Podcasts about covax

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  • 548PODCASTS
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  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about covax

Show all podcasts related to covax

Latest podcast episodes about covax

Africa Daily
Can Africa become vaccine self-sufficient?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 14:12


This time last year we were asking whether Africa would get enough Covid-19 vaccines. As 2021 progressed, it became clear that it wouldn't. African leaders complained that rich countries weren't meeting their commitments to Covax, the scheme aimed at ensuring equitable access to the vaccines. South African president Cyril Ramaphosa coined the term vaccine apartheid, in reference to the gulf between vaccination rates on the continent and other parts of the world. And some people began to ask how the continent could avoid being in this position again in the future. So, can Africa become self-sufficient when it comes to vaccine production? #AfricaDaily

WorldAffairs
Where in the World Are All the Vaccines?

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 59:01


With the rapid spread of Omicron and CDC guidelines changing on a near-daily basis, the pandemic can feel more confusing than ever. To help make sense of it all, we bring you this week's episode two days ahead of schedule. Even in the face of a highly infectious variant, COVID vaccines still offer the best protection from severe illness and death, but 40% of the world's population, mostly in low income countries, have yet to receive a first dose. With so many people unvaccinated, new variants will continue to emerge. So, what can be done to break vaccine gridlock and bring this pandemic to an end? On this week's episode, Dr. Luciano Cesar Azevado, an ICU doctor in São Paulo, explains how Brazil went from being a COVID hotspot to a world leader in vaccinations. Then, Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO of GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, talks with Ray Suarez about overcoming the challenges of vaccine distribution in hard to reach areas. Guests:  Dr. Luciano Cesar Azevado,  ICU physician and professor of critical care and emergency medicine, Sírio-Libanês Hospital in São Paulo, Brazil Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO, GAVI, The Vaccine Alliance Hosts: Philip Yun, CEO, World Affairs Ray Suarez, co-host, World Affairs

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
COVID Q & A with Dr. Peter McCullough #13

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 59:06


Is the new Paxlovoid pill just a "reworked" ivermectin? What do you think of the data? Love the show. My question is, is it safe to take the provolone iodine with hypothyroid? There is a history of heart disease in my husband's family so the thought of my boys getting any vac scares me, especially since I have 3 teenage sons. Will there be a 'safe' alternative? Will Novovax or Covax be safer?

THE MCCULLOUGH REPORT
COVID Q & A with Dr. Peter McCullough #13

THE MCCULLOUGH REPORT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 59:06


Is the new Paxlovoid pill just a "reworked" ivermectin? What do you think of the data? Love the show. My question is, is it safe to take the provolone iodine with hypothyroid? There is a history of heart disease in my husband's family so the thought of my boys getting any vac scares me, especially since I have 3 teenage sons. Will there be a 'safe' alternative? Will Novovax or Covax be safer?

Podcast Internacional - Agência Radioweb
Covid-19: menos da metade das vacinas prometidas foram entregues

Podcast Internacional - Agência Radioweb

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 1:28


Mesmo com a circulação da variante Ômicron do coronavírus, o ano de 2022 começa com menos da metade das vacinas prometidas em 2021 entregues em todo o mundo. Segundo dados da Covax reunidos pelo Our World in Data, enquanto países mais e de média renda já aceleram a distribuição da dose de reforço, as nações mais pobres contam com menos de 10% de suas populações com uma dose dos imunizantes disponíveis.

Habari za UN
31 DESEMBA 2021

Habari za UN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 12:07


Katika jarida la matukio ya mwaka la Umoja wa Mataifa hii leo Assumpta Massoi anakuletea -Wanajeshi watatu wa kulinda amani kutoka Tanzania wanaohudumu kwenye mpango wa Umoja wa Mataifa nchini Jamhuri ya Afrika ya Kati MINUSCA, wamejeruhiwa na mmoja vibaya sana baada ya msafara wao kukanyaga vilipuzi. Wote wanatibiwa hospitalini mjini Bangui -Shirika la Umoja wa Mataifa la kuhudumia watoto UNICEF limesema mwaka huu umekuwa wa machungu na ukiukwaji mkubwa wa haki za watoto katika mizozo ya muda mrefu na ile mipya.  -Shirika la Umoja wa Mataifa la mpango wa chakula duniani WFP limesitisha opetresheni zake jimboni Darfur Kaskaini nchini Sudan baada ya mabohari yake matatu kuporwa mjini El Fasher hali ambayo itaathiri watu milioni 2 wanaohitaji msaada nchini humo mwaka 2022 -Mada kwa kina leo inamulika matukio makubwa yaliyojiri mwaka 2021 -Na katika kujifunza Kiswahili leo tuko Kenya kwa mtalam wetu Josephat Gitonga akifafanua methali ""IMARA YA JEMBE KAINGOJE SHAMBANI"

EN POCAS PALABRAS
Covid en America Latina y el Caribe bastante controlada

EN POCAS PALABRAS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 3:59


En América Latina y el Caribe según los registros de la OPS hasta el 28 de diciembre, el 57% de la población de está completamente vacunada, y ya se han administrado más de 1,400 millones de dosis en el continente americano. El mecanismo COVAX* ha entregado más de 76,2 millones de dosis de vacunas en 33 países de América, muchas de ellas donadas por otros países, a través del Fondo Rotatorio de la Organización.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Are booster programs driving global vaccine inequity?

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 8:20


While the rollout of boosters in Australia and many other countries is well underway, there's concern that poorer countries are still lagging behind. Vaccine production has scaled up to meet global demand, but just 8 per cent of people in low income countries have received at least one dose of the COVID jab.

ONU Info

Covid-19 I UNESCO et éducation I racisme dans le monde Au menu de l'actualité  - La solidarité vaccinale contre la Covid-19 et les promesses du COVAX en 2022. - L'UNESCO exhorte à repenser le futur de l'éducation pour répondre aux mutations profondes des sociétés. - L'artiste québécois Webster dresse un bilan mitigé de la lutte contre le racisme dans le monde. 

Depictions Media
WHO Press update December 21 2021

Depictions Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 59:14


2021 was a year in which we lost 3.5 million people to COVID-19 – more deaths than from HIV, malaria and tuberculosis combined in 2020.WHO issued updated guidance for health workers, recommending the use of either a respirator or a medical mask. Only half of WHO's Member States have been able to reach the target of vaccinating 40% of their populations by the end of the year. Today, COVAX shipped its 800 millionth vaccine dose. Half of those doses have been shipped in the past three months. SAGE expressed concern that blanket booster programmes will exacerbate vaccine inequity.WHO is working to identify the next generation of vaccines through the Solidarity Trial Vaccines. The trial includes two vaccines, three others will be included shortly.

It is Discernable®
Professor Nikolai Petrovsky's Breakthrough with the Australian TGA

It is Discernable®

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 91:33


Professor Nikolai Petrovsky invented SPIKOGEN (formerly called Covax-19) which has now rolled out to millions of people with zero deaths, zero cases of myo/pericarditis, and zero cases of thrombosis. Such a remarkable adverse event profile is, according to the professor, absolutely normal in traditional vaccine development but has been forgotten in a sea of adverse events around the world. Now approved in New Zealand as a travel vaccine, the professor joined me to discuss a massive range of topics including the science behind spike proteins, C-19 variants, truth in efficacy reporting, natural immunity, viral attenuation, and the future for his vaccine SPIKOGEN. Nikolai is the Director of Endocrinology at the Flinders Medical Centre (South Australia), Professor of Medicine at Flinders University (South Australia), Vice President of the International Immunomics Society, founder of Vaxine and creator of SPIKOGEN. Watch this episode: https://youtu.be/0nGLwBuJnLI --------------------------------------- DISCERNABLE Our Private Community: discernable.locals.com The Crew Mailing List: https://discernable.io/crew The Podcast: http://discernable.io/listen The Video Archive: https://www.youtube.com/discernable & https://odysee.com/@discernable Our Town Hall on Ethics with Acting Senior Sergeant Krystal Mitchell: https://www.crowdcast.io/e/learnethics PROFESSOR NIKOLAI PETROVSKY https://twitter.com/vaxine_news https://vaxine.net --------------------------------------- 1:47 SPIKOGEN receives a provisional determination from Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) 3:25 How does SPIKOGEN compare to NovaVax? 6:22 SPIKOGEN approved in New Zealand 14:17 The safety of protein based vaccines 15:10 Adverse events with protein vaccines 17:22 The scientific data on SPIKOGEN 23:30 The historic crowdfunding of a vaccine 25:54 What are ‘breakthrough infections'? 30:09 Protein vaccines can be as fast as mRNA therapies 33:26 How to make spike proteins for different variants – genomic sequences 36:43 Injecting ready made spike proteins vs injecting mRNA 39:39 The different types of spike proteins 40:59 Why are mRNA vaccines causing thrombosis, myocarditis, pericarditis etc? 45:34 How does natural immunity compare to vaccinal immunity? 52:08 Omicron variant is not necessarily ‘less severe' – we don't know yet 54:17 Why viral attenuation is a myth 59:54 Nikolai Petrovsky vs Geert Vanden Bossche – antibody dependent enhancement 1:03:27 Population wide vaccination vs vulnerable vaccination 1:07:47 Should we vaccinate young children with SPIKOGEN? 1:09:56 The problem with comparing Covid-19 to influenza 1:16:46 SPIKOGEN is NOT a life-long prescription 1:22:30 How doctors used to weigh up risk vs benefit 1:25:46 COVAX is NOT COVAX-19…this is the difference 1:26:57 The professor took his own vaccine but it wasn't good enough for government 1:29:53 The financial deal between Vaxine and Discernable to promote SPIKOGEN 1:30:18 EOI for SPIKOGEN clinical trials

World Review
Has the world failed to share vaccines? | with Covax managing director Aurélia Nguyen

World Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 26:44


As a new Covid variant causes concern about the effectiveness and global equity of vaccine programmes, is the project to deliver vaccines to the Global South working?New Statesman reporter Harry Clarke-Ezzidio interviews Aurélia Nguyen, the managing director of Covax, an organisation set up to ensure fair access to Covid vaccines. They discuss criticism of the current vaccination programme, whether richer countries are hoarding vaccines, and why the world needs to cooperate to defeat the pandemic. If you have a You Ask Us question for the international team, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk.Further reading:International coronavirus vaccine tracker: how many people have been vaccinated? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

NZZ Akzent
Omikron: Impft Afrika jetzt?

