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Best podcasts about Baghdadi

Latest podcast episodes about Baghdadi

The Fact Hunter
Episode 77: The Pulse-Part One

The Fact Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 88:13


On June 12, 2016, Omar Mateen, a 29-year-old man, killed 49 people and wounded 53 more in a mass shooting at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, United States. Orlando Police officers shot and killed him after a three-hour standoff.In a 9-1-1 call made shortly after the shooting began, Mateen swore allegiance to the leader of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, and said the U.S. killing of Abu Waheeb in Iraq the previous month "triggered" the shooting. He later told a negotiator he was "out here right now" because of the American-led interventions in Iraq and in Syria and that the negotiator should tell the United States to stop the bombing. The incident was deemed a terrorist attack by FBI investigators.thefacthunter.comfacthunterradio.com

Petit Journal
BP 240 - Zé Biden, pedaladas e os juízes afegãos

Petit Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 30:25


O Bate-Papo 240 está no seu feed, com os principais temas da semana economia e na política internacional, debatidos pelos professores Daniel Sousa e Tanguy, o Baghdadi. No Episódio de hoje tem: * Jovens afegãos ou juízes afegãos? * As taxas de juros no Brasil e nos Estados Unidos * A crise diplomática entre Joe Biden e Emmanuel Macron * A possibilidade de acordo comercial entre EUA e Reino Unido * Os discursos de Biden e Xi Jinping na ONU * As pedaladas dos precatórios Quer se tornar apoiador do Petit Journal? Acesse nosso site www.petitjournal.com.br e siga as instruções. Semana que vem tem aula gratuita hein! Os detalhes tão lá em www.petitcursos.com.br Dica: a personagem principal da aula é a Merkel e você não vai querer perder! E, para nos ouvir, prefira a Orelo: o aplicativo é lindo, tem página na web e ajuda a remunerar o nosso projeto. O endereço web é escute.orelo.audio/petit

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.54. History of the Mongols: Ilkhanate #4

