brando, who had been awarded best actor for his performance in The Godfather. It is still a striking scene to watch.  Amid the gaudy 70s evening wear, 26-year-old Littlefeather's tasselled buckskin dress, moccasins, long, straight black hair and handsome face set in an expression of almost sorrowful composure, make a jarring contrast.  Such a contrast, that is beggered belief.   Liv Ullman read the name of the winner and Roger Moore made to hand Littlefeather Brando's Oscar, but she held out a politely forbidding hand.  She explained that Brando would not accept the award because of “the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry.”  Some people in the audience applauded; a lot of them booed her, but she kept her calm.  Here, you can listen for yourself.  [sfx clip]  At the time, Wounded Knee, in South Dakota, was the site of a month-long standoff between Native American activists and US authorities, sparked by the murder of a Lakota man.  We're used to this sort of thing now, but on the night, nobody knew what to make of a heartfelt plea in the middle of a night of movie industry mutual masturbation.  Was it art, a prank?  People said Littlefeather was a hired actress, that she was Mexican rather than Apache, or, because people suck on several levels at once, that she was a stripper.  How did this remarkable moment come to pass?   Littlefeather's life was no cake-walk.  Her father was Native American and her mother was white, but both struggled with mental health.  Littlefeather had to be removed from their care at age three, suffering from tuberculosis of the lungs that required her to be kept in an oxygen tent at the hospital.  She was raised by her maternal grandparents, but saw her parents regularly.  That may sound like a positive, but it exposed her to domestic violence.  She once tried to defend her mother from a beating by hitting her father with a broom.  He chased her out of the house and tried to run her down with his truck.  The young girl escaped into a grove of trees and spent the night up in the branches, crying herself to sleep. r   She did not fit in at the white, Catholic school her grandparents sent her to.  At age 12, she and her grandfather visited the historic Roman Catholic church Carmel Mission, where she was horrified to see the bones of a Native American person on display in the museum. “I said: ‘This is wrong. This is not an object; this is a human being.' So I went to the priest and I told him God would never approve of this, and he called me heretic. I had no idea what that was.”  An adolescence of depression and a struggle for identity followed.   Fortunately, in the late 1960s and early 70s Native Americans were beginning to reclaim their identities and reassert their rights.  After her father died, when she was 17, Littlefeather began visiting reservations and even visited Alcatraz during the Indians of all Tribes occupation.  She travelled around the country, learning traditions and dances, and meeting other what she called “urban Indian people” also reconnecting with your heritage.  “The old people who came from different reservations taught us young people how to be Indian again. It was wonderful.”  By her early 20s Littlefeather was head of the local affirmative action committee for Native Americans, studying representation in film, television and sports.  They successfully campaigned for Stanford University to remove their offensive “Indian” mascot, 50 years before pro sports teams like the Cleveland Indians got wise.  At the same time, white celebrities like Burt Lancaster began taking a public interest in Native American affairs.  Littlefeather lived near director Francis Ford Coppola, but she only knew him to say hello.  Nonetheless, after hearing Marlon Brando speaking about Native American rights, as she walked past Coppola's house to find him sitting on his porch, drinking ice tea.  She yelled up the walk, “Hey! You directed Marlon Brando in The Godfather” and she asked him for Brando's address so she could write him a letter.  It took some convincing, but Coppola gave up the address.   Then, nothing.  But months later, the phone rang at the radio station where Littlefeather worked.  He said: ‘I bet you don't know who this is.'  She said, “Sure I do.  It sure as hell took you long enough to call.”  They talked for about an hour, then called each other regularly.  Before long he was inviting her for the first of several visits and they became friends.  That was how Brando came to appoint her to carry his message to the Oscars, but it was hastily planned.  Half an hour before her speech, she had been at Brando's house on Mulholland Drive, waiting for him to finish typing an eight-page speech.  She arrived at the ceremony with Brando's assistant, just minutes before best actor was announced.  The producer of the awards show immediately informed her that she would be removed from the stage after 60 seconds.  “And then it all happened so fast when it was announced that he had won.  I had promised Marlon that I would not touch that statue if he won. And I had promised [the producer] that I would not go over 60 seconds. So there were two promises I had to keep.”  As a result, she had to improvise.   I don't have a lot of good things to say about Marlon Brando --he really could have had a place in the Mixed Bags of History chapter of the YBOF book; audiobook available most places now-- but he had Hollywood dead to rights on its Native Americans stereotypes and treatment, as savages and nameless canon fodder, often played by white people in red face.  This was a message not everyone was willing to hear.  John Wayne, who killed uncountable fictional Natives in his movies, was standing in the wings at that fateful moment, and had to be bodily restrained by security to stop him from charing Littlefeather.  For more on Wayne's views of people of color, google his 1971 Playboy interview.  Clint Eastwood, who presented the best picture Oscar, which also went to The Godfather, “I don't know if I should present this award on behalf of all the cowboys shot in all the John Ford westerns over the years.” In case you thought fussing out an empty chair was the worst we got from him.  When Littlefeather got backstage, people made stereotypical war cries and tomahawk motions at her.  After talking to the press --and I can't say I'm not surprised that event organizers didn't spirit her away immediately -- she went straight back to Brando's house where they sat together and watched the reactions to the event on television, the ‘compulsively refreshing your social media feed' of the 70's.   But Littlefeather is proud of the trail she blazed. She was the first woman of colour, and the first indigenous woman, to use the Academy Awards platform to make a political statement. “I didn't use my fist. I didn't use swear words. I didn't raise my voice. But I prayed that my ancestors would help me. I went up there like a warrior woman. I went up there with the grace and the beauty and the courage and the humility of my people. I spoke from my heart.”  Her speech drew international attention to Wounded Knee, where the US authorities had essentially imposed a media blackout.  Sachee Littlefeather went on to get a degree in holistic health and nutrition, became a health consultant to Native American communities across the country, worked with Mother Teresa caring for Aids patients in hospices, and led the San Francisco Kateri Circle, a Catholic group named after Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint, canonized in 2012.  Now she is one of the elders transmitting knowledge down generations, though sadly probably not for much longer.  She has breast cancer that metastasized to her lung.  “When I go to the spirit world, I'm going to take all these stories with me. But hopefully I can share some of these things while I'm here.  I'm going to the world of my ancestors. I'm saying goodbye to you … I've earned the right to be my true self.”   And that's...Rather than being taken to the hospital for the stab wound a centimeter from her heart, Waneek and the other protesters were taken into custody.  Thankfully, she would heal just fine and even went on to become an Olympic athlete and continued her activism.  And little Tio?  She grew up to be an award-winning actress, best known in our house for playing Tanis on Letterkenny.  Season 10 premier watch party at my house.  Remember….Thanks...       Sources: https://www.history.com/news/how-boarding-schools-tried-to-kill-the-indian-through-assimilation http://www.nativepartnership.org/site/PageServer?pagename=airc_hist_boardingschools https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17645287 https://hairstylecamp.com/native-american-beard/ https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jun/03/i-promised-brando-i-would-not-touch-his-oscar-secret-life-sacheen-littlefeather https://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/reflections-of-oka-stories-of-the-mohawk-standoff-25-years-later-1.3232368/sisters-recall-the-brutal-last-day-of-oka-crisis-1.3234550 https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/oka-crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArOIdwcj2w8 https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago  

western canada canadian playboy pr students california american music audible black indian god home world war ii freedom english oscars history french nope boys north america hollywood army city council british rock aids poverty san francisco peace girls land brainiac united states manhattan federal tennessee warriors government education drugs clint eastwood academy awards pennsylvania new world mississippi native americans native thanksgiving natives memorial day navajo alcatraz reach roger moore francis ford coppola hang jokes indians mexican soldiers aboriginal creator cross golf john wayne navy dominion quebec stanford university national museum pines columbus christianity catholic oak oca northern ireland bs olympic games brando south dakota apache godfather american indian psalms surely roman catholic bureau swat john ford marlon brando tio tribes john carlos naturally coppola troubles discipline mercier anishinaabe moxie carlisle summer olympics graham green judicial committee privy council mea mulholland drive conversion mother teresa columbus day cleveland indians beatitudes provincial lakota amid ten commandments storyid golf courses tanis tuberculosis mohawk burt lancaster wounded knee oka sq kanna letterkenny alcatraz island code talkers bloody sunday tiananmen square iat mohawks liv ullman american indian center james cromwell residential schools carlisle indian school commissioners aki little tree akwesasne oakes kent state canadian armed forces red power kahnawake oka crisis tommie smith sf chronicle saint j native american heritage pageserver anglicized indian act sacheen littlefeather pilgrim fathers minnesota historical society indian child welfare act curriculums navajo code talkers richard henry pratt kanesatake richard oakes
Roundhouse Roulette | A Walker, Texas Ranger Podcast
Michael Preece | Walker's Director

Roundhouse Roulette | A Walker, Texas Ranger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 77:47


We are excited to share our interview with legendary director, Michael Preece, who worked on 70 episodes of Walker, Texas Ranger! He got his start script supervising the likes of Brando, Wayne and McQueen only to jump in the director's chair and helm some of TV's biggest shows (Dallas, MacGyver & 7th Heaven). We talk about it all with a heavy dose of Chuck Norris!See complete episode stats (# of fights, explosions, vehicle chases, roundhouse kicks & more) at roundhouseroulette.com.Share your opinions with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter or by emailing us at roundhouseroulette@gmail.com.If you'd like to support the show, leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. To further support our shenanigans, check out our fresh Merch or our ever evolving Patreon mayhem. Most importantly, thanks for hanging with us!

The Opperman Report'
On Borrowed Fame: Money, Mysteries, and Corruption in the Entertainment World

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 81:49


This meticulously researched book explores the concept of fame in all its fleeting glory and confounding inconsistency. Why do so many entertainers do so much better financially than peers who have comparable resumes? Author Donald Jeffries also examines a subject he is quite familiar with; the myriad of unnatural deaths which have plagued the entertainment industry since the dawn of Hollywood. The deaths of John Lennon, Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, Natalie Wood, and many others are scrutinized in exacting detail. Jeffries communicated with many older entertainers during the course of researching the book, and their perspectives are included here. On Borrowed Fame will be of great interest to fans, celebrities, and anyone with even a cursory affinity for the world of show business.If you're anything like me, and have a hard time not looking at the car crash as you drive by: You will love this book. I'm dyslexic and have difficulty reading but found it even more difficult stopping. The book showed me how very lucky I've been, pursuing my passions; Acting, Class A Speedway Racing and Inventing.- Billy Gray, Father Knows Best, The Day the Earth Stood StillDonald Jeffries' On Borrowed Fame is indeed a revelatory and painful experience. It paints the big picture of the price of Fame in Hollywood. One that mercilessly illustrates through fact and story the real price paid by many of my colleagues and myself. Fame is not a blessing, it's a curse. This book is a witness to the carnage and horrible truth of the matter. Fame is not what it appears to be on the outside. Fame is a glamorous car wreck. Fame sucks. This is an important book that tells us all as fellow human beings that attention must be paid.I congratulate Mr. Jeffries for having had the courage to write it.- Nick Mancuso, Paris 2020“It's possible to be a musician in the biggest band imaginable, and within a few years be forced to work a regular job.” That ominous statement is echoed throughout Donald Jeffries' whirlwind of woe in the world of entertainment, On Borrowed Time. Those household name actors in your favourite TV shows you assumed were well paid and would surely always have a firm foothold in show business? Not so much it turns out, as stated here: “A regular on a television series is at least as likely to have their acting career end when their show does.” The arbitrary payment structures that seem to have been made up on the spot, the blatant rip offs and the sheer number of early and often suspicious Hollywood deaths that were rarely investigated would make anyone think twice about being an actor. What an eye opener this book is!- Graham Parker, singer-songwriterIf you've ever dreamed of being famous--and who hasn't--then Donald Jeffries offers a shocking literary vaccine--so you might avoid those pitfalls. Just maybe! “On Borrowed Fame,” his juicy and richly detailed fast moving dossier, catalogues the long and winding and perilous road trod by some of the most famous names in showbiz. Those talented celebs had one thing in common: They inevitably discovered that fame does not guarantee fortune-- but is often a prescription for bankruptcy and early death. I have reported on Hollywood for nearly half a century but can attest that Jeffries has entertainingly laid out the most detailed compendium of horror stories experienced by some of tinsel town's biggest names. No one is spared--from Stan Laurel to Marlon Brando to Michael Jackson. And so, so many more. His research is formidable. This is the most fascinating chronicle of show business malfeasance, mayhem and misery I have ever read. The Beatles sang “Can't Buy Me Love,” They should have added “happiness” as well!- Ivor Davis