NZZ Akzent

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 16:26


Mit der neuen Virusvariante Omikron blickt die Welt wieder nach Afrika und stellt fest: Die Impfquote ist erschreckend tief. Lange hat der Westen den Kontinent bei der Versorgung von Impfstoffen im Stich gelassen. Doch will Afrika tatsächlich mehr impfen? Heutiger Gast: Fabian Urech Weitere Informationen zum Thema: https://www.nzz.ch/meinung/der-omikron-weckruf-afrika-muesste-mehr-impfen-doch-will-es-das-ld.1658038 Hörerinnen und Hörer von «NZZ Akzent» lesen die NZZ online oder in gedruckter Form drei Monate lang zum Preis von einem Monat. Zum Angebot: nzz.ch/akzentabo

The Real Story
Omicron: Did Africa get a raw deal?

The Real Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 48:57


The emergence of the Omicron variant has once again highlighted the difficulty in preventing the pandemic from spreading across the globe. Health experts have long argued that regions like southern Africa, where the variant was first detected, are prone to dangerous mutations of the virus when large groups of people are left unvaccinated. Only a tenth of Africa's billion plus population have received their first dose and the continent is yet to create its own Covid vaccines. African nations are reliant on vaccines from the international alliance Covax but the supply is far less than what's required. Meanwhile many on the continent have opted to pursue traditional remedies, with some denying the existence of the virus altogether. So what's the road ahead for Africa as it tries to overcome the pandemic? What sort of public engagement is required to reduce vaccine hesitancy? And how is the fight against Covid made more difficult by other health emergencies? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts. Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed.

Bloomberg Westminster
Boosters Not Boosterism (with Jamie Driscoll)

Bloomberg Westminster

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 24:56


Jamie Driscoll, the Labour Mayor of the North of Tyne says he regrets the Government's relaxation of mask-wearing rules earlier this year. On vaccines, Driscoll says we need 'boosters not boosterism'. Plus: Should companies be forced to give up their Covid vaccine patents? Rosa Pavanelli, General Secretary of Public Services International tells Bloomberg Westminster's Yuan Potts and Caroline Hepker that the Covax programme has not delivered for poorer nations. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: African Politics and Security Issues