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 33:21


Of all the rulers of the Ilkhanate, perhaps none matched the might or the glory of Ghazan. Of a prestigious lineage: son of Arghun Ilkhan, grandson of Abaqa Ilkhan, great-grandson of Hulegu Ilkhan, great-great-grandson of Tolui and great-great-great-grandson of Chinggis Khan, Ghazan ruled with the self-assured confidence of a proud Chinggisid, who at the same time was veiled in an Islamic legitimacy. For Ghazan, while not the first Muslim monarch of the Ilkhanate, was the one who permanently islamicized the khanate. The Ilkhanate after Ghazan was a very different entity from the time before him, and the course of this we will examine in today's episode. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.    Ghazan did not come to the throne peacefully. As we covered in our last episode on the Ilkhanate, since the reign of his father Arghun Ghazan had been the top commander on the Ilkhanate's eastern border, defending against Chagatais, Neguderis and the rebelling general Nawruz. Though Ghazan was not happy with his uncle Geikhatu's election as Il-Khan in 1291, he accepted it. Geikhatu was murdered in early 1295 and an invitation soon came to Ghazan for the throne, he happily accepted. But when a cousin, Baidu, was hurriedly elected by a group of rambunctious princes led by Taghachar Noyan, Ghazan was furious. The result was skirmishing and near full out civil war only narrowly averted. In the end, on the urging of his former foe Nawruz, Ghazan converted to Islam, rallied his forces and stole away Baidu's supporters. On Ghazan's order, Baidu was executed, and Ghazan was finally elected as Il-Khan in autumn 1295; taking the title of Sultan Mahmad, as well as padishah-i islam, Emperor of Islam.   Twenty-four years old when he stepped onto the throne, Ghazan was already an individual who had made himself known for his military ability and defence of the Ilkhanate's eastern border. Having brought about the submission of the former rebel Nawruz Noyan, Ghazan had made Nawruz his number two man. A staunch and loyal supporter of Ghazan, especially once he had convinced the young prince to convert to Islam, Nawruz became Ghazan's na'ib, viceroy,  and acted a sword and shield for Ghazan… as long as Ghazan did as he wished. It seems that at the start of his reign, Ghazan struggled to control Nawruz, and on Nawruz's urging, Ghazan's first decree had been to order the destruction of Christian, Jewish and Buddhist places of worship in Islamic cities in the Ilkhanate, especially in Tabriz and Baghdad, the empire's chief cities. While Ghazan, as a new convert to Islam, may have sought to establish his credentials as a good Muslim monarch, Nawruz seems to have been the more zealous of the two and behind this pogrom.    Once Ghazan reached Tabriz in October 1295 and was officially enthroned the following November, his first orders of business were to set out allotments, who would govern where, who was rewarded for their loyalty, and other enthronement celebrations. One of his bodyguard commanders, Mulai, was made the governor of Diyarbakir, and in a decidedly un-islamic ceremony, Ghazan married one of his father's widows, Bulughan Khatun. Already it was clear that Ghazan's conversion to Islam and lofty islamic titles had not replaced his Mongolian identity; while such a marriage, called levirate, was not just encouraged but expected among Mongols, particularly their monarchs, this sort of marriage was expressly forbidden in islam. Ghazan's servants sought to justify it based on the fact that Ghazan's father Arghun had not been a Muslim, and hence the marriage never truly legal. Whether this convinced anyone is debatable, but none could tell Ghazan “no.”   But in what was to be a common trend in Ghazan's reign, punishment was also to be violently meted out once celebrations were done. Ghazan had seen the noyans who had proven themselves duplicitous over the previous reigns, jumping from candidate to candidate as fortunes change. Ghazan would have none of it. The noyan Qunchuqbal was put on trial and executed. Qunchuqbal's comrade, Taghachar Noyan, who had betrayed every Il-Khan since Teguder Ahmad, was too powerful with too many friends to be so summarily executed, so he was instead “rewarded” with a cushy appointment in Anatolia, where he was quietly murdered. The murder of Taghachar angered one of his friends, the governor of Anatolia named Baltu Noyan. Baltu rebelled at the start of 1296, and Ghazan responded with a large army led by his loyal commander and brother-in-law, Qutlughshah Noyan. It took until the winter of 1296 for Qutlughshah's forces to defeat and kill Baltu.   This was not the only plot Ghazan faced. In the winter of 1295 forces from the Chagatai Khanate attacked Khurasan and Mazandaran. Ghazan sent Nawruz Noyan and two princes, Sögä and Barula, to repulse them, but the princes soon began to plot against Ghazan. Once learning of their plots, Ghazan ordered Nawruz to turn back and kill them. Another Chinggisid prince, a descendant of Chinggis Khan's brother Qasar named Arslan, also revolted and was quickly put down. By the end of 1296, Ghazan had faced rebellion from five imperial princes, who were all killed on his order. By the end of his reign,  at least seven Chinggisid princes, 31 noyans and 10 high ranking Persian officials perished by the will of Ghazan.  One of the most significant was the former vizier, Jamal al-Din Dastjirdani, who was executed in October 1296 on Ghazan's order, after a trial which would ultimately bring down Nawruz as well.   Dastjirdani's great rival was Sadr' al-Din Zanjani, who has popped up repeatedly over our previous episodes, usually seeking the vizierate and generally causing trouble.  Having been vizier under Geikhatu Il-Khan, he had lost the position under Geikhatu's successor Baidu, who gave it to Zanjani's rival Jamal al-Din Dastjirdani. During Ghazan's final march on Baidu, Zanjani was one of the first to abandon Baidu for Ghazan, and was rewarded with the position of vizier. However, Ghazan found himself displeased with his viziers; Zanjani was removed after a few months, replaced with Sharaf al-Din Simnani, who was in turn replaced in September 1296 by Zanjani's old foe, Dastjirdani. Dastjirdani was a close ally to Nawruz, and to reclaim the position of vizier Zanjani would need to take down both men. First, he whispered in Ghazan's ear of Dastjirdani's corruption, that he had been embezzling a huge quantity of funds from the treasury. Ghazan quickly had Dastjirdani put on trial and executed, after only a month as vizier.    Zanjani was given the position for the third time, and quickly looked to undermine Nawruz. His timing was good, as Nawruz's standing with Ghazan had already fallen. Once Ghazan had sent Nawruz east to push the Chagatais out of Khurasan, Ghazan rescinded the most extreme prosecutions against Christians and Jews, who could reconstruct their churches and synagogues. In fact, Ghazan would punish Muslims who led assaults on Christian and Jewish buildings later in his reign. The same privilege was not extended to Buddhists, who permanently lost their standing in the Ilkhanate and Iran. They were given the choice of conversion, or of leaving the Ilkhanate. Once victory was achieved over the Chagatais, Nawruz returned to Tabriz to visit his very sick wife. As he journeyed west, some of the troops Nawruz left in Khurasan revolted, pillaged territory and joined the Chagatais.   Ghazan was furious, insulted Nawruz and ordered him back to his post. Nawruz cooly replied that he would, once he had visited his ill wife. Ghazan's now poor disposition to Nawruz was taken advantage of by his new vizier, Zanjani. When a clerk in service of a Baghdadi merchant who travelled often to Mamluk Egypt was arrested in March 1297, Zanjani struck. Zanjani and his brother fabricated letters from Nawruz to the Mamluk Sultans, which depicted Nawruz as a man conspiring with them. Planting the letter into the clerk's belongings, they watched and waited. When Ghazan personally interrogated the clerk, he swore his innocence and made no mention of the letters. But when Ghazan searched the man's possessions and found the letter ascribed to Nawruz, he was apoplectic with rage. On the spot, Ghazan ordered the clerk beaten to death, then called for the deaths of Nawruz's family and servants, then ordered Nawruz's arrest. Nawruz fled upon learning of this, but was captured at Herat and turned over to Noyan Qutlughshah in August 1297, who had Nawruz cut in half. The late noyan's severed head spent some years adorning one of Baghdad's gates.   Nawruz's downfall saw the stars of both Zanjani and Qutlughshah rise. In the meantime, Ghazan continued to advance his image as an almighty Muslim monarch, educating himself on Islamic laws and in 1297,  donning a turban. He even experimented with bearing black banners as the ‘Abbasids once did, portraying himself as a sort of replacement ‘Abbasid Caliph, in part to challenge the puppet ‘Abbasid Caliphs the Mamluks kept in Cairo. Zanjani was finally confident in his position as vizier and wielded extreme power. But in the fashion of all Ikhanid viziers, his arrogance bred enemies. In March 1298, news came to Ghazan's ears that Zanjani was stealing funds from the imperial treasury. Fearing for his life, Zanjani decided to shift the blame away from himself. He went before Ghazan and bravely made accusations against one of his deputies and friends, a physician in Ghazan's keshig named Rashid al-Din. Ghazan saw through Zanjani's effort to condemn Rashid, and put a stop to it, though Zanjani maintained his position. The vizier needed a new plot, and to deal with Rashid al-Din. When Qutlughshah Noyan returned from crushing a rebellion in Georgia, the Noyan argued with Zanjani over tribute from the kingdom. Fearing the powerful Qutlughshah's wrath, Zanjani thought of himself a devilish plan to rid himself of both Qutlughshah and Rashid al-Din. He notified Ghazan that Qutlughshah had  ruined the economy of Georgia. Ghazan was then mad at Qutlughshah, who openly wondered who had made the accusation to Ghazan. Zanjani told Qutlughshah that it had been Rashid al-Din, and Qutlughshah stormed off to question Rashid over the matter.   