The Opperman Report
On Borrowed Fame: Money, Mysteries, and Corruption in the Entertainment World

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 81:49


This meticulously researched book explores the concept of fame in all its fleeting glory and confounding inconsistency. Why do so many entertainers do so much better financially than peers who have comparable resumes? Author Donald Jeffries also examines a subject he is quite familiar with; the myriad of unnatural deaths which have plagued the entertainment industry since the dawn of Hollywood. The deaths of John Lennon, Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, Natalie Wood, and many others are scrutinized in exacting detail. Jeffries communicated with many older entertainers during the course of researching the book, and their perspectives are included here. On Borrowed Fame will be of great interest to fans, celebrities, and anyone with even a cursory affinity for the world of show business. If you're anything like me, and have a hard time not looking at the car crash as you drive by: You will love this book. I'm dyslexic and have difficulty reading but found it even more difficult stopping. The book showed me how very lucky I've been, pursuing my passions; Acting, Class A Speedway Racing and Inventing. - Billy Gray, Father Knows Best, The Day the Earth Stood Still Donald Jeffries' On Borrowed Fame is indeed a revelatory and painful experience. It paints the big picture of the price of Fame in Hollywood. One that mercilessly illustrates through fact and story the real price paid by many of my colleagues and myself. Fame is not a blessing, it's a curse. This book is a witness to the carnage and horrible truth of the matter. Fame is not what it appears to be on the outside. Fame is a glamorous car wreck. Fame sucks. This is an important book that tells us all as fellow human beings that attention must be paid. I congratulate Mr. Jeffries for having had the courage to write it. - Nick Mancuso, Paris 2020 “It's possible to be a musician in the biggest band imaginable, and within a few years be forced to work a regular job.” That ominous statement is echoed throughout Donald Jeffries' whirlwind of woe in the world of entertainment, On Borrowed Time. Those household name actors in your favourite TV shows you assumed were well paid and would surely always have a firm foothold in show business? Not so much it turns out, as stated here: “A regular on a television series is at least as likely to have their acting career end when their show does.” The arbitrary payment structures that seem to have been made up on the spot, the blatant rip offs and the sheer number of early and often suspicious Hollywood deaths that were rarely investigated would make anyone think twice about being an actor. What an eye opener this book is! - Graham Parker, singer-songwriter If you've ever dreamed of being famous--and who hasn't--then Donald Jeffries offers a shocking literary vaccine--so you might avoid those pitfalls. Just maybe! “On Borrowed Fame,” his juicy and richly detailed fast moving dossier, catalogues the long and winding and perilous road trod by some of the most famous names in showbiz. Those talented celebs had one thing in common: They inevitably discovered that fame does not guarantee fortune-- but is often a prescription for bankruptcy and early death. I have reported on Hollywood for nearly half a century but can attest that Jeffries has entertainingly laid out the most detailed compendium of horror stories experienced by some of tinsel town's biggest names. No one is spared--from Stan Laurel to Marlon Brando to Michael Jackson. And so, so many more. His research is formidable. This is the most fascinating chronicle of show business malfeasance, mayhem and misery I have ever read. The Beatles sang “Can't Buy Me Love,” They should have added “happiness” as well! - Ivor Davis

The Art of Manliness
The Epic Story of the Making of The Godfather

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:39


When it comes to lists of men's favorite movies, The Godfather is a perennial inclusion. And as hard as this may be to believe, the critically acclaimed and popularly beloved film is coming up on the 50th anniversary of its release.Journalist Mark Seal wrote an in-depth piece on the making of The Godfather for Vanity Fair magazine back in 2009, and after doing even more interviews with director Francis Ford Coppola, the actors of the film, and other behind-the-scenes players, wrote a new book on the subject called Leave the Gun, Take the Cannoli: The Epic Story of the Making of The Godfather. It's easy to forget that the film was based on a novel by Mario Puzo, and we spend the first part of our conversation there, with Mark unpacking how an indebted gambler became a bestselling novelist. From there we turn to how Puzo's novel was adapted for the screen — a story as dramatic and entertaining as the film itself. Mark explains why Coppola took the job of directing the film and his genius for casting. He delves into the unexpected selection of Marlon Brando to play Don Corleone, and how James Caan inhabited the role of Sonny, despite not being Italian-American. We get into how a real-life character named Joseph Colombo temporarily shut down production of the film in opposition to the stereotyping of Italian-Americans as mafia, despite the fact Colombo was a mob boss himself. Mark explains why Coppola considered making The Godfather the most miserable experience of his life and the X-factor that ultimately made the film so good. We end our conversation with whether a movie like The Godfather could be made today.Resources Related to the PodcastThe Godfather by Mario Puzo“The Godfather Wars” — Mark Seal's 2009 piece for Vanity FairHearingsJoseph ColomboAoM Podcast #551: Inside the Gangsters' CodeAoM Article: 100 Must-See MoviesConnect With Mark SealMark's WebsiteMark on TwitterMark on Instagram

Dan Snow's History Hit
We Didn't Start the Fire: Dien Bien Phu

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 36:13


This episode of the podcast comes from a show called ‘We Didn't Start The Fire' which is a modern history podcast inspired by the lyrics of the legend that is Billy Joel. In this episode, Dan chats with the wonderful Katie Puckrik and Tom Fordyce about the Battle of Dien Bien Phu, which took place in 1954 in Vietnam. If any place on Earth symbolises the end of the European Empire, it's here.If you want more of those episodes, go and look up the rest of the series right now. They've got loads of great episodes from Nixon, Eisenhower and Stalin to Marlon Brando and Marilyn Monroe. There's a new episode out every Monday, so go and search for ‘We Didn't Start The Fire' and follow or subscribe now. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gals Guide
Sacheen Littlefeather - Edan‘s 1 Cool Indigenous Gal

Gals Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 35:04


Edan talks about the life of Sacheen Littlefeather before and after refusing Marlon Brando's Oscar for The Godfather. We also talk about drum circles, sweat lodges and casting more Indigenous People in films and TV.  More info at: galsguide.org Patreon: patreon.com/galsguide Facebook: www.facebook.com/galsguidelibrary/ Twitter: twitter.com/GalsGuideLib  

Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?!
MUSICALS!: Guys and Dolls (1955)

Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


CLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER CONTENT WARNING: Discussion of sexism, mind games, manipulation. AJ Ganaros of Christmastide, Ohio and Shattered Worlds RPG joins us this week to talk about a weird movie. This time, it's not the script (which is outstanding, funny, and thoughtful) or the directing (bold, energetic, gorgeous). For once, it's the cast that just doesn't make any sense, because Marlon Brando doesn't belong in this movie, and he knows it. Worse yet, Frank Sinatra also knows it, and just seems bitter that he's not playing Brando's role. The two of them just seem to be so miscast, and so out of their element, that they can't really match the magic of their co-stars and supporting cast. Which is a testament to everything else about this movie, because even with the awkwardness of those stars this movie is still an absolute banger. Grab your racing digest and watch out for the cops while we discuss 1955's Guys and Dolls this week on Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Overture” from the original motion picture soundtrack to the film A Star is Born, written by Harold Arlen, composed by Ray Heindorf and performed by The Warner Bros. Orchestra. Copyright © Sony Music Entertainment Inc. Excerpts taken from the film Guys and Dolls (1955) are © 1955 Warner Bros. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from the theme song to the television series Top Cat. © Hanna-Barbera Productions, Screen Gems. Excerpt taken from “Luck Be A Lady,” written by Frank Loesser, arranged by Billy May, and performed by Frank Sinatra. © WEA International Inc. / Reprise Records.

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 496: Blaine Capatch

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 91:14


August 24-30, 1974 Another long time coming guest, this week Ken welcomes comedian Blaine Capatch to the show. Ken and Blaine discuss throwing to a clip, classic cars, 1974, growing up in PA, weird square back cars, music instruction schools, Godsmack, Stryper, bad metal bands, working in music stores, guitars, speculation without Googleation, Susie Blakley, 70s pantsuits, neighbors having cable, Blaine's Dad's barber shop, calling Sandy Frank, Battle of the Planets, Starblazers, MST3k, werewolves, monkey phases, Christopher Lee, Jimmy Walker, Funky Phantom, Inch High Private Eye, Mission Magic, Archie Bunker, figuring out which shows get long descriptions, sending away for out of business comic book ads, The Bob Newhart Show, Lorenzo Music, Julie Newmar, It Takes a Theif, Tonight from Harvard Square, the music of Hee Haw, insane Marlon Brando, starting comedy in Baltimore, John Waters, the slog of The Clash's Sandinista, Dom Delouise, The End, above ground pools, Marcus Welby, Roller Derby, Rock N Rollergames, Rod Hull and Emu, Six Million Dollar Man, The Bionics Action Club, jackets, Patton Oswalt, LQ Jones, Harlan Ellison, A Boy and His Dog, fresh made stories, Hollywood Squares, meeting Paul Williams, @midnight, The Brady Bunch house, Beat the Geeks, Dana Gould, Bobcat Goldthwait, Steve Martin, how Billy Crystal is nobody's favorite stand up comedian, SCTV, Martin Short, all blues shows, rock n roll revivals, and lemon flavored cigarettes.

Sorry He Sucks
28 - Frank & Marlon

Sorry He Sucks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 126:56


Kara and Amber look into the long long lives of two dead white guys: Frank Sinatra and Marlon Brando.