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


Michelle Gavin, CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, leads a conversation on African politics and security issues.     FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR fall of 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, cfr.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Michelle Gavin with us today to talk about African politics and security issues. Ambassador Gavin is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies. Previously, she was managing director of the Africa Center, a multidisciplinary institution dedicated to increasing understanding of contemporary Africa. From 2011 to 2014, she served as the U.S. ambassador to Botswana and as the U.S. representative to the Southern African Development Community, and prior to that, she was a special assistant to President Obama and the senior director for Africa at the National Security Council. And before going into the Obama administration, she was an international affairs fellow and adjunct fellow for Africa at CFR. So we are so delighted to have her back in our fold. So, Michelle, thank you very much for being with us. We have just seen that U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken went on a trip to Africa. Maybe you could begin by talking about the strategic framework that he laid out on that trip, and then we have in just recent days—with a new variant of Omicron—seen the travel ban imposed on several African countries and what that means for the strategic vision that he laid out. GAVIN: Sure. Thank you. Well, thank you so much for inviting me to join you today. And I looked at the roster. There's so much amazing expertise and knowledge on this Zoom. I really look forward to the exchange and the questions. I know I'll be learning from all of you. But maybe just to start out to talk a little bit about Secretary Blinken's trip because I think that, in many ways, his efforts to sort of reframe U.S. engagement on the continent, trying to move away from this sort of binary major power rivalry lens that the Trump administration had been using is useful, but also exposes, really, a lot of the challenges that policymakers focused on Africa are dealing with right now. So he tried to reset the relationship in the context of a partnership, of purely acknowledging African priorities and African agency in determining what kind of development partners Africa is interested in, what kind of security partners. I think that's a very useful exercise. Then he kind of ticked through, as every official has to do in making these big framing statements as sort of broad areas of engagement and cooperation, and he talked about increasing trade, which, of course, is interesting right now with AGOA sunsetting soon, working together to combat pandemic diseases, particularly COVID, working together on climate change, where, of course, Africa has borne more consequences than many other regions of the world while contributing far less to the problem, working together on the democratic backsliding and authoritarian sort of surge that we've seen around the world and, finally, working together on peace and security. So this huge agenda, and I think what's interesting and what in many ways his trip made clear is that it's very hard to get to the first four points when the last one, the peace and security element, is in chaos. And, look, obviously, Africa's a big continent. All of us who ever engage in these conversations about Africa are always—are forever trying to provide the disclaimer, right, that there's never one African story. There's never one thing happening in this incredibly diverse continent. But it is the case that the peace and security outlook on the continent is really in bad shape, right. And so the secretary traveled to Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. The headlines from his trip, really, were dominated by the disorder in the Horn of Africa that we're seeing right now. So you have the civil conflict in Ethiopia, which has been incredibly costly to that country in terms of lives, in terms of their economic outlook, has been characterized by atrocities of war crimes. And, I think right now, most observers are very concerned about the integrity of the Ethiopian state, its capacity to persist. Regardless of today, tomorrow, or next week's military developments, it's very hard to see a lasting and sustainable military solution to this conflict and the parties do not appear, really, amenable to a serious political negotiation. But it's not just Ethiopia, of course. It's Sudan, where we saw the tenuous military-civilian transitional government kind of fully hijacked by the military side of that equation in a coup that has been, really, rejected by so many Sudanese citizens who are still on the streets even today trying to push back against the notion of military dominance in their transition and beyond, and they are being met with violence and intimidation. And the outlook there is quite worrying. You've got border clashes between Ethiopia and Sudan. You have electoral crisis in Somalia. So the Horn, you know, is looking like a very, very tough neighborhood. And, of course, everyone is concerned about the impact on Kenya and East Africa itself, given the insurgency in Mozambique, which has more than once affected neighboring Tanzania, these bombings in Uganda and the sense of instability there. The picture is one of multiple crises, none of which come with easy fixes or purely military solutions. And then you have this kind of metastasizing instability throughout the Sahel, right, and the concern that more and more states will fall victim to extremely worrisome instability and the very costly violence. So there's a huge security agenda and we're just—we're all aware of the basic facts that it's very hard to make progress on partnerships to support democratic governance in the midst of conflict. It's very hard to come together on climate change or to fight a pandemic in the midst of these kinds of circumstances. So I think it's a really challenging picture. And just to pull a couple of these threads, on this issue of democratic backsliding the Biden administration's desire to build more solidarity among kind of like-minded countries whose democracies may take different forms but who buy into a basic set of democratic values, it's undeniable that the trend lines in Africa have been worrisome for some time and we do see a lot of these kind of democratic authoritarian states, these states where you get some of the form, some of the theater, of democracy, particularly in the form of elections, but no real capacity for citizens to hold government accountable. It's not really a kind of a demand-driven democratic process, that the fix is often in on these elections, and there is polling, right, that suggests that this is turning people off of democratic governance in general, right. If what you understand democratic governance to be is a sham election, you know, at regular intervals while you continue to be governed by a set of individuals who are not really beholden to the electorate, right, and are protecting a very small set of interests, then it's not surprising to see some waning enthusiasm. It's not that other forms of government are necessarily looking great to African populations, but I think it is notable in some of that Afrobarometer polling in places where you wouldn't expect it, right, like South Africa, where people sacrificed so much for democracy, and you really do see a real decline in enthusiasm for that form of governance. So there's a lot of work to be done there. The last thing, just because you brought it up, on the latest news about this new variant, the Omicron variant—I may be saying that wrong. It may be Omicron. Perhaps someone will correct me. And the kind of quick policy choice to institute a travel ban on a number of southern African countries. So I do think that in the context of this pandemic, right, which has been economically devastating to the continent—where the global economic downturn that occurred for Africans, too, but you had governments with very little fiscal space in which to try to offset the pain for their populations. In addition, you have had the issues of vaccine inequity, right, where it's just taken far too long to get access to vaccines for many African populations—it's still not adequate in many places—and a sort of sense that the deal initially proposed in the form of COVAX wasn't really what happened—you know, a feeling of a bait and switch—that looks like—what it looks like is disregard for African lives. And while I am really sympathetic—I used to work in government and it's crystal clear when you do that your first responsibility is the safety of the American people—these travel bans sort of fit into a narrative, right, about scapegoating, about disregard for African life that, I think, is going to make it awfully hard for this new reframing of respect and partnership, right, to really resonate. And I would just note, as a former U.S. ambassador in Botswana, that the scientists in the lab in Gaborone and the scientists in South Africa who did the sequencing and helped to alert the world to this new variant, right, were doing us all a tremendous favor. It's not at all clear that this variant started in southern Africa, right. We know that it exists on every continent right now except Antarctica. We know that samples taken in Europe before these discoveries were made in southern Africa—just tested later—showed that the variant was already there. And so it is a bit hard to explain why specifically southern Africans are banned from travel. You know, I think it's unfortunate. There are other policies that could be pursued around testing, around quarantine requirements. So I'll leave that there. I'm not a public health expert. But I think it's—I'm glad you brought it up because I think these things do really resonate and they inform how the United States is understood on the continent. They inform how Africans understand global institutions and kind of global governance to reflect or not reflect their concerns and interests. And if what the Biden administration wants is partners in this notion of democratic solidarity and partners in trying to reconstruct kind of international institutions a sense of global order, a norms-based rules-based approach to multilateral challenges, it's going to be hard to get the African buy-in that is absolutely necessary to achieve those goals when these kinds of issues continue to give the impression that Africa is an afterthought. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much, Michelle. That was really a great overview for us. So now we want to go to all of you. You can raise your hand—click on the raised hand icon to ask a question—and when I recognize you please unmute yourself and state your affiliation. Otherwise, you can submit a written question in the Q&A box, and if you do write a question please say what institution you're with so that I can read it and identify you properly and—great. Our first hand raised is from Dr. Sherice Janaye Nelson. And let me just say, the “Zoom user,” can you please rename yourself so we know who you are? So, Dr. Nelson, over to you. Q: Good afternoon, everyone. Dr. Sherice Janaye Nelson from Southern University. I'm a political science professor in the department. And the question, I guess, I have is that we know that the African people have a history of nondemocratic governance, right? And when we look at a place like Tunisia, we know that one of the reasons in the Arab Spring that they were so successful—although often considered an Arab country, they are successful because there had been tenets of democracy that were already broiled in the society. The question I have is that to these places that do not have that institutional understanding or have even—maybe don't even have the values to align with democracy, are we foolhardy to continue to try to support democratic governance as the full-throated support versus trying to look at more of a hybrid of a sovereign situation that allows for, in many ways, a kingdom, a dictator, and et cetera, with then a democratic arm? Thank you so much. GAVIN: Thanks, Dr. Nelson. It's an interesting question, and I agree with you insofar as I think that it's really interesting to think about the kind of governance antecedents in a bunch of African countries, particularly in the pre-colonial era, right, and try to figure out how they find expression afterwards. There's no question that, you know, colonialism doesn't set the table well for democracy. There's no doubt about that. But I would say that, you know, despite the loss of faith in democratic governance that we've seen in some of the polling, you know, very consistently for a long time what you've seen is that African populations do seem to want democratic governance. They want to be able to hold their leaders accountable. They want everyone to have to abide by the law. They want basic protections for their rights. So, you know, I'm not sure that there's any society that's particularly ill-suited to that. But I do think that democracy comes in many forms and it's always particularly powerful when there is, you know, some historical resonance there. I also—you know, if we take a case like one of the world's last absolute monarchies in eSwatini right now what you see is a pretty persistent civic movement demanding more accountability and less power for the monarch, more protection for individual rights. And so, you know, I'm not—I think that people are feeling disillusioned and frustrated in many cases and you see this, too, in the enthusiasm with which several of the recent coups in West Africa have been met—you know, people pouring out into the streets to celebrate because they're frustrated with the status quo. They're interested in change. But very rarely do you see then persistent support for, say, military dictatorships or military-dominated government. So I'm not sure that the frustration means enthusiasm for some of these other governing models. People want democracy to work a lot better. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Lucy Dunderdale Cate. Q: Hi. Yes. I'm Lucy Dunderdale Cate. I'm with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I wanted to just ask you about kind of the African Union's role in this, you know, particularly and with the Biden administration, and thinking about, you know, the Horn of Africa security issues that you mentioned. Kind of where do you see that we're going and what do you see kind of for the future there? Thank you. GAVIN: Sure. Thanks for that question. I think the AU, for all of its flaws—and, you know, find me a multilateral organization that isn't flawed—is actually incredibly important. You know, for the Biden administration, which has kind of staked out this position that international institutions matter and multilateral institutions matter, they've got to work better, we can't address the threats we all face without these functioning and they may need to be modernized or updated but we need them, then the AU is a really important piece of that puzzle. And I think, you know, right now, for example, in Ethiopia that the—it's the AU's negotiator, former Nigerian President Obasanjo, who really is in the lead in trying to find some glimmer of space for a political solution, and this was a little bit late in the day in terms of AU activism on this issue and I think it's been a particularly difficult crisis for the AU to address in part because of being headquartered in Addis and sort of operating within a media and information environment in Ethiopia that is one that does not create a lot of space for divergence from the federal government's position. So I think that, in the end, right, the prospect of the collapse of a 110-million-strong country, a place that used to be an exporter of security, a major diplomatic player in the region, right, spurred AU action. But it's been a little bit—more than a little bit slow. But you have seen some pretty forward-leaning stance at the AU as well. Their response to the military coup in Sudan this fall was pretty robust and clear. Now this sort of new transitional arrangement that appears to be more palatable to much of the international community than to many Sudanese citizens is a—we're wading into murkier waters there. But I think the AU, you know, it's the only game in town. It's essential, and particularly in the Horn where the subregional organization EGAD is so incredibly weak that the AU, as a vehicle for an African expression of rules-based norms-based order, is—you know, actually its success is incredibly important to the success of this major U.S. foreign policy plank. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next written question from Rami Jackson. How much of the democratic backsliding is supported by outside powers? For example, there was a chance for a democratic movement in Chad but the French threw their weight behind Déby's son after he was shot. GAVIN: That's a great question. I think that it's, certainly, not the case that external partners or actors are always positive forces, right, for democratic governance on the continent. There's no doubt about that, and it can be France and Chad. It can be, you know, Russian machinations in Central African Republic. There's a lot. It can be some of the Gulf states in Sudan, right, who—or Egypt, who seem very comfortable with the idea of military dominance and maybe some civilian window dressing for this transition. So you're right that external actors are kind of an important piece of the puzzle. You know, I don't think that there are many situations where there is a single external actor who is capable of entirely influencing the direction of government. But there are, certainly, situations where one external actor is tremendously powerful. Chad is a great example, again. And it is something that, I think, you know, again, an administration that has staked so much of its credibility on the notion that this is something very important to them, you know, is going to have to deal with. And it's thorny, right. Foreign policy always is where you have competing priorities. You need to get important work done sometimes with actors who do not share your norms and values, and it's the messiness of trying to articulate and integrate values in a foreign policy portfolio that runs the gamut, right, from counterterrorism concerns to economic interests. But I think that those are tensions that the administration will continue to have to deal with probably a little more publicly than an administration who didn't spend much time talking about the importance of democratic governance. FASKIANOS: Great. And I just want to mention that Rami is a graduate student at Syracuse University. So I'm going to go next to a raised hand from Mojúbàolú Olufúnké Okome. I know you wrote your question, too. Q: Good afternoon. Thank you very much. Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: I wrote my question because I couldn't figure out how to name myself on the phone. You know, thank you for your presentation. When I look at democracy in Africa—I mean, this is not the first go-round—and the response by people, by citizens, to the backsliding by governments is not—it looks familiar to me because, you know, in the 1960s—from the 1960s, there were similar responses. People were dissatisfied. They welcomed authoritarian governments again and again because the government they voted for rigged elections, were also authoritarian, and they were kleptocratic. So what's different now and where's the continuity and what has changed, really, with democracy? The other thing is about this COVID—the management of the COVID situation. I also kind of see the—I think I agree with you. The way Africa is being treated looks very familiar—you know, with disdain, with disrespect, as if the lives of the people there don't matter as much. And what is it going to take, really, to change the—because, you know, if a pandemic that cannot be stopped by walls and borders is not instigating change what is it going to take to change the way in which world politics is—world politics and its governance is done? GAVIN: Fantastic questions and ones that, I think we could talk about for, you know, a week-long conference. But so I'll start from the beginning and just take a stab. I think you're absolutely right. There have been these interesting cycles when it comes to governance on the continent and I think—when I think about sort of what's different from what we were seeing in, say, toward the end of the '60s, I think it's a couple things. One is geopolitical context, right. So my hope is that what we're not doing is kind of doing a reprise of this bipolar world where we're subbing in China's authoritarian development model for a Soviet Communist model and sitting here on the other side and, you know, trying to manipulate other countries into one camp or another. I don't think we're quite there yet and I think the Biden administration is trying very hard not to wade into those waters. So I do think the geopolitical context is a bit different. I also think, you know, that where so many African states are is at—in terms of kind of the scope of their existence as independent entities is an important difference, right. So I think that in the immediate kind of post-colonial era, for an awful lot of governments the fundamental basis for their legitimacy was having—is not being a colonial administrator, not being a puppet of some external power and so the, you know, legitimacy came from liberation, from independence. In places that had terrible conflict sometimes legitimacy came from, you know, delivering some degree of security from a long-standing insecure situation. So, you know, you look at—I think that's where sort of President Museveni derived a lot of legitimacy in the late '80s and through the '90s. And I think that, you know, now, as you have these very significant young populations whose lived experience is not one of ever knowing a time pre-independence, you know, they're looking for service delivery, right. They're looking for opportunity. They're looking for job creation, and I think legitimacy is increasingly going to be derived from the ability to deliver on these priorities. And so I do think that that makes kind of the governance landscape a little bit different, too, sort of different ideas about where governing legitimacy comes from. And, you know, I think that can be manifest in really different ways. But if I had to try and, you know, grab onto that interesting idea about what's different, that's what comes to mind. In this, you know, incredibly important question about what's it going to take to recognize African states as equal players and African lives as—every bit as urgently valuable as any other, you know, I do think that as the world continues to grapple with this pandemic and with other issues that can only be resolved globally, like climate change, it will, over time, kind of force a reckoning and a rethink about what are the important states and what are not. You know, it's interesting to me, it's absolutely true that by not moving out robustly to ensure that the whole world has access to vaccines the richest countries have created opportunities for new mutations to emerge. I hesitate to say that, in some ways, in this context because it sounds like I'm positive that these emerged from Africa, and I'm not. But we do know, you know, as a basic matter of science, right, that we're not safe until everyone's safe. And so I do think that as these kinds of issues that military might and economic power cannot address alone, where it really does take global solidarity and an awful lot of multilateral cooperation, which is messy and cumbersome, right, and necessary, my hope is that that will start to change perceptions in framing. FASKIANOS: Thank you. So I'm going to go next to a written question from Abbey Reynolds, who's an undergraduate student at the University of Central Florida. What steps do you think that international and regional organizations can take to preempt future attempts to derail democratic governance in the region—coups, circumvention of constitutional term letter—limits, rigged elections, et cetera? GAVIN: OK. I'm sorry. What steps should who take? I'm sorry. FASKIANOS: Multilateral—international and regional organizations. GAVIN: OK. You know, I think that in a number of cases subregional organizations have been taking steps, right—ECOWAS, certainly, in rejecting coups and suspending memberships, et cetera. I think, you know, if you look at the sort of articulated and documented principles of a lot of these organizations they're pretty good. It's really about the gulf sometimes between stated principles and practice. So, you know, I think the Southern African Development Community is sometimes guilty of this where there are—you know, there's a clear commitment in static kind of principle documents and protocols around democratic governance but you also have an absolute monarchy that's a member state of SADC. You've had, you know, significant repression in a number of states—Zimbabwe leaps to mind—that SADC doesn't have, really, anything to say about. So you can have organizations that have kind of principles and procedures. At the end of the day, organizations are made up of member states, right, who have a set of interests, and I think that, you know, how governments understand their interest in standing up for certain norms, it's—I think it's specific in many ways to those governments in those states how they derive their own legitimacy, the degree to which they feel they may be living in a glass house, and, you know, frankly, relative power dynamics. So I'm not sure. Certainly, it's always—you know, I'm a believer in multilateralism. I think from an African point of—you know, if you imagine African states trying to assert themselves on the international stage, multilateralism is really important, right, to get if it's possible, where interests align, to have as many African states speaking with one voice. It's a much more powerful message than just a couple individual states. But there are always going to be intrinsic limits. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Gary Prevost with the College of St. Benedict. And if you can unmute yourself. Q: Speaking today, actually, as honorary professor and research associate from Mandela University in South Africa. I've had several students in recent years—doctoral and master's students—study U.S. and allied counterterrorism strategies both in the Middle East and in Africa, and they've come away with a general perspective that those strategies going back several administrations have been almost solely focused on military action and that it has led them in their recommendations sections of their theses to argue that other steps must be taken if these efforts in places like Nigeria or Somalia or Mozambique or even in the Middle East, Syria, and Iraq, are to be successful they must have a changed mindset about counter terror. What's your perspective on that? GAVIN: Well, thanks for that. I wholeheartedly agree, right, and I think, you know, you'll even get plenty of military officers, right, who will say there's no way we can address some—these problems, these, you know, kind of radical violent organizations aligned to global terrorist groups with a purely military approach. It's frustrating. I'm sure it's frustrating for your students, too, because it feels like everyone keeps coming to this conclusion, and, certainly, there have been efforts to, you know, counter violent extremism, provide opportunity for young people. But we're not very good at it, right. We haven't been very good at it yet. There's still a mismatch in terms of the resources we pour into these kind of relative—these different streams of effort, right. But I think also while it's very clear in a situation like Mozambique that if you want to weaken the insurgency you need to be providing more opportunity and building more trust in a community that's been disenfranchised and alienated from the center for a very, very long time. But the how to do that, how to do that effectively and how to do it in a climate of insecurity I actually think is an incredibly difficult challenge, and there are, you know, brilliant people working on this all the time. You know, some of the best work that I've seen suggests that some of this can be done but it's an incredibly long-term undertaking and that, you know, is sometimes, I think, a difficult thing to sustain support for, particularly in a system like the United States where, you know, our appropriations cycles tend to be very short term. So people are looking for, you know, quick impact, things you can put on a bar graph quickly and say that you've done. And I think that, you know, a lot of the kind of peace building research suggests that that's—that, you know, building community trust, which is a huge part of what needs to happen, operates on a very different kind of timeline. So it's a really thorny, thorny problem and how to get—you know, how to sustain political and budgetary support for those kinds of efforts. I don't know the answer yet. I'm sure somebody really smart on—maybe on the Zoom does. FASKIANOS: I'm going to go next to Pearl Robinson at Tufts University. Q: Hello, Ambassador Gavin. First of all, I'd like to congratulate you in your new position as Ralph Bunche Senior Fellow for Africa, and that's actually—as I've been sitting here listening to this, my thought was I'd like to know if you have thought about ways in which you can use your position at the Council to help actualize forms of partnerships about policy dialogues related to Africa. You began by articulating the U.S.'s new strategic vision for Africa. That was an American statement. I haven't really heard an African statement that would be engaging with that policy dialogue. These one-on-one trips of the secretary of state and other people going to individual African countries, based on our agenda, and having one-on-one dialogue discussions, in a way, does not get towards that real notion of African agency in policy and partnership. So I'm actually wondering whether you might envision the Council playing a role and creating some kinds of policy dialogue fora that would have American(s) and Africans participating in ways that would be visible to American publics as well as African publics. So I'm suggesting that you might, you know, be uniquely well suited to have the Council play a role in actually making visible and operationalizing this concept. I just thought about this sitting here listening because what I realized was everybody talking is talking from the American side and I'm wondering if—well, my dear colleague, Olufúnké, actually was an African voice. But I think what needs to happen is there needs to be a way for this taking place maybe with African institutions, academics, civil society actors. So I just throw that out for you to think about and I'd like to hear your first response to that idea. GAVIN: So I think it's exciting and I'd love, actually, to follow up with you. I'm delighted that you're here. I heard some wonderful things about your work. I think there's always the hard part of, right, who speaks for Africa, right, because there are so many diverse African perspectives. But I don't think you're suggesting there's necessarily a unitary voice. You're talking about sort of different actors, and I would agree with you that it's always incredibly rich to have conversations. You know, I recently did a panel with Professor Ed Vitz, who is working on some—working on a paper, I think, that will eventually be a book about sort of U.S.-Africa policy and particularly interested in the kind of frame of major power rivalry. But it was such a refreshing conversation to examine that and compare notes on what we thought the flaws of that frame might be to hear his perspective on where he thought there might be advantages to be seized from it. It was wonderful, and I agree with you that the more dialogue and the more opportunity not just to sort of talk amongst ourselves in a U.S. community that cares about Africa and about U.S. policy the better. You know, I will be honest with you, I often, in a situation like the one right now, I try hard to stick to—to at least keep circling back to U.S. policy because that's where my background is and I, you know, have no desire to posit myself as speaking on behalf of Africans. That's nuts and, you know, not my role. But I do—I have spent a lot of time thinking about how the U.S. engages with the continent. And so I think it's a really interesting notion. I'd love to follow up with you. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take the next written question from Krista Johnston, who's a professor at Howard University. The African Continental Free Trade Area will create the largest consumer market. What are the barriers U.S. businesses investing in Africa and positioning themselves to take advantage of this new trade area and what can the Biden administration do to incentivize this kind of engagement with China? And perhaps I can tack on another question to that because we have a lot of questions—(laughs)—both raised hands—is just to talk a little bit about China's footprint in Africa as well. GAVIN: Sure. Well, so I absolutely agree that the African Continental Free Trade Area is a really incredibly promising step forward for African economic integration and that is, you know, compelling in any number of ways. I think, for example, about the very hot topic of pharmaceutical production, right. And between the Free Trade Area, the standing up of the African Medicines Agency, right, which should help to harmonize regulatory standards for pharmaceuticals and medical equipment throughout the continent, investments seem a lot more attractive, right, when you're looking at much bigger markets than any one country, even than a giant like Nigeria, can provide. So I think that there's tremendous potential here. I will go back to what I said earlier, which is that even with these positive steps, right, it's going to be really important that the peace and security parts start trending in the right direction because it's very—you know, I would say this. U.S. investors are already quite bad at assessing risk in Africa and a backdrop of instability is not going to help that situation, right, and it is, in many cases, going to make a given investment opportunity or partnership opportunity too risky for many. So, you know, there's just no way to jettison those concerns. But wholeheartedly agree it's an exciting development. If the world hadn't gotten sort of hijacked by COVID, I think we'd be talking about it a lot more. On China, you know, the Chinese engagement on the continent is a fact of life that's existed for a very long time and is not going anywhere. It is economic, it is political, it is, increasingly, cultural, and I think, you know, for a state like China that aspires to be a major global power it's entirely predictable and understandable. Do I think that there are some ways in which Chinese investment and engagement are not always beneficial to African states? I do. I have concerns, certainly, about the way China sometimes uses its influence to secure African support for Chinese positions that appear antithetical to stated values in AU documents and other(s) and I have concerns about the transparency of some of the arrangements. I have concerns as well about some of the tech standards and just sort of play for technical dominance that maybe does not have the cybersecurity interests of Africans as its top priority. All that said, I think it's really important for the United States to, you know, understand that there's no—there's nothing to be gained by constantly vilifying China's engagement, some of which has been incredibly helpful for African states hungry, particularly, for financing on major infrastructure projects, and, you know, it's a fact of life we all have to learn to deal with. I do think, you know, there's some natural tension between the Biden administration's democracy focus, right, and the very explicit and intentional efforts of China to present a different model, and I don't think that the U.S. needs to shy away from that or pretend that those differences don't exist. But I do think it's incredibly unhelpful to frame up all of U.S. policy as if it's intended to counter China as opposed to intended to find those areas in the Venn diagram of, you know, those overlaps of African interests and U.S. interests and work together on them. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Anna Ndumbi, who is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Southern Mississippi. Please unmute yourself. Q: Thank you very much. I really appreciate the presentation. I have a quick question in regards to the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is center of Africa. About three years ago, there was a new president that stepped in by the name of Félix Tshisekedi, and he decided to pass a law saying that all the secondary education should be free because, obviously, in Africa schools aren't free. And I, personally, think that maybe it wasn't really—it was something they should have probably considered before passing the law. The result of that is that you have classrooms where there were maybe twenty students and now there's, like, there could be over a hundred students in one classroom, right. So we spoke about the pandemic. When COVID hit a lot of schools were shut down. They were shut down for a long period of time, and when you look at a lot of schools in Africa they don't have the ability of giving out maybe laptops or anything like that to assist students to continue school at home. So in result of that, you see a lot of children who are really below what they should be, below the average when it comes to education, and my question with that is where do we see the future going as far as maybe having international organization(s) or United States intervene because the future is not bright when we look at education with the children or the youth. How can United Nation(s) or maybe other international organization(s) assist, especially with what happened during COVID, going forward? What does the future look like for Africa? And I'm speaking more for the Democratic Republic of Congo. How can nonprofit organization(s) or United States intervene and assist in this matter? GAVIN: Well, thank you for that, and I have followed this a little bit because it was an interesting and kind of splashy promise and initiative on the part of President Tshisekedi and it's been disappointing, I think, to see that some of the, you know, government's budget that was intended to be allocated for that appears to have found its way into a handful of individuals' accounts. But I think that, you know, the fundamental point you're making, which is that in DRC but also throughout the African continent, right, there are these vast populations of young people. It is the youngest region of the world. And if you look at it historically at how other parts of the world have dealt with youth bulges, right, investing in that human capital so that they can be drivers of innovation and economic growth has been a really powerful kind of transformational tool—for example, in Asia. And so I definitely think that you're onto something really important right now about prioritizing investing in young people and their capacity, and you're absolutely right that the disruptions of the pandemic have, in many cases, fallen most heavily on children. You know, how to tackle that, I think, is sort of—you know, I can't design a program in this moment, I'll be honest with you. But I think that you're absolutely right, it's an incredibly important and too often easily overlooked priority. You know, there have been some interesting education innovations on the continent but they're too often kind of small, not scalable, and the need is so incredibly vast. But here, again, I will be a broken record. We do have to go back to this issue that peace and security matters, right. It's very, very hard for kids to get a sustained education that's going to provide them with opportunity in a context of insecurity, which, for a lot of children in eastern Congo, is still the case. FASKIANOS: OK. We have three minutes left. I am going to—and so many questions, and I apologize that we're not going to be able to get to all of you. So I'm going to give the final question to Caleb Sannar. Q: Hi. Yes. Thank you for joining us today, Ambassador Gavin. As they said, my name is Caleb Sanner. I'm a student from the University of Wisconsin in Whitewater. My question is with the Abraham Accords the Trump administration signed the agreement with Morocco to recognize Moroccan sovereignty over Western Sahara. Following that, there was some discrepancies in the southern territory controlled by the U.N., MINURSO, and the Polisario Front, the external Saharawi government, ended up declaring war again on Morocco, resuming the war from nineteen years previously. My question is what is the Biden administration's policy on that? GAVIN: Great question. Reporters have been asking that question, too, and with great message discipline the administration continues to say is that they're supporting U.N. efforts. And so whenever they ask, are you are you going to reconsider this decision regarding recognition of Moroccan sovereignty in Western Sahara, they respond not by answering that question but by saying they're supporting U.N. efforts. So that's the most I can report to you in—regarding that. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Well, we are at the end of our time. So, Ambassador Gavin, thank you very much for being with us and, again, to all of you for your fantastic questions, and I apologize for not being able to get to all of you. But we will have to continue doing webinars on this important topic and on digging in a little bit deeper. So we will be announcing the winter-spring academic lineup next month through our academic bulletin. This is the final webinar of this semester. Good luck with your finals—(laughs)—and grading and taking the exams and all of that. I know it's a very busy and stressful time with the pandemic layered on top of all of it. If you haven't already subscribed for the bulletin, please, you can do so by emailing us at cfracademic@cfr.org. You can follow us on Twitter at @CFR_Academic. And of course, please go to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. You can see on CFR.org Michelle's latest post on Africa—blog posts, so you should follow her there as well. So, again, thank you. Thanks to all of you, and happy holidays, and we look forward to reconvening in 2022.

