Podcasts about Hygiene

set of practices performed for the preservation of health

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Best podcasts about Hygiene

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Latest podcast episodes about Hygiene

This Is America with Rich Valdes Podcast
A History of Homophiles, Teachers blocks dads on TikTok, Hygiene habits, Trump Interview

This Is America with Rich Valdes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 59:31


The Pope recently made comments about homosexuality. Today, Rich shares portions of an interview from some 60 years ago on the matter of the "homophile" movement. Then, we find out why a teacher in Mexico chose to block students' dads from TikTok. Meanwhile, we find out more than we needed to know about the bathing habits of a former OnlyFans star. And in case you missed it, catch Rich's interview with former President Trump. Subscribe to this podcast. Comment and follow on Facebook, Twitter, GETTR, and Truth Social or visit us at RichValdes.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Auf Herz und Nieren – Der Podcast für ein gutes Körpergefühl

Kommt eine „Erkältung“ tatsächlich von „Kälte“? Kann man Krankheitserregern aus dem Weg gehen? In dieser Folge räumen wir mit Mythen rund um Erkältungen auf und finden heraus, was wirklich bei Husten, Schnupfen, Fieber und Co. hilft. Welche Rolle spielen Mathematik und Hygiene, wenn es darum geht, Ansteckungen vorzubeugen? Und lässt sich das Immunsystem irgendwie unterstützen? Dazu haben wir die Professorin Martina Prelog eingeladen. Sie ist Immunologin und Fachärztin für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin am Universitätsklinikum in Würzburg. Redaktion: Christian Andrae und Andrea Bannert Schnitt: Antonia Schillinger Kooperationspartner dieser Folge ist Zinkorotat-POS. Hier findet ihr mehr Infos, wie ihr euer Immunsystem winterfest machen könnt: www.zinkorotat-pos.de/fit-durch-den-winter/erkaeltung-vorbeugen Wie das Spurenelement Zink das Immunsystem unterstützen könnte: www.zinkorotat-pos.de/fit-durch-den-winter/immunsystem Weitere Infos zum Produkt und seinen Vorteilen findet ihr hier: https://zinkorotat-pos.de/produkt/ Zu Risiken und Nebenwirkungen lesen Sie die Packungsbeilage und fragen Sie Ihren Arzt oder Apotheker. In unserer Podcastfolge #18 „Immunsystem boostern“ gibt es noch mehr nützliches Wissen zur Abwehr – etwa warum Stress anfälliger für Infektionen macht und was Hormone mit der Immunabwehr zu tun haben: www.focus-arztsuche.de/magazin/gesundheitstipps/podcast-folge-18-das-immunsystem-boostern

iTs DoomsDay Podcast
Hygiene and medications

iTs DoomsDay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 37:09


Hygiene and medications Join Jester and Al as they have a conversation about hygiene and medications. Nuclear war, zombie apocalypse, tornado, hurricane, disaster? They have got you covered! its DoomsDay Podcast is now 3 years old! Are you prepared? Check out black beard fire starters! www.blackbeardfire.com/doomsday Use code DOOMSDAY at checkout for 10% off! Looking for survival food? Go to www.readywise.com and use promo code DOOM10 at checkout for 10% off! Email us itsdoomsdaypodcast@gmail.com  Find us on Clapper: @itsdoomsdaypodcast @Big_Daddy_Prep Twitter: @itsdoomsdaypod Instagram: @itsdoomsdaypodcast survivalist survivalism end of the world apocalypse conspiracy doomsday preppers survival SHTF prepper podcast prepping homesteading best podcast most popular podcast awesome podcast new podcast death toll storm XXX #itsdoomsdaypodcast #prepperpodcast #doomsdaypreppers #survival #conspiracy #apocalypse #news #etertainment #deathtoll #storm #XXX #zombieapocalypse

The Buss Earz Podcast
Trabass talks Sting 2022, Usain bolt, Hygiene & More

The Buss Earz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 82:25


Andrew trabass back on another exciting episode. This episode we talk about current affairs and share views on music and plans for 2023

eDiscovery Data Points from ComplexDiscovery
[Educational Webcast] Proper Hygiene Matters: Three Cybersecurity, Privacy, and Data Protection Challenges and Solutions

eDiscovery Data Points from ComplexDiscovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023


Led by cybersecurity, legal discovery, and computer forensics investigation expert, educator, and innovator, Michael Sarlo, this educational webcast presentation will share insight and options on solutions from HaystackID, an international eDiscovery provider with specific offerings supporting cybersecurity, privacy, and data protection needs. The post [Educational Webcast] Proper Hygiene Matters: Three Cybersecurity, Privacy, and Data Protection Challenges and Solutions appeared first on ComplexDiscovery.

Behind the Vinyl
#142 - Patrick Kindlon (Drug Church, Self Defense Family & Axe to Grind

Behind the Vinyl

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 72:27


Mike and Steve join forces for an epic conversation with multi-dimensional creative Patrick Kindlon. We dive into the current buzzing success of Drug Church, the immortality of Self Defense Family, and the past and present of hardcore. Whether it's new music from Earth Crisis, the growing momentum of younger bands in the scene like Anxious or GEL, or even a lesson on touring time management in relation to one's defecation schedule, Patrick's wit and wisdom is on full display in this chat. A nod to THE hardcore podcast, “Axe to Grind”, PK gives us a full-on “pit report” of a Guns ‘n Roses set he caught in his current hometown, Perth. Catch Drug Church on tour during their Hygiene album cycle in 2023, with new music and more tour dates on the horizon.  

Going Viral: The Mother of all Pandemics
How Many Deaths Are Too Many?

Going Viral: The Mother of all Pandemics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 67:34


From the outset of the Covid-19 pandemic, the British Government made it clear that a baseline level of mortality from Covid was being “priced in” to its decision making: on March 12th 2020, Boris Johnson stopped short of ordering the sort of lockdowns seen in other countries and warned that, “many more families are going to lose loved ones before their time.” This approach belied a series of value judgements and trade-offs where people's lives were set against other values, such as personal liberty and the economy. Today Mark and his guests Anjana Ahuja, Martin McKee and Dominic Wilkinson, reappraise this approach. With Ceinwen Giles and Matt Fowler. Produced in collaboration with the UK Pandemic Ethics Accelerator. Presented by Mark Honigsbaum @honigsbaum With: Anjana Ahuja  Contributing writer on science for the Financial Times and co-author of the bestselling ‘Spike: The Virus Vs The People' - the inside story of the Covid-19 pandemic with Sir Jeremy Farrar. https://www.ft.com/anjana-ahuja  /  @anjahuja Ceinwen Giles Co-CEO of Shine Cancer Support, member of the General Advisory Council of The King's Fund and Chair of the Patient and Public Voices Forum for the NHS England Cancer Programme. www.shinecancersupport.org / @ceineken Professor Martin McKee Professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Martin is Research Director of the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies and he's published many scientific papers and books on health and health policy, with a particular focus on countries undergoing political and social transition. www.lshtm.ac.uk/aboutus/people/mckee.martin / @martinmckee Matt Fowler Co-Founder of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice. www.jrct.org.uk/covid-19-bereaved-families  / @CovidJusticeUK Professor Dominic Wilkinson Professor of Medical Ethics and Director of Medical Ethics at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics. Dominic is also a Consultant Neonatologist at the John Radcliffe Hospital and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College. He is one the editors of a forthcoming book with Oxford University Press on pandemic ethics. www.jesus.ox.ac.uk/about-jesus-college/our-community/people/professor-dominic-wilkinson/ / @NeonatalEthics Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald @Melissafitzg Co-producer: Kate Jopling  @katejopling Cover art by Patrick Blower. www.blowercartoons.com Follow us on Twitter: @GoingViral_pod     Follow us on Instagram: goingviral_thepodcast  This episode of Going Viral on trust in the pandemic, has been produced in collaboration with the UK Pandemic Ethics Accelerator. The Ethics Accelerator was funded by the UKRI Covid-19 research and innovation fund.  https://ukpandemicethics.org/   /  @PandemicEthics_ If you enjoy our podcast - please leave us a rating or review.  Thank you!  

Historically High
The History of Hygiene

Historically High

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 124:42


You ever think about time travel? Yeah us too. How bad do you think people in the past smelled when their baths were considered a luxury, only to happen a few times each year. Or how about when people literally shit in buckets inside, only to fling open their windows and toss the contents into the street. And what the fuck were humans wiping their asses with? You've got questions we've got disgusting answers. You may need to shower after this one. 

The Break Room
Can I Borrow Your Shower?

The Break Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 13:04


If you're going to use my bathroom for this, you better be prepared to bring your own stuff. 

The Conscious PIVOT Podcast
Simple Practices That Help With Brain Hygiene With Wendy Swire

The Conscious PIVOT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 54:15


Wendy Swire is an author, speaker, professor, leadership consultant, and certified fitness coach who founded the DC Neuroleadership Group. One of her missions is to guide people in giving their minds a well-deserved break by teaching them the concept of brain hygiene. In this conversation with Adam Markel, she shares simple practices and rituals to recharge and reset your brain, giving it a chance to handle the endless flow of information every single day. She explains the best approach to reducing cognitive load and how to fight negativity bias by embracing a mindset of gratitude. Wendy also talks about how any person can play the role of a coach and empower others just by asking the right questions.

Attached to Hygiene
45. Trends in Absorbent Baby Products pt. 2 with Natalia Richer

Attached to Hygiene

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 30:00


This episode is sponsored by Cotton Incorporated and their B2B focused website, CottonWorks.If you'd like to learn more about cotton as a natural leader in the global baby care market, you can do so on CottonWorks.When it comes to staying current on global trends in the absorbent hygiene industry, Natalia Richer has an enviable position. As COO of Diaper Testing International (DTI), she sees what companies around the world are working on and what consumers are purchasing. Fortunately, Natalia is glad to share her insights with ‘Attached to Hygiene' listeners. In Part 2 of her conversation with host Jack Hughes, their discussion includes additional trends and hopes for the future of baby diapers. Consumers, safety, and sustainable materialsThe current movement toward greener absorbent hygiene products is undeniable. New brands are appearing, and a segment of the consumer base is embracing them. However, parents' reasons may vary. Certainly many parents value sustainability, but a large portion list safety as their primary motivation. These parents equate natural materials with safer, more gentle experiences for their babies.The shift toward thinner diapers, channel cores, and pre-compound coresFrom all that DTI has seen, the slow evolution toward thinner products continues unabated. Newer core designs like channel and pre-compound cores are proving their value and their use is spreading. Pre-compound cores in particular are lowering entry barriers for start-ups. By purchasing cores instead of building them, these emerging brands avoid certain equipment costs and production headaches. This may be one reason more smaller players, including D2C (Direct to Consumer) brands, are reaching the market. Current estimates place smaller brands at about 2% of sales. Natalia noted that most are focusing their advertising efforts at competing with other brands in the same niche, rather than targeting customers of the larger brands.Predictions and hopes for the future of baby diapersElastics and pant diapers are two of the industry's biggest trends and both are expected to continue. Each of them offers advantages to consumers and babies alike. Prominent among the benefits are convenience, comfort, fit, and performance. The shift toward more eco-friendly practices is likely to continue as well. However, until the industry makes headway in finding viable end-of-life options, companies will focus on the production side and more sustainable ingredients.Natalia also shared a hope for the future. She looks to the industry to begin more differentiation in products based on their target use. One example would be diapers specifically designed for daytime vs. night-time wear. Another would be more variation between smaller and larger sizes to reflect changes in a growing baby's behaviour patterns.Outline of the Episode[1:28] Continuing evolution toward thinner products and new core designs[4:10] Premade cores lower the entry barriers for small brands[9:45] The focus on safety and sustainable materials[14:57] What product reviews say about consumer reasons for buying eco-friendly diapers[21:27] Consumer testing surprises: US consumers are more open to wider chassis diapers than expected[23:59] Predictions and hopes for the future of baby diapers ResourcesConnect with Natalia Richer at via LinkedIn.Follow with DTI (Diaper Testing International) on LinkedIn.Listen to other ‘Attached to Hygiene' episodes featuring Natalia Richer:Trends in Absorbent Baby Products pt. 1 with Natalia RicherAbsorbent Hygiene Market Insights with Natalia Richer and Heidi BeattyHYGIENIX 2022 Conference OverviewTo learn more about adhesives for baby diapers, read:Adhesives Used in Baby CareThe Total Elastic Attachment Adhesive Solution for Pants DiapersGet Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our Listener Survey to receive copies of all 5 of our CSR Documents.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Bostik | Absorbent Hygiene on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from Green Onion Creative.Post production for Attached to Hygiene is done by PodcastBoutique.com.Legal Disclaimer