How Did This Get Made?
Matinee Monday: The Island of Dr. Moreau w/ Alex Fernie

How Did This Get Made?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 53:03


Paul & June are joined by the very funny Alex Fernie (Children's Hospital, Bajillion Dollar Properties) to talk about Marlon Brando and Val Kilmer not caring at all in 1996's The Island of Dr. Moreau. So you know what that means.... For more Matinee Monday content, check out Paul's Youtube pagehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ikagk-WhC-YFor upcoming HDTGM info visit https://www.hdtgminfo.com/HDTGM Discord: discord.gg/hdtgmPaul's Discord: https://discord.gg/paulscheerCheck out Paul and Rob Huebel live on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/friendzone) every Thursday 8-10pm ESTSubscribe to The Deep Dive with Jessica St. Clair and June Diane Raphael here: https://www.earwolf.com/show/the-deep-dive-with-jessica-st-clair-and-june-diane-rapheal/Subscribe to Unspooled with Paul Scheer and Amy Nicholson here: http://www.earwolf.com/show/unspooled/Check out The Jane Club over at www.janeclub.comCheck out new HDTGM merch over  at https://www.teepublic.com/stores/hdtgmWhere to Find Jason, June & Paul:@PaulScheer on Instagram & Twitter@Junediane on IG and @MsJuneDiane on TwitterJason is Not on Twitter

How Did This Get Made?
Matinee Monday: The Island of Dr. Moreau w/ Alex Fernie

How Did This Get Made?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 53:13


Paul & June are joined by the very funny Alex Fernie (Children's Hospital, Bajillion Dollar Properties) to talk about Marlon Brando and Val Kilmer not caring at all in 1996's The Island of Dr. Moreau. So you know what that means....   For more Matinee Monday content, check out Paul's Youtube page  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ikagk-WhC-Y For upcoming HDTGM info visit https://www.hdtgminfo.com/ HDTGM Discord: discord.gg/hdtgm Paul's Discord: https://discord.gg/paulscheer Check out Paul and Rob Huebel live on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/friendzone) every Thursday 8-10pm EST Subscribe to The Deep Dive with Jessica St. Clair and June Diane Raphael here: https://www.earwolf.com/show/the-deep-dive-with-jessica-st-clair-and-june-diane-rapheal/ Subscribe to Unspooled with Paul Scheer and Amy Nicholson here: http://www.earwolf.com/show/unspooled/ Check out The Jane Club over at www.janeclub.com Check out new HDTGM merch over  at https://www.teepublic.com/stores/hdtgm Where to Find Jason, June & Paul: @PaulScheer on Instagram & Twitter @Junediane on IG and @MsJuneDiane on Twitter Jason is Not on Twitter

Cinematório Podcasts
Em Foco: ”Os Inocentes” (1961), de Jack Clayton

Cinematório Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 99:40


Analisamos o clássico "Os Inocentes", dirigido por Jack Clayton e protagonizado por Deborah Kerr, um dos melhores filmes de horror de todos os tempos. Confira abaixo a minutagem dos quadros do podcast: 00:00:00 - Introdução 00:06:10 - Grande Angular: saiba mais sobre o elenco e a equipe do filme 00:14:56 - Close-up: perfil da atriz Deborah Kerr 00:20:10 - Ponto de Vista: análise e comentários sobre o filme 01:21:06 - Zoom: cenas ou momentos essenciais do filme 01:27:57 - Fora de Quadro: outras adaptações de "A Outra Volta do Parafuso" para o cinema e para a TV "Os Inocentes" é baseado na novela gótica "A Outra Volta do Parafuso", escrita por Henry James. O roteiro foi adaptado por William Archibald e Truman Capote. O enredo acompanha a Srta. Giddens (Deborah Kerr), uma governanta recém-contratada para cuidar dos irmãos órfãos Flora (Pamela Franklin) e Miles (Martin Stephens), que vivem na Mansão Bly, em Essex, no Leste da Inglaterra. Não demora para que a Srta. Giddens comece a notar comportamentos estranhos nas crianças e a ser assombrada por visões de um casal de ex-funcionários da propriedade que teriam morrido no local. E essas supostas forças sobrenaturais perturbam cada vez mais a rotina da Srta. Giddens e a sua relação com Flora e Miles. Além da análise do filme em si, o nosso podcast também discute a importância da fotografia em CinemaScope dirigida pelo renomado Freddie Francis; destaca a importânica de Daphne Oram, pioneira da música eletrônica, para o design de som do filme; traz o perfil da atriz Deborah Kerr; comenta a prequela "Os Que Chegam com a Noite" (The Nightcomers, 1971), estrelada por Marlon Brando; e relembra outras adaptações de "A Outra Volta do Parafuso" para o cinema e para TV. Participam do podcast sobre "Os Inocentes": Renato Silveira e Kel Gomes, editores do cinematório, Ana Lúcia Andrade, professora de Cinema da Escola de Belas Artes da UFMG, e Heitor Capuzzo, também professor de Cinema, escritor e crítico, autor dos livros “O Cinema Além da Imaginação”, “Alfred Hitchcock: O Cinema em Construção” e “Lágrimas de Luz: O Drama Romântico no Cinema”. No Em Foco, você ouve debates e análises de filmes, sejam eles clássicos, grandes sucessos de bilheteria e de crítica, produções que marcaram época ou que foram redescobertas com o passar dos anos, não importa o país de origem. Além disso, você revisita conosco a filmografia de cineastas que deixaram sua assinatura na história do cinema. Quer mandar um e-mail? Escreva seu recado e envie para contato@cinematorio.com.br. - Visite a página do podcast no site e confira material extra sobre o tema do episódio! - Junte-se ao Cineclube Cinematório e tenha acesso a conteúdo exclusivo de cinema!

Screen Test of Time
Episode 175: A Streetcar Named Desire

Screen Test of Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 44:36


The film adaptation of Tennessee Williams's play, A Streetcar Named Desire, is wildly famous for Marlon Brando in a wet t-shirt, but the film is largely the very sad story of a deeply wounded and traumatized woman, played by Vivien Leigh, who only gets further wounded and traumatized during the movie. It's considered a classic, but is it good enough to justify the emotional toll it exacts from its audience?

Morning Meeting
Episode 58: The Secret History of "The Godfather"

Morning Meeting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 33:28


This week we take you inside the making of The Godfather—and reveal how Marlon Brando's Don Corleone was based on … a woman! Writer Mark Seal joins Ashley and Mike to discuss his new book about the making of one of the biggest books and movies ever. Plus, we have a look at Prince Andrew's mounting troubles, Jeff Bezos's projectile dysfunction, and much more in this week's Morning Meeting. View on Air Mail →

Cinema Joes
On The Waterfront (1954)

Cinema Joes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 86:34


This week, Justin, Alex, & Noah welcome Pat Pannell onto the show to discuss her favorite film Elia Kazan's 1954 Best Picture Winning Film On The Waterfront, starring Marlon Brando, Eva Marie Saint, and Karl Malden. Don't forget to follow the show @CinemaJoes on Twitter and follow our hosts around the web at the following places! Hosts' Other Pods Pod on the Rooftops - TV Break Hosts' Writing Justin's Blog - Justin's Letterboxd Noah‘s Blog - Noah's Twitter Alex's Letterboxd - Alex's Twitter - Alex's PopBreak --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/CinemaJoes/support

What We're Drinking with Dan Dunn
146. What's Driving Dan to Drink?

What We're Drinking with Dan Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 26:30


When Dan is alone and angry, he sometimes drinks to quell his exquisite inner angst. This episode is one of those times. Among the things driving Dan to drink are CNN, Shatner in space, and shifting gender roles in the cocktail world. Special appearances from the cast of "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," Motorhead and the late Marlon Brando as The Godfather. Strap in, it's a wild ride. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max
Ken Sagoes on playing Kincaid in A Nightmare on Elm St. 3 & 4 ”Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max”

Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:09


Big thank you to Ken Sagoes for calling into my show for an interview! Ken Sagoes discussed playing his famous role as Kincaid in A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors and A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master, seeing Robert Englund for the first time in the Freddy Krueger makeup, and what he learned most from working with Robert. He talked about Laurence Fishburne teaching him how to be a physical actor on the set of Dream Warriors, if there could be a remake of Dream Warriors, and his time as a staff writer for Paramount Pictures. He got into his time starting out as a security guard at Universal Pictures, studying under Marlon Brando and Edmund J. Cambridge, and his conversations with legends such as Alfred Hitchcock and Vincent Price. He won numerous awards for his short film Mc Henry Trial - Don't Judge a Kid By Their Hoodie that released in 2020. He is currently working on an important short film called The Secret Weapon that addresses the deplorable actions of Bull Connor and is raising money for it. His non-profit organization called the Giving Back Corporation gives money to students for school and books. You can donate to his short film and non-profit corporation through his website: https://www.thesagoescompany.com/. Follow me on Instagram and Twitter: @thereelmax. Website: https://maxcoughlan.com/index.html. Website live show streaming link: https://maxcoughlan.com/sports-and-hip-hop-with-dj-mad-max-live-stream.html. MAD MAX Radio on Live 365: https://live365.com/station/MAD-MAX-Radio-a15096. Subscribe to my YouTube channel Sports and Hip Hop with DJ Mad Max: https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCE0107atIPV-mVm0M3UJyPg.  Ken Sagoes on "Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max" visual on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsTr4P3he5M. 

MetaLearn
ML187: Larry Grobel on The Art of the Interview, Lessons from Hollywood Stars and Writing Great Stories

MetaLearn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:03


Larry Grobel is a writer and interviewer who has interviewed every big name in Hollywood from Robert de Niro to Nicole Kidman, Al Pacino to Angelina Jolie. In this episode we discuss:- The art of a great interview informed by Larry' work with the world's biggest stars- Techniques for building rapport fast to make people feel comfortable and open up - Larry's principles for great storytelling that he's used in his writing & interviewing We also talk about Larry's 10 days on Marlon Brando's private island, his close 30 year friendship with Al Pacino and his controversial interview with former Indiana basketball coach Bob Knight.

Choses à Savoir CÉLÉBRITÉS
Pourquoi Marlon Brando a-t-il refusé l'Oscar de meilleur acteur ?

Choses à Savoir CÉLÉBRITÉS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 1:57


Marlon Brando dans « Le Parrain » : voilà une incroyable performance qui méritait bien un Oscar. Pourtant, à la surprise générale, l'acteur américain n'a pas soulevé la prestigieuse statuette pour ce rôle. Plus précisément : bien qu'étant récompensé par ses pairs, l'interprète de Don Vito Corleone a décliné la récompense ; en laissant une jeune femme faire un discours à sa place. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Queens of the Mines
The Occupation of Alcatraz - Happy Indigenous Peoples Day!