Washington Post Live
José Manuel Barroso on COVAX's global vaccination efforts, the omicron variant

Washington Post Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 24:31


José Manuel Barroso, board chair of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, joins Washington Post Live to discuss navigating the global vaccine divide, growing concern over the omicron variant, rising coronavirus cases in Europe and how global health leaders are preparing for the next pandemic.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
UNICEF calls for urgent action to address vaccine inequity

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 8:43


The United Nations children's agency is calling on wealthy nations to do more to address vaccine inequity, amid growing concern about the impact of the new COVID-19 strain. UNICEF says international cooperation to deliver doses to developing countries - particularly those with health systems that are struggling to cope - must be made a priority.

ONU Info
Covid-19 : l'OMS continue d'exhorter les pays à accélérer la vaccination et propose son soutien

ONU Info

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 1:38


Face aux nouveaux variants du virus covid-19 et les incertitudes qu'ils suscitent, l'OMS continue d'exhorter les pays à accélérer la vaccination, notamment des groupes hautement prioritaires.  Outre le mécanisme COVAX, l'agence sanitaire mondiale apporte son soutien aux pays pour les aider à maximiser leur couverture vaccinale. C'es le cas en RDC, où l'OMS et les autorités ont finalisé un plan de relance de vaccination contre la Covid, qui commence par Kinshasa et le Nord Kivu, comme l'explique le Dr Richard Mihigo, Coordonnateur du Programme de vaccination et mise au point des vaccins au Bureau régional de l'OMS pour l'Afrique.   (Extrait sonore : Dr Richard Mihigo, Coordonnateur du Programme de vaccination et mise au point des vaccins au Bureau régional de l'OMS pour l'Afrique)

Information Morning Fredericton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

Wealthy countries still aren't meeting their vaccine sharing commitments to the COVAX program. And experts say it's impacting the emergence of new variants.

Redeye
People's Vaccine Alliance calls for an end to vaccine apartheid

Redeye

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 12:46


As long as Covid-19 exists anywhere in the world, it is a threat everywhere. But, in spite of our shared risk, the world's richest countries have exercised a “me first” approach to the Covid-19 vaccine, buying up more than half the total. The People's Vaccine Alliance says our best chance of all staying safe is to ensure a Covid-19 vaccine is available for all as a global common good. We talk with Brittany Lambert of Oxfam Canada.