Future Generations Podcast with Dr. Stanton Hom
131: Matt Maruca: Light Hygiene: How Blue Light Blocks Healing

Future Generations Podcast with Dr. Stanton Hom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 88:11


Get the Heart of Freedom III Replay here: https://hof3replay.thefuturegen.com/hof3recording Join the Future Generations Community here: https://community.thefuturegen.com   Remember to Rate, Review and Subscribe on iTunes and Follow us on Spotify Follow us on Instagram: @futuregenpodcast   San Diego area residents, take advantage of our special New Patient offer exclusively for podcast listeners here. We can't wait to experience miracles with you!   Show your eyes some love with a pair of daylight or sunset (or both!) blue-light blocking glasses from Ra Optics. They have graciously offered Future Generations podcast listeners 10% off any purchase. Use code FGPOD or click here to access this discount, and let us know how your glasses are treating you!   Are you a fan of cold plunges? Did you know you can get your hands on a PORTABLE ice bath? Check out the Edge Theory Labs website to learn more about the benefits of cold plunges. Future Generations podcast listeners can enjoy $150 off any tub by using code THEFUTUREGEN. Happy plunging!   In this enlightening episode, Matt Maruca details the evolution of the light diet and its connection to our inner light potential.  In doing so, he also offers valuable tools and practices to offset the physiological disruptions caused by artificial lights and screens present in our modern society.  You won't want to miss this informative discussion and the message Matt has for humanity and the life we are meant to live.   Matt Maruca is the founder and CEO of Ra Optics, a company that teaches about the essential role that light plays in health, and develops advanced light therapy-based products.   He founded Ra Optics after a decade-long personal health journey that ultimately led him to light. The discovery that we are ultimately beings of light has led him to a profound interest in the nature of consciousness and existence itself.   Matt spends his time teaching, traveling, working with top executives, and celebrities, and building the future of lighting for the world. Matt enjoys singing, reading, running, and surfing, among other hobbies. Tap the link in bio @futuregenpodcast for the full episode.   Stay Connected with Matt: Website: raoptics.com  The Light Diet 101: raoptics.com/thelightdiet Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thelightdiet/ https://www.instagram.com/ra_optics/ The Light Diet Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-light-diet/id1534261406   Spectra of different types of light __________________________________________________________   Stay Connected with the Future Generations Podcast:  Instagram: @futuregenpodcast, @thefuturegensd  and @drstantonhom_  Facebook: Future Generations Podcast and Future Generations | Clinic of Chiropractic  Website: Future Generations | Clinic of Chiropractic    Remember to Rate, Review and Subscribe on iTunes and Follow us on Spotify!

The Dental Hacks Podcast
Very Dental: "The Great Hygiene Migration" with Amy Morgan

The Dental Hacks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 50:53


"...a hygiene dollar, even in the best of times, has at best a 15-20% profit margin. A doctor dollar has up to 60%..." -Amy Morgan Amy Morgan will give you 52% clinical excellence. But she wants 48% for business excellence! Amy joined Spear in 2018 as Vice President of Consulting Strategy. For more than 25 years as a She's been a consultant and trainer for more than 25 years and is the former CEO of Pride Institute.  Amy and Alan had a wide ranging conversation at the Spear Summit back in September. Some of the topics they covered include: How did Spear quickly retool for the COVID crisis? Is she over Zoom? Once the "fight or flight" crisis was over, what did Amy and Spear Education learn?  "The Great Hygiene Migration" What's the strategy for the lack of hygienists? (spoiler: you can't wish for something that's not there) Healthy patients vs. less healthy patients Doctors should NOT be doing hygiene Embrace your inner hypochondriac What do you do for COVID no-shows? (RFR..."reason for return") Having patient sign their financial commitments ("we hold this spot for YOU") "Lost time fee" vs. "missed appointment fee" (you can have that one for free!) "It's OK to not like people" Paying your team well is important, but you need to know how to do it right. "Don't chase behaviors but question beliefs" How does a team member show their value objectively? Variable component of pay: quarterly bonuses paid out over a quarter A very fat pitch for Spear Practice Solutions! A specific hygiene formula: hygiene wages should range 30-40% of their production Some links from the show:  Spear Education Spear Practice Solutions Spear Online Go get your ticket and your room for Voices of Dentistry 2023! Join the Very Dental Facebook group using the password "Timmerman," Hornbrook," "McWethy" or "Lipscomb!" The Very Dental Podcast network is and will remain free to download. If you'd like to support the shows you love at Very Dental then show a little love to the people that support us! -- Crazy Dental has everything you need from cotton rolls to equipment and everything in between and the best prices you'll find anywhere! If you head over to verydentalpodcast.com/crazy and use coupon code “verydental10” you'll get another 10% off your order! Go save yourself some money and support the show all at the same time! -- The Wonderist Agency is basically a one stop shop for marketing your practice and your brand. From logo redesign to a full service marketing plan, the folks at Wonderist have you covered! Go check them out at verydentalpodcast.com/wonderist! -- Enova Illumination makes the very best in loupes and headlights, including their new ergonomic angled prism loupes! They also distribute loupe mounted cameras and even the amazing line of Zumax microscopes! If you want to help out the podcast while upping your magnification and headlight game, you need to head over to verydentalpodcast.com/enova to see their whole line of products!   CAD-Ray offers the best service on a wide variety of digital scanners, printers, mills and even  their very own browser based design software, Clinux! CAD-Ray has been a huge supporter of the Very Dental Podcast Network and I can tell you that you'll get no better service on everything digital dentistry than the folks from CAD-Ray. Go check them out at verydentalpodcast.com/CADRay!

Meesh, Ain’t Life Funny ?!
It's Givin Hygiene

Meesh, Ain’t Life Funny ?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 23:01


Hygiene is one of the top priorities please stay on top of it and do your research on natural herbs vs. what doctors are subscribing. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/micalf/support

Turi Ryder's
Houseguests and Hygiene

Turi Ryder's "She Said What?" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 15:35


There's no time you dislike your houseguests more than when you clean up after they leave. No good deed goes unpunished—the time Turi's guest left her with a disgusting reminder of his stay. Wax paper—yes, one can argue about it. We pick at our food, and on the restaurant on which the movie “The Menu” may have been based.  Marci and Siri and Alexa, oh my.

Inject It Podcast
105. A Series of an Unfortunate Hairline

Inject It Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 91:06


Episode 105: A Series of an Unfortunate Hairline Welcome to Inject It podcast, hosted by Alexandra and Deanna! On this week's episode we talk about: Hygiene and mental health TW neglect and deaths in police custody in the U.K. Animal cruelty and horse riding Strike laws Maths until 18 Air BnB finally bans plantation listings Unconscious bias vs racism Harry & William vs Phil & Grant Mitchell Gabrielle Union “entitled to cheat” Would you want a promise ring?

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
How changing national diets could help fix our global food crisis

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023


How do you get a country to change its national diet? That's what China has been trying by introducing potato as a staple as part of an effort to improve food security. Chinese farmers plant the largest amount of potatoes in the world, and the country produces about 20% of the global potato output. But while fresh potatoes are a traditional part of the Chinese national diet, they're viewed as a vegetable rather than as a staple, and China's per capita consumption of potato is below the global average.In 2015, the Chinese government decided to try and change that. It introduced a policy to promote the potato as the country's fourth staple alongside rice, wheat and maize. As Xiaobo Xue Romeiko, a professor at the University at Albany, State University of New York in the US, explained, behind the strategy lay concerns over food security and the availability of arable land.“Potato is more versatile and it can be grown in marginal land which is not suitable as our arable land,” she said.Potatoes are also less energy intensive to grow and, according to her research, have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from food production in China, particularly if it introduces varieties with higher yields.Other countries may need to follow China's lead. As pressures mount on the global food system thanks to climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic and Russia's invasion of Ukraine, food security has become a central issue for many more governments.“At the moment, the food system really is under the highest stress,” said Paul Behrens, associate professor in environmental change at Leiden University in the Netherlands.In 2022, the UN's food price index, which measures monthly changes in international prices of a basket of food commodities, has hit record highs.Behrens said that many of the responses from governments so far have been shortsighted.“I don't see an awful lot of governments considering the fundamental system transitions that are needed to really secure food systems and make them more resilient to future climatic change.”He argued that countries need to radically change their nations' diets, specifically in high-income nations where the over-consumption of meat is driving much of the interlocking crisis.So, what would an optimum diet that is nutritious and sticks within planetary boundaries actually look like? A group of researchers put their heads together to find out and came up with the EAT-Lancet diet, also known as the planetary health diet.One of them was Marco Springman, a professor of climate change food systems and health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK, and also a senior researcher at the University of Oxford.“You shouldn't have more than one serving of red meat per week. Not more than two servings of poultry per week, not more than two servings of fish per week. And if you have dairy, not more than one serving per day,” he said.Counting that up, that means being vegetarian or vegan on two days a week.Gemma Ware is the editor and co-host of The Conversation Weekly Podcast. Daniel Merino is the associate science editor and co-host of The Conversation Weekly Podcast.

Cliff and Puck
1-11 H1: Jim's Hygiene or Lack Thereof, Christian Caple Joins & Al Woods Impact

Cliff and Puck

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 43:00


Jim hasn't showered in a few days... Puck shares his thoughts on sideline reporters, do we need them, also picthes an idea for a gambling sideline repoter. Christian Caple, who covers the Huskies football team, via The Athletic visits to talk about Sam Huard entering the transfer portal and more. Also, has Hugh Millen's impact been all that, Puck looks at the numbers that might say otherwise.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
01-11-23 - Katie Hobbs Vows To Eliminate The Pink Tax Women Pay On Hygiene Products - We Debate The Costs Of Having A Period

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 26:01


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Wednesday January 11, 2023

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
How changing national diets could help fix our global food crisis

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023


How do you get a country to change its national diet? That's what China has been trying by introducing potato as a staple as part of an effort to improve food security. Chinese farmers plant the largest amount of potatoes in the world, and the country produces about 20% of the global potato output. But while fresh potatoes are a traditional part of the Chinese national diet, they're viewed as a vegetable rather than as a staple, and China's per capita consumption of potato is below the global average.In 2015, the Chinese government decided to try and change that. It introduced a policy to promote the potato as the country's fourth staple alongside rice, wheat and maize. As Xiaobo Xue Romeiko, a professor at the University at Albany, State University of New York in the US, explained, behind the strategy lay concerns over food security and the availability of arable land.“Potato is more versatile and it can be grown in marginal land which is not suitable as our arable land,” she said.Potatoes are also less energy intensive to grow and, according to her research, have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from food production in China, particularly if it introduces varieties with higher yields.Other countries may need to follow China's lead. As pressures mount on the global food system thanks to climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic and Russia's invasion of Ukraine, food security has become a central issue for many more governments.“At the moment, the food system really is under the highest stress,” said Paul Behrens, associate professor in environmental change at Leiden University in the Netherlands.In 2022, the UN's food price index, which measures monthly changes in international prices of a basket of food commodities, has hit record highs.Behrens said that many of the responses from governments so far have been shortsighted.“I don't see an awful lot of governments considering the fundamental system transitions that are needed to really secure food systems and make them more resilient to future climatic change.”He argued that countries need to radically change their nations' diets, specifically in high-income nations where the over-consumption of meat is driving much of the interlocking crisis.So, what would an optimum diet that is nutritious and sticks within planetary boundaries actually look like? A group of researchers put their heads together to find out and came up with the EAT-Lancet diet, also known as the planetary health diet.One of them was Marco Springman, a professor of climate change food systems and health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK, and also a senior researcher at the University of Oxford.“You shouldn't have more than one serving of red meat per week. Not more than two servings of poultry per week, not more than two servings of fish per week. And if you have dairy, not more than one serving per day,” he said.Counting that up, that means being vegetarian or vegan on two days a week.Gemma Ware is the editor and co-host of The Conversation Weekly Podcast. Daniel Merino is the associate science editor and co-host of The Conversation Weekly Podcast.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
01-11-23 - Rock Wars - Song From A Guys Perspective On The Pink Tax For Women's Hygiene Products

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 12:05


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Wednesday January 11, 2023

Catie and Erik's Infinite Quest: An ADHD Adventure
ADHD & Hygiene Pt 1: Tasks Add Up