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:53


The famed Alcatraz prison on Alcatraz Island was in operation from 1934 to 1963. For most, the thought of Alcatraz may bring up a Hollywood film or some of the most notorious criminals in America. But the island carries a different symbolism to the native coastal peoples of California. The California Ohlone Mewuk which translates to coastal people, passed down an oral history that tells us that Alcatraz was used by their Native population long before  anyone else “discovered” the San Francisco Bay. Trips would be made to the island in tule boats for gathering foods, such as bird eggs and sea-life. It was also used as a place of isolation, or for punishment for naughty members of the tribe. The island was also a camping spot and hiding place for many native Americans attempting to escape the California Mission system. In 1895, the island was being used as a US fort and military prison and 19 Hopi men served time on Alcatraz for trying to protect their children from being sent to federal Indian boarding schools, which we discussed last week.    “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. This week's episode is coming out a few days early in honor of Indigenous Peoples Day. Today we will talk about The Occupation of Alcatraz and the Red Power Movement which demanded self-determination for Native Americans to better the lives of all Indian people. To make it known to the world that they have a right to use their land for their own benefit by right of discovery. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out.    In 1953, U.S. Congress established a policy towards American Indians: termination. This policy eliminated most government support for indigenous tribes and ended the protected trust status of all indigenous-owned lands. It wiped out the reservations and natives had the choice to assimilate or die out. So the BIA began a voluntary urban relocation program where American Indians could move from their rural tribes to metropolitan areas, and they would give them assistance with locating housing and employment. Numerous American Indians made the move to cities, lured by the hope of a better life. It was a struggle for them. Many struggled to adjust to life in a city with these low-end jobs, they faced discrimination, they were homesickn and they totally lost their cultural identity. Giving a person a home and a job, yet taking away everything that they are, that is defining a human only in economic terms. So, after they relocated and got job and housing placement, as soon as they received their first paycheck, the assistance was done. Termination.    This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Charles, you will love. Now, back to Alcatraz.   When Rosebud Sioux Belva Cottier heard the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary was closing in 1963 and that the property was going to be given to the City of San Francisco, she thought of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Treaty that allowed Native Americans to appropriate surplus federal land. So, she and her cousin Richard McKenzie retrieved a copy of the treaty and thought, if the property was surplus land of the government, the Sioux could claim it.    Belva organized a demonstration to raise awareness and planned to take court action to obtain the title to the island. On March 8, 1964 her group of Sioux activists, photographers, reporters and her lawyer landed on Alcatraz. About 40 people. The demonstration lasted only four hours. It was "peaceful and in accordance with Sioux treaty rights” but the demonstrators left under the threat of felony charges. The idea of reclaiming “the Rock” became a rallying cry for the indigenous population.   Five years later, on October 10, 1969, there was a fire that destroyed the San Francisco American Indian Center. It was a detrimental loss for the native community because the center provided Native Americans with jobs, health care, aid in legal affairs, and social opportunities.    An activist group formed, known as “Indians of All Tribes” with Pipestone Indian Boarding School graduate Adam Fortunate Eagle and the handsome, Mohawk college student Richard Oakes.  Richard had co-founded the American Indian Studies Dept at SF State and worked as a bartender in the Mission District of San Francisco which brought him in contact with the local Native American communities.    The goal was to take immediate action towards claiming space for the local Indian community and they set their sights on the unused federal land at Alcatraz, which would soon be sold to a billionaire developer.   Adam and Oakes planned a takeover of the island as a symbolic act. They agreed on November 9, 1969. Richard would gather approximately 75 indigenous people and Adam would arrange transportation to the island. The boats did not show up.   Nearby, a sailor was watching the natives waiting, some wearing traditional ceremony dress and Adam Fortunate Eagle convinced him, the owner of a three-masted yacht to pass by the island with him and 4 friends on board. As the boat passed by Alcatraz, Oates and two men jumped overboard, swam to shore, and claimed the island by right of discovery. At this moment, Richard became the leader of the movement. The five men were quickly removed by the Coast Guard.    Later that night, Adam, Richard and others hired a boat, making their way back to the island again, some students stayed overnight before they were again made to leave. Richard Oakes told the San Francisco Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   Eleven days later on November 20, 1969, Richard and Adam met 87 native men, women and children, 50 of whom California State University students at the No Name bar in Sausalito just after closing at 2, met with some free-spirited boat owners and sailed through San Francisco Bay towards Alcatraz, not knowing if they'd be killed, ignoring warnings that the occupation of the island was illegal. Indians of All Tribes made one last attempt to seize Alcatraz and claim the island for all the tribes of North America using unarmed, body and spirit politics. As they disembarked onto the island an Alcatraz security guard yelled out, may day! May day! The Indians have landed! Three days in, it became clear - this wasn't going to be a short demonstration.    Richard Oates soon addressed the media with a manifesto titled “The Great White Father and All His People.” In it, he stated the intention was to use the island for an Indian school, cultural center and museum. Oates claimed Alcatraz belonged to the Native Americans “by right of discovery”. He sarcastically offered to buy the island back for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”, the same price that Natives received for the island of Manhattan.    Now I'll read the manifesto   “We feel that this so-called Alcatraz Island is more than suitable as an Indian Reservation, as determined by the white man's own standards. By this we mean that this place resembles most Indian reservations, in that: It is isolated from modern facilities, and without adequate means of transportation. It has no fresh running water. The sanitation facilities are inadequate. There are no oil or mineral rights. There is no industry and so unemployment is very great. There are no health care facilities. The soil is rocky and non-productive and the land does not support game. There are no educational facilities. The population has always been held as prisoners and kept dependent upon others. Further, it would be fitting and symbolic that ships from all over the world, entering the Golden Gate, would first see Indian land, and thus be reminded of the true history of this nation. This tiny island would be a symbol of the great lands once ruled by free and noble Indians.   “We hold the Rock”   The Nixon administration sent out a negotiator, and as the two sides debated, the natives continued to settle onto their new land. Native American college students and activists flocked to join the protest, and the population of Alcatraz often swelled to more than 600 people. They moved into the old warden's house and guards' quarters and began personalizing the island with graffiti. Buildings were tagged with slogans like Home of the Free, Indian Land, Peace and Freedom, Red Power and Custer Had It Coming.   This episode is brought to you by Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This episode was also brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner, carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Alcatraz   The occupation sought to unify indigenous peoples from more than 500 nations across America, the Western Hemisphere and Pacific. Everyone on the island had a job. The island soon had its own clinic, kitchen, public relations department and even a nursery and grade school for its children. A security force sarcastically dubbed the “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs” patrolled the shoreline to watch for intruders. All decisions were made by unanimous consent of the people. A Sioux named John Trudell hopped behind the mic to broadcast radio updates from Alcatraz under the banner of “Radio Free Alcatraz.” “ We all had things to offer each other,” resident Luwana Quitquit later remembered. “Brotherhood. Sisterhood.”    The federal government initially insisted that the protestors leave the island and they placed an inadequate barricade around the island. The demonstration was a media frenzy and the protestors received an enormous amount of support. There was a call for contributions  and a mainland base was set up at San Francisco's Pier 40, near Fisherman's Wharf. Supplies such as canned goods and clothes were shipped in. Visitors and volunteers were sailing in, and thousands of dollars in cash were pouring in from donors across the country. The Black Panther Party had volunteered to help provide security and celebrities like Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda and Merv Griffin visited the island in support. The band Creedence Clearwater Revival gave the Indians of All Tribes a boat, which was christened the “Clearwater.”    Things started to change in early 1970, there was a leadership crisis.  The organizers and a majority of the college students had to return to school. Many vagrants who were not interested in fighting for the cause moved in, taking advantage of the rent free living and drugs and alcohol, which were originally banned on the island, started to move freely among a select crowd.     Then tragically, Richard and Annie Oakes's daughter Yvonne fell 5 stories to her death from one of the prison's stairwells in the guards quarters. Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz in the wake of the accident, leaving groups of warring activists to fight it out for control of the island.    In May of 1970, the Nixon administration cut the electricity to Alcatraz, hoping to force the demonstrators out. Let's face it, the government was never going to meet the demands of the Indians of All Tribes. Next, they removed the water barge which had been providing fresh water to the occupiers. Three days following the removal of the water barge, a fire was started on the island, destroying the warden's house, the inside of the lighthouse which was important for SF bay navigation and several of Alcatraz's historic buildings. No one knows who started the fire. It could have come from either side. Was it - Burn it down? Or get them out?   Two months later, President Richard Nixon gave a speech saying, “The time has come…for a new era in which the Indian future is determined by Indian acts and Indian decisions.” The U.S. government later returned millions of acres of ancestral Indian land and passed more than 50 legislative proposals supporting tribal self rule. The termination policy was terminated.   In the meantime, the FBI, Coast Guard and the Government Services Administration stayed clear of the island. While it appeared to those on the island that negotiations were actually taking place, in fact, the federal government was playing a waiting game, hoping that support for the occupation would subside and those on the island would elect to end the occupation. At one point, secret negotiations were held where the occupiers were offered a portion of Fort Miley, a 15 minute walk from the Sutro Baths, as an alternative site to Alcatraz Island.    The occupation continued into 1971. Support for the cause had diminished after the press turned against them and began publishing stories of alleged beatings and assaults; one case of assault was prosecuted. In an attempt to raise money to buy food, they allegedly began stripping copper wiring and copper tubing from the buildings and selling it as scrap metal. Three of the occupiers were arrested, tried and found guilty of selling some 600lbs of copper. In January 1971, two oil tankers collided in the entrance to the San Francisco Bay. Though it was acknowledged that the lack of an Alcatraz light or fog horn played no part in the collision, it was enough to push the federal government into action. A few holdouts continued to live on the Rock for another year. “I don't want to say Alcatraz is done with,” former occupier Adam Fortunate Eagle lamented to The San Francisco Chronicle in April 1971, “but no organized Indian groups are active there. It has turned from an Indian movement to a personality thing.”    Citing a need to restore Alcatraz's foghorn and lighthouse, President Nixon gave the go-ahead to develop a removal plan to be acted upon with as little force as possible, when the smallest number of people were on the island. The government told the remaining occupiers they would have news on the deed the following Monday morning. They were told no action would be taken until the negotiations were settled. That was a lie. On June 10, 1971 armed federal marshals, FBI agents, and special forces police descended on the island and removed five women, four children, and six unarmed men. the last of the indigenous residents. The occupation was over.   An island ledger entry reads “We are about to leave for Alcatraz, maybe for the last time, To this beautiful little Island, which means a little something, which no one will ever understand my feelings.”  It is signed by Marie B. Quitiquit of Stockton. Beneath Quitiquit's words someone wrote in capital letters “I SHALL NEVER FORGET, MY PEOPLE, MY LAND ALCATRAZ”.   Oakes, who had once proclaimed that “Alcatraz was not an island, it was an idea”, never left the idea behind and continued his resistance. As a result of his activism, he endured tear gas, billy clubs, and brief stints in jail. He helped the Pit River Tribe in their attempts to regain nearly 3 million acres of land that had been seized by Pacific Gas & Electric and had plans to create a "mobile university" dedicated to creating opportunities for Native Americans.  Soon after he left the occupation, Oates was in Sonoma where Michael Morgan, a YMCA camp manager was being accussesd as a white supremacist, and being tough with Native American children. 30 year old Oakes reportedly confronted Michael Morgan. Morgan said he was in fear for his life, when he drew a handgun and fatally shot Richard Oakes. Oakes was unarmed. Morgan was charged with voluntary manslaughter, but was acquitted by a jury that agreed with Morgan that the killing was an act of self-defense, even though Oakes was unarmed. Oakes supporters contend the shooting was an act of murder, and that Morgan received support from a racially motivated jury and district attorney.  So, over the course of the 19-month occupation, more than 10,000 indigenous people visited the island to offer support. Alcatraz may have been lost, but the occupation gave birth to political movements which continue today as injustices inflicted on indigenous people is an ongoing problem. The Rock has also continued to serve as a focal point of Native American social campaigns  and it left the demonstrators with big ideas. Indian rights organizations, many of them staffed by Alcatraz veterans, later staged occupations and protests at Plymouth Rock, Mount Rushmore, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and dozens of other sites across the country. Federal officials also started listening to calls for Indian self-determination. The occupation of Alcatraz was the first demonstration of its kind for the American Indians. It was a spiritual reawakening for the indigenous peoples and renewed interest in tribal communities. Many natives did not know what it meant to be native, and they learned of and about their heritage in light of the media attention the occupation received. It was the first chance they were able to feel proud of their indigenous background. A beginning for Native pride, the kickstarter for a move back to a traditional identity. A revival of language, traditions. Awakening the native people, the tribes, the media, the government and Americans. The “return of the buffalo”. Dr LaNada War Jack, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, one of UC Berkeley's first native students & demonstration leader tells us, “We wanted to bring to the forefront that every single one of (more than 500) treaties were broken by the fed government.” The boarding schools, genocide, relocation, termination, , everything that historically happened to American Indians — continues to impact them today. They are still here.  Now, that is a real theft of freedom. A theft of freedom from the ones who were here first. So, I do not want to hear a damn word about your loss of rights for having to wear a damn mask. You want to fight for freedom? Stand up for your local indigenous people.    Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2020-11-19/alcatraz-occupation-indigenous-tribes-autry-museum https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago The Alcatraz Indian Occupation by Dr. Troy Johnson, Cal State Long Beach https://www.nps.gov/alca/learn/historyculture/we-hold-the-rock.htm https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=ALCATRAZ_Proclamation  

Scarecrow Radio
Episode 29 - DUELING BRANDOS

Scarecrow Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:21


On today's show Darcy and Ben get into the best way to watch a certain show about nothing, various film formats throughout the ages, and their favorite celebrity Marlon Brando impressions.