But Zanjani had not counted on one thing: the friendly relations between Qutlughshah and Rashid al-Din from their time in the keshig together. When Qutlughshah questioned Rashid as to why the physician had denounced him, Rashid convinced Qutlughshah of his innocence in the matter. Returning to Ghazan, they quickly deduced that it was the plotting of Zanjani turning them against each other. In April 1298, Zanjani was put on trial and given over to Qutlughshah for execution, who had Zanjani killed in the same manner as Nawruz; cut in half. So ended the third vizierate of Sadr' al-Din Zanjani.   Following Zanjani's bisection, Ghazan lifted two men into the position of vizier in 1298: Sa'd al-Siwaji and Rashid al-Din Hamadani. If the latter name is familiar, it is because Rashid al-Din has been a voice we have commonly consulted in our podcast. Indeed, we could say that Rashid al-Din is one of, if not the, most important single medieval author on the Mongols, for he is the author of the massive Compendium of Chronicles, which he began soon after Zanjani's fall. First we should finally give mr. Rashid al-Din an introduction. He was born in the northwestern Iranian city of Hamadan around 1247 into a Jewish family. Like his father, Rashid was trained as a physician. As Hamadan was an important centre for Iranian Jews, featuring a Rabbinical college, and as evidenced from his knowledge of Jewish customs and Hebrew in the Compendium of Chronicles, we can say that Rashid was educated and raised in Jewish law. Yet for unclear reasons, he converted to Sunni Islam around the age of 30, perhaps in order to benefit his entrance into the majority Muslim bureacracy of the Ilkhanate. Most of his life between these broad strokes before the end of the thirteenth century is unknown. Perhaps as early as the reign of Abaqa Il-Khan did Rashid enter service of the Il-Khans in the role of a physician, and likely served Il-Khan Geikhatu as a steward and prepared his food. According to his own testament, during the failed effort to implement paper money in the midst of economic woes under Geikhatu, Rashid spent his own money to support the vizier's office of Zanjani with food and cooks.   By the time of Zanjani's final vizierate during Ghazan's reign, Rashid al-Din appears as a trusted associated respected by Ghazan and Qutlughshah Noyan, though we know nothing of how this relationship came about beyond Rashid's presence in the keshig, the imperial bodyguard, in which he had served as steward. Surprisingly little is known of Rashid al-Din's activities before he became Sa'd al-Siwaji's associate in the vizierate. Rashid al-Din was a highly educated man, well read in the Qur'an, poetry and the great Iranian national epic, the Shahnama of Firdausi, and was a man proud of Persian culture. A trained physician, he also showed interest in science, history and agriculture, all interests he pursued during his long reign at the top of the Mongol bureaucracy. Soon after reaching this lofty position, he was commissioned by Ghazan to begin a history of the Mongol Empire, from Chinggis Khan to Ghazan himself. This work was to be the beginning of the vast Jami' al-Tawarikh, the Compendium of Chronicles, which under Ghazan's successor Oljeitu was expanded to become a universal history covering Chinese, Turkish, Islamic, Indian and, to a lesser extent, Frankish history. Much of the central part of the Compendium of Chronicles is the Ghazanid Chronicle, his history of the Mongol Empire. Named for his patron, this is a history of the Mongol Empire relying on now lost sources, including a Mongolian source on Chinggis Khan's life, the Authentic Chronicle of Chinggis Khan, also called the Veritable Record of Chinggis Khan. Though this source is no longer extant, it was used by Rashid al-Din and two of the most important surviving Chinese sources on Chinggis Khan, the Shengwu Qinzheng lu and the first chapter of the Yuan Shi. The compilers of the Secret History of the Mongols used the same sources the Authentic Chronicle did, and the authors of the Authentic Chronicle made use of the Secret History of the Mongols, which Rashid himself did not have access to. It was, you know, secret, after all.    Additionally, Rashid made use of earlier Arabic and Persian sources on the Mongols, such as ibn al-Athir, al-Nasawi and ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini's History of the World Conqueror, who of course had been the older brother of Shams al-Din Juvaini, one of Rashid al-Din's predecessors as Ilkhanid vizier. Further information in Rashid al-Din's Compendium of Chronicles was collected from envoys from other Mongol khanates, a high ranking judge from the Yuan Dynasty named Bolod Chingsang, and apparently from Ghazan himself. Fittingly, Rashid al-Din's history is the main source for Ghazan's reign, to whom he devotes a very lengthy chapter, which concludes with forty stories illustrating Ghazan's character and supreme ability. If we take Rashid's account of Ghazan's life at face value, then Ghazan was fluent in Mongolian, Arabic, Persian, Hindi, Kashmiri, Tibetan, Chinese and a “Frankish” language. As well, he was a master goldsmith, blacksmith, carpenter and painter who also loved history, medicine, astronomy and alchemy. A perfect Muslim monarch who loved and cared for his people, and refused to harm even a fly if it landed in his food. In Rashid al-Din's account, the period before Ghazan is one of almost total anarchy, where inept khans more interested in hunting and feasting allowed their viziers and noyans to run the empire; in contrast, Ghazan took true interest in running the government, and under his guidance numerous reforms were launched to rejuvenate the struggling Ilkhanate. How much of this is true is hard to say; we know, for instance, that Ghazan had to rely on interpreters for dealing with Arabic speaking embassies from Damascus, and it seems doubtful the 30 year old Ghazan had found time to master so many industries during his military career.  The fact that most of our Persian sources were written during or after Ghazan's reign makes it hard to check many of Rashid's statements on the earlier period.  The glowing nature of Rashid's descriptions of Ghazan is often humorous when compared to other contemporaries, such as the Armenian Het'um of Corycus, who describes Ghazan as exceptionally short and ugly.   Regardless, Rashid al-Din's work is incredibly valuable, and few histories on the Mongol Empire will fail to make reference to it. While Rashid played up Ghazan's glory, there can be no doubt that under Ghazan serious reforms were undertaken, though whether Ghazan was the inspiration for them, or they came from Rashid himself is unknown. A major effort was directed to reducing abuses of the empire's agricultural base and farming population. From limiting the numbers of officials and clerks who took advantage of their gereg privileges to collect supplies from the yam routes, to stamping out bandity with more highway patrolmen and new laws. They  also tried to prevent the Mongols from harassing the sedentary population. As the Mongols were not provided a salary, many had to support themselves by collecting what they needed through force from the Ilkhan's subjects. Ghazan sought to solve this by granting lands to Mongol minghaans. The income from these allotted farms and villages would be used to support these Mongols, and stop their pillaging.  These were accompanied by monetary reforms and new silver currency, bearing not Mongolian inscriptions but the shahada and Ghazan's title of padishah-i islam. Measurements and weights throughout the Ilkhanate were ordered to be standardized largely based on what was used in Tabriz, in order to facilitate trade between regions. Canals and underground waterways were built to provide water for cities and irrigation. He also forbid the practice of enticing young women into prostitution.   Under Ghazan, the Ilkhanid treasury was reformed and refilled. The poorly managed treasury had before been subjected to theft from its own guards, and no accounts were made regarding what was contained within or spent. Ghazan and his vizers al-Siwaji and Rashid al-Din remedied this, with a more effective system under better protection. Evidently this was not mere rhetoric on Rashid al-Din's part, as evidenced by Ghazan's massive building projects and army mobilizations which indicate a substantial financial backing. At Tabriz, the Ilkhanid capital, Ghazan spent great sums improving the city. A new wall was built around it, along with entire new districts; one of these Ghazan made “New Tabriz,” and encouraged merchants and travellers to frequent it. Rashid al-Din was allotted funds to build himself an entire suburb in Tabriz, the famed Rab-e Rashidi. Here, Rashid al-Din oversaw a community of scholars, scientists and artists from across Iran to as far away as China and Italy. It became a veritable factory that was, in time, tasked by Rashid in copying and reproducing the Compendium of Chronicles, both its text and artwork. Rashid al-Din hoped for his magnum opus to become a medieval bestseller, and dreamed of a copy in every city of the Ilkhanate.   