Catie and Erik's Infinite Quest: An ADHD Adventure

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 40:59


In part one of this two-part episode, Cate and Erik sit down to talk about some of the more difficult and stigmatized issues that face ADHDers, in particular, hygiene. Showering, teeth brushing, cleaning our kitchens- all of those are tasks that require executive function (and, in Cate's case, working anti-depressants) to happen, which is NOT happening for us this week. Also Cate makes Infinite Quest history by being the first person to say "stinky butthole" on the podcast. ____ Do you like the work we do? Don't forget that Infinite Quest has a patreon! Consider supporting the work we do by pledging just $5 a month to keep us operating. Learn more by visiting www.patreon.com/infinitequest Erik: www.patreon.com/heygude Cate: mostlypans.com or www.patreon.com/catieosaurus Find us on TikTok and Instagram at: @catieosaurus @heygude @baileyosaurusrex We also stream daily on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/catieosaurus https://ww.twitch.tv/heygude Cool new listener email: ask@infinitequestpodcast.com Media/Business Email: infinitequestpodcast@gmail.com Find all of our links and cool stuff at: www.infinitequestpodcast.com Get your own podcast by visiting anchor.fm --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/infinitequest/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/infinitequest/support

The Gate 15 Podcast Channel
The Risk Roundtable EP 37: Breaking in 2023 with continuations from 2022 - critical infrastructure risks, terrorism, and cyber hygiene

The Gate 15 Podcast Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 49:51


Embarking on year 4, the Risk Roundtable jumps two feet into 2023 by talking through the various physical and cyber threats that continue to present challenges. Jen opened up the discussion covering the latest breaches with password managers, fast food restaurants and even platforms that seem to be unbreakable. Matching Jen, Dave covers the wide variety of physical security threats and environmental considerations that organizations are already dealing with this year to include critical infrastructure concerns (power stations, solar plants), terrorism, and environmental factors, to include understanding the role that politics can have in the workplace.  Before moving to the roulette round Andy led a discussion about the importance of preparedness in this complex environment and the risk of not evaluating these incidents and taking appropriate action. Jen then talked about the news and cyber implications around ChatGPT, as well as ensuring organizations are aware of some upcoming timelines such as the end of support for Windows 7 (yes, it is still being used). Dave transitioned and talked about Bridget Johnson's latest piece on 7 Terrorism Trends for 2023 before Andy wrapped up with the ever-popular three questions. Some of the topics discussed include: Imperva Report: More Lessons Learned from Analyzing 100 Data Breaches https://www.imperva.com/resources/resource-library/white-papers/more-lessons-learned-from-analyzing-100-data-breaches/ Not in a million years: It can take far less to crack a LastPass password Dec 28, 2022 https://blog.1password.com/not-in-a-million-years/ Troy Hunt on Twitter regarding Twitter breach: https://twitter.com/troyhunt/status/1611263070738972677?s=61&t=vOVhs4DMT_LNUVPd9z8gkg We gave a few mentions of our esteemed colleague Bridget Johnson, @BridgetCJ on Twitter, and her recent article in HS Today, 7 Terrorism Trends to Watch in 2023. Attacks on Critical Infrastructure to include power plants, and a solar energy farm ChatGPT links: SANS Institute https://www.sans.org/webcasts/what-you-need-to-know-about-openai-new-chatgpt-bot-and-how-it-affects-your-security-lightning-talks-panel-sessions/ https://www.darkreading.com/omdia/chatgpt-artificial-intelligence-an-upcoming-cybersecurity-threat- https://www.hackread.com/hackers-openai-chatgpt-malware/ https://www.scmagazine.com/analysis/emerging-technology/cybercriminals-are-already-using-chatgpt-to-own-you 

Wine, Spirits & Witches
Alter Hygiene

Wine, Spirits & Witches

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 25:02


Welcome one and all, its time to get in gear this year and clean that dirty alter cause we know you probably havent so lets get too it!

The Shit Show Of My Twenties
Psychedelics, Energetic Hygiene, And Money Blocks With Bijou Finney

The Shit Show Of My Twenties

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 39:20


Today I am joined by Bijou Finney. Bijou is a Brand Stylist™, psychonaut and holistic guide specializing in visionary life design for conscious entrepreneurs. Her therapeutic process teaches business owners how to use psychedelics and healing practices retrain their nervous systems and clear limiting mental blocks. She is an integration alchemist that offers transformational retreat experiences and 1-on-1 virtual coaching.We talk about how she got into psychedelics, energetic hygiene, and money blocks.To connect with Bijou https://www.storyxstyle.comhttps://www.instagram.com/mushroommamasita/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Arts & Ideas
Wilkie Collins & disability

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 44:32


A blind woman who temporarily regains her sight is the heroine of Wilkie Collins' 1872 novel Poor Miss Finch. Matthew Sweet is joined by Clare Walker Gore, Tom Shakespeare and Tanvir Bush to discuss how Collins' own poor health led him to write about disability and physical difference in a more nuanced way than many of his contemporaries. Apart from Lucilla Finch, who has more agency when blind than sighted, other examples include the apparently monstrous Miserrimus Dexter ('the new centaur: half-man, half-chair') in The Law and the Lady, and the shockingly moustachioed Marian Halcombe in The Woman in White. Tanvir Bush is the author of Cull. You can also hear her discussing John Wyndham's novel The Day of the Triffids on Free Thinking. Clare Walker Gore has contributed to a Free Thinking discussion about Depicting Disability and written essays for Radio 3 about authors including Dinah Mulock Craik and Margaret Oliphant. Tom Shakespeare is Professor of Disability Research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. You can hear his Radio 3 essay on Tolkien on BBC Sounds. Producer: Torquil MacLeod

Bericht für die Lebensmittelbranche
#109 Bio-Verordnung: weltweite Erfahrungen und Beobachtungen in der Umsetzung

Bericht für die Lebensmittelbranche

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 19:50


Mit der neuen Bio-Verordnung mussten Lieferanten und Hersteller vieles anpassen und neue Maßnahmen installieren. Was davon wird bereits wo kontrolliert? Herr Dr. Norbert Kolb beschreibt seine Erfahrungen, die er in 2022 mit dem Inkrafttreten der Bio-Vérordnung in seiner weltweiten Tätigkeit gemacht hat. Was hat sich bei den Betrieben und auch in den Ursprungsländern der Rohwaren in 2022 verändert? Und was noch nicht? Ihr Experte Dr. Norbert Kolb Kontaktdaten E-Mail: Norbert_Kolb@web.de Weiter Informationen zum Thema dieser Folge Informationen zum Online-Seminar „Die Öko-Verordnung: bestens vorbereitet in das Bio-Audit“ am 06. Februar 2023 finden Sie unter www.behrs.de/7505 oder senden eine email an akademie@behrs.de. Wir freuen uns immer über ein Feedback. Schreiben Sie uns Ihre Meinung an podcast@behrs.de. Links Kostenfreie Informationen zu Hygiene und Recht BEHR'S…SHOP BEHR'S…AKADEMIE BEHR'S…ONLINE QM4FOOD HACCP-Portal Impressum Unsere Bitte: Wenn Ihnen diese Folge gefallen hat, hinterlassen Sie bitte eine 5-Sterne-Bewertung, ein Feedback auf iTunes und abonnieren diesen Podcast. Sie können diesen auch mit Ihren Freunden und Bekannten teilen. Hinterlassen Sie uns hier Ihre Bewertung Dadurch helfen Sie uns die Podcast immer weiter zu verbessern und Ihnen Inhalte zu liefern, die Sie sich wünschen.

DailyQuarks – Dein täglicher Wissenspodcast

Außerdem: Brauchen wir neue Regeln fürs Maske tragen? (10:01)// Mehr spannende Themen wissenschaftlich eingeordnet findet ihr hier: www.quarks.de // Kritik, Fragen? Schreibt uns! --> quarksdaily@wdr.de Von Ina Plodroch.

Attached to Hygiene
44. Trends in Absorbent Baby Products pt. 1 with Natalia Richer

Attached to Hygiene

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 40:23


This episode is sponsored by Cotton Incorporated and their B2B focused website, CottonWorks.If you'd like to learn more about cotton as a natural leader in the global baby care market, you can do so on CottonWorks.Staying informed about current global trends in the absorbent hygiene industry can be challenging. Fortunately, our guest Natalia Richer has a better vantage than most. As COO of Diaper Testing International (DTI), Natalia sees what companies around the world are working on. In the first of a two-part series, she and ‘Attached to Hygiene' host Jack Hughes discuss DTI and some of the biggest trends they see in baby diapers. Diaper Testing International: Evaluating products from around the worldAs the industry evolves, manufacturers look to make changes and assess new designs. DTI offers these producers a host of analytical tests and product user group studies. Determining rewet, strikethrough (speed of acquisition), capacity, creep, and peel are typical. But to truly bridge the gap between lab data and user experience, parent testing and usage diaries are invaluable. In the future, DTI's testing may also become more specific to age and size group. This is because, as babies grow and their movements change, different design elements are needed to protect against leakage.Elastics are valued for improved fit and leak protectionOver the last few years, stretch has been proving a key feature in delivering both ergonomic fit and better leak protection. Some companies have been quick to adopt elastics at the waist and other locations, whilst others have been slower to expand their use in products. One key benefit of waist and belly elastics is their ability to ensure fit as food is digested. Babies' waistlines contract markedly as food is absorbed—far more than in adults. Because of this, diapers that fit snugly at mealtime become loose if parents do not adjust them appropriately. The resulting gaps can increase the chance of leakage. Conversely, elastics correct the fit automatically, keeping the insult where it belongs.Pant diapers thrive in newer absorbent hygiene markets Across the globe, pant-style diapers have been gaining ground. Parents enjoy the simplicity of pulling on a diaper, especially as a growing baby begins to resist or struggle during diaper changes. In developing markets, pants are very popular. Some brands in India even offer them in newborn sizes. More mature markets like the US and Europe typically label pants as a ‘potty training aid', which tends to keep demand low. However, some smaller brands are promoting pants for other age groups.Outline of the Episode[5:29] Natalia enjoys the world of diapers because it is dynamic and always evolving[9:45] Parental stress, the need for convenience, and the impact of failures [16:12] The industry's most common tests are not dependent on diaper size; they do not fully reflect user experience as babies grow and their movements change[20:41] Other tests evaluate the whole product for features like sizing, as well as creep and peel performance [23:23] Regional differences in products and what consumers value[25:35] The use of elastics for fit and leak protection[29:57] Pant-style products for babies are popular but under-promoted in some markets ResourcesConnect with Natalia Richer at via LinkedIn.Follow with DTI (Diaper Testing International) on LinkedIn.Listen to other ‘Attached to Hygiene' episodes featuring Natalia Richer:Absorbent Hygiene Market Insights with Natalia Richer and Heidi BeattyHYGIENIX 2022 Conference OverviewTo learn more about adhesives for baby diapers, read:Adhesives Used in Baby CareThe Total Elastic Attachment Adhesive Solution for Pants DiapersGet Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our Listener Survey to receive copies of all 5 of our CSR Documents.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Bostik | Absorbent Hygiene on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from Green Onion Creative.Post production for Attached to Hygiene is done by PodcastBoutique.com.Legal Disclaimer

Chicago Gnosis Podcast
Spiritual and Mental Health 04 Energetic and Psychic Hygiene

Chicago Gnosis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 112:51


Many great spiritual traditions emphasize the importance of physical, moral, and psychological cleanliness. Through maintaining bodily, emotional, and mental health, individuals establish greater serenity and stability within various domains of life: the social, economic, professional, familial, and personal. By cultivating positive energy from spiritual practices like meditation, we can enhance and enliven our level of being for the betterment of self and other. Likewise, we strengthen and protect our psyche from psychological contagion, characterized by harmful internal states and negative external influences.