Heirloom Radio
Damon Runyon Theater - The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown - Feb. 6, 1949 - Comedy

Heirloom Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 29:02


The Broadway and film hit "Guys and Dolls" (Photo - Jean Simmons and Marlon Brando) was based on Damon Runyon's short story "The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown" - narrated by John Brown (as Broadway)... this is a love story of a high class gambler named "Sky" who has fallen in love with a Missionary, Miss Sarah Brown... and he is doing everything he can to earn her approval. Intro gives background on the series and introduces the story. This episode of The Damon Runyon Theater lives in the Playlist on this Soundcloud.com podcast "Damon Runyon Theater"... This is the 11th episode in the series.

Film Gold
Episode 12- Marlon Brando: The Greatest (Part 2 of 2)

Film Gold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 109:26


We conclude our 2-part look at the mercurial, infuriating but always compelling actor and cultural figure Marlon Brando. In this part, we look at some key books (including Brando's memoir 'Songs My Mother Taught Me'), documentaries and interviews as well as discussing Brando's turbulent personal life, the less well-known periods of his career and a few other things. There are many sound clips included for your enjoyment and to complement the conversation 'Film Gold' is on all the main podcast platforms. Feedback to antony@antonyrotunno.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/filmgoldpod Twitter- @FilmGold75 Antony's website (blog, music, podcasts) https://www.antonyrotunno.com Ghosty's you tube channel (radio interviews) https://www.youtube.com/user/GhostyTMRS episode links 'Meet Marlon Brando' short documentary (1965) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BU7Gwv4PRNE Trailer for 'Listen To Me Marlon' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgoFFzy0z8k Brando on the Dick Cavett Show 1973 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uU-4wmwc2Rw Brando with Connie Chung 1989 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHou3oDFP84&t=1520s Brando with Larry King 1994 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdmXB-OYnS4