Ghazan was not above a little indulgence in Tabriz, in the form of a massive tomb complex for himself. It was a massive construction that was supposed to be larger than even the mighty mausoleum of the Seljuq Sultan Sanjar. Unfortunately, little of these projects remain. Even Rashid al-Din's suburb is now little more than a dusty mound outside of Tabriz today. The cause of this we will see in our next episode.   While these efforts were ongoing, Ghazan turned his eyes to military matters. Initially, these were defensive, as with the Chagatais, or crushing rebellions. After the end of Baltu's revolt in Anatolia, one of the men left in charge of the peninsula, Sulemish, a grandson of Baiju Noyan, began to have his own designs on the region. In contact with the Mamluks, when thick snowfall in winter 1298 cut Anatolia off from the rest of the Ilkhanate, Sulemish revolted. Ghazan of course, would have none of this. When spring came in 1299, an army under Qutlughshah Noyan was sent to bring Sulemish to heel. When his army was defeated, Sulemish fled to the Mamluks, left his brother as a hostage with them and returned to Anatolia with an army. This too was quickly defeated, and Sulemish brought captive to Tabriz, where late in 1299 he was publicly, and very violently, executed.    The revolt, brief as it was, brought the Mamluks to Ghazan's full attention. Their now shared religion was no cause for peace between them. Like Teguder Ahmad, Ghazan believed it should have made it easier for the Mamluks to submit to him, but their failure to respond to his declaration of his conversion in 1295 infuriated him. Ghazan had no love for them: intensely proud of his Chinggisid ancestry, to Ghazan the Mamluks - lowly slave soldiers who had become kings and were, even worse, Qipchaqs - were nothing but natural servants of the Mongols. Their submission, either through diplomacy or conquest was necessary and inevitable, and the fact they now shared a God did not change that. In March of 1299, defectors came to the Ilkhanate from the Mamluk Sultanate, and brought Ghazan up to speed on what had been happening in Cairo. The news pleased him. From the highs of the might of Baybars, Qalawun and al-Ashraf Khalil, the position of Sultan had become decidedly vulnerable. A young son of Qalawun, al-Nasir Muhammad, had been enthroned following al-Ashraf Khalil's murder, but his regent, a man of Mongolian origin named, somewhat ironically, Kitbuqa, seized power. al-Nasir Muhammad was deposed and Kitbuqa became Sultan, only to be in turn pushed out by another Mamluk named Lajin. Lajin ruled for three years until his murder at the start of 1299, and the 14 year old al-Nasir Muhammad was recalled to resume the Sultanic title, though real power was in the hands of the emirs.    Thus, as Ghazan had stomped down on threats to his throne and strengthened his power by 1299, the Mamluk Sultanate was ruled over by a young boy with no power fought over between squabbling emirs. It was as perfect a time as any to complete the conquest started by Hulegu some 40 years prior. Ghazan, always with an eye to the message, found a perfect pretext for war when during Ramadan in summer 1299, a Mamluk raiding party raped women in a mosque in an Ilkhanid town. With this, Ghazan was able to get a fatwa declared, coming into Syria in the final weeks of 1299 not as a Mongol conqueror, but a jihadi warrior come to preserve the dignity of Muslims. The fact that he brought a significant body of Christian soldiers from Armenia and Georgia was not lost on his Mamluk critics, especially the famous Hanbali jurist ibn Taymiyyah.    In terms of execution, Ghazan's 1299 campaign was brilliantly orchestrated. His timing was perfect, and he kept tight discipline over his troops to limit raiding on the population of Syria. On December 22nd, 1299, Ghazan met the army of al-Nasir Muhammad outside of Homs, where his great-uncle Mongke-Temur had been defeated in 1281. Unlike Mongke-Temur, Ghazan was a very experienced captain. He positioned his army at the nearby water source and forced the Mamluks to cross the desert to attack him.  The young al-Nasir Muhammad could not overawe the infighting between the emirs, and Ghazan soundly outmaneuvered them. Known as the battle of Wadi al-Khaznadar, Ghazan inflicted a devastating defeat on the Mamluk army- the only major victory enjoyed by the Mongols in all their conflict with the Mamluks. The sultan fled all the way back to Egypt, his army routed, his baggage abandoned and looted by the Mongols. The news of the Mamluk defeat spread rapidly across the region, and Mamluk garrisons from Syria and Palestine melted away or ran to join the sultan in Cairo. In the last days of the thirteenth century, Ghazan took the submission of Damascus. Here, if we believe Rashid al-Din, he took the time to further humiliate the Mamluks. He is supposed to have asked the assembled Damascene delegation who his ancestors were. They explained that he was Ghazan, son of Arghun, son of Abaqa, son of Hulegu, son of Tolui, son of Chinggis Khan. And who, Ghazan asked, was al-Nasir Muhammad's father? They answered that it was Sultan Qalawun. And who, Ghazan asked again, was Qalawun's father? Those assembled could not answer, for Qalawun's father was an unknown Qipchaq slave from the great steppe, from where Qalawun had been taken as a boy. Ghazan's point had been to demonstrate his own exalted lineage, from the grandest of all conquerors, the family given command by heaven to conquer the world. In contrast, the Mamluks were slaves, nobodies, and without right to rule.    Whether or not Ghazan really had this interaction, it does play into the skillful propaganda he employed during the campaign. As Damascus he had letters read out in Arabic signalling that he would spare the population and denounced Mamluk rule. These letters are rich with Qor'anic references, and it would have felt they were now the subjects of a Muslim, rather than a Mongol. Not all were drawn in by Ghazan's efforts. A Mamluk scholar in Damascus, ibn Taymiyyah, virulently decried Ghazan as a false Muslim served by a Jew, Rashid al-Din, and accused Ghazan of venerating Chinggis Khan as a prophet. Seeking to encourage resistance against Ghazan, Taymiyyah claimed to have rarely seen the Mongols pray, that they were ignorant of Islam or had Shi'a leanings. The latter is not entirely false; Ghazan had a deep affection for the Caliph ‘Ali and his family, the first legitimate caliph in the eyes of Shi'a Muslims, and like many Mongols was annoyed at infighting between Sunni schools.   Damascus was not put to the torch, and Mongol forces advanced down through Palestine. In some reports, they even entered Jerusalem itself. The path seemed open to Egypt. Yet, in February 1300 Ghazan suddenly turned back to the Ilkhanate, leaving a smaller force under Qutlughshah and the King of Cilicia Armenia, Het'um II, to briefly hold the region until they too retreated. By the start of the summer, the Mamluks had retaken their lost territory. Why Ghazan withdrew is unclear; the most common explanation is that he chose to avoid the summer heat, judging that he lacked the resources to supply an army all the way into Egypt once the summer sun beat down. Certainly, it was not because he lacked desire: in the autumn of 1300 he resumed the campaign, entering Syria again only for sudden extreme rainfall to turn the roads into deep mud that trapped men and horses. Unable to advance, he withdrew the army. Letters were sent to Europe following the first invasion seeking to organize an alliance, but brought, as usual, no actual results. He launched another invasion in spring 1303 under Qutlughshah Noyan, while Ghazan hung back. Qutlughshah suffered a great defeat against the Mamluks at Marj al-Suffar, for which Ghazan had him beaten with a rod upon his return. Yet another invasion was ordered in fall 1303, but was halted when Ghazan's health took a downward turn.   Ghazan seems to have suffered from routine inflammation of the eyes, mentioned by Rashid al-Din for the first time in 1299. In September 1303, the inflammation returned and quickly became serious. Rashid mentions that Ghazan was cauterized in two places, though unclear where or why. The Il-Khan made a show of moving about on a platform built on the backs of two elephants, an effort to hide the fact he could barely walk and could no longer ride his horse due to the pain. In January 1304, his youngest wife  Kärämün Khatun died, which became an emotional blow on top of his physical ailments. The vigorous monarch became depressed, the death of a wife making his own impending mortality seem all the greater. As the weather warmed he recovered some strength, and was able to ride and hunt again. Almost immediately, perhaps as a show of vitality or change of scenery, he set out for Rayy. The decision was foolhardly. On the road his symptoms returned and he lost his appetite. It became clear to all, especially himself, that he was dying. Retaining his mental faculties even as his body failed him, he summoned the noyans to him, and made them swear over and over again to confirm his brother Oljeitu as his successor. Perhaps only once he felt confident their oaths were genuine, did Ghazan allow himself to pass. On the 17th of May, 1304, Ghazan Il-Khan succumbed to his illness. He was 32 years old. His body was returned to Tabriz and entombed in his massive mausoleum, the first Il-Khan to abandon the secret burials of the Mongols. As per his wishes, his brother Oljeitu was enthroned as Khan of the Ilkhanate, setting off the final stage of the Khanate's history. The reign of Oljeitu begins our next episode, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this and would like to help us continue producing great content, please consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or sharing this with your friends. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.   