Money Tales
The Tables Have Turned, with Lubna Bhayani

Money Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 32:34


In this episode of Money Tales, our guest is Lubna Bhayani. Lubna is a globetrotter. For most of her marriage, she followed her husband from country to country, wherever his job took them. Recently, they turned the tables. Lubna relocated the family to Kenya for an exciting position she wanted to take. This latest move has caused the couple to go deep into money conversations, which she shares with us on Money Tales. Lubna works for the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Regional Office as the Lead Specialist for Partnerships, Grants Management and Resource Mobilization. With a career spanning over 15 years and several countries, Lubna has worked on issues linking gender and development, women in humanitarian crisis. In recent years, she has focused on universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially for those who are most structurally marginalized due to their age, sex, sexual identity and gender orientation. Most recently Lubna has begun to delve into the issue of menstrual hygiene, which should really be a non-issue but is omnipresent yet very absent from broader SRHR discourse. Lubna hopes to design projects and advocate to address this. Lubna has an undergraduate degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and master's degrees from both the London School of Economics and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK. She moved to Nairobi in 2021 with her husband and two boys and spends her time ensuring her boys #BreakTheBias and believe women and men are distinctly equal. Learn more about Money Tale$ > Subscribe to the podcast Recent episodes See all episodes > Form CRS Form ADV Terms of Use Privacy Rights and Policies

Bulletproof Dental Practice
The Doctor-Hygienist Disconnect: Communication, Compensation, Values with Brittany Simon of Bulletproof Hygiene

Bulletproof Dental Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 54:56


Bulletproof Dental Practice Podcast Episode 278 Host: Dr. Craig Spodak Guest: Brittany Simon, CRDH, BASDH Key Takeaways:Introduction Hygienist's Compensation Top 3 Things Hygienist Can Provide To Add Value To The Practice References: Bulletproof Mastermind 2023 Bulletproof Summit Mighty Networks: Bulletproof Dental Practice Bulletproof ERC  Tweetables: The first step with an empowered employee is having self-worth. Dr. Craig Spodak All communication is either a loving response or a cry for help. Dr. Craig Spodak Whatever your narrative is, is the lens through which you see the entire world through. Dr. Craig Spodak Business ownership is not for everybody. Dr. Craig Spodak If you can't control your fears you're going to have a bad life. Dr. Craig Spodak

Darmglück
DG181 - Warum Holzteller hygienischer sind als Porzellanteller

Darmglück

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 13:32


WUSSTEST DU, DASS HOLZ EINE ANTIBAKTERIELLE WIRKUNG HAT?   Wir sind mit unserem Campervan gerade in Mora in Schweden. Es ist der Ort, wo der Zieleinlauf des berühmten Langlaufrennens Wasalauf liegt.  Mora liegt aber auch in der Region, wo die berühmten Dala Pferde aus Holz geschnitzt werden. Natürlich konnte ich nicht widerstehen und habe mir auch eins gekauft. Überhaupt begegnet man dem Thema Holz und Schnitzen hier öfters. Die Häuser sind aus Holz, es werden hier in Mora auch berühmte Messer hergestellt, unter anderem zum Schnitzen und auch Holzteller und Schüsseln sieht man öfters. Das passt genau zum Thema der heutigen Folge! Vor unserer Abreise auf dem Weihnachtsmarkt in unserem Städtchen Einsiedeln mit einem Drechsler gesprochen, der dort unter anderem Holzteller verkauft hat. Und ich dachte mir, Holzteller sind super praktisch im Van, da sie nicht so leicht kaputtgehen, wenn sie mal etwas hin und her gerüttelt werden. Aber ist das hygienisch, fragte ich mich? Und fragte ich dann auch den Drechsler! In dieser Folge erfährst du: Warum Holz sich quasi selbst reinigt (antibakterielle Gerbsäure, eventuell Milchsäurebakterien, Holz saugt Wasser auf und entzieht Bakterien Lebensgrundlage) Was der Drechsler als Kind auf der Alp bezüglich Holzgeschirr erlebt hat Wieso Holzschneidebretter viel besser sind als Plastik und worauf du beim Reinigen achten kannst (kein Spülmittel, von beiden Seiten nass machen, nicht im Wasser stehen lassen, regelmässig mit Öl oder Fett einreiben) Darmgesundheit bedeutet unter anderem auch, Toxine zu meiden. Plastik ist deswegen etwas, das du möglichst sparsam einsetzen oder auch so gut wie möglich meiden solltest. Die Shownotes zu dieser Folge findest du unter: https://www.arktisbiopharma.ch/181    LINKS AUS DIESER FOLGE: Der Wanderdrechsler: https://www.wanderdrechsler.ch/  Holzboutique Senn Einsiedeln: https://www.holzboutique-senn.ch/  Artikel über Holz und Hygiene: https://www.uni-goettingen.de/de/document/download/0dd2c53f64a3b144d045e74e5cc90029.pdf/HK41_2011-Seite21.pdf  Als Podcasthörer:in bekommst du von uns einen Rabatt auf unsere Produkte. Und zwar 15% Rabatt auf deinen ersten Einkauf (1 Mal anwendbar, nur auf nicht bereits rabattierte Produkte) Gib hierfür den Gutscheincode podcast15 ein, bevor du deine Bestellung abschliesst. https://www.arktisbiopharma.ch/shop https://www.arktisbiopharma.de/online-shop 

A Little Less Fear Podcast
#142: Energetic Hygiene: Be True to Yourself, with Intuitive Counselor/Spiritual Coach Victoria Shaw

A Little Less Fear Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 38:17


BiographyVictoria Shaw is an intuitive Counselor and Spiritual Coach who combines her background and training in psychology and counseling with intuitive guidance to help clients heal, grow and realize their full spiritual and personal potential.  She takes a holistic approach to counseling, addressing clients' concerns on the mind/body/spiritual levels. She especially loves working with people who are committed to using their life experiences or struggles to fuel their own spiritual awakening.  Victoria is the author of four self-help books for parents, children and teens, and the host of Intuitive Connection podcast.Send Audience To:https://victoriashawintuitive.com/free-e-book/This book brings together over a decade of teaching thousands of people in learning to leverage the power of their inner  wisdom.Victoria Shaw - Intuitive Counselor - Victoria Shaw IntuitiveFacebook(57) Victoria Shaw, PhD, LPC | LinkedInVictoria Shaw (@victoriashawintuitive) • Instagram photos and videosThis is Dr. Lino Martinez the host for A Little Less Fear Podcast. For more information, please use the information below. Thanks so much for your support!Author | A Little Less FearWriters Work | Write Your Way to the Life You WantA Little LESS FEAR Podcast (@alittlelessfearpodcast) • Instagram photos and videosLino Marinez (@alittlelessfear) TikTok | Watch Lino Marinez's Newest TikTok VideosWriters Work | Write Your Way to the Life You Want

BrushwithBritt
21. Leaving My First Hygiene Position

BrushwithBritt

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 15:55


In this episode I give you a brief insight as to why I left my first hygiene position. With the new year on the way I wanted to recap on the things I'm leaving in 2022. Looking forward to the new year season three will be the best season yet! With more guests, inspiration, and motivation! Goodbye 2022 and hello 2023!! Thank you for tuning in! xoxo, Britt

Define the Narrative
Raising Competent Eaters

Define the Narrative

Play Episode Play 15 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 50:02


Are you raising a competent eater? Do you worry your relationship with food will prevent you from raising a child who has a healthy relationship with food? Carol Danaher from the Ellyn Satter Institute shares The Golden Rule, also known as the Division of Responsibility that frees parents from being too controlling when it comes to their child's eating habits. Publications referenced in this episode can be found at:  https://www.ellynsatterinstitute.org/product-category/books-videos/Carol Danaher, is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. She received her Master's in Public Health from Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene & Public Health.  She is on the faculty and board of the Ellyn Satter Institute. Carol's career in public health nutrition has focused on the feeding relationship and includes program development and administration within county-level public health, local Head Start Programs and other nonprofit childcare organizations. Carol worked for the Food and Nutrition Service of USDA conducting analysis and evaluation on our nation's food and nutrition programs for children and families. Volunteer work in Jakarta, Indonesia led to her interest in Public Health.  Carol's work with children includes being a middle school teacher, a Girl Scout leader for 12 years, a Cub Scout leader and spending as much time as she can with her children and granddaughters.It's your life- Define the Narrative! Check out our website and let us know what's on your mind. www.definethenarrative.usFollow us:IG: @definethenarrativeFB: @Ann Argo

Seriously…
5. Bad Blood - The Curse of Mendel

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 28:50


A key goal of eugenics in the 20th century was to eliminate genetic defects from a population. Many countries pursued this with state-led programmes of involuntary sterilisation, even murder. We unpick some of the science behind this dark history, and consider the choices and challenges opened up by the science today. In the mid-19th century, an Augustinian friar called Gregor Mendel made a breakthrough. By breeding pea plants and observing how certain traits were passed on, Mendel realised there must be units - little packets - of information determining characteristics. He had effectively discovered the gene. His insights inspired eugenicists from the 1900s onwards. If traits were passed on by specific genes, then their policies should stop people with ‘bad' genes from having children. Mendel's ideas are still used in classrooms today - to teach about traits like eye colour. But the eugenicists thought Mendel's simple explanations applied to everything - from so-called ‘feeblemindedness' to criminality and even pauperism. Today, we recognise certain genetic conditions as being passed on in a Mendelian way. Achondroplasia - which results in short stature - is one example, caused by a single genetic variant. We hear from Professor Tom Shakespeare about the condition, about his own decision to have children despite knowing the condition was heritable - and the reaction of the medical establishment. We also explore how genetics is taught in schools today - and the danger of relying on Mendel's appealingly simple but misleading account. Contributors: Dr Brian Donovan, senior research scientist at BSCS; Professor Tom Shakespeare, disability researcher at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; and Dr Christine Patch, principal staff scientist in Genomic Counselling in the Society and Ethics Research group, part of Wellcome Connecting Science. Music: Jon Nicholls Presenter: Adam Rutherford Producer: Ilan Goodman

I Don't Know About That
E133 18/19th Century Hygiene

I Don't Know About That

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 73:43


Our expert Mina Moriarty (@historyho101) teaches the IDKAT team how much we used to stink! SPONSORED: NextEvo - Mid 1 https://nextevo.com/podcast with code IDK BetterHelp - Mid 2 “This episode is sponsored by/brought to you by BetterHelp. Give online therapy a try at https://betterhelp.com/IDK and get on your way to being your best self.” Our merch store is now live! Go to idontknowaboutthat.com for shirts, hoodies, mugs, and more! Subscribe to our Patreon at patreon.com/IDKAT for ad free episodes, bonus episodes, and more exclusive perks! Tiers start at just $2! Go to JimJefferies.com to buy tickets to Jim's upcoming tour, The Moist Tour.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast
121422 @107wchv "Governmental Hygiene?"

WCHV's Joe Thomas in the Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 38:27


What's the POLITICAL definition of insanity? Going back to the same people that continue to commit 'Munchhausen-by-government' to us over-and-over-again? Well, I guess if we wren't bad they wouldn't....See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Health Fix
Ep 326: What Toxins From Your Hygiene, Food, Medication and Cosmetics Are Messing with Your Hormones?

The Health Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 56:44


Curious about how your environment impacts your toxins that build up in your body?  Wondering if there's something hanging around in your body that's keeping you from your health or fertility goals?  Have you cleaned up your diet and removed household toxins but are still experiencing health issues or infertility?  Thousands of products contain BPA, phthalates, parabens, oxybenzone, and other chemicals that disrupt your hormones. Your bodies confuse these chemicals for estrogen, which can throw off our fertility, immunity, mental health, and physical health.  Dietician and environmental health scientist, Dr. Jenna Hua, was frustrated by the lack of data for how harmful chemicals (like BPA, phthalates and parabens) from plastics and everyday products were affecting health and clinical outcomes.  So Jenna set out on a mission to create testing and a personalized approach to mitigate harmful chemical exposures with her company Million Marker. In this episode of The Health Fix Podcast, Dr. Jannine Krause interviews Dr. Jenna Hua on how she's helping poeple understand what chemicals are inside of them and the simple solutions for quickly reducing harmful chemicals through mail-in test kits, lifestyle audits, product recommendations, and counseling. What You'll Learn In This Episode: What urine can tell you about your diet, environment and infections in your body What are the 13 hormone disruptors being tested in the Million Marker testing How Million Marker helps you swap out products and make changes to lower your toxic load Why BPA free doesn't always mean that it is Why you want to say no to receipts for your health & the environment Why you want fragrance free products and vegetarian capsules How enteric coated and extended release medications can have toxic ingredients Resources From the Show: Million Marker Testing  Million Marker Instagram Million Marker Twitter  

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1324 - Year End Hygiene - Your Backups

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 8:58


The last episode in your home hygiene series talks about your backups. Are you doing them? How are you doing them? Be aware, be safe. Support the show and get access to behind the scenes content as a patron - https://www.patreon.com/SecurityInFive *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five Mighty Mackenzie - https://www.facebook.com/mightymackie Where you can find Security In Five - https://linktr.ee/binaryblogger Email - bblogger@protonmail.com

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1323 - Year end Hygiene - Your Accounts

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 7:35


As this week's home hygiene series continues this week's episode talks about your accounts. Your credentials across the Internet are the gateways to your financial, healthcare and personal information. It's a good time to get control of those. Be aware, be safe. Support the show and get access to behind the scenes content as a patron - https://www.patreon.com/SecurityInFive *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five Mighty Mackenzie - https://www.facebook.com/mightymackie Where you can find Security In Five - https://linktr.ee/binaryblogger Email - bblogger@protonmail.com

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1322 - Year End Home Hygiene - Your Devices