Nerds Amalgamated
Crazy Dr Who News, PC Affordability & New Solar Cells

Nerds Amalgamated

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 58:37


Rusty is coming back to Doctor Who. No, not that one. It's Russell T Davies, back to regenerate the greatest show on TV with his old production team. It remains to be seen whether he can recapture the magic, but the BBC must be desperate. Gaming PCs are incredibly rare, and they're likely to get even rarer. This means people will pay a massive premium, and that entry level parts don't really exist anymore. This makes us sad. Everyone should have the opportunity to build a PC and learn about electronics. Maybe in the post apocalyptic future there will be enough supply to meet demand. An Aussie team has created a significantly cheaper and easier to make solar panel that outperforms traditional panels. The sunniest place on Earth could really use some of those. They still need to scale up, but it's great to see Aussie scientists making huge strides. Doctor Who: A New Hope? - https://twitter.com/bbcdoctorwho/status/1441405833997217798 Affordable PCs are now a pipe dream- https://www.pcgamer.com/rip-cheap-graphics-cards/Tech Start Up makes new Solar Cell- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-21/australian-start-up-creates-world-s-most-efficient-solar-cell/100476152Other topics discussedBBC - 5 things the Doctor does in any worrying situation | @Doctor Who - BBC- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0ED6CGmjm4Russell T Davies (a Welsh screenwriter and television producer whose works include Queer as Folk, The Second Coming, Casanova, the 2005 revival of the BBC One science fiction franchise Doctor Who, Cucumber, Years and Years and It's a Sin.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_T_DaviesTorchwood (a British science fiction television programme created by Russell T Davies. A spin-off of the 2005 revival of Doctor Who, it aired from 2006 to 2011.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TorchwoodBad Wolf (production company) (a British television production company founded by Julie Gardner and Jane Tranter in 2015, with its headquarters in Cardiff, Wales.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Wolf_(production_company)Olly Alexander set to be new Doctor Who as first gay actor to play Time Lord- https://www.thesun.co.uk/tv/15405348/olly-alexander-doctor-who-actor-gay/Ruth Clayton (a human identity assumed by the Fugitive Doctor, who hid on Earth using a Chameleon Arch.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Ruth_ClaytonJo Martin (Jo Martin played Ruth Clayton/Fugitive Doctor in the Doctor Who television stories Fugitive of the Judoon and The Timeless Children, alongside Jodie Whittaker's Thirteenth Doctor. She was the first non-white actor to be cast in the role of the Doctor in the DWU.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Jo_MartinDoctor Who: actor Christopher Eccleston reveals he has anorexia- https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/49719101Christopher Eccleston is the Doctor!- https://www.bigfinish.com/news/v/christopher-eccleston-is-the-doctorMurray Gold (an English composer for stage, film, and television and a dramatist for both theatre and radio. He is best known as the musical director and composer of the music for Doctor Who from 2005, until he stepped down in 2018 after the tenth series aired in 2017. He has been nominated for five BAFTAs.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murray_GoldDaleks and Cybermen- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCsXO7r6-z4Bob Baker (scriptwriter) (a British television and film writer. Baker and Martin devised for Doctor Who the robotic dog K-9 (created for The Invisible Enemy), the renegade Time Lord Omega (created for The Three Doctors, Doctor Who's 10th anniversary story) and the Axons. K-9 was originally intended to appear in one story only, but the BBC decided to make it a recurring character. )- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Baker_(scriptwriter)Elisabeth Sladen (an English actress. She became best known as Sarah Jane Smith in the British television series Doctor Who, appearing as a regular cast member from 1973 to 1976, alongside both Jon Pertwee and Tom Baker, and reprising the role many times in subsequent decades, both on Doctor Who and its spin-offs, K-9 and Company (1981) and The Sarah Jane Adventures (2007–2011).)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_SladenSarah Jane Smith (a fictional character played by Elisabeth Sladen in the long-running BBC Television science fiction series Doctor Who and two of its spin-offs.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Jane_SmithThe Sarah Jane Adventures (In addition to Sladen, the first series of the programme stars Yasmin Paige as Maria Jackson, Sarah Jane's 13-year-old neighbour in Ealing, west London, and Tommy Knight as a boy named Luke, who is adopted by Sarah Jane at the conclusion of the introductory story.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sarah_Jane_Adventures#Cast_and_crewSadie Miller (an English actress and author. She is known for her portrayal of Natalie Redfern in the Sarah Jane Smith audio drama series by Big Finish, her novel, Moon Blink, from Candy Jar Books's series, Lethbridge-Stewart, as well as her association with the science fiction series, Doctor Who. She is the daughter of actors Brian Miller and Elisabeth Sladen.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadie_MillerSean Pertwee (the son of Jon Pertwee, who played the Third Doctor. He briefly appeared as himself in the 50th anniversary story The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Sean_PertweeJon Pertwee (played the Third Doctor from 1970 to 1974, beginning from Spearhead from Space to Planet of the Spiders.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Jon_PertweeGotham (TV series) (an American crime drama television series developed by Bruno Heller, produced by Warner Bros. Television and based on characters published by DC Comics and appearing in the Batman franchise, primarily those of James Gordon and Bruce Wayne.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gotham_(TV_series)Showrunner Russell T. Davies wants a Doctor Who Cinematic Universe- https://winteriscoming.net/2021/01/25/doctor-who-cinematic-universe-russell-t-davies/The Day of the Doctor (a special episode of the British science fiction television programme Doctor Who, marking the programme's 50th anniversary.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_of_the_DoctorJourney's End (TV story) (Journey's End was the thirteenth and final episode of series 4 of Doctor Who. It was the final regular appearance of all the Tenth Doctor's companions, though they would all appear in cameos in The End of Time (barring Catherine Tate and Bernard Cribbins who prominently feature) to commemorate David Tennant's final story.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Journey%27s_End_(TV_story)Torchwood: Miracle Day (the fourth series of the British science fiction television programme Torchwood, a spin-off from the long-running show Doctor Who.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torchwood:_Miracle_DayDay One (Torchwood) (the second episode of the first series of the British science fiction television series Torchwood. The episode centres on Gwen Cooper (Eve Myles) working her first case with the alien hunters Torchwood in Cardiff, when she lets loose a purple alien gas that survives on the energy of orgasms. Over the course of the episode, the team hunt for Carys before the gas kills her.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_One_(Torchwood)Everything Changes (Torchwood) (the first episode of the British science fiction television programme Torchwood, which was first broadcast on 22 October 2006. The story is told from the perspective of Gwen Cooper (Eve Myles), who comes across the Torchwood team through her job as a police officer with the South Wales Police, who are investigating a series of strange deaths in Cardiff.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everything_Changes_(Torchwood)Resurrection gauntlet (The resurrection gauntlet — also known as the resurrection glove or just the glove, and, jokingly, the risen mitten — was a metal gauntlet that had the ability to revive the dead for a limited time, though with unfortunate and usually deadly consequences.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Resurrection_gauntletTorchwood: Children of Earth (Children of Earth is the banner title of the third series of the British television science fiction programme Torchwood, which broadcast for five episodes on BBC One from 6 to 10 July 2009.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torchwood:_Children_of_EarthRyzen (a brand of x86-64 microprocessors designed and marketed by Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) for desktop, mobile, server, and embedded platforms based on the Zen microarchitecture. It consists of central processing units (CPUs) marketed for mainstream, enthusiast, server, and workstation segments and accelerated processing units (APUs) marketed for mainstream and entry-level segments and embedded systems applications.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RyzenWhy is there a chip shortage?- https://www.bbc.com/news/business-58230388Nvidia sold $155 million in crypto mining chips last quarter, but PC gaming remains its biggest market- https://www.cnbc.com/2021/05/26/nvidia-pc-gaming-still-more-important-than-crypto-for-revenue.htmlThe Life of a Miner - Crypto Mining Farm at Apartment | August 2021 Update- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VB7NV7SR3bAChubbyemu - A Bitcoin Miner Heatstroked In His Sleep. This Is What Happened To His Organs.- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr8bp8a2QS4PCPartPicker - Asus Radeon RX 580 8 GB DUAL Video Card- https://au.pcpartpicker.com/product/jkFXsY/asus-radeon-rx-580-8gb-dual-video-card-dual-rx580-o8g?history_days=730China's top regulators ban crypto trading and mining, sending bitcoin, rivals tumbling- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-25/chinas-top-regulators-ban-crypto-trading-/100491122Chrome OS (a Gentoo Linux-based operating system designed by Google. It is derived from the free software Chromium OS and uses the Google Chrome web browser as its principal user interface. Unlike Chromium OS, Chrome OS is proprietary software.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrome_OSSolarCity (a publicly traded company headquartered in Fremont, California that sold and installed solar energy generation systems as well as other related products and services to residential, commercial and industrial customers.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SolarCityElon Musk's Battery Farm Has Been a Total Triumph. Here Comes the Sequel.- https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/green-tech/a34598095/elon-musk-battery-farm-sequel-australia-tesla-powerpack/Hornsdale Power Reserve (a 150MW/194MWh grid-connected energy storage system owned by Neoen co-located with the Hornsdale Wind Farm in the Mid North region of South Australia, also owned by Neoen. During 2017 Tesla, Inc. won the contract and built the Hornsdale Power Reserve, for a capital cost of A$90 million, leading to the colloquial Tesla big battery name.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsdale_Power_ReserveHornsdale Power Reserve (Elon Musk placed a wager that the battery would be completed within "100 days from contract signature", otherwise the battery would be free. Tesla had already begun construction, and some units were already operational by 29 September 2017, the time the grid contract was signed. The battery construction was completed and testing began on 25 November 2017. It was connected to the grid on 1 December 2017. The 63 days between grid contract and completion easily beat Musk's wager of "100 days from contract signature", which started when a grid connection agreement was signed with ElectraNet on 29 September 2017, 203 days after Musk's offer on 10 March (in Australia).- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsdale_Power_Reserve#ConstructionNorwich Games Festival - Ashens - Gallery of Shame - 1 June 2019- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFF9O73iwkoS.S. Antarctica (a battleship owned by the penguins of Antarctica.)- https://simpsonswiki.com/wiki/S.S._AntarcticaSS Penguin (a New Zealand inter-island ferry steamer that sank off Cape Terawhiti after striking a rock near the entrance to Wellington Harbour in poor weather on 12 February 1909.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_PenguinElden Ring (an upcoming action role-playing game developed by FromSoftware and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. The game is a collaborative effort between game director Hidetaka Miyazaki and fantasy novelist George R. R. Martin.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elden_RingBandai Namco Selects “My Dark Souls Story” Contest Winners- https://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2016/03/11/bandai-namco-selects-my-dark-souls-story-contest-winners.aspxNerdy, Inc. - My Dark Souls Story: Biography of the Chosen Undead - The Dark Souls Story- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbiLl-m0Ry4NASA's Mars Rover Curiosity Had Planetary Protection Slip-Up- https://www.space.com/13783-nasa-msl-curiosity-mars-rover-planetary-protection.htmlAmazon Women in the Mood (the first episode in season three of Futurama.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Women_in_the_MoodApocalypse Now (a 1979 American epic psychological war film directed and produced by Francis Ford Coppola. It stars Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen, Frederic Forrest, Albert Hall, Sam Bottoms, Laurence Fishburne, Harrison Ford, and Dennis Hopper.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocalypse_NowCast Party: A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast (TNC podcast)- https://www.patreon.com/CastPartyShout Outs 20th September 2021 – Mick McGinty, Legendary Video Game Artist, passes away - https://www.nintendolife.com/news/2021/09/legendary_street_fighter_ii_artist_mick_mcginty_has_passed_away Mick McGinty, an artist that produced cover art for video games like Street Fighter II and Streets of Rage 2, has died. While many gamers might not know McGinty by name, those that grew up in the '90s will immediately recognize his art. The artist contributed some of the most iconic images in all of gaming, telling stories that immediately captivated players. McGinty was an immensely talented artist, as is evidenced by the impressive collection of work on his personal site, but for gamers of the '90s, his output will be almost synonymous with video game covers. He is perhaps most famous with Nintendo fans for creating the western cover artwork for the SNES version of Street Fighter II. While many people took issue with the 'westernisation' of the artwork at the time, it was very common practice for companies like Nintendo to commission entirely new artwork which was better suited to a particular region. McGinty's cover – which features Chun-Li fighting Blanka over the prone body of Ryu – has gone down as one of the most recognisable video game covers of all time. McGinty's association with Street Fighter would continue with Street Fighter II: Champion Edition on the Mega Drive / Genesis, Street Fighter II Turbo on the SNES and Super Street Fighter II.21st September 2021 – Endangered South African penguins killed by swarm of bees near Cape Town - https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-58622482Sixty-three endangered African penguins have been killed by a swarm of bees in a rare occurrence near Cape Town, bird conservationists in South Africa say. The protected birds, from a colony in Simonstown, were found on the shore with multiple bee-stings. They had no other physical injuries. National parks officials told the BBC this was the first known attack at the world-famous Boulders Beach, which attracts up to 60,000 visitors a year. "Usually the penguins and bees co-exist," said Dr Alison Kock, a marine biologist with South Africa's national parks agency (SANParks). "The bees don't sting unless provoked - we are working on the assumption that a nest or hive in the area was disturbed and caused a mass of bees to flee the nest, swarm and became aggressive," she added. "Unfortunately the bees encountered a group of penguins on their flight path." Post-mortems found that the birds had been stung around the eyes and on their flippers. That is because "those are the parts that are not covered by feathers," Dr Katta Ludynia, from the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob), told the BBC. Penguins have pink sweat glands around their eyes and "that area is particularly thin - similar to human fingers," explained Shanet Rutgers, senior penguin keeper at Cape Town's Two Oceans Aquarium. One of the penguins had been stung 27 times. African penguins are distinctive for their small size, and live on the coast and islands of South Africa and Namibia - though some have been spotted as far north as Gabon.Their populations are rapidly declining, the International Union for Conservation of Nature says. The national body said in a statement on Sunday that it was still conducting toxicity and disease checks on the birds, and would continue to monitor the situation.22nd September 2021 – 10th Anniversary of Dark Souls - https://www.glitched.online/landmark-rpg-dark-souls-celebrates-its-10th-anniversary-today/ Ten years ago to the day, Japanese video game developer From Software released the critically acclaimed dark fantasy action RPG, Dark Souls, which would go on to change the gaming landscape forever. Refining the formula already established in Demon's Souls while introducing a bevy of new mechanics that have been adopted and replicated by other titles, Dark Souls would spearhead an entirely new sub-genre of gaming. Today, Dark Souls officially celebrates its 10th anniversary. Dark Souls‘ history is relatively straightforward in comparison to many other success stories in gaming. From Software first dabbled in the dark fantasy setting with Demon's Souls, showcasing their ability to tell epic but narratively mysterious tales featuring fantastical beasts, ambiguous NPCs and deceptively challenging gameplay. The last part has remained the foundation of all From Software games since, increasing their difficulty in newer titles like Bloodborne and Sekiro while still retaining their creative power for captivating and immersive stories, worlds and characters. Dark Souls was well-received by fans, often cited as their favourite game of all time. It's success went on to spawn two sequels, Dark Souls II and Dark Souls III; two creative spiritual successors in Bloodborne and the upcoming Elden Ring; and a Tenchu-styled action title Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice that heavily borrowed elements from From Software's trademark style. Demon's Souls may have been the first, but it was really Dark Souls that put the Japanese studio on the map, leaving behind a legacy that has been the source of inspiration for a number of games like the Nioh series, The Surge, Lords of the Fallen, Mortal Shell, and numerous others. Dark Souls is not only remembered for its staple difficulty, but inspired world design, creative boss encounters, a plot that simply begged to be dissected and explored further, and a blueprint for a new style of game that bounced off the success of this defining RPG.24th September 2021 – 20th anniversary of Ico - https://www.nme.com/en_au/features/gaming-features/ico-minimalist-masterclass-in-cinematic-and-emotional-storytelling-3051674 Released between those two films in 2001 and 2002, Ico (pronounced ‘ee-ko' – but don't worry if you get it wrong, I did so too for a very long time) is a single-player action-adventure game developed by Sony's Japan Studio. This game kicked off the career of Fumito Ueda. It was the first in a series of games that featured similar themes, including beloved titles like Shadow of the Colossus and The Last Guardian. Ico is special in the way it handles abandonment and isolation. Devoid almost entirely of all dialogue, Ico essentially works like a silent film. There's a clear sense of loneliness that's present throughout the entire game. But there's also a feeling of hope. Ico's soundtrack is almost suffocating at times, though it also presents a number of beautiful pieces. “Heal,” for example, is one of the best save themes in any game. Ico's soundtrack is almost suffocating at times, though it also presents a number of beautiful pieces. “Heal,” for example, is one of the best save themes in any game. One of the game's fans is also Hidetaka Miyazaki of FROM Software. Miyazaki, the creator of Demon's Souls, and in turn the Souls series, is one of the biggest game industry figures of the last decade. Much in the way the game would inspire Straley and Druckmann, Miyazaki cites Ico as a game that showed him the different possibilities that video games as a medium had to offer.Remembrances21st September 1954 – Mikimoto Kōkichi - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikimoto_K%C5%8DkichiA Japanese entrepreneur who is credited with creating the first cultured pearl and subsequently starting the cultured pearl industry with the establishment of his luxury pearl company Mikimoto. He was inducted into the house of peers by imperial decree and posthumously awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Sacred Treasure. On April 18, 1985, the Japan Patent Office selected him as one of Ten Japanese Great Inventors. The company was ranked as one of the world's most luxurious brands by Women's Wear Daily Magazine and Mikimoto was considered one of the best Japanese financial leaders of the 20th century by Nihon Keizai Shimbun. He is also known as the founder of Mikimoto Pharmaceuticals, a company specialising in beauty products containing pearl calcium. Mikimoto Pearl Island is named after him. In addition, the "Phoenix Mikimoto Crown" used by Miss Universe winners as well as the pageant crown used by Miss International is credited to his patented work. Mikimoto began his search of an alternative method to produce pearls as the chairman of the Shima Marine Products Improvement Association. At this point the demand for pearls had severely outweighed the supply, prompting the consideration of an effort to protect the oysters. In 1888, Mikimoto obtained a loan to start his first pearl oyster farm at the Shinmei inlet on Ago Bay in Mie prefecture with his wife and partner Ume. On 11 July 1893, after many failures and near bankruptcy, he was able to create the hemispherical cultured pearls. The pearls were made by seeding the oyster with a small amount of mother of pearl. In 1927, Mikimoto met with inventor, Thomas Edison, who was in awe of Mikimoto's cultured pearls as it was "supposed to be biologically impossible". He died at the age of 96 in Japan.Famous Birthdays21st September 1902 – Allen Lane - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allen_LaneA British publisher who together with his brothers Richard and John Lane founded Penguin Books in 1935, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market. In 1967 he started a hardback imprint under his own name, Allen Lane. He rose quickly at Bodley Head, becoming managing editor in 1925 following the death of his uncle. After conflict with the board of directors who were wary at first—for fear of being prosecuted—of publishing James Joyce's controversial book Ulysses, Lane, together with his brothers Richard and John, founded Penguin Books in 1935 as part of the Bodley Head. Penguin Books became a separate company the following year. The legend goes that on a train journey back from visiting Agatha Christie in 1934, Lane found himself on an Exeter station platform with nothing available worth reading. He conceived of paperback editions of literature of proven quality which would be cheap enough to be sold from a vending machine; the first was set up outside Henderson's in Charing Cross Road and dubbed the "Penguincubator". Lane was also well aware of the Hamburg publisher Albatross Books and adopted many of its innovations. Most booksellers and authors were against the idea of paperbacks. They believed that paperbacks would result in individuals spending less money on books. Lane was a person that was very stubborn when it came to his company. He operated mainly on intuition and imagination. "He thrived in an atmosphere of crisis and came most fully alive under the challenge of great dilemmas." He was a creative genius that once he had an idea he would not stop until it came to fruition. Once he decided on creating paperbacks he set about in deciding what the books should look like and finding a name. He had decided that the books would be reprints so he also needed to approach other publishers to see if they and their authors would be willing to sublease the rights of the books. He was quoted as saying, "I have never been able to understand why cheap books should not also be well designed, for good design is no more expensive than bad." He was born in Bristol.Events of Interest21th September 2003 – The Galileo spacecraft is terminated by sending it into Jupiter's atmosphere. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_project#End_of_mission_and_deorbit When the exploration of Mars was being considered in the early 1960s, Carl Sagan and Sidney Coleman produced a paper concerning contamination of the red planet. In order that scientists could determine whether or not native life forms existed before the planet became contaminated by micro-organisms from Earth, they proposed that space missions should aim at a 99.9 percent chance that contamination should not occur. This figure was adopted by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) of the International Council of Scientific Unions in 1964, and was subsequently applied to all planetary probes. The danger was highlighted in 1969 when the Apollo 12 astronauts returned components of the Surveyor 3 spacecraft that had landed on the Moon three years before, and it was found that microbes were still viable even after three years in that harsh climate. An alternative was the Prime Directive, a philosophy of non-interference with alien life forms enunciated by the original Star Trek television series that prioritized the interests of the life forms over those of scientists. Given the (admittedly slim) prospect of life on Europa, scientists Richard Greenberg and Randall Tufts proposed that a new standard be set of no greater chance of contamination that that which might occur naturally by meteorites. Galileo had not been sterilized prior to launch and could have carried bacteria from Earth. Therefore, a plan was formulated to send the probe directly into Jupiter, in an intentional crash to eliminate the possibility of an impact with Jupiter's moons, particularly Europa, and prevent a forward contamination. On April 14, 2003, Galileo reached its greatest orbital distance from Jupiter for the entire mission since orbital insertion, 26 million km (16 million mi), before plunging back towards the gas giant for its final impact. At the completion of J35, its final orbit around the Jovian system, Galileo impacted Jupiter in darkness just south of the equator on September 21, 2003, at 18:57 UTC. Its impact speed was approximately 48.26 km/s (29.99 mi/s).21st September 1994 – Dinosaur Island premiered in Japan - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0109627/ On this day in 1994 in Japan, Dinosaur Island enjoyed its premiere on home video. The Fantasy/Comedy feature starred Griffin Drew and Michelle Bauer, and here's the premise: "An army captain is flying three misfit deserters home for a court martial when the plane has engine trouble and they must land on an uncharted island. There they find a primitive society of cave women who routinely sacrifice virgins to appease The Great One, the top dog dinosaur on the the island. Mistaken for gods, the men must destroy The Great One or face death, but meanwhile they fall in love."The cavewomen's ranch was constructed on a remote portion of David Carradine's ranch.Shot in 12 days.Almost every day was extremely hot during the shooting of this film except one.A sequence with a stop-motion animation dinosaur attacking people on the beach was changed to a hand puppet dinosaur in post-production.The filmmakers paid an additional four thousand dollars for the poster art used to advertise this film.Antonia Dorian said she was nervous filming her first love scene in this film, especially since she was going to be topless. She'd danced topless in Vegas shows and in videos, but that wasn't the same as being on a small set surrounded by male actors and crew just a few feet away, all staring at her. Jim Wynorski gave her wine to calm her nerves. He also limited how many people would be on set. That and the wine helped her finally get through the scene.When the female warriors are chasing the dinosaur towards the ocean, you can see Malibu homes in the background hills.Wynorski said that Roger Corman asked he and Fred Olen Ray to make the film after Jurassic Park came out. "It wasn't so much a Jurassic Park rip off as a cavewoman movie", Wynorski said.Wynorski and Ray said they rewrote the script entirely. They knew who they were going to cast, employing actors they had worked with before, and tailored the script accordingly. They based the characters of the soldiers on characters in Stripes. Another influence was The War that Time Forgot, part of the Star Spangled War Stories comic book series.The movie was shot at Vasquez Rocks and David Carradine's ranch at Sun Valley over ten days. Wynorski says he and Ray made it "on a wing and a prayer".Wynorski later said, "I'd never co-directed a movie before, but it was smooth sailing all the way. When one of us got tired, the other would take over. I'd usually go back to the comfort of the air-conditioned motor home and hang out with the girls. You really can't beat that."Wynorski says he was at a party when he met Joe Pesci who told him he loved the film, saying "everytime I watch it I feel like I want to go there."IntroArtist – Goblins from MarsSong Title – Super Mario - Overworld Theme (GFM Trap Remix)Song Link - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GNMe6kF0j0&index=4&list=PLHmTsVREU3Ar1AJWkimkl6Pux3R5PB-QJFollow us onFacebook- Page - https://www.facebook.com/NerdsAmalgamated/- Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/440485136816406/Twitter - https://twitter.com/NAmalgamatedSpotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6Nux69rftdBeeEXwD8GXrSiTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/top-shelf-nerds/id1347661094Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/nerds_amalgamated/Email - Nerds.Amalgamated@gmail.comSupport via Podhero- https://podhero.com/podcast/449127/nerds-amalgamated See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