New Books in Literature
ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī, "A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Journal of the Famine Years" (NYU Press, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 81:15


A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Journal of the Famine Years (NYU Press, 2021) is a unique text that will fascinate specialists and general readers alike. Written by the polymath and physician ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī, and intended for the Abbasid caliph al-Nāṣir (r. 1180-1225 CE), the first part of the book offers detailed descriptions of Egypt's geography, plants, animals, and local cuisine, including a recipe for a giant picnic pie made with three entire roast lambs and dozens of chickens. ʿAbd al-Laṭīf's text is also a pioneering work of ancient Egyptology, with detailed observations of Pharaonic monuments, sculptures, and mummies. An early and ardent champion of archaeological conservation, ʿAbd al-Laṭīf condemns the vandalism wrought by tomb-robbers and notes with distaste that Egyptian grocers price their goods with labels written on recycled mummy-wrappings. The book's second half relates his horrific eyewitness account of the great famine that afflicted Egypt in the years 597–598/1200–1202. ʿAbd al-Laṭīf was a keen observer of humanity, and he offers vivid first-hand depictions of starvation, cannibalism, and a society in moral free-fall. At times funny and witty, at others poignant and harrowing, al-Baghdadi's voice is rendered through the expert translation of Tim Mackintosh-Smith, a travel writer and Arabist who has been based in Sana'a, Yemen, for four decades. In this interview we discuss the art of translating a text for a modern audience, and explore this fascinating text, published in a bilingual Arabic-English version by the Library of Arabic Literature (New York University Press, 2021), which is distinguished by the acute, humane, and ever-curious mind of its author. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī, "A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Journal of the Famine Years" (NYU Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 81:15


A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Journal of the Famine Years (NYU Press, 2021) is a unique text that will fascinate specialists and general readers alike. Written by the polymath and physician ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī, and intended for the Abbasid caliph al-Nāṣir (r. 1180-1225 CE), the first part of the book offers detailed descriptions of Egypt's geography, plants, animals, and local cuisine, including a recipe for a giant picnic pie made with three entire roast lambs and dozens of chickens. ʿAbd al-Laṭīf's text is also a pioneering work of ancient Egyptology, with detailed observations of Pharaonic monuments, sculptures, and mummies. An early and ardent champion of archaeological conservation, ʿAbd al-Laṭīf condemns the vandalism wrought by tomb-robbers and notes with distaste that Egyptian grocers price their goods with labels written on recycled mummy-wrappings. The book's second half relates his horrific eyewitness account of the great famine that afflicted Egypt in the years 597–598/1200–1202. ʿAbd al-Laṭīf was a keen observer of humanity, and he offers vivid first-hand depictions of starvation, cannibalism, and a society in moral free-fall. At times funny and witty, at others poignant and harrowing, al-Baghdadi's voice is rendered through the expert translation of Tim Mackintosh-Smith, a travel writer and Arabist who has been based in Sana'a, Yemen, for four decades. In this interview we discuss the art of translating a text for a modern audience, and explore this fascinating text, published in a bilingual Arabic-English version by the Library of Arabic Literature (New York University Press, 2021), which is distinguished by the acute, humane, and ever-curious mind of its author. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī, "A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Journal of the Famine Years" (NYU Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 81:15


A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Journal of the Famine Years (NYU Press, 2021) is a unique text that will fascinate specialists and general readers alike. Written by the polymath and physician ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī, and intended for the Abbasid caliph al-Nāṣir (r. 1180-1225 CE), the first part of the book offers detailed descriptions of Egypt's geography, plants, animals, and local cuisine, including a recipe for a giant picnic pie made with three entire roast lambs and dozens of chickens. ʿAbd al-Laṭīf's text is also a pioneering work of ancient Egyptology, with detailed observations of Pharaonic monuments, sculptures, and mummies. An early and ardent champion of archaeological conservation, ʿAbd al-Laṭīf condemns the vandalism wrought by tomb-robbers and notes with distaste that Egyptian grocers price their goods with labels written on recycled mummy-wrappings. The book's second half relates his horrific eyewitness account of the great famine that afflicted Egypt in the years 597–598/1200–1202. ʿAbd al-Laṭīf was a keen observer of humanity, and he offers vivid first-hand depictions of starvation, cannibalism, and a society in moral free-fall. At times funny and witty, at others poignant and harrowing, al-Baghdadi's voice is rendered through the expert translation of Tim Mackintosh-Smith, a travel writer and Arabist who has been based in Sana'a, Yemen, for four decades. In this interview we discuss the art of translating a text for a modern audience, and explore this fascinating text, published in a bilingual Arabic-English version by the Library of Arabic Literature (New York University Press, 2021), which is distinguished by the acute, humane, and ever-curious mind of its author. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī, "A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Journal of the Famine Years" (NYU Press, 2021)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 81:15


A Physician on the Nile: A Description of Egypt and Journal of the Famine Years (NYU Press, 2021) is a unique text that will fascinate specialists and general readers alike. Written by the polymath and physician ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baghdādī, and intended for the Abbasid caliph al-Nāṣir (r. 1180-1225 CE), the first part of the book offers detailed descriptions of Egypt's geography, plants, animals, and local cuisine, including a recipe for a giant picnic pie made with three entire roast lambs and dozens of chickens. ʿAbd al-Laṭīf's text is also a pioneering work of ancient Egyptology, with detailed observations of Pharaonic monuments, sculptures, and mummies. An early and ardent champion of archaeological conservation, ʿAbd al-Laṭīf condemns the vandalism wrought by tomb-robbers and notes with distaste that Egyptian grocers price their goods with labels written on recycled mummy-wrappings. The book's second half relates his horrific eyewitness account of the great famine that afflicted Egypt in the years 597–598/1200–1202. ʿAbd al-Laṭīf was a keen observer of humanity, and he offers vivid first-hand depictions of starvation, cannibalism, and a society in moral free-fall. At times funny and witty, at others poignant and harrowing, al-Baghdadi's voice is rendered through the expert translation of Tim Mackintosh-Smith, a travel writer and Arabist who has been based in Sana'a, Yemen, for four decades. In this interview we discuss the art of translating a text for a modern audience, and explore this fascinating text, published in a bilingual Arabic-English version by the Library of Arabic Literature (New York University Press, 2021), which is distinguished by the acute, humane, and ever-curious mind of its author. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

Saturday Extra - Separate stories podcast
Islamic State and the rise of violent extremism in Africa

Saturday Extra - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 15:27


After the death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and the fall of its self-declared caliphate in the Middle East, it seemed as though Islamic State’s influence was waning. Instead, its centre of gravity appears to have moved – to Africa.

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior
The Middle East Crisis Factory: The Iyad El-Baghdadi Interview

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 64:25


Gaslit Nation welcomes a special guest whose incredible life story captures the complex, often misunderstood region of the Middle East, the topic of this week’s discussion. Iyad el-Baghdadi, whom some of you may know from his must-read Twitter account, is a Palestinian activist, writer, and the co-author, with Ahmed Gatnash, of the compelling and important new book The Middle East Crisis Factory: Tyranny, Resilience and Resistance.