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 7:29


As we continue with the home hygiene series this episode talks about your devices. This time consuming but important task will help you get visibility and understanding to what is connected in your home. Be aware, be safe. Support the show and get access to behind the scenes content as a patron - https://www.patreon.com/SecurityInFive *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five Mighty Mackenzie - https://www.facebook.com/mightymackie Where you can find Security In Five - https://linktr.ee/binaryblogger Email - bblogger@protonmail.com

Wai Society
#61 - Energetic Hygiene + Rituals Behind The Chair

Wai Society

Play Episode Play 29 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 31:17


In this episode, I'm talking about the power of rituals and energetic hygiene behind the chair. Let me ask you a question, are you experiencing any of the following?You have a hard time focusingYou're constantly multi-taskingYou're extra emotional, or sensitive to the emotions of the people around youYou're lacking energy or drained, or wake up feeling exhaustedYou feel stressed or anxiousYou're easily overwhelmedIf you said "YES" to any of the above this episode is for you. Make sure you check out the Energetic Hygiene + Rituals Alchemy Session within the  Creating Alchemy Membership if you want to learn more. CLICK HERE to join now and get online courses, replays, and more✨ Thank you for listening to this episode of the Find Your WAI Podcast! Check out the links below to connect with me and learn more about my offerings:

Learning for Life @ Gustavus
A Global Gustie in Public Health

Learning for Life @ Gustavus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 56:26


While Greg is absorbed in teaching and grading the last weeks of fall semester 2022, we are offering some memorable past episodes of the podcast. In this one from January 2021, Katie Schlangen '14 talks about her challenging background and path to Gustavus, living and teaching in Seoul and Hong Kong, working and traveling internationally for a Minnesota-based NGO focused on healthcare, her commitment to health access and policy, and graduate study in global health policy through the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Currently, Schlangen is Senior Program Coordinator - Immunization at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