Les beaux parleurs - La 1ere
Dispute - La suisse décale sa commande de vaccin

Les beaux parleurs - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 11:06


La Suisse a prévu de décaler sa commande dʹun million de doses du vaccin Moderna, pour que le dispositif international Covax en profite et puisse les distribuer dʹici fin décembre. La Suisse devient ainsi le premier pays à répondre à cette demande de la communauté internationale, qui appelle les pays riches à partager leur stock ou à décaler leur approvisionnement. Un vrai geste de solidarité ou un moyen de se débarrasser des doses excédentaires, à lʹheure où la population suisse refuse de se faire vacciner?

Les beaux parleurs - La 1ere
Les beaux parleurs - C'est cadeau (audio)

Les beaux parleurs - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 55:04


Jonas Schneiter est entouré pour cette émission de Suzette Sandoz, Micheline Calmy-Rey, Stéphanie Mérillat et de lʹhumoriste Charles Nouveau. L'équipe parle du dispositif Covax, des capteurs dʹalcool dans les voitures et de la taxation des multinationales.

AP Audio Stories
India's Serum Institute resumes vaccine exports to COVAX

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 0:50


Aujourd'hui l'économie
Pourquoi le rebond du Covid-19 ralentit la vaccination des pays pauvres

Aujourd'hui l'économie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 3:57


Les vaccins continuent à manquer dans les pays les plus pauvres. Avec la nouvelle vague de Covid-19 qui déferle sur l'hémisphère nord, les inégalités dans l'accès au sérum pourraient encore s'aggraver, notamment en Afrique sub-saharienne, la région la moins vaccinée au monde. L'Allemagne a décidé de reporter les dons de vaccins BioNtech qu'elle devait livrer à Covax avant la fin de l'année. Cette petite phrase lâchée il y a quelques jours par le ministre allemand de la santé a fait bondir les ONG. Cette décision brutale choque de la part d'un pays jusqu'alors plutôt généreux, Berlin a déjà expédié 100 millions de doses dans les pays du sud. Mais face à la cinquième vague qui épouvante nos voisins d'Outre-Rhin, Berlin sécurise son approvisionnement en BioNtech, la marque plébiscitée par les Allemands, car beaucoup refusent aujourd'hui la molécule de Moderna que l'Allemagne a pourtant en grande quantité. Avec le rebond du Covid-19, le nombre de personnes ayant reçu une troisième dose dans les pays avancés est déjà bien supérieur à celui des vaccinés en Afrique sub-saharienne. Pendant qu'un habitant d'un pays à faibles revenus reçoit sa première dose, six autres bénéficient du rappel dans les pays les plus riches, selon le directeur de l'OMS. La préférence nationale demeure un réflexe dans les pays les mieux pourvus, malgré le moratoire sur la troisième dose demandée par l'OMS. Et pourtant les pays les plus riches disposent de surplus. Selon Oxfam 100 millions de doses achetées par les pays du G7 pourraient être périmées avant la fin de l'année, et donc gaspillées alors que d'autres pays sont en manque. Les laboratoires ne font pas mieux. Ils ont certes des projets d'usines en Afrique -c'est le cas de Pfizer et de Moderna- et certains sont prêts à céder leurs droits sur le remède anti Covid-19, comme Pfizer ou le labo allemand Merckd. Mais sur le vaccin, jusqu'à maintenant, il n'a jamais été question de partager. L'immense majorité de la production de Pfizer-BioNtech et de Moderna est encore captée par les pays développés ou émergents. Il y a quand même une lueur d'espoir. L'Union européenne a fait savoir mardi 23 novembre qu'elle pourrait finalement accepter une levée partielle des droits pour produire du vaccin à bas coût dans les pays en développement. Le sujet sera discuté la semaine prochaine à l'organisation mondiale du commerce En attendant, le manque de vaccin devient un frein au développement économique Cette inégalité croissante face au vaccin est d'abord un problème de santé publique, car pour éradiquer le coronavirus il faut que la réponse soit globale, comme le disent les experts depuis le début de la pandémie. Mais cette inégalité persistante dans l'accès au vaccin va effectivement engendrer des difficultés économiques pour les moins bien servis. Les investisseurs comme les visiteurs rechignent à venir dans ces pays encore considérés comme à risque. En Afrique, les chiffres sur la circulation de la pandémie sont pourtant rassurants, mais ils ne sont pas fiables, souvent la maladie n'est même pas détectée, et quand elle l'est, l'outil statistique n'est pas toujours suffisant pour la répertorier. Le taux de vaccination demeure très bas En Afrique sub-saharienne seulement 4% de la population a reçu les deux doses à la mi-novembre. Le taux moyen est de 40% pour les autres pays émergents, 70% dans les pays riches, rappelle le FMI dans un post publié cette semaine sur son blog. À l'allure actuelle, l'objectif des 40% à l'échelle mondiale à la fin de l'année fixé par l'OMS ne sera jamais atteint et cela va peser sur la croissance de la région. La reprise qui se manifeste cette année restera timide, de l'ordre de 3% selon le FMI, contre 5% dans les pays avancés. L'Afrique sub-saharienne est la région qui connait le plus faible rebond économique et il reste bien incertain, suspendu à l'évolution de la pandémie et à d'éventuels reconfinements.

The Global Politico
Why the African Union isn't waiting for COVAX

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:02


The U.N.-backed COVAX vaccine facility was supposed to be a game changer. But with less than ten percent of Africans vaccinated — well short of the African Union's goal of 60% by the end of this year— Strive Masiyiwa, the head of the Union's vaccination effort, says the continent can no longer rely on donations and vaccines produced abroad to fight disease. Masiyiwa tells POLITICO's Ryan Heath about his negotiations with the Indian government after he realized they would no longer be exporting vaccines to Africa — and why that moment convinced him the only thing left to do was to build out a vaccine infrastructure back home.  POLITICO couldn't confirm a figure mentioned by our guest in this episode — that there has been $32b distributed in stimulus funds across Africa during the coronavirus pandemic. Strive Masiyiwa's team did not respond to request for comment in time for broadcast. Strive Masiyiwa is the head of the African Vaccine Acquisition Task Team and the founder and executive chairman of Econet.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi  edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Global pandemic response hasn't been properly coordinated: former NZ PM Helen Clark

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 12:00


Six months after the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response called for urgent action to end the pandemic, the former co-chairs have released a progress report, which includes solutions to avert another pandemic. But Helen Clark says that the global response to COVID-19 hasn't been effectively coordinated, raising questions about the international community's ability to deal with other 'existential' challenges like climate change.

Overnight with Michael McLaren
Vaccinating the world

Overnight with Michael McLaren

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 11:47


Michael is joined by Elizabeth de Somer, chief executive officer at Medicines Australia - the peak body representing research-based pharmaceutical companies in Australia, who encourages the Australian Government to urgently step up its commitments, particularly in financial support to the COVAX program and to introduce a commitment to share doses with COVAX.   COVAX aims to accelerate the development and manufacturing of COVID-19 vaccines, and guarantee fair and equitable access for every country.   Since the start of the pandemic, the global biopharmaceutical industry has worked to find solutions to the Covid-19 virus. This tremendous collaboration has been enabled – not undermined – by the international intellectual property system.   As a result, more than 6.5 billion doses of the Covid-19 vaccine have been administered around the world, and 23.67 million are administered every day, saving countless lives and reviving economies.   In Australia, more than half of the population is vaccinated against this deadly virus. As our country marches towards a fully vaccinated population, there is still some way to go before we can achieve this on a global scale.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

La chronique de Benaouda Abdeddaïm
Benaouda Abdeddaïm : Malgré la mise en garde de l'OMS, l'Allemagne reporte des dons de vaccins BioNTech au programme COVAX - 22/11

La chronique de Benaouda Abdeddaïm

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 3:22


Ce lundi 22 novembre, la nouvelle vague de Covid en Allemagne qui a choisi de garder des doses de vaccins prévues pour les pays pauvres a été abordée par Benaouda Abdeddaïm dans sa chronique dans l'émission Good Morning Business présentée par Sandra Gandoin et Christophe Jakubyszyn sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast..

Talking Africa
#117: Mark Suzman, Gates Foundation CEO - "Stop stockpiling vaccines"

Talking Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 26:49


Mark Suzman is the CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.He sits astride one of the biggest charitable endeavours on the planet, a $50bn endowment that has in the last 18 months thrown itself at the Covid-19 pandemic, funding all manner of research and vaccine trials, and now the COVAX scheme itself.In this conversation with Nicholas Norbrook, he talks through the thorny nature of global collective action problems, and why the world should fund African vaccines shots to avoid a costly new Covid-19 variant.