Keith Knight - Don't Tread on Anyone
The History of Al-Qaeda. Scott Horton & Keith Knight

Keith Knight - Don't Tread on Anyone

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 56:09


**Enough Already: Time to End the War on Terrorism**: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08T7RD14R/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1 -- If you find value in the content, please consider donating to my PayPal KeithKnight590@gmail.com LBRY: https://lbry.tv/@KeithKnightDontTreadOnAnyone:b -- 0:00 - Operation Cyclone (1979-1989) 4:56 - Anti-war quote 5:14 - In 2001 there were 400 Al-Qaeda members, how many exist today after trillions of dollars and hundreds of thousands of lives spent? 7:08 - Azzam group 8:12 - Osama Bin Laden 11:11 - Ayman al-Zawahiri 14:21 - Abu Musab al-Zarkowi 18:55 - Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi & Abu Yahya al-Libi (Libya, LIFG, Benghazi, Ghadaffi) 24:29 - Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi 32:27 - Difference between Mujahideen & Al-Qaeda 37:46 - Did the U.S. military intentionally let Bin Laden escape from Afghanistan to Pakistan? (Thomas Greer aka Dalton Fury) 46:55 - Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Ramzi Yousef, & Emad Salem (WTC 1993, FBI, Carson Dunbar) 52:34 - How many civilians have been killed in the war on terrorism?

Wait... What?
Episode 32: What all Trump supporters really have in common.

Wait... What?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2021 22:36


I don't care why they joined the zombie mob of imbeciles that killed a Capitol Police Officer. I don't care what motivates people to support men like Donald Trump, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, El Chapo, or Carlo Gambino. I only care that they supported them. I'm finished trying to understand them. I'm unsure if that makes me a kind of bigot. Hear me out and decide for yourself.

BardsFM
EP38 - Intelligence Report, BARDS + MONKEY, WE.ARE.AT.WAR. Red October - PART 2

BardsFM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2020 25:41


“Last night the United States brought the world’s number one terrorist leader to justice,” the president began. “Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is dead…“He died after running into a dead end tunnel, whimpering and crying and screaming all the way,” Trump said. “The compound had been cleared by this time with people either surrendering or being shot and killed. 11 young children were moved out of the house and are uninjured. The only ones remaining were Baghdadi in the tunnel and he had dragged three of his young children with him. They were led to certain death.” This message and its timing are not accident. As the Red October coup heats up, President Trump has sent an unmistakable message to the Deep State…. “We will hunt you, will send fear into you, we will destroy you. There is nowhere you can hide.” Donate: https://www.bards.fm/p/donate-1584248352/Buy the Film: https://bardsofwarfilm.comSupport the work via PayPal: paypal.me/bardsofwar 

The Chad Prather Show
Ep 194 | Famous Last Words? 'Epstein Didn't Kill Himself!'

The Chad Prather Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2020 52:37


Retired Navy SEAL Mike Ritland famously declared on Fox News that "Epstein didn't kill himself." He returns to the podcast to discuss that controversial appearance, the dog that got al-Baghdadi, and his thoughts on the influx of service animals.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Vox's Worldly
A very Worldly guide to 2019 — and 2020

Vox's Worldly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2019 46:05


Zack, Jenn, and Alex do a 2019 year in review — each one of them making a choice for biggest US foreign policy story of 2019, while the whole team debates just how important each of these events were. Then, after the break, they do the same for 2020 — making predictions about what the big stories will be. References: Here’s Alex’s great piece on how the Baghdadi raid went down:  Alex interviewed Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó about his failed push to overthrow Nicolás Maduro  Vox's Umair Irfan explained Trump’s formal withdrawal from the Paris climate accords Here’s a phenomenal feature on what Afghans think about US-Taliban peace talks and the possible withdrawal of US troops Zeeshan Aleem explained the latest in the US-China trade war for Vox  Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), national security reporter, Vox More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily news podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram. About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Derek Hunter Podcast
Liberals Won't Stop Until Everyone Is As Miserable As They Are

The Derek Hunter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2019 61:33


On today's show we talk about how the joyless "woke" crowd is trying to suck all the fun out of life and kill comedy. We get into why a comedian won't play college campuses anymore, a Washington Post columnist sees conspiracy in President Trump honoring a hero dog, Democrat win a lower court battle and think they won a war, pervert Bill Cosby speaks for the first time, NYC leftists protest police and enforcing the law, and Kamala Harris essentially calls for the destruction of the pharmaceutical industry. Comedian and Saturday Night Live star Pete Davidson won't play college campuses anymore because the "woke" crowd are too easily offended. Davidson said it's not worth it because if you say the wrong thing they'll hound you and damage your career and earnings. But it's not just the young social justice warriors ready to ruin everything. Washington Post columnist Kathleen Parker attacked President Donald Trump for simply honoring the hero dog from the raid that killed ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Yes, she really did. We have both stories and the bigger story of how miserable liberalism makes people. A federal court sided with Democrats against the Trump administration in trying to force former White House counsel to testify. Liberal media celebrated, but it's essentially meaningless. It will be appealed, and the appeals will take time and could easily be overturned. But anything that can be portrayed as bad for Trump gets the media exited. We have the story. Bill Cosby is likely to die in prison, and seems to deserve to. The convicted sex offender has no regrets and refuses to show any remorse, still proclaiming his innocence. Meanwhile, New York leftists are protesting police again for the mere act of enforcing the law, and Kamala Harris calls for the government to seize the patents of drug companies that refuse to accept her government price control scheme. So much crazy, so little time. We get into all of it.

Pod Save the World
Breaking down the Baghdadi raid

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2019 83:13


Tommy and Ben discuss what the death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi means for ISIS as well as Trump's strange lie about Baghdadi's "whimpering" demise. Then they cover the Paris Climate Agreement and the future of climate activism, Iran's increased nuclear activity and use of hostages as a foreign policy strategy, and protests in Chile and Iraq. Later they shout about Mike Pompeo, discuss the House resolution on Armenian Genocide, the Uighurs, bad guys hacking WhatsApp, and Rudy Giuliani, butt dialing cyber security czar. Then America Dissected host Dr. Abdul El-Sayed joins to discuss Ebola, superbugs, and how trust in government is key to global public health. 

Louder With Crowder
CROWDER SPOOKTACULAR AT TEXAS A&M! | Louder with Crowder

Louder With Crowder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2019 121:33


Steven Crowder heads to Texas A&M for the annual Halloween Spooktacular live show! Talking Trump nailing Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, Halloween triggering, an updated from Pedowood, and how Gen Z may clinch a 2020 win! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Drinkin' Bros Podcast
Episode 499 - The Death Of al-Baghdadi

Drinkin' Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2019 98:58


Ross Patterson and Mat Best chat about the mission that killed #1 ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi as Mat shouts out his homies for taking him down, Mat's recent hunting trip which including killing a 400 pound Red Stag, why BRCC had a llama inside it's office strapped with .50 cals, and lastly Mat gives us 2 chapters from his audiobook "Thank You For My Service" which is in it's 9th consecutive week on the New York Times Bestsellers List.