2Scientists
The pharmacovigilante

2Scientists

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 66:23


He's here, he's there; Dr. Hillman brings drug safety everywhere! So given the rules and regulations he needs to follow, the title “vigilante” could be nothing but ironic.We chart David's progress through choosing pharmacology as a subject to study, and settling on pharmacovigilance as a career to pursue. Listen: The Bollywood beats come courtesy of Cambridge-based artist Anish Kumar whose music you can also find on Bandcamp: anishkumarmusic.bandcamp.com, YouTube, Instagram and Twitter.Watch:Subscribe to our YouTube channel now for all future recordings. Episode transcript[Background intro music playing is "Nazia" by Anish Kumar]Parmvir: Hello everyone. And welcome to another episode of the 2Scientists podcast, where inspiring scientists share their work with you, wherever you like to listen. Today we come to you from a rather unique spot, rather than a cafe or bar we are camped out in Kensington Gardens in London, because it's a glorious day and our podcasting equipment allows us to do that. But enough about me and us, we are here today, of course I am your host Parmvir Bahia here and we're here with David Basanta, but we also have with us another David who is very special to me, he is an old friend of mine from my PhD program, and we shared much time and much swearing over experiments together at University college London. How are you David Hillman? David: I'm doing well. Thank you. It's, as you say, it's a, it's a lovely day and, it's nice to be back with old friends. Parmvir: Yes, yes. Of course everything rotates background to COVID and whereas we would normally see each other once a year. It's been three, four, possibly? David: Three, I think that's yeah.Parmvir: Miserable. David: Yeah. Sad times we shall have to make up for it. Parmvir: We will, we will. There's a bottle of Cava with our name on it. Once we've done with this. David: And onion rings. Parmvir: And onion rings. Yes. Fancy Marks and Spencer's one's though. So let's start at the beginning. I'm not talking about like, where were you born kind of thing. Although you can mention Kidderminster if you'd like. So as I understand it, we had a relatively similar track as undergraduates. So you did a bachelor's in pharmacology, correct? David: Yeah, that's right. Parmvir: So tell us why, why pharmacology? David: So this is gonna age me, age us.So I, for my A levels, so for my senior school exams, I, studied chemistry, biology, and maths, and I wanted to study something at university that combined chemistry and biology. And so this is the bit that will age us. So back in the day, if you remember, you would go to the, career advice department who were trying to help people to steer people towards what options they might want to pick at university.And they had this huge telephone directory effectively, which, mapped together people's different, combinations of A level courses and then gave you a list of options that you could, study at university. So I was sat in this little tiny room with this career advisor person, and they were basically running through this list of different courses.And when they came to pharmacology, they'd already mentioned pharmacy, which, you know, most people know what it is, but then they said pharmacology and I stopped them and said, well, what's, what's the difference? And they actually gave a pretty good summary. They said, it's more the biology of medicine. It's more the, the research and development of new medicines. They said it's potentially a controversial topic because it's the pharmaceutical industry is itself sometimes controversial and there's other aspects to the industry, which are, challenging sometimes. But yeah, that's how it started. So I picked a few different pharmacology courses, one of which was King's College London. I was always very practical, so I liked the idea of doing a year in industry at some point. So I chose a sandwich course like you and yeah, so that took me to KCL all that time ago. Parmvir: Mm. So I didn't realize how similar our tracks had been, because I also did biology, chemistry and maths, and I wanted to do something with the chemistry and the biology.And I got put in that direction by David: did you pick it out of the phone book as well? Parmvir: I did. What was it called? There was a name for it. David: It was pretty like a UCAS publication. Parmvir: Yes. It was just, it was enormous. David: Yeah. Parmvir: But yeah, in any case, I also, I did a sandwich year and I got to go and hang out in Germany for a year, which was fun.But yeah. So obviously after that you came to do a PhD at UCL where we were, well, I was a year ahead of you, I think. David: Yeah. You were. Parmvir: Why? Why did you do a PhD? David: So well for the reasons that I guess a lot of people do them, which is that I wasn't sure what to do next [both laugh] and a PhD seemed like a good way to string it out for another few years before I figured that out.But the reason I landed on UCL was that when I did go and do my year in industry, which like you was for a large pharma company, I worked in a lab looking at some non-clinical safety models. And we were using electrophysiology techniques at the time that was sharp electrode electrophysiology.Parmvir: You're gonna have to explain what electrophysiology means. David: Oh, don't make me do that. It's been 20 years [Parmvir laughs]. Oh, it's basically where you take either isolated cells or tissues and you put tiny, tiny electrodes into them and measure the changing currents across cell membranes. And as you put different drugs on, you can look at different effects of those drugs how they affect the electrical signals that you can measure.And really it's ions moving back and forward across membranes by little things called ion channels. So yeah, so I'd done sharp electrode electrophysiology there. I went back to university to finish my last year, and then the question came up about what to pick for a PhD. And I thought, well, although I hadn't enjoyed electrophysiology, it's something that I had started to, I guess, gain an interest in. Plus I had some skills that in that area. So, yeah, so I found a course, rather a PhD studentship at UCL, which seemed to fit the bill. It was looking at using a slightly different electrophysiology technique, so patch, clamping in a different area, but I thought it was something that I could use what I'd learnt in my year in industry Parmvir: I gave you some of these questions beforehand. David: Yes, because I'm incapable of spontaneous reaction to questions [Parmvir laughs]. Parmvir: Actually, I loved it so much that I have to read out your description of what your memory is like. David: I was quite proud of that. I coined that yesterday. I used to think of my memory as a lobster pot. Parmvir: All right. So you said I've just come up with a good analogy for my recall memory. It's like a reference library. You have to put in a request and then go away for a bit. When you come back, I'll have retrieved something from the vaults. Hopefully. David: Yeah, exactly. Parmvir: But aside from that I wanted to say this might be something of a loaded question, but what did you think of your PhD experience?David: You know, I really, I look back on those years with fond memory. Now it's partly because looking back, you edit out all of the stress and anxiety associated with doing a research project like that. I remember at the time when I first started UCL ran some induction courses where they pulled together PhD students and other postgraduate students from all sorts of backgrounds and John Foreman who you'll remember who was the Dean of students at the time, he gave a little introduction to UCL, but also gave some interesting advice let's say and pointers.And one of the things he pointed out in that session was the high degree of mental illness that is encountered by students in general taking these types of courses because they are stressful. And you often feel like you are kind of on your own. Driving your own research project forward. Sometimes through difficult times. So I do remember that in particular, but you know, what I remember mostly is just how impressed I was with all of the people that surrounded me because our department was not particularly flashy in its kind of presentation, but there were some seriously impressive people there.So I always like to think of our lab in the sense of, you know, it was run by effectively by Dennis and, and Guy when we got there. But before then it had been run by Don and before then it had been run by Bernard Katz who was a Nobel laureate. So it felt like we were the either grandchildren or great grandchildren of a Nobel Laureate and the whole department was a bit like that. It had a lot of very understated people who were world experts in their, in their field. And I always felt like the dumbest person in the department. But that didn't bother me too much because you know, being surrounded by all this greatness and even just, you know, the little glimpses of things you would see at the kind of coffee breaks and in the corridors, some of those memories still live with me, you know. Bearing in mind, this was back in what, between 2001 and 2005.So very, very early days of smartphones, things like trios and things like that, which seem antiquated now. But I remember coming across two old professors, so probably in their seventies or eighties comparing their smartphones and that like little microcosm, are the things that I loved about the department.Parmvir: Actually, I mean, I think you're, you're definitely selling yourself short. Like nobody would say that you weren't smart enough to be there. And I think one of the things that kind of ties into the, the mental health aspect is that we all felt that way. David: Yeah. Parmvir: Except we didn't express it to anyone else. It's, it's utterly ridiculous. How can we all be the least smart person in the room that's just not possible. David: Yeah. Parmvir: And after that, we all got our PhDs anyway, so, you know yeah. David: I certainly have no regrets about it. And I look back on those times with, with very fond memories, for sure. Parmvir: Yeah. Just talk briefly about what you did for your project and what the difficulties were.David: So the lab that I joined, so which, which you were a part of as well, their specialty was calcium activated potassium channels. And over time, the lab had looked at these ion channels in various different settings. The project that I was given was looking at these channels in vascular endothelial cells, which was a cell type that no one in the lab had ever studied before.Parmvir: Mm. David: So one of the biggest challenges that we were hit with straight away was that no one in the lab could really help that much with firsthand experience of how to obtain these cells, how to isolate them, how to culture them, how to grow them and really how to manage those cell types. So you might well remember that, the first, probably nine months of my PhD was just spent trying to culture these cells. Parmvir: Mm-hmm David: and it started with you know, available tissue from rats and other small mammals.But then eventually we were not having success with culturing cells from those models. So I switched onto pigs and, you know, I'd done a bit of reading that, you know, these vessels, because they were much larger the blood vessels, it was easier effectively to culture cells from, so I looked in the phone book and I found the address of an abattoir out in the middle of Essex.And there began my weekly trip for getting on for two and a half years to the deepest, darkest corners of Essex to go and retrieve pig, coronary artery cells once a week. Parmvir: Yeah. And essentially you suffered because these things were so flat. [David laughs] And when you're trying to, so you, for anyone who's listening, you have to picture trying to get a very, very fine tube onto something that is incredibly flat, and essentially you need this thing to form a vacuum seal and that just wasn't gonna happen. David: No, so, you know, vascular endothelial cells, they're the cells that line blood vessels, which is why they're, they're very flat. They're like tiles almost on the inside of veins and arteries.And you know, with other cells in the lab that were being looked at like the ones that you were looking at, like DRGs and like neurons and things like that, you know, you were basically putting the, the electrode down onto like a ball. Parmvir: Yeah. David: So the gap between the bottom of the dish and the top of the cell was who knows, 10, 20 microns, something like that. The cells that we were looking at, they flattened themselves out so much, they were about one micron, I think we estimated and therefore the tiniest vibration in the room would destroy the cell. And yeah, so the first stage was trying to culture, the damn things, and that was extremely challenging. It took a long time, but nine months of the way through managed it, and then began the whole pain of trying to get electrical recordings from them, which turned out to be as difficult. Parmvir: Yeah. So one of the things, I don't know if we ever talked about this, but what did you aspire to do after you'd done your PhD originally?Like, did you have any kind of idea? David: I mean, I think I was always headed into the pharmaceutical industry, which is where I landed up. In my undergrad degree in, I think my either first or second year, I did a very nice course, which was a kind of practical introduction to the pharmaceutical industry and from very top level, how drugs are developed and how pharma companies are organized internally and how the research progresses. And that, I'd always found that interesting. I mean, I find the entire pharmaceutical industry absolutely fascinating. And still do to this day. It's such an amazingly complex industry. And so, yeah, so I think I'd always been heading in that direction. Sure enough, the PhD certainly made me decide I was done with bench science [Parmvir laughs]. So, you know, by the time you've spent three plus years plodding along with these experiments that have a success rate of one in 50 sometimes. Parmvir: Yeah. David: You know, days and weeks without getting any data, and towards the end, still being in the lab at three o'clock in the morning, trying to get something to work and breaking more and more glassware as time goes on [Parmvir laughs]Yeah, I decided I was done with bench science, although I loved being in the labs, I loved playing in the labs. But I was never that into the kind of reading of the scientific papers and that sort of thing. Once it came down to maths and things like that, I wasn't so engaged. I needed to see practical things. Parmvir: Yeah. I feel like at some point we realized we were both some kind of engineer at heart rather than David: Yeah. Maybe Parmvir: scientist, David: maybe. Parmvir: It's more like, how does this work rather than trying to answer a bigger scientific question. David: Yeah. Parmvir: But obviously you were, you were a little bit scarred by your experience there, and you ended up going off in, I guess, a very different track from what the standard academic education leads you towards. So I think at this point this might be a good place to put your disclaimer in. David: Yes. So I work in the pharmaceutical industry and over time I've worked for, and with a variety of different companies.Any of the content that I describe today are my opinions and my opinions alone, and often they're really based off things which are in the public domain. In fact it's all based off things that were in the public domain and also some of the education that I've received, because actually, even after I finished my PhD, I then years later went on to study a, another academic course specifically in pharmacovigilance and pharmacoepidemiology.Parmvir: Oh, where did you do that? David: London school of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Parmvir: Oh. David: And it's interesting because it's a short course and I felt was a very valuable course. It's a course where regulatory authorities also send their people to learn too. Parmvir: So there's a lot of questions I can ask next.But one of the things that your job description throws up is this word "pharmacovigilance". What does that mean? David: Okay. So somewhere because I'm not gonna do it justice from memory, I'm going to read out the WHO definition of pharmacovigilance. It doesn't roll off the tongue, unfortunately, which is why it's never quite there in my head.So per the WHO: pharmacovigilance is the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects, or any other medicine, or vaccine-related problem. So essentially it is the process and the science relating to drug side effects. Now as you'll remember from pharmacology days, very early on, you're taught that all pharmacologically active substances, if it applies to the human body have side effects. The same side effects are not encountered by every person.And you know, some of the side effects might have obvious clinical manifestations. Some might not, you might get side effects, never know you've had them. And of course they vary massively in severity. So when you are looking at a medicine, particularly one that you're introducing to kind of general use in humans, you have a trade-off to make because you have an expected therapeutic benefit, but you also have to be mindful of potential side effects, particularly serious side effects and how much tolerance you have for those versus the good that the drug is supposed to do.And achieving that balance is one of the big challenges that's faced in drug development.Parmvir: So what you do really, it kind of comes at the end of the whole process of clinical trials and so on for given products, right? David: It actually starts right at the beginning of clinical development.So. Parmvir: Oh, hang on, I have to ask David's question: does that make you a Pharmacovigilante? David: [David and Parmvir laugh] I've often wondered the same thing myself. But yeah, so pharmacovigilance takes off really where toxicology leaves. So before you can put a drug into clinical development, by which I mean development in humans, drugs first have to go through preclinical development and that's where all the various toxicology studies are run.Parmvir: Can you quickly define toxicology for us? David: Sure. It is really focusing on the well, the potentially toxic side of medicines. So before you put a drug anywhere near a human, you want to be absolutely certain that it doesn't cause various catastrophic side effects in humans.So, for example, you need to be confident that it doesn't cause cancer. You need to be confident that it's not gonna cause a heart attack immediately, or cause a stroke immediately or things like that. So as per regulations in pretty much every country in the world, before you put a drug anywhere near a human in a clinical trial, it has to go through a standard set of tests.And there's various ways to achieve that. You know, sometimes those are tests using computer simulated models. Sometimes they are using individual cells or cultured cells or tissues. And sometimes as is well known in the industry they're using animal models and these are legally required tests.So every drug that goes through the process has to go through these. So that's done before it gets to clinical development. And then you start with phase one clinical trials which are studies on, usually on healthy volunteers and they're very small trials. They involve perhaps a few tens of patients. And the only purpose of those trials is to look at the safety and tolerability of the drug. So this is the first time you're putting the drug into humans. There is a bit of an exception to that. So although these are usually conducted on healthy volunteers, for some drugs, including, for example oncology drugs. Those drugs are usually along the more kind of toxic end of agents, so it's not ethical to put those into healthy volunteers. So sometimes those studies are conducted in a patient population. So once a drug moves into human studies into phase one, from that point, really for the rest of the lifetime of that drug as a human medicine pharmacovigilance is involved. So all the way through the phase one, two and three studies and then once the drug goes onto the market, pharmacovigilance continues.So the companies or the pharmaceutical or biotech companies that are developing these assets have a legal requirement to collect and analyze this data on an ongoing basis pretty much forever. Until that drug is eventually, perhaps if it's lucky enough to get to the market, until it's withdrawn from the market, perhaps many decades later.Parmvir: Very good. And I think that there are probably some very topical things that have come up recently as a result of COVID 19, which is important to consider when we're talking about these things, in that we are not just relying on these clinical trials that have gone out to ensure that these things are safe, but once they're out there that you have to continue to get feedback from people who are taking these to ensure that they continue to be safe in the long term, right?David: That's true. So, you know, ordinarily in clinical development, once you get through phase 1, 2, 3, and if you are lucky enough to have a drug, which is sufficiently efficacious, tolerable to go to market, then yes, you know, the drug's released to market and you continue to monitor for this stuff.Vaccines are in a particularly special category because they are drugs that are given to healthy people. Mm yes. And so therefore the benefit risk balance is more complicated in some ways, because , you know, it's, it's hard to consider the benefit to the individual of taking a product when they don't yet have that disease.So now there are other drugs that are in a similar category, other drugs that are given to healthy people. This is where I can ask you some questions. So what, what do you think those other drugs include? Parmvir: Oh, goodness. Um, I'm trying to think off the top of my head, what they might be. David: Yeah. It's very unfair. Parmvir: All I can think of at the moment are the other vaccines. David: Okay. So, Parmvir: but there are lots of prophylactic things. Yeah. Yeah. I can't think of anything David: Contraceptives. Parmvir: The obvious prophylactic. Yes. David: Drugs used for travel. So things like anti-malaria tablets. Parmvir: Oh yeah. David: Drugs used for things like smoking cessation Parmvir: mm-hmmDavid: stuff like that.So again, these are all drugs that are generally given to healthy people. So, you know, and this is where benefit risk balance comes into sharp focus, because if you have a drug that has been developed to treat a very hard to treat cancer, let's say, then when you consider benefit risk balance you know, if these patients are effectively going to die without a treatment, and this is the only treatment available, you might be able to accept that a drug has a one in a hundred chance of causing a fatal stroke. Particularly if that drug is given in hospital and these things can be, can be managed. If however, you are developing a cough medicine, then your tolerance for any type of dangerous side effects is basically zero, and of course, many drugs elsewhere on that scale. So yeah, benefit risk balance is a key part of what has to be looked at during drug development. And yeah, as we say, vaccines are particularly challenging. Often these days when a new drug is developed the clinical development and the studies don't stop necessarily when the drug is released for marketing. So, often as a condition of the marketing authorizations that are granted for these drugs, there have to be continuing studies to look at safety. These are called post-authorization safety studies. And so there's ongoing collection of data in a rigorous way to keep monitoring for various things. Either new things that we didn't know about the drug before, because of course when you're in clinical development, your number of patients is normally quite small Parmvir: mm-hmm David: so you're less likely to spot very rare side effects. You wouldn't usually detect a one in 50,000 probability side effect in a clinical trial cohort. Parmvir: Yeah. David: But sometimes these post authorization safety studies allow you to pick up more of that and enable you to characterize some of the side effects that you do know about more in detail.Parmvir: Yeah. So David B here asks essentially how long do these things go on after the drug's been on the market? For example, is there still pharmacovigilance for aspirin? David: Yes. Every single drug that has a marketing authorization out there it is the law in pretty much every country in the world that all safety data that becomes available to the marketing authorization holders, that's the company that owns the rights to the drug and effectively sells the drug, they're required by law to collect process, analyze and report this data. Now as drugs age, the natural reporting rate for some of these drugs drops so the probability of a physician or a pharmacist or a nurse, or even a patient reporting a side effect probably drops over time because theses are not new medicines anymore, but even so, any data that is collected has to go through that process, which is the pharmacovigilance that we were referring to earlier. In addition to that, all companies with marketing authorizations have to look at scientific and medical literature. It all has to be reviewed, so in European requirements, including the UK on a weekly basis, companies have to trawl some of the big literature databases, such as PubMed and M base, they have to trawl that information for any articles on their drugs. And any indication of side effects or other similar challenges. Parmvir: So how is this information collected and processed? Cause you've said obviously doctors, nurses, patients, they will all report certain things. Mm-hmm how do you kind of get them to a central place and cataloged and how do you decide what are actual side effects versus David: So if we think about the front end of the process, most pharma companies out there will have medical information help lines. So these are help lines that are set out there so that healthcare professionals. So that's the physicians, the, the pharmacists, the nurses and others but also consumers can contact the company for more information about the medicine and also potentially report adverse events, side effects. In parallel to that the same thing's going on with the regulators. So in the UK, for example, we have the yellow card scheme, which these days is a web portal system where anyone can go in and report side effects of medicines they're taking. In the us, you have the MedWatch scheme, which is very similar. Most companies around the world have similar things. Plus you've also got ongoing clinical trials, clinical studies, so data is coming in that way too. We've got data coming in from literature that I've mentioned. The regulators, when they receive stuff directly, they often pass that information over to the pharma company.So essentially all this information is coming towards the pharma company. It all gets directed to a pharmacovigilance department. And then we go through the process of processing that data. And so that data comes in from everywhere around the world where the drug is available for patients to take both in clinical trials and on the market.So the process basically consists of firstly translating the data, if it needs to be translated that gets captured into a safety database and there are various commercial safe databases out there. This is where companies collate all the information received on their drugs. And it goes through a process whereby data is kind of standardized it's put into standard terminology in a way that is compatible with the regulatory requirements. A narrative is constructed. So we write a story of what's happened to the patient from beginning to end. We look at various things like if the information is available to us, you know, what other medications were the patients taking? What's their medical history? What was the sequence of events? So what was the time to onset if possible, if we have that information between the patient taking the drug and them reporting the side effect, what the clinical course of the side effect was, so did the patient recover? Was any adjustment made to the the, the dosing or any treatments given? And so all that gets written up, we then decide what other information do we need to know?And then there's a feedback loop to go and ask the reporter if they'll provide additional information. Usually we ask for more information on more serious adverse events. We don't wanna overburden the reporters. Now reporters in clinical trials, so physicians involved in those, they're legally obliged to help with that process. Spontaneous reporters that we refer to, which is just where any healthcare professional or consumer contacts, the company, that's a voluntary reporting system, so we can ask them for additional information, they don't have to provide it, but we have to ask the questions anyway. So the information gets pulled together. It then goes, usually goes through a medical review, so we have kind of scientists pulling the data together. And then we have physicians reviewing the case, making sure it makes medical sense. And then depending on the seriousness of the case and other attributes, that case might have to be reported out to regulators worldwide.And a lot of the reports which are serious, have to be reported out within 15 days of what we call day zero, which is the first day anyone in the company became aware of the report. Parmvir: Mm-hmm. David: But to give you an idea, the large pharma companies are dealing with potentially tens of thousands of reports a week that are coming in on all of their products. So these are vast systems that are set up and they have to be set up to be able to meet all of the regulatory requirements in terms of timelines, for reporting. So the data's coming in, the expedited reports are going out in the format that the regulators require. We also have to pull together what we call aggregate reports. So these aggregated analyses of data over time for newer drugs, for example, those are submitted in Europe every six months. And then over time as the drug gets older, the gap between reports gets longer. And then also we're doing something, what we call signal section, which is where we are analyzing the data. And we're looking for trends in the data. Where we think we've got patterns we're starting to then look into researching those patterns a little bit more, you know, if we start to see, for example that I don't know that we are getting what appears to be a disproportionate number of nose bleeds, let's say, in a patient cohort, we would, you know, do background research on, well, you know, is there a plausible biological mechanism that we know about through the development of the drug? Was there stuff seen in the animal studies or even the human studies that might indicate that there's a, there's a root cause