time tv women google australia new zealand japanese japan television events california american national shot earth war queer lords english doctors south africa las vegas mars star trek space moon british europa shadow hamburg batman dc comics nintendo demon galileo folk nature bbc fremont conservation harrison ford warner bros planet sony stripes african thomas edison francis ford coppola released fallen jurassic park software tesla henderson rage agatha christie souls futurama musk mood streets wales rusty antarctica davies rpg casanova spiders south australia malibu sin zen dennis hopper apollo aussie david tennant exeter miyazaki baftas shame james gordon dark souls bloodborne street fighter colossus bbc one sequels ulysses torchwood sarah jane smith sladen cybermen pc carl sagan welsh jupiter international union catherine tate heal marlon brando penguin books committee namibia roger corman richard greenberg cardiff snes spearhead bruce wayne jodie whittaker torchwood children ryu star spangled war stories cape town james joyce affordability fall in love ealing penguins robert duvall ico gotham tv street fighter ii blanka dark souls ii martin sheen solar cells laurence fishburne amazon women david carradine julie gardner tenth doctor russell t davies prime directive john lane brian miller miss universe doctors reboot time lord charing cross road carys npcs second coming sun valley big finish surge thirteenth doctor third doctor judoon elisabeth sladen bad wolf christopher eccleston tom baker jon pertwee sarah jane adventures sarah jane torchwood miracle day bernard cribbins time forgot lethbridge stewart fugitive ume bob baker cucumbers michelle bauer fred olen ray sekiro joe pesci jim wynorski utc google chrome international council great one chun li albert hall mistaken surveyor bruno heller axons miss international refining bbc television gabon vasquez rocks devoid neoen cpus chrome os mcginty jovian apus sekiro shadows die twice amalgamated nioh hidetaka miyazaki dinosaur island last guardian dark souls iii bandai namco entertainment fumito ueda three doctors fantasy comedy allen lane mega drive genesis olly alexander wynorski gaming pcs mid north tenchu gentoo linux elden ring george r super street fighter ii japan studio simonstown two oceans aquarium chromium os invisible enemy mortal shell podhero
Wrong Reel
WR574 - The Making of 'One-Eyed Jacks'

Wrong Reel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 213:40


We're back in the saddle alongside David Lambert to discuss the evolution of Charles Neider's novel 'The Authentic Death of Hendry Jones' from Sam Peckinpah's screenplay adaptation to Marlon Brando's directorial debut 'One-Eyed Jacks' (1961). Follow David Lambert on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidlambertart/ Follow David Lambert on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DavidLambertArt Follow James Hancock on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WrongReel Wrong Reel Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/wrong-reel

Cult Movies Podcast

John Cribbs of The Pink Smoke makes his triumphant return to the show this week to talk about Gillo Pontecorvo's Burn starring Marlon Brando. We talk the different cuts of the film, Brando's "dandy" performance, behind the scenes drama, and offer up pairing recommendations. Head to ColumbusvHughes.com for extensive show notes and links to where you can find John.

Nick and Russ Don't Know Anything!
And the Winner Is: The Godfather (1972)

Nick and Russ Don't Know Anything!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 88:57


Nick and Russ, along with GNO, and guest podcaster and New Yorker John Svendese discuss the Oscar for Best Picture  The Godfather. As always with their spin on it, diving in to what happened that year, looking at the cost of living, and what was popular. So enjoy as they go back to 1973 and discuss Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather, starring Marlon Brando and Al Pacino.  This was prerecorded when Nick had dental surgery and was a little out of it, so enjoy.

Hacking The Afterlife podcast
Hacking the Afterlife with Jennifer Shaffer and Luana Anders about dreams

Hacking The Afterlife podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 51:03


Another mind bending session with Jennifer Shaffer and Luana Anders on the flipside. I posted some photographs on Facebook of Luana who appeared in Francis Coppola's first film "Dementia 13" as it's being released on Blue Ray this week with a commentary by Francis.  And when mentioning that on our podcast, Jennifer revealed that she's been "reading" a member of the Coppola family since 2009.  I have no idea of how that came about - it clearly didn't have anything to do with me or Luana since Jennifer and I didn't meet until 6 years ago, and I had not known that she had "met" or helped someone from the family meet with folks on the flipside. Luana was close with Eleanor and Francis, and we spent many years at their home for Thanksgiving, and as noted in the podcast, Luana spent many times going up there to visit on her own. Francis not only cast her in Dementia 13, she did voice over work for him the Godfather (she's the voice of the nurse who moves Marlon Brando in the film), and also contributed to the script of "One From the Heart." Fans of this podcast know that Luana was instrumental in dragging me into the flipside, since passing in 1996 in my arms.  She started showing up visually, audibly, in dreams - until I made a concerted effort to "find her."  If she was able to visit me, why couldn't I visit her? And have been doing so since I fell into the research behind "Flipside." Then, Luana become our conduit for our "classroom" on the flipside. As noted, it was Tom Petty who said "Your friend Luana is like the bouncer at the stage door with the list of people who get into the VIP lounge. No one gets to speak to you unless she approves it." Today I got an email from a woman in Italy who asked Luana for some help with a classroom she is teaching, and had the distinct impression that Luana said she would, and directed her to look at a video on my YouTube page ("Going Home" a talk I gave at an iands event.) Anyways, this is a podcast about "Hacking the Afterlife." And Luana gives a number of "Life Hacks" in this one, talking about how to interpret dreams, and how to allow that the visuals we see may be related to other lifetimes as well as other adventures. Mind bendingly so.

Sucedió una noche
Sucedió una noche | Un tranvía, Oliver Stone y canciones en el Kit Kat Club

Sucedió una noche

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 55:55


Hace 70 años se estrenaba ‘Un tranvía llamado deseo', la película que lanzó la carrera de Marlon Brando. Celebramos el cumpleaños de Oliver Stone, el gran cronista de la vida social y política de los Estados Unidos. Charlamos con el actor Salva Reina; iba para profesor de gimnasia pero el teatro se cruzó en su camino. Y en nuestra sección dedicada al cine musical nos ocupamos de ‘Cabaret' la película que aportó dramatismo y profundidad psicológica a un género pensado esencialmente para entretener. 

Bringing Down The GrindHouse
The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996) - Film Analysis

Bringing Down The GrindHouse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 43:10


Marlon Brando, Ron Perlman, Val Kilmer & an island full of furries?

Julia en la onda
Persona física: "¿Quién sería el Marlon Brando de la mesa de diálogo?"

Julia en la onda

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 22:31


Raquel Martos y Pedro Vera repasan la actualidad política en clave de humor en Julia en la Onda. Iceta y su comentario sobre la guerra de Vietnam o el enredo entre Ayuso y Almeida son algunos de los temas del día.