Reasonable Doubt
RD - al-Baghdadi, Flynn, China & Erdogan Sanctions

Reasonable Doubt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2019 65:00


Adam and Mark open the show discussing the recent developments in the Michael Flynn case as his attorneys allege misconduct and ask for a dismissal before turning to the news coming out of Turkey from potential political sanctions to demands that President Erdogan account for his personal wealth. The guys also discuss the recent killing of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and the circumstances surrounding who was and wasn't told about the operation in advance, and why that may be. As the show winds down, Adam and Mark explore the strange but accurate statement that Donald Trump is the Rodney Dangerfield of Presidents, and why that is. Please Support Our Sponsors: AISInsurance.com/Doubt EightSleep.com/Doubt LegalZoom.com Promo Code DOUBT Watch Limetown - only on Facebook Watch

The Editors
Episode 173: It Doesn't Work Like That, Senator Warren

The Editors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2019 53:10


Today on The Editors, Rich, Charlie, and Luke discuss the House's progress on impeachment, Warren's ridiculous Medicare for All plan, and Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi's death.

1A
The News Roundup for November 1, 2019

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2019 89:56


All but two House Democrats voted for the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Twitter plans to stop all political advertising on the platform. And the Washington Nationals won the World Series.Around the world, ISIS founder Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is dead. Political turmoil rocked South America. And there are widespread protests in the Middle East.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Drinkin' Bros Podcast
Drinkin' Bros Fake News 28 - Halloween Show

Drinkin' Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2019 72:44


Ross Patterson, Dan Hollaway, and Jessie Wiseman are joined by Tiffany Hart aka "Freedom Franny" to give you the realest fake news of the week with the death of Abu Bakr al‑Baghdadi, why Joe Biden is falling in the new polls, the Washington Nationals winning Game 7 of the World Series last night, how Netfix is trying to cash in on the Oscars with The Irishman, El Chapo's son getting involved in a violent shoot out with police in Mexico, why Twitter has decided to ban all political campaign ads in 2020, and restaurants that received an "F" in antibotics for their beef supplies.

Pat Gray Unleashed
Scary Stuff for Halloween! | 10/31/19

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2019 98:00


AOC's racist comments in Congress. Glenn breaks down Ukraine and does the job that the media refuses to do. Jeffrey Epstein autopsy update. Pat's got another new song in honor of al-Baghdadi. Joe Biden struggling in Iowa. New Jersey's "pumpkin tax." Another ice age on the way? Greta gets a beetle named after her. What happens in a black hole? Austin, Texas, is spiraling out of control.DK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Savage Nation Podcast
ISIS Leader Baghdadi was a Rapist and Genocidal Maniac

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 70:39


ISIS leader Baghdadi was a rapist and genocidal maniac, Savage says he didn't deserve Islamic ceremony after being taken out by U.S. forces. Army "Hero" in whistleblower sham could be a manchurian candidate. Indiana Congressman Jim Banks joins to talk about the raid over the weekend. Banks serves on the House Intelligence Committee. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Josh Marshall Podcast
Ep. 90: Vindman of the Hour

The Josh Marshall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 57:20


The Joshes, Kate and David discuss a week replete with impeachment developments, from the first current White House official's testimony (against the administration's wishes) to the Republicans' fearless storming of the SCIF. The group also parses the arraignment of Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, as well as the Baghdadi raid.

Intelligence Matters
Bonus Pod: Michael Morell's Takeaways from the al-Baghdadi Raid

Intelligence Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 20:29


In this bonus episode of Intelligence Matters, host Michael Morell discusses the implications of the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, including the U.S. raid’s operational details and how the terror group’s senior leadership may respond. Morell, who was deputy director of the CIA when Osama bin Laden was brought to justice in 2015, evaluates the intelligence collection opportunities that resulted and makes observations about current U.S. counterterrorism efforts.

The Buck Sexton Show
Hero Dog Unites America

The Buck Sexton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 116:05


President Trump releases a photo of the canine that helped capture Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi as the fallout from his death continues. A new witness comes forward in the Ukraine scandal but where is the whistleblower? Plus the fires in California rage on.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Michael Knowles Show
Ep. 440 - Zero Bark Thirty

The Michael Knowles Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 46:15


Somehow the story of how U.S. troops killed ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi has gotten even better as President Trump declassifies a photo of the dog who chased him down. We will examine what the photo means as most Americans ignore the strategic and symbolic significance of this very good boy. Then, Pete Buttigieg eats Kamala Harris’s lunch in the 2020 Democratic primary campaign, and it’s all Joe Biden’s fault. We’ll take a look at the latest polls. Finally, a leftist admits and defends the lawlessness of the latest impeachment push in the Dumbest Article on the Internet Today. Date: 10-29-2019

The Dan Bongino Show
Pelosi And Schiff Make a Catastrophic Mistake (Ep 1098)

The Dan Bongino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 54:01


In this episode, I address the catastrophic decision by Nancy Pelosi to move forward with her fraudulent impeachment and the real reasons she’s doing so. I also address the media freak out over the killing of al-Baghdadi and the reason they can’t give Trump a win. News Picks:Breaking: Nancy Pelosi is authorizing a vote on her fake impeachment.   Here are the real reasons the media are freaking out over Trump’s Baghdadi mission.    How the FBI trapped Mike Flynn.   How media lunatics found fault with the killing of our number one enemy.   The Washington Post is a disgrace to journalism.   Trillion dollar deficits are going to destroy our country if we don’t change course quickly.   We raised record tax revenue and we are still running massive deficits.   Confiscating the wealth of all billionaires wouldn’t even pay for 3 years of government run healthcare.    Here are all of the options to pay for government run “Medicare for all.” They options aren’t pretty.   Copyright Dan Bongino All Rights Reserved.     .

The Daily Zeitgeist
Booty Giuliani, Lock HIM Up? 10.29.19

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 74:20


In episode 504, Jack and Miles are joined by comedian Daniel Van Kirk to discuss the new upgraded AirPods, Rudy Giuliani's butt dial, John Kelly claiming to have warned Trump, Stephanie Grisham calling Trump a genius, Trump's speech about ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi's death, Trump being boo'd at the World Series, an Iowa being killed at a gender reveal party, and more! FOOTNOTES: Apple unveils new in-ear AirPods Pro coming October 30 for $249 Rudy Giuliani butt-dials NBC reporter, heard discussing need for cash and trashing Bidens MUST LISTEN: LEAKED RUDY GIULIANI BUTT DIAL VOICEMAIL John Kelly says he warned Trump he’d be impeached if he hired a ‘yes man’ as chief of staff to replace him White House: John Kelly 'was totally unequipped to handle the genius of our great President' President Trump on ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi: "He didn't die a hero. He died a coward."  In creating spectacle around Baghdadi’s death, Trump departs from Obama’s more measured tone on bin Laden Trump getting booed and enduring chants of "Lock Him Up" at the World Series is exactly the kind of content my heart desires.  Look how Trump’s face changes when he realizes an entire stadium is booing him Iowa woman killed by explosion at gender reveal party WATCH: Crumb - Part III [Official Audio] Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers

The Daily
The Life and Death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 27:53


After a five-year international manhunt, the leader of the Islamic State, who at one point controlled a caliphate the size of Britain, was killed in a raid by elite United States forces in Syria over the weekend.Today, we explore the life and death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi — and the legacy he leaves behind. Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism and the Islamic State for The Times, in conversation with Natalie Kitroeff. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Kurdish forces were essential in the mission to track and identify Mr. al-Baghdadi. President Trump’s decision to withdraw American troops from northern Syria threw the operation into turmoil.Some survivors of Islamic State brutality said Mr. al-Baghdadi’s death came too late. “He deserves a worse and more abhorrent death,” one added.

Zero Blog Thirty
ZBT #212: Baghdadi is BaghDEADi

Zero Blog Thirty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 57:08


Round 1: A veteran gets super veterany about trash that was blowing all over his precious, precious street. He needs three soldiers to come police call the area right damn now.Round 2: The leader of ISIS was killed over the weekend by US Special Forces in Syria. Good riddance, turd. We've reported his death at least twice before but this time it seems to be true. Round 3: Navy auditors found a warehouse w/ $126 million in aircraft parts, under secretary Thomas Modly says. Was it a warehouse, or a maintenance chief's wall locker? Round 4: TikTok is under fire as lawmakers urge US Intelligence to evaluate whether or not it is a national security threat. They no doubt will find that it is after searching hashtag military on the app.Round 5: Everyone's been talking about boobs after Game 5 of the World series when 2 ladies behind the duggout flashed ‘em. Perfect timing because we've got some military boob talk of our own. 

Pantsuit Politics
Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, Global Protests, and the Federal Budget Process

Pantsuit Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 51:44


Topics Discussed:Power & Wildfires in California (02:24)Killing of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi (03:15)Global Protests (08:56)Compliments: Mark Meadows and the American Congressional Exchange (21:17)The Federal Budget Process (26:37)Outside of Politics (50:07)Pantsuit Politics in the Wild:Nuance Nation Tour tickets for Dallas Blissdom (November 14-16)Sponsors:ThirdLoveRothy'sThank you for being a part of our community! We couldn't do what we do without you. To become a tangible supporter of the show, please visit our Patreon page, purchase a copy of our book, I Think You're Wrong (But I'm Listening), or share the word about our work in your own circles.Episode Resources: GOP's Meadows offers tribute to Elijah Cummings (The Hill) American Congressional Exchange (Bipartisan Policy Center) To bridge divide, our congressman went to Arkansas. Theirs came here. Did it work? (The News Tribune)Killing of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi: This is the compound where ISIS' Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi died (NBC News) With Baghdadi in their sights, U.S. troops launched a ‘dangerous and daring nighttime raid’ (The Washington Post) Al-Baghdadi Raid Was a Victory Built on Factors Trump Derides (The New York Times) How the US military raid that killed al-Baghdadi happened (CNN)Global Protests: Do today's global protests have anything in common? (BBC News) Spinning, downplaying, ignoring: Lebanon protests and the media (Al Jazeera)

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 10/28/19

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 118:59


On Monday's Mark Levin Show, credit must be given to the U.S. military and President Trump on taking out ISIS Leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi. During the Obama administration, then-president Obama had the exact coordinates for a targeted drone strike on Baghdadi but he refused to authorize the strike due to new rules implemented by the State Department during the Obama years. Yet, the media won't mention any of that, they're just too concerned with criticizing Trump and asking whether or not he told Speaker Nancy Pelosi and why or why not. Even though General Tony Thomas has noted that a previous lead on Baghdadi was leaked to the New York Times and the ISIS chief got away. This is a monster who kidnapped, raped and beheaded American aid-worker Kayla Mueller and countless others and his demise is good for the whole world. Later, the Democrats will do anything they can to impeach Trump from their secret hearings with no due process, to not taking a vote in the inquiry, to vilifying every single thing Trump has done or spoken. Thanks to the pushback of Republican Members, the House will take up a vote on the impeachment inquiry and announce new rules yet again, despite the lack of due process and the damage already done by it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Lawfare Podcast
Special Edition: Syria and The Al-Baghdadi Raid

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019 43:10


President Donald Trump announced on Sunday that Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State, died in a raid conducted by U.S. Special Operation Forces. The president used highly unusual language to describe the raid, including that al-Baghdadi “died like a dog.” He also stated that the U.S. would be “leaving soldiers to secure the oil.” Scott R. Anderson and Dan Byman join Benjamin Wittes to discuss the raid, what it means for the future of the Islamic State, Trump’s speech and what it all means for the broader region.

The News & Why It Matters
Ep 402 | Hey WaPo, Al-Baghdadi Is a Terrorist, NOT a 'Religious Scholar' | Guest: Grant Stinchfield

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 43:37


ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was killed over the weekend, but the Washington Post wanted to remember him as a "religious scholar" rather than the terrorist that he truly was. But luckily, Twitter users were there to make fun of WaPo's headline and create their own versions of obituaries for people like Jeffrey Dahmer and Darth Vader. And President Trump was booed Sunday night at the World Series game. Really? We can't even come together after one of the biggest terrorist threats in the world was just killed? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hard Factor
Hard Factor 10/29: Wildfire Hell, Gender Reveals Get Soft Cornered, Hero Dog Okay

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 30:42


Barstool Sports Daily News PodcastSupport Hard Factor & ‘Pop The Clutch'™ on a Shirt » Merch: http://bit.ly/HF-Merch ------------------------------------------------- On today's episode...The Wild Fires are Way too Wild Northern California can't catch a break. the Kincade fires have displaced 10s of thousands people, PG&E is again expected to cut off power to residents in Sonoma county as wind conditions worsen again, and it does not look like the states biggest fire has any intention of slowing down.Gender Reveal Death Gender reveals have become a game of one-upmanship to see who can have the craziest reveal. One family decided that creating a pipe bomb reveal was the logical next level and then grand mom died. Now the whole event has been placed in the Soft Corner.News Buffet Hillary Clinton believes it's her personal manifest destiny to become President of the United States; A Georgia state prison let a rapist who was in for a life sentence out accidentally; There is a gross nudist colony in Maryland; US Hero dog that was injured in Baghdadi raid is going to recover fullyBrought to you by PredictIt - Go to http://bit.ly/2Mcuq0c to get your first $20 deposit matched in the stock market of politics!Brought to you by NOOM, go to noom.com/hardfactor to find out how NOOM can help you get in the best health of your life. ------------------------------------------------- Follow us on Twitter: @HardFactorNews: http://bit.ly/HFTWIT@HardFactorMark: http://bit.ly/MarkCats@HardFactorPat: http://bit.ly/PatHF@HardFactorWes: http://bit.ly/WesTwit@HardFactorWill: http://bit.ly/HFwillFollow us on Instagram: @HardFactorNews: http://bit.ly/InstagHFSee how sweaty we look » Youtube: http://bit.ly/HardFactorYT

The Charlie Kirk Show
Austere Washington Swamp Creatures Boo the President

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 45:00


The media swings and misses in its portrayal of American special forces’ heroic and flawless mission to pursue and kill the evil terrorist and ISIS leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi; swamp creatures in Washington, D.C. boo the President of the United States; and Nancy Pelosi finally calls a vote on House Democrats’ sham impeachment inquiry. Thank you