here.We'll look into confounding effects. Are all these patients on other drugs, which actually are likely causing that? And yeah, so kind of an appraisal is done: what's going on? Is it likely to be caused by something else? And if not, you know, we, keep on looking and those conversations then have to be shared with the regulatory authorities.And over time, what you'll see is the labeling of the product, the professional labeling which in Europe, including the UK, is the SMPC, the summary of product characteristics, which is a bit like the instruction manual for the product, which is available to healthcare professionals and the simplified version of that PIL those little leaflets you find inside of packs, those eventually get revised on an ongoing basis to accommodate the new knowledge that we are gaining on the side effect profile of the drug. So this is an ongoing process and it happens throughout the entire lifetime of the, of the drug. Parmvir: But yeah, so here's a subject that no one's talked about for a little while. COVID 19 David: mm-hmm Parmvir: [laughs] Obviously I know there's probably a collective groan from people listening right now, but it seems like a relevant subject, given the conversations around safety that people are having with regard to the vaccine. So do you know if there's been like a major uptick in these reports by individuals, of side effects from the vaccines, or do you take account of the fact that so many billions of people essentially at this point have received at least one shot of the vaccine versus how many reports you get coming in?David: Yeah. So this is one of the big challenges, and one of the things I should have said about drugs like vaccines is because they're given to such vast numbers of people, it becomes a particular challenge to differentiate between things which are being caused potentially by the vaccine and other things, which unfortunately are just bad luck of being a human being.And by that, I mean, so years ago when I was doing one of the academic courses we were being taught about the vast amounts of research that had to be done in terms of epidemiology before the HPV vaccines were released. So these vaccines were being released for use in teenage girls, and at the time it was felt that there was perhaps an insufficient understanding of the general health of that population, including things like what is the probability of a freak occurrence that a teenage girl is going to have a stroke or something like that? Things which we think of as of course, they're exceptionally rare, but they do happen.Parmvir: Mm-hmm David: and I'm talking about in untreated populations. Parmvir: Yep. David: But of course, you know, some of these patients are also on birth control and things like that, that also have other risk factors associated with them so my understanding is before the HPV vaccines were released, a huge amount of epidemiology research was done so that when the new vaccines were released, we knew that we would expect, and I'm just gonna make up a number here that, you know, one in 500,000 teenage girls would have, I don't know, some kind of fatal event which would just naturally occur, you know, even without them having the vaccine. And so that's similar for other vaccine rollouts as well. There has to be a good understanding of the background events of other things that, people will have happen to them, which have nothing to do with the medicine that you are giving.So, you know, that data is kept available and kept an eye on by the regulatory authorities and also the pharma companies. We don't have background rates for everything, so being prepared for what might come and then, you know, there perhaps isn't so much panic when the first case comes in of a patient that has one of these catastrophic events but if you start to see more than that, that's when you start to perhaps get more interested in: is this really being caused by the vaccine or the drug of interest. So, yeah, a lot of upfront work has to be done before you even put the drug out there. I mean, in terms of the COVID vaccines and the treatments, because of the high degree of public interest and scrutiny a lot of these drugs when they were first given and the vaccines were first given, so adverse events, side effects were tracked through post-authorization safety studies. So actually a lot of people, when they got their first doses, consented to have maybe a follow up call from an investigator who would ask them about various side effects that happened. So in addition to all of the natural spontaneous reporting that was coming in, there were very large cohorts of past study data coming in which is a robust way to look at these things. I know as well, there were legitimate questions about, you know, the COVID vaccines in particular were produced fairly quickly compared to the usual 10 to 15 years in development of, of a product. But you know, there are various reasons for this. So vaccines are perhaps one of the medicines where it's more possible to template out the product and therefore switch out components. But they still have a product which is similar to other products that have previously been used. But also, the COVID era in terms of vaccine development and treatment development was, in my opinion at least a completely unique event in terms of drug development so far. If you think of drug development as a kind of universe, or I'm gonna use some wonky analogies here, but let's say as galaxies, which have solar systems within them that have planets within them.So if you think of the galaxy of drug development you have all of these different stakeholders involved. You have the pharmaceutical companies and biotech companies and the service companies that support them, that's one area. You have the regulatory authorities but you have many other stakeholders.You have patients, of course they're the most important. For chronic diseases you might have patient advocacy groups. But also, you know, you guys are part of this universe as well, because you are the ones doing basic research, which is the foundation on which all, you know, all of this is, is ultimately built. So you have universities and other research organizations. You have the funding bodies that sit behind those that decide where the research money goes. And then out the other end of the process you have ethics committees that are involved in approving clinical trials. You have payers. So these are the organizations that ultimately pay for medicinal products in the UK, for example, that's the NHS. Parmvir: Yep. David: In the US, that would be insurance companies. Parmvir: Yeah. David: You have many other stakeholders. So you have obviously healthcare professionals at the end of the day, new drugs have to be woven into the fabric of medicine. And so you have to bring HCPs along with you. There are the learning bodies as well in relation to HCPs, the kind of professional bodies.So that's really at a kind of galaxy level, these are all the different solar systems. And then within them, if you look at the pharmaceutical biotechnology and service provider solar system, within those you have an incredibly complicated set of different skills departments, functions, you have the functions that are doing discovery.So these are the early days of, development where, you know, biologists and chemists are working out, you know, what are the new therapeutic targets we can look at? Then you have the clinical development division. You have the patent divisions, you have the regulatory affairs functions. You have the pharmacovigilance functions. You have the medical affairs functions, you have the medical information functions [Parmvir cackles]. There are, and I'm going to miss out many, many. You have the, the bio stats folks, you have the medical writers. And then of course you have the manufacturing, which is in itself a completely different, you know, specialized world.So yeah, you're dealing with a very complicated process with lots of things which are interlinked. But for me, if you think of all these things, like if you use layout or different compass, let's say, and I'm talking about the compass you use to check direction, not the ones you used to draw circles [Parmvir laughs] and if you scatter them all out they'll all be pointing at different directions. You know, all of these different entities have their own priorities. Because of course the industry as a whole is developing many different medicinal products for different reasons. I think when COVID came along, it was like drawing a magnet across the top of all those compasses and it got all the needles to point in the same direction.So you had governments who had a clear incentive to try and support the development of treatments. So you had governments putting up money, which was perhaps slightly unusual. They were putting money into basic research, such as the type of stuff that you guys do. They were putting money into diagnostics, which are critical for things like COVID.They were putting money into the development of vaccines and into treatments. And then of course, you know, you have the pharma companies where there was a scramble to try and develop something, to help humanity in its hour of need. You had the regulators with a lot of focus on them you know, and everyone watching their, every move and trying to ensure that you know, as many processes that often might take months, or perhaps even years were made as efficient as possible.Parmvir: Mm-hmm David: And it was a unique point in time because everyone was lined up with the same objective. So it meant, for example, that, you know, parts of the industry, which are normally a nine to five job, became a 24/7 job. Parmvir: Yeah. David: For a short period of time.And there was a huge amount of collaboration, which happened between the different stakeholder groups, you know regulatory authorities offered perhaps free scientific advice to companies that were developing this stuff. They met very regularly with companies that were in development. They gave a lot of advice as to what their expectations were when the data was received by them. They shortened some administrative pathways let's say which usually take a lot of time. They prioritized resource. So there's resource specifically waiting for this data to come in. And so, yeah, a lot of normal processes were adapted so that things could be done as efficiently as possible.And the outcome was that, you know, these drugs went through the entire process in a much more efficient way than would usually be encountered. I think another thing as well is with things like vaccines, the side effects that we anticipate to see, including the rare unusual ones ordinarily these manifest within, you know, days or weeks.It's not something that usually we anticipate things to occur years later. So there was that aspect too, but yeah, it was a, it was a unique time. Parmvir: Yeah. And actually this is a good throwback to Dr. Carina Rodriguez's podcast because she ran one of the clinical trials for the vaccine in children at USF where I work.David: Oh, fascinating. Parmvir: Yeah, so she talked about some of the things that you mentioned as well. David: I should say I was not involved sadly in any of the COVID vaccine development, but you know, it was fascinating to watch and actually to see my profession become a talking point in the news every day. Parmvir: Yes. David: It was very interesting to see all of this play out.Parmvir: Yeah. So actually, that's probably a good point to pause and ask you, what do you actually do? David: Okay. So [everyone laughs]. So as I've kind of indicated the process of pulling in adverse event data of coding it, which is the term we use for tidying up all of the data, putting it into a safety database, writing those narratives, getting the medical review, getting the important cases out the other end to the regulators, writing the reports, doing the signal section.These are very complicated processes and every company will develop them slightly differently. You know, small biotech companies, they might only have one product. It might only be approved in one or two countries. A top five pharma company will have hundreds of products authorized in many countries around the world. But all of these processes are put together in compliance with extremely strict regulations. Regulations that as I said exist in almost every country in the world and actually the regulations kind of cross over in the sense of, if you have a product that's authorized for marketing in the UK and the US, for example you know, the UK requires you to collect all the data and analyze it as does the US.They also require you to collect the data from each other's territories so companies are in the middle of the very complicated regulatory framework, which is a little bit different in each country, but fortunately is harmonized through some international bodies and international terminology. But building pharmacovigilance systems is complicated and it has to be done right. Firstly, for the obvious reason that we want to protect patients it's in no one's interest that that that patients are not protected. But also, you know, the penalties for not complying with these complex regulatory requirements are severe. And so my job really, as a, let's say senior leader within a pharmacovigilance department is to make sure that we build the right structures.And for these companies that we that we keep an eye out on all the areas, which are potential challenges and that companies are being compliant with the legislation to which we're all held. And so, so yeah, so building pharmacovigilance systems, I think is the simplest way I can describe it.Parmvir: It sounds pretty heavy and pretty complicated. David: Yeah. I mean, if you look at the larger pharma companies, if you add up all of the resource that they put into pharmacovigilance that they're legally required to put into pharmacovigilance, to service the needs of their products. A lot of things are outsourced these days, if you the count everything that comes from the outsourcing organizations as well, the big pharma companies have thousands of people like me involved in the processing and analysis of this data. So it is a big area, and that is all we do. You know, we are not involved in any other aspect of the drug. Not involved in the sales and marketing, for example, with the product, that's almost the complete opposite side of the company to us, all we do is you know, work in this very professionalized, very standardized discipline, which is pharmacovigilance. Parmvir: So David has a couple of questions. So first one should be relatively quick, which is that, is there a regulatory authority that is the gold standard? David: [David laughs] This is a very politically sensitive one.There are certainly some regulatory authorities who, particularly in some of the larger markets who are let's say more prominent. So examples would be the US FDA, the food and drug administration that is the drug regulatory authority for the United States. In the UK, we also have an extremely prominent regulator, the MHRA they're one of the oldest regulators, I believe in the world. So that's the UK medicines and healthcare products, regulatory agency. But you know, every country has its own regulator and whilst there are some who put themselves out there, perhaps as world leading regulators, there are just as many others that are doing the same important job for their countries. The European Union and European Economic Area has a slightly more complicated system because they have a coordinating regulatory authority, which is the European Medicines agency, the EMA, who many of you all have heard about in news reports, particularly during the COVID situation. But at a national level, you also have all of the national regulators who are working in tandem with the EMA. Parmvir: Okay. So this sounds quite different from, obviously it's very different from what you were doing during your PhD. David: Yes. Parmvir: He also wants to know, how did your PhD work, prepare you to do what you do now. David: If I could sum it up in one phrase, and this is a phrase which is overused, but I think in this case, it is really true: problem solving.Parmvir: Mm-hmm David: because it's interesting, you mentioned earlier that you and I we're almost engineers. Well, I went from becoming a physical engineer, at least in a lab environment to a process engineer. And, you know, I always used to think very naively when I was doing the basic research with you, I used to think, look, we are solving problems that no one knows the answer to. This must be the hardest job in the world. [Parmvir laughs] We're not solving manmade problems. Manmade problems must be so easy to solve. But no manmade problems [Parmvir laughs] are also particularly challenging. And when I say manmade problems, you know, I'm not talking about problems that someone is deliberately created, it's just, you know, logistical challenges, and just the challenges caused by working in, you know, different regulatory envionments with different sets of requirements and how to build processes that meet all of the requirements at the same time. And react to events, of course, because it might well be that you've had a product that has been ticking along nicely for a long time. And then suddenly there is a safety concern with the product. And if that safety concern is in the public domain, you will be deluged with reports in relation to that product called stimulated reporting. And you know, of course sometimes companies will be subject to class action lawsuits particularly in the US. So they might also receive large volumes of reports all in one go. All of those reports have to meet the same legal timelines, but now suddenly you've got 10,000 reports landed on your desk. Each one takes four hours to process and they're all due to the regulators in 15 days. So yeah, it is challenging working in a hyper regulated environment. Parmvir: Essentially these are problems that come about because we are humans. David: Exactly. Yeah. Parmvir: And we have to somehow live together. David: Yeah. Parmvir: So I had a couple of questions from my little sister and these might not be directly related to your work, but they are related to the fact that you work within an environment that involves clinical trials and patients and so on.And so Sukhy wants to know are side effects from drugs, usually the same for healthy people versus patients. David: This is a great question and cause me a little bit of head scratching. I think, I mean, the answer is it depends, I think by and large. Yes. But there will be some exceptions and those exceptions include things like some of the oncology treatments, because obviously there is an interaction often between the drug and the tumor, for example, so in a healthy person you can't emulate that because there is no tumor. So an example would be a phenomenon called tumorlysis syndrome which can only occur when there's a tumor to react to the particular drug. But by and large, yes, we extrapolate safety data from healthy individuals initially, which is why the earlier phases of studies are done often in healthy volunteers with some exceptions. But yeah. Then when we move on to phase two and then phase three, phase two and three are conducted in patients that have the indication of interest, I have the disease that we're trying to treat.Parmvir: So another question she had: how do you know people who are not healthy will be able to tolerate the drugs given that initially that they're tested on healthy people?David: So the first thing I would say is I'm not an expert in the design of clinical trials, but as I said, as you go through phase one which are the trials that are normally on healthy patients, you actually start out with a tiny, tiny dose. So you have an idea of dosing from your animal studies, but the data isn't always transferrable. But you take the maximum tolerable dose in animals, including in the most sensitive animals. And you then cut that by huge factor by perhaps 500 fold. Parmvir: Right. David: So you start out with a tiny amount and then you escalate up the doses to see how the patients are tolerating the drug, not the patients subject, I should say. So these are healthy volunteers usually. Parmvir: Yep. David: So that's phase one, but yeah, then of course, when you go into phase two, you're dealing with a different patient population. I don't know exactly how that's always done, but of course, you know, trials are put together by experts in the field. And they involve, you clinicians whose expertise is this particular area of medicine.Parmvir: Yeah. David: And of course it's not just the physicians at the pharmaceutical company and the biopharma company and the scientists, I should say as well. Also, this stuff is going to regulatory authorities, it's going to ethics committees, all of whom will have their own areas of expertise. So, you know, protocols are designed around the patient and to ensure the patients are not put at unnecessary risk.Parmvir: Ah, sometimes David sends me one of those questions that really makes me giggle. And this is if regulations are so important and onerous, how do I start my own biotech in the garage? David: [David laughs] Well, it's interesting, you know, companies don't necessarily have to be that big themselves to get started, but what they will need is a lot of help.Parmvir: Yeah. David: So what you'll see these days is you know, new biotechs starting up. But they rely very heavily on outsourcing. So they will partner with service providers with contract research organizations, with contract manufacturing organizations, all sorts of other parties that have the expertise that perhaps they aren't able to pull together themselves.But yeah, there are some companies out there, particularly smaller companies in earlier development that are, you know, pretty small might have 20 people in the company. Parmvir: Yeah. David: But they will need to rely on the help of many others, because going back to the kind of universe description that I gave, you know, there are so many specialized areas that you need to have covered in order to pull together everything you need, both to run a clinical trial. and also to submit a marketing authorization application. And then also keep your product compliant with all of the legal requirements that are out there.Parmvir: It's a lot.David: It is a lot, and you know this is why drug development is so costly because it needs a truly vast number of specialists involved. And, you know, quite a lot of physicians as well. And also, you know, most drugs that enter drug development don't make it all the way through the other end, so the end costs of medicinal products also have to cover the cost of the drugs that didn't make it.And plus companies only have a certain period of exclusivity before their drug becomes generic, i.e., other companies can start making it. Parmvir: So this is purely from a personal perspective, from your point of view: what do you think about the fact that obviously you have these companies who have put so much money developing these things, which were designed to treat a global pandemic. And yet we found that for example, like entire continents, like Africa still don't have a lot of people vaccinated against COVID 19, and those companies will refuse to open up the patents to allow them to be able to get people to stay healthy. David: Yeah, it's an area that really I'm not really sufficiently qualified to talk on. And I'm not just saying that, you know, through not wanting to put my foot in my mouth, but particularly with some of the vaccine technologies that were used, they were not simple medicines to manufacture. So not simple to manufacture, not simple to store, not simple to distribute. And sometimes I guess, it is perhaps a legitimate concern of a company that if other companies start making their same drug to a lower quality, that can have ramifications elsewhere. Now I'm not saying that that was the reason behind some of what you mentioned. Now there was a vaccine that was developed the UK vaccine which was specifically developed from the outset to be made available in developing world countries, let's say, and specifically to be made available at cost. And even the way that product was designed, it can be manufactured and stored at fridge temperature Parmvir: mm-hmm, which is a big deal. David: Exactly. It is a big deal, you know, those are all very important components to consider. A vaccine that could be used in those environments. But even, I remember because I vacuumed up all of the documentaries I think on television, Netflix, everywhere else about all of the challenges that were being faced. And, you know, there were even things that you just wouldn't think about, which was, you know, because the mRNA vaccines had to be stored at -80 [degrees Celsius], there wasn't enough minus 80 freezers in the developed countries, let alone figuring out how to develop and ship these to other countries with different climatic conditions.And so you even had the manufacturers of that type of equipment, having to up their game and suddenly churn out much more equipment than they previously had. So, yeah, there's no simple answer. I mean, historically there've been other challenges in the past with other types of drugs, such as the HIV medications. In the end access to those drugs was resolved through very careful dialogue between companies, regulators others. Access issues, I believe to those drugs, and again, this is just basically what I see on documentaries and other things; where are access problems these days, they're not in relation to the drug supply chain they're in relation to other things like people not wanting to come forward and receive treatment because of the stigma associated with things like that.Parmvir: So in short, do you enjoy your work? David: I do. I mean, I can honestly say that in my work every day is different. I'm very privileged in my job to support a number of different companies that are developing different products with a very wide variety of indications. And also, you know, just when you think you've seen it all worked with a wide variety of medicinal products, suddenly something completely new will come along. For example, we are now on the precipice of many commercial gene therapies coming out. Parmvir: Ooh. David: And you know, those products have some different considerations. Perhaps some of these interventions are irreversible Parmvir: mm-hmm.David: So, you know, what happens if patients do start developing something rare and unexpected. You have patients surviving a lot longer than was originally envisaged so, you know, are there other things which come about you know, as a result of the underlying disease that just no one had ever seen before. And yeah, many other types of technologies and the regulations are always having to evolve to take into account of these new therapies and the challenges associated with them.Parmvir: Well, it sounds like you will continue to live in interesting times. David: Yeah. I don't think I'm going anywhere anytime soon . Parmvir: Well, thank you so much for your time today, David. That was fantastic. And yeah, as I say, we kind of thought of you as soon as we started thinking about the safety surrounding things like COVID vaccines and knew that was your jam.So yes, we very much appreciate your time today. David: Okay. Thank you very much. [musical interlude]David: So I mentioned earlier that at an early point in my PhD, I switched to studying vascular endothelial cells that were harvested from pigs. So essentially these were pigs that were being slaughtered for the meat industry. And so I had to look through a phone book and identify an abattoir that I could go to and get the tissue that I needed to do my experiments so obviously this all had to start somewhere. So I put in a call to an abattoir in deepest, darkest Essex. And I gingerly made my way on the train to this place, which of course was in the middle of rural nowhere. And unfortunately the first day that I picked to go, it was snowing. Now we don't get vast amounts of snow in Southern England, but this was a decent sprinkling of snow. So I arrived in this quiet rural destination and I walked across various fields. I think I'd perhaps just got GPS on my phone, but it was very early days. And I was lost in fields of white in no time at all. So I ended up putting in a call to, the guys, to, come and pick me up, which they very kindly did. So then, you know, at that time I really didn't know what a coronary artery looked like so what I decided to do for that first trip was I just collected the fresh hearts that they were able to bring out the processing facility. So these were kind of warm pig hearts, freshly harvested from animals. I think I had three hearts or something like that. And so I had a large polystyrene box with me with some ice in it. And I think they were kind enough to give me the ice, as I put these hearts inside bags and put them in the box and then started making my way back to London. And of course, you know, this being a cold day, the heating was on, on the train, and so as I was sat on the train, in fact, I think it was when I got onto the tube, I suddenly became horrified that my polystyrene box was starting to leak water. And of course I knew, but no one else knew on the tube that within that water were bags, perhaps not secured, very tightly containing hearts and containing probably a fair amount of blood.And I suddenly started sweating that this puddle that was starting to pull around my polystyrene box on the floor of the tube would suddenly start to go pink and then red. And then before I knew it, I would be in serious trouble. So it was just one of those situations where the tube journey seemed to get longer and longer, and I was sweating more and more and then it got to the point where I felt that I couldn't wait any longer, so I kind of dashed outta the tube at the next station went up what was perhaps one of the longest escalators on the underground and managed to just get out the other side before I caused perhaps a fake terrorist incident or something like that. I was trying to think about how I would explain that I'd got three hearts in my polystyrene box and a set of scalpels bearing in mind that pig's hearts are very similar size to human hearts as well. So, yes, I managed just about to get to the lab. I clearly looked quite distressed, I suppose when I got back to the lab. So I started telling this story to my PhD supervisor, Dennis, and uh a retired professor that had come into the department, Don. And before too long, the two of them were crying with laughter at my story.So, um, so yeah, so that was my very first trip and yes, never, never forgotten.[musical outro]David: Our lab, when we first joined, it was quite old and a bit dog eared. And there was one particular chair in the office, which was, I mean, it was like a typical office swivel chair, but it had definitely seen better days and it was extremely uncomfortable. And when we had lab meetings, no one wanted to sit on this chair. And so Parmvir and I nicknamed it, Beelzebub's stool.