Rotten Tomatoes is Wrong (A Podcast from Rotten Tomatoes)
52: Special Guest Chance the Rapper Takes Us to Task

Rotten Tomatoes is Wrong (A Podcast from Rotten Tomatoes)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 65:19


The Eric Metaxas Show
Mallory Millet (Encore)

The Eric Metaxas Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 43:44


Mallory Millett has had a long and varied career and association with the world's elite, including almost dating Mick Jagger, calming the nerves of Marlon Brando, and hobnobbing with Mother Theresa. (Encore Presentation) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Misty and Ike Ruin the Internet
Burt Reynolds • Episode 291 • Misty and Ike

Misty and Ike Ruin the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 16:37


Burt Reynolds • Episode 291 • Misty and IkeIn the history of the world, there are few men that could rock an extraordinary mustache.Sean Connery, Tom Selleck and....BURT REYNOLDS!The king of Florida trailer park cool.  That burst into Hollywood and pissed off Marlon Brando right off the bat.Wanna know why?  You gotta take a listen.And while you are at it- leave us a review or a rating on whatever platform you are listening on!How much does a hot air balloon cost?   What happens when you get abducted by an alien?   Who died on the set of The Wizard of Oz?   Frasier VS Seinfeld, Old School VS Stepbrothers, Chris Farley VS John Candy?   What happens in a city after the Olympics are over?  Misty Roberts and Isaac Heckert are gonna talk about cool sh*t for 15 minutes everyday and have fun doing it.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/MistyandIke)

After The Kid Goes Down
On The Waterfront/Scarface

After The Kid Goes Down

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 57:25


On the season 1 finale, Matt & Nicole watch the FINAL two movies from the 100 Move Bucket List: the Marlon Brando classic, "On The Waterfront" and our second Brian De Palma film, "Scarface." After their new kid learns to sleep through the night, Matt and Nicole will return for season 2. You can recommend movies for them to review on Twitter (@kidgoesdownPOD)  or on Instagram (afterthekidgoesdown)Remember to subscribe, rate, and review!!!Expectations: 00:36On The Waterfront: 9:54Scarface: 32:22

Highlights from Moncrieff
"I like a man who mumbles." From Marlon Brando to Tom Hardy

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 8:33


Women are turned on by men who mumble according to research by the University of California, women find it macho. However men prefer refined tones in women. Henry McKean hit the streets to find mumbling men to break the news to them that they are sexy.

The World Is Wrong
BONUS...Steven Peros on The Cat's Meow

The World Is Wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 41:26


Steven Peros discusses the production of "The Cat's Meow" the film based upon his play. On episode 33 we sang the praises of "The Cat's Meow" from 2001. On episode 45 the film's writer Steven Peros joined us to discuss "The Missouri Breaks" Find all of our episodes at www.theworldiswrongpodcast.com Follow us on Instagram @theworldiswrongpodcast Follow us on Twitter @theworldiswrong Check out: The Director's Wall with Bryan Connolly & AJ Gonzalez & The Radio8Ball Show hosted by Andras Jones See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

In honoring the life and career of late, great producer-director Richard Donner ("Superman," "The Omen," "Lethal Weapon," "The Goonies") Gilbert and Frank present this ENCORE episode from 2018, featuring a fascinating conversation about the importance of on-set teamwork, the eccentricities of Marlon Brando, the singular talent of Rod Serling and the challenge of (faithfully) adapting the Man of Steel for the big screen. Also, Gregory Peck cashes in, Gene Hackman plays hardball, Jackie Gleason bends the elbow and Richard looks back on directing Hollywood's greatest character actors. PLUS: "Inside Moves"! Miguelito Loveless! “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet”! Celebrating Don Rickles! Gilbert auditions for “Scrooged”! And Richard remembers his friend Christopher Reeve! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Art of Darkness
Marlon Brando and the Investigators

Art of Darkness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 163:24


Brad and Kevin tackle the sexually intense, controversial, wildly troubled pioneering actor of the stage and screen: Marlon Brandon. You know him from On the Waterfront, A Streetcar Named Desire, the Godfather and Apocalypse Now, but how much do you really know? The AoD guys go deep in this one. Support the show and get [...]

Madness Madness!
Episode 29: The IRA vs. the AIM

Madness Madness!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 154:20


This week we take a look at two groups of people utterly fucked over — by England and by the people so awful they got kicked out of England, respectively — and the groups they formed to express their well-thought-out grievances. Props to the American Indian Movement (AIM) for making their point while killing a whole whole whole lot fewer people; slight demerits for Marlon Brando's involvement, though seriously NOBODY EVEN INVITED HIM. Props to the Irish Republican* Army (IRA) for coming painfully close to killing Margaret Thatcher; fairly serious demerits for killing, uh, a whole lot of civilians, wrongly suspected informants, and even rightly suspected informants. Plus Gerry Adams is involved, the base lying shitheel. Anyway! Come learn with us!*not that kind of RepublicanErin's review of Gaywyckhttps://matsentertainment.com/librarian-wanted-no-librarians-need-apply/

The Nerd Party - Master Feed
House of Coppola - 47 - Apocalypse Now

The Nerd Party - Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 72:47


Apocalypse Now took 16 months to shoot, two years to edit, and there are three different versions. This week, Darren, John, and Tristan review the Final Cut and discuss the changes around the three as well as tons of behind-the-scenes information. Does this film hold up for you?

House of Fincher
House of Coppola - 47 - Apocalypse Now

House of Fincher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 72:47


Apocalypse Now took 16 months to shoot, two years to edit, and there are three different versions. This week, Darren, John, and Tristan review the Final Cut and discuss the changes around the three as well as tons of behind-the-scenes information.Does this film hold up for you?

First Timers Movie Club
Streetcar Named Desire

First Timers Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 113:53


This week Patrick shows Lolo the 1951 screen adaption of the Tennessee Williams play A Streetcar Named Desire, a film that help change modern screen acting as we know it. They continue their debate about Marlon Brando and his acting as well discussing what is method acting and is it okay, how and why this film was translated from the original play and the difficulties with dealing with the censors that this film faced. New episodes of First Timers Movie Club come out every other Friday so click SUBSCRIBE and rate us five stars to make sure you don't miss our next episode!Have a favorite (or least favorite) famous movie that you think we should've seen? Reach out to IX Film Productions on Twitter, Instagram or email and we'll add it to our list!Don't miss our 2021 Oscars series and the upcoming Harry Potter Episode exclusively on our Patreon: www.patreon.com/ixfilmproductionsFollow IX Film Productions for podcast updates, stand up comedy, original web shorts and comedy feature films at:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ixfilmproductionsTwitter: www.twitter.com/ixproductionsInstagram: @IXProductionsYouTube: www.youtube.com/ixfp"First Timers Movie Club" is brought to you by IX Film Productions."Making the World a Funnier Place one Film at a Time"MusicThe Curtain Rises by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5007-the-curtain-risesLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The Eric Metaxas Show
Mallory Millet

The Eric Metaxas Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 42:48


Mallory Millet has had a long and varied career and association with the world's elite, including almost dating Mick Jagger, calming the nerves of Marlon Brando, and hobnobbing with Mother Theresa. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

One Brew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Episode 83: No Sudden Move

One Brew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 64:12


Benicio is tired of wearing a mask and so are Kevin and Doug. They take off their masks to review Steven Soderbergh's new 1950's gangster flick “No Sudden Move” starring Benicio del Toro and Don Cheadle. First Kevin and Doug will take you on a whirlwind ride of terrible impressions of Al Pacino, and Marlon Brando. Listen and enjoy the not so serious side of gangster movies.

Novel Pairings
72. A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams and contemporary novels with plenty of drama

Novel Pairings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 70:12


Today, Chelsey and Sara discuss a melodramatic classroom staple: A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams. We relive our classroom experiences, investigate why this play is still taught, and dig into the iconic characters made famous by Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh in the 1951 film adaptation. Plus, as always, we offer six contemporary pairings that capture similar themes. For more bonus episodes, nerdy classes, and extra book talk,  join our Classics Club: patreon.com/novelpairings.com. Connect with us  on Instagram or Twitter. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get updates and behind-the-scenes info. Get two audiobooks for the price of one from Libro.fm. Use our Libro.fm affiliate code NOVELPAIRINGS and support independent bookstores.   Skip to the pairings: [43:50] . . . . Books mentioned: Thank you for supporting the show by shopping our affiliate links!  Chelsey Luster by Raven Leilani (Amazon) Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison (Amazon) The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah (Amazon) Sara Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney (Amazon) Real Life by Brandon Taylor (Amazon) Detransition, Baby by Torrey Peters (Amazon)   Picks of the Week: You Must Remember This: On the Waterfront and Eliza Kazan The Morgan Tennessee Williams Exhibit

Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast
178 - LOST SOUL: THE DOOMED JOURNEY OF RICHARD STANLEY'S ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU w Sam Mickens

Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 57:53


George talks to musician Sam Mickens about one of his favorite docs LOST SOUL: THE DOOMED JOURNEY OF RICHARD STANLEY'S ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU (2014, David Gregory)It's the mid-'90s. British/South African horror director Stanley pitches a version of the H.G. Wells novel The Island of Dr. Moreau and New Line Cinema picks it up. Some huge movie stars get attached and the set becomes a war of egos, bad weather, worse attitudes, and inevitable chaos. Stanley is sent packing, but this is not the last we see of him.Sam Mickens is a native Angeleno, musician, writer, multidisciplinary artist, and now President/head of programming for Another World is Possible, a new politics and culture streaming service and news network.*Abuse accusations leveled against Stanley came to light in 2021.Follow Sam on:Twitter: @SamMickensInstagram: @SamMickensFollow Another World Is Possible on:Twitter: @AWIPTVInstagram: @AWIPTVFollow us on:Twitter: @supdocpodcastInstagram: @supdocpodcastFacebook: @supdocpodcastsign up for our mailing listAnd you can show your support to Sup Doc by donating on Patreon.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Keepin It 100 with Konnan
K100 Rehash Ep 29: Controversial debates & a LIVE Disco List!

Keepin It 100 with Konnan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 66:48


- On this week's K100 ReHash, we start out with Disco discussing a controversial discussion he had with Vince Russo, and the conversation turns into racism and sexism in America, plus an infamous debate on comparisons between Colin Kaepernick and Muhammad Ali! (Episodes 23 & 24)- Formerly a Patreon exclusive, Konnan and Joe talk about Marlon Brando's "speech" at the Oscars, stereotypes, sports unifying people of all colors and creeds, and the disgraceful and unbelievable stories of "Coon Chicken Inn" and "Sambo's." (February 2018)- A never heard before LIVE Disco List from Expo Lucha1 (September 2018)K100 Rehash is brought to you by...Tiege Hanley returns as a sponsor, bringing back the uncomplicated skin care system for men! Go to tiege.com/K100 for the best skin care system (facial wash & scrub, AM and PM moisturizer) at the best price, plus a FREE gift with your first box!Lambs joins K100 as a sponsor, and as Disco says, "this is high tech stuff!" T shirts, underwear, hats, masks and more, that block 99% of wireless radiation, including cellphones, 4G, 5G, Wifi, and BlueTooth radiation! Get 20% off with the code K100 at getlambs.com! Support the show and keep your body safe!Use the code K100 at RealGoodFoods.com and receive a $25 credit towards your order! Stuffed chicken, breakfast sandwiches, sugar free ice cream, Italian entrees and more! Support the show and use K100 for your $25 off!Go to Manscaped.com and use our new code K100 for 20% off all your below the belt male grooming needs, including a trimmer, razor, cologne, wash and deodorant and more! PLUS, the NEW Lawnmower 4.0!Check out LegacySupps.com and use the code K100 for 10% off of their fat burner, pre workout, testosterone supplement, and sleep aid! Brought to you by friend of the show, Nick Aldis!

Fresh Air
Rita Moreno

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 45:45


Moreno moved to the U.S. mainland from Puerto Rico as a child. She says her 'West Side Story' role is "the only part I ever remember where I represented Hispanics in a dignified and positive way." We talk about some of the racism and sexism she experienced in Hollywood, her relationship with Marlon Brando, and why she's happier than ever now at 89 years old. Moreno is an EGOT, a winner of an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.