PBS NewsHour - World
How the COVAX vaccine program is faring, and what challenges developing nations still face

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 5:49


The Biden administration is ramping up plans for vaccine manufacturing for the coming year. But developing nations have been struggling with delays and short supplies for months and will not meet their vaccination goals for this year. Drug maker Moderna will reportedly supply 56 million more doses to those countries in the first half of 2021, but far more is needed. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How the COVAX vaccine program is faring, and what challenges developing nations still face

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 5:49


The Biden administration is ramping up plans for vaccine manufacturing for the coming year. But developing nations have been struggling with delays and short supplies for months and will not meet their vaccination goals for this year. Drug maker Moderna will reportedly supply 56 million more doses to those countries in the first half of 2021, but far more is needed. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
How the COVAX vaccine program is faring, and what challenges developing nations still face

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 5:49


The Biden administration is ramping up plans for vaccine manufacturing for the coming year. But developing nations have been struggling with delays and short supplies for months and will not meet their vaccination goals for this year. Drug maker Moderna will reportedly supply 56 million more doses to those countries in the first half of 2021, but far more is needed. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Truthiverse with Brendan D. Murphy
Episode 40: Daughter of Auschwitz warns: Australia is becoming like Nazi Germany

Truthiverse with Brendan D. Murphy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:50


Nina Angelo is an Australian artist and storyteller whose sheer existence is the result of an incredible love story against all the odds. Her parents met serendipitously (if we can use that term) at Auschwitz during World War II. The fact that they even lived to meet is itself amazing because the Nazis killed the whole of their respective families, leaving only Nina's future parents. Having built a life in Australia as an artist over many years now, Nina - who knows the horrors of fascism only too well - is speaking out with a warning for the complacent masses of a dying Australia. Mandatory masks, vaccines, pervasive QR codes (tracking), covipasses, and the push for universal digital ID: the intentional installation of totalitarian control under the guise of "health and safety" measures against "covid-19" is only too clear to see for a (growing) minority of us. Perhaps an echo from the horrors of the second World War will break through the mass hypnosis before the Great Reset is complete? Special Guest: Nina Angelo.

In Pursuit of Development
The UN in a post-pandemic world — Achim Steiner

In Pursuit of Development

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 52:48


Achim Steiner is UNDP Administrator. He has served across the United Nations system. He was the Director-General of the United Nations Office at Nairobi and between 2006-2016 he led the United Nations Environment Programme, where he prioritized investments in clean technologies and renewable energy. Achim has also held other notable positions including Director General of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, and Secretary General of the World Commission on Dams.Achim Steiner- TED Talk : Humanity's planet-shaping powers -- and what they mean for the futureFuture of Development public conversation between Amartya Sen, Nobel Laureate and Professor of Economics and Philosophy, and Achim Steiner, UNDP Administrator.  UNDP Future Of Development - YouTubeClimate Promise | United Nations Development Programme (undp.org)UNDP Development Futures Series | United Nations Development ProgrammeHuman Development Reports (undp.org)Hello Future | UNDPTwitter: @AchimSteiner @UNDP Host:Professor Dan Banik, University of Oslo, Twitter: @danbanik  @GlobalDevPodhttps://in-pursuit-of-development.simplecast.com/ 

The Global Politico
136 countries agreed to a global minimum corporate tax rate. What now?

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 18:52


Last month, 136 countries agreed to a global treaty that would tax large companies at a rate of at least 15 percent. POLITICO's Ryan Heath talks with the OECD's Pascal Saint-Amans, who led negotiations on the historic deal, on stage at the annual Web Summit in Lisbon, Portugal, about when the tax kicks in and what loopholes he's on high alert for. Plus: Saint-Amans dishes on a Biden Cabinet member who supports a global carbon price system.  Pascal Saint-Amans directs the OECD's Center for Tax Policy and Administration.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi  edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

Noticentro
AMLO califica como fracaso el mecanismo COVAX

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 1:49


AMLO califica como fracaso el mecanismo COVAXUsuarios del metro bloquean Viaducto Río de la Piedad por la suspensión del servicio en la línea 9Familiares de niños con cáncer realizan un bloqueo

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy
Ep 1258: COVID-19 - Pfizer's Anti-Viral Pill A Real Game Changer

The Stand with Eamon Dunphy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 28:26


Professor Paul Moynagh of Maynooth University talks to Eamon about recent developments with Covid-19 treatments and the power of vaccines in limiting serious illness. Also, the argument for Antigen Testing in schools and Covax and the urgency to vaccinate the poorer countries. The Stand is proudly sponsored by Tesco. Recorded 9th November 2021

Vandaag
Zo kreeg een huisarts tóch vaccins in Namibië

Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 19:46


Voor het bestrijden van de coronavirus zijn arme landen afhankelijk van donaties uit het rijke westen. Maar overgebleven vaccins komen daar niet vanzelfsprekend terecht, tot grote verbazing van redacteur Pim van den Dool. Hij ging na hoe een particulier initiatief dat probeerde vaccins naar Namibië te krijgen vast dreigde vast te lopen in de Nederlandse bureaucratie. Gast: Pim van den DoolPresentatie: Floor Boon Productie: Iris Verhulsdonk & Esmee Dirks Montage: Stef Visjager Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Global GoalsCast
Covid Chaos

Global GoalsCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:54


The World Health Organization's emergency committee on Covid-19 says that “analysis of the present situation and forecasting models indicate that the pandemic is far from finished.” To curtail it, a “coordinated international response” is needed, reports Co-host Claudia Romo Edelman. “Where have I heard that before?” replied co-host Edie Lush. A coordinated response is exactly what the world has not had. Edie and Claudia explore the chaotic response with Dr. David Nabarro and other health experts at his regular briefing. Rebecca Kanter, a nutrition expert based in Chile, described how travel had become a crazy patch work of rules that could only be met by taking extra doses of vaccine. “I have a PhD and I can't even figure out now what the new travel restrictions are,” she said. “I have friends who say, ‘I don't want to get 5 vaccines.' But if the only way they can move around is to get five vaccines they're in a weird ethical dilemma.” John Atkinson, an expert on how systems work, and why sometimes they don't, said: “systems like this are almost inevitably not designed to be that way. They're the unintended consequences of really caring often and smart people trying to do the right thing. Each time layer upon layer upon layer. And the whole thing ends up in a complete mess. We have to surface these contradictions and make them visible. So people just see how crazy it is.” David Nabarro, special envoy on Covid-19, said the tangled rules disadvantaged the poor and helped those who knew how to play the system. He also described how vaccination distribution remained wildly inequitable. Rich countries should pay for vaccine supply to go directly from manufacturers to COVAX, the global system for distributing vaccine, rather than donating surplus supplies they have been holding. These surpluses are often near their expiry date, he said, and giving them away was like donating stale bread to the hungry.

워싱턴 뉴스 광장
워싱턴 뉴스 광장 2021/11/3 - 11 03, 2021

워싱턴 뉴스 광장

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 59:58


VOA 한국어 아침 뉴스 프로그램 '워싱턴 뉴스 광장' 2021년 11월 3일 방송입니다. 중국과 러시아가 유엔 안전보장이사회에 대북제재 완화를 위한 결의안 초안을 다시 제출했습니다. 미국은 제재를 이행하라고 이들 나라에 촉구했습니다. 미한 연합공중훈련은 비도발적이고 방어적인 것이라고 미 국방부가 밝혔습니다. 코백스(COVAX)는 북한에 백신을 지원할 준비가 돼 있다고 밝혔습니다. 방송 시간: 한반도 오전 5:00~6:00 (UTC 20:00~21:00).

Esteri
Esteri di ven 29/10/21

Esteri

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 26:24


1-Salvare il mondo o condannarlo a un futuro infernale...Dall'Onu al movimento Fridays for Future si moltiplicano gli appelli alla Cop26. (Martina Stefanoni)....2- Da Glasgow a Parigi: le promesse non mantenute dai paesi ricchi stanno portando a un catastrofico aumento della temperatura globale. (Simonetta Poltronieri)....3-Gli effetti del surriscaldamento in Africa. ..Un tempo il lago Ciad dava acqua a 20 milioni di persone, oggi è poco più di una pozzanghera. (Raffaele Masto)....4-Sudan. La protesta contro il golpe paga. ..A sorpresa il nuovo uomo forte del paese, il Generale Burhan, ha chiesto al premier deposto di formare un nuovo governo. (Emanuele Valenti)....5- Le spose bambine del Malawi. Il Covid e la chiusura delle scuole hanno intensificato il fenomeno dei matrimoni forzati. La campagna di ActionAid che vuole restituire ai più piccoli il diritto allo studio (Paola Maceroni – Actionaid Italia)....5- L'egoismo del G20 ha affossato il piano Covax...Finora i paesi in via di sviluppo hanno ricevuto soltanto il 12% delle dosi di vaccino anti Covid promessi ad ogni vertice. (Alfredo Somoza)

The Global Politico
The U.N.'s roadmap for navigating Covid and China's rise

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 26:15


Covid-19 has knocked the United Nations off schedule — it's now running behind on meeting some Sustainable Development Goals and vaccination targets. As the head of the United Nations Development Program, Achim Steiner is on the front lines to catch up to those targets. He tells POLITICO's Ryan Heath about why, even as countries are falling short of their COVAX and climate commitments, the United Nations is still the world's best — and possibly only — bet to fight global problems. Achim Steiner is the Administrator of the United Nations Development Program.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

Truthiverse with Brendan D. Murphy
Episode 39: Flying Free on Prison Planet Earth: The Emerging Travel Infrastructure for the Awake

Truthiverse with Brendan D. Murphy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 43:13


In this episode of Truthiverse, Brendan welcomes Susan Sweetin, founder of Freedom Travel Alliance. The right to travel freely without succumbing to medical extortion and sacrificing bodily autonomy is being aggressively challenged by the administrators of the New World Order. As humanity splits in two and chooses radically different paths (evolution and devolution) in the post-scamdemic world, the clamps of totalitarianism grip tighter and tighter on the collective psyche, seeking to extinguish all last remaining shreds of freedom and choice. First it was masks, then vaccine ultimatums just to cross borders or even leave one's own country (see: Australia). The pharmaceutical cartel has effectively taken over most of the world's political, travel, and other infrastructure. Fortunately, a countercurrent of constructive, creative rebellion grows stronger by the day. Enter Susan Sweetin and her brainchild Freedom Travel Alliance (FTA). Created in January 2021, FTA is a nascent organisation and movement seeking to create a whole travel industry that services the CONSCIOUS people who are now rendered as second class citizens and excluded from many things that we all once took for granted. First it's private charters for the un-jabbed, but the vision doesn't end with air travel for the medically unmolested—every form of transport that can plausibly be replicated solely for the use of the 21st century's medical pariahs is fair game, according to Susan and her team. Every uptick in tyranny forces a creative innovation from conscious humans, and FTA is a sterling example. Want a two-tier society? Well, there may just be some nice little benefits. ;-) Get ready for a whole new take on the "Mile High Club"! Special Guest: Susan Sweetin.

C dans l'air
COVID : LA CHINE RECONFINE... – 26/10/21

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 66:12


COVID : LA CHINE RECONFINE... – 26/10/21 Invités Pr ANNE-CLAUDE CRÉMIEUX Professeure en maladies infectieuses - Hôpital Saint-Louis Membre de l'Académie de médecine Pr DIDIER PITTET Épidémiologiste, chef du service de contrôle des infections Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève NICOLAS BERROD Journaliste santé – « Le Parisien » SOAZIG QUÉMÉNER Rédactrice en chef du service politique – « Marianne » Pr BRUNO LINA - En direct de Lyon Virologue - CHU de Lyon Membre du Conseil scientifique Après un été presque insouciant, l'ambiance se refroidit sur le front de l'épidémie. Alors que les mesures sanitaires se sont relâchées un peu partout sur fond de vaccination, la pandémie repart à la hausse en Europe qui représente actuellement plus de 55 % des nouvelles contaminations dans le monde. C'est le cas au Royaume-Uni où près de 50 000 cas sont comptabilisés chaque jour. Plusieurs pays sont également déjà en grande difficulté, à l'instar de la Bulgarie où la hausse des cas de Covid-19 submerge le système hospitalier. « Notre capacité en termes d'effectifs et de ventilateurs est presque épuisée, nous allons devoir chercher de l'aide à l'étranger », a alerté le ministre de la santé, évoquant également la possibilité d'un confinement dans le pays, qui a le plus faible taux de vaccination de l'Union européenne. Seuls 24 % de Bulgares sont actuellement totalement vaccinés. En Russie, où l'on compte plus de 1000 morts quotidiens, un niveau inédit depuis le début de l'épidémie, Vladimir Poutine a décrété la quasi-mise à l'arrêt du pays pendant onze jours. Le président russe a également appelé les nombreux récalcitrants à se faire vacciner pour tenter de circonscrire une flambée de Covid-19 hors de contrôle. Au pays des inventeurs du vaccin Spoutnik V, seulement 31 % des Russes sont immunisés. Un échec de la campagne de vaccination reconnu par le Kremlin qui pointe du doigt la responsabilité de la population. Alors qu'en Chine, qui avait quasiment éradiqué l'épidémie sur son sol depuis le printemps 2020, les autorités viennent, elles aussi, de décider le confinement des quatre millions d'habitants de la ville de Lanzhou dans le nord du pays et de demander aux résidents de Pékin de réduire leurs déplacements, en raison d'un rebond des cas d'infection. Attribuée au variant Delta, hautement contagieux, la nouvelle poussée épidémique se serait déjà propagée dans onze provinces ainsi que dans la capitale qui se prépare à organiser les JO d'hiver dans une centaine de jours. Et en France, quelle est la situation ? La courbe est-elle en train de s'inverser ? Après des semaines de baisse, « on assiste à une petite poussée » de l'épidémie en Europe, et donc dans l'Hexagone, a expliqué vendredi le ministre de la Santé. Olivier Véran a une nouvelle fois rappelé la nécessité de maintenir les gestes barrières pour contenir la pandémie, malgré les bénéfices de la vaccination, mais aussi l'importance pour les personnes de plus de 65 ans ou immunodéprimées de faire une 3ème dose de rappel. Selon les chiffres communiqués par le ministre, seulement 100 000 doses de rappel sont effectuées quotidiennement. Un chiffre insuffisant d'après le gouvernement qui s'interroge sur les moyens de convaincre les Français éligibles à une 3ème dose et n'écarte pas la possibilité de l'intégrer au pass sanitaire. Interrogé sur le sujet, Jean Castex a ainsi expliqué que la décision était soumise à la Haute Autorité de Santé. « A la HAS de nous dire si nous devons ou non étendre l'éligibilité du pass à la troisième dose. L'avis est sollicité » a affirmé le Premier ministre en marge d'un déplacement au Vatican le 18 octobre dernier. Mais d'ici là, le pass sanitaire devrait faire l'objet d'une âpre bataille au Palais du Luxembourg. Car si à l'issue de débats souvent électriques, marqués par des divisions au sein même de la majorité, l'Assemblée nationale a donné un premier feu vert au projet de loi "vigilance sanitaire", avec la possibilité de recourir au pass sanitaire jusqu'au 31 juillet 2022, au Sénat, Sénateurs LR et PS entendent restreindre l'utilisation du pass aux départements où moins de 75 % de la population totale est vaccinée. Le dispositif ainsi encadré ne durerait que jusqu'au 28 février, et non au 31 juillet comme le demande le gouvernement. Alors assiste-t-on à une reprise de l'épidémie ? Faut-il craindre une 5ème vague généralisée ? Enfin à l'heure où l'OMS s'agace de l'iniquité vaccinale dans le monde, où en est le mécanisme de distribution des vaccins Covax ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

NachDenkSeiten – Die kritische Website
Impf-Debatte um Joshua Kimmich: Heuchelei auf beiden Seiten

NachDenkSeiten – Die kritische Website

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 11:37


Der Fußballer Joshua Kimmich vertritt trotz Gegenwinds öffentlich seine Überzeugung und seine Skepsis gegenüber den in Deutschland verfügbaren Corona-Impfungen. Das macht ihn in meinen Augen zu einem Vorbild. Gleichzeitig hat er aber COVAX unterstützt und 2G/3G im Münchner Stadion akzeptiert. Das ist wiederum heuchlerisch. Trotzdem ist Kimmichs Position höher zu achten als zahlreiche Reaktionen inWeiterlesen

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Aussies could soon be offered booster shots, but is it fair?

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 9:14


Lieutenant General John Frewen has flagged a decision on a third jab is imminent and would probably come 6 months after a second dose.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
"The world is awash with vaccine... But it is all going the most well resourced countries right now"

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 6:11


The WHO is warning the COVID pandemic will continue deep into 2022 unless vaccines are redirected to poorer countries.

The Global Politico
Taiwan's digital minister on China's “digital authoritarianism”

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:12


Imagine a world in which middle schoolers fact check presidential debates and public officials publish transcripts of every conversation they have. That's the world that Audrey Tang, Taiwan's digital minister, has helped create, thereby fortifying Taiwan's democracy even as it faces increasing threats from China. Tang tells POLITICO's Ryan Heath what it's like to govern and live in the shadow of China. Audrey Tang is Taiwan's digital minister.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and authors the newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi  edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

The Global Politico
UNGA Dispatch 1: Covid precautions and fears dominate Day One

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 9:53


Host Ryan Heath runs all over New York, capturing the madness of UNGA's kickoff, accompanied by his sidekick, producer Olivia Reingold. Hear from Ryan's go-to “U.N. whisperer,” Richard Gowan of the Crisis Group, and Penny Abeywardena, New York City's Commissioner for International Affairs. Plus: protestors accusing the U.S. of “vaccine apartheid” stop New York City traffic, setting the tone for critics of the Biden administration to come throughout the week. Also: if you have the time, we're trying to learn more about our listeners. We'd appreciate it if you're able to take our short survey.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.  Richard Gowan is the Crisis Group's UN director.  Penny Abeywardena is New York City's Commissioner for International Affairs.  Linda Thomas-Greenfield is the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.   You can subscribe to Ryan's “Global Insider” newsletter here. And check out POLITICO's other newsletters:  China Watcher West Wing Playbook Playbook Nightly Corridors EU's Brussels Playbook Morning Tech Morning Energy Weekly Shift