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1321 - Year End Home Hygiene - Your Network

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 7:58


The end of the year is a good time to focus on your home IT. The next few episodes will talk about some tips on what you can do with your home IT to help clean it up and make it more secure for the year to come. We'll start with the network. Be aware, be safe. Support the show and get access to behind the scenes content as a patron - https://www.patreon.com/SecurityInFive *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five Mighty Mackenzie - https://www.facebook.com/mightymackie Where you can find Security In Five - https://linktr.ee/binaryblogger Email - bblogger@protonmail.com

Cozy Conversations with The Sister Project
218 | Sleep Health and Hygiene with Sleep Specialist, Kelly Murray

Cozy Conversations with The Sister Project

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 53:16


Kelly Murray of Kelly Murray Sleep Consulting sat down with the sisters to talk about what causes sleep issues and everyday ways to better your sleep. A good night's sleep is actually good for your health so tune in to this episode for better zzz's. If you love Cozy Conversations with The Sister Project and would like to show your support for the content created, please visit Anchor.com (link in show notes) for more information. Thank you! Resource Links: Kelly Murray Adult Sleep Kelly Murray Sleep for Kids The Sister Project @thesisterproj Anchor: Support Our Small Business --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cozy-conversations/support

Dental A Team w/ Kiera Dent and Dr. Mark Costes
#609: Let's Get Elevated Hygiene

Dental A Team w/ Kiera Dent and Dr. Mark Costes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 15:58


There's a lot to know under the umbrella of a hygiene department. Kiera and Tiff touch on what the ideal and most efficient hygiene department looks like — including each hygienist bringing in 3 times their hourly rate — and how to run an assessment to know where your department falls on a 5-star ranking scale. Episode resources: Reach out to Kiera and Tiff Subscribe to The Dental A-Team podcast Become Dental A-Team Platinum! Review the podcast

Know Your Aura with Mystic Michaela
EP157: Cleaning Your Aura with Relaxing Meditation

Know Your Aura with Mystic Michaela

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 51:14


Is your aura feeling a bit… musty? Do you find yourself feeling exhausted, scattered and in a funk which you can't seem to get out of? Michaela deep dives into spiritual hygiene, what it is and how maintaining it can lead to a more balanced and joyful life. She discusses the ways in which we can become more routined about cleaning up our auras. Michaela will lead you through a short meditation to assist you in calling your energy and power back to you at the very end!  Mystic Michaela Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mysticmichaela Know Your Aura Website: https://knowyouraura.com Mystic Michaela Website: https://www.mysticmichaela.com Mystic Michaela Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2093029197406168 Mystic Michaela Podcast Itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/know-your-aura-with-mystic-michaela/id1477126939 Mystic Michaela Bonus Episode - Every Aura Color Explained: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bonus-every-aura-color-explained/id1477126939?i=1000479357880 Get 20% off your first order at https://dadgrass.com/kya Get $15 off any order $80 or more at https://milkbarstore.com/kya More podcasts at WAVE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/artist/wave-podcast-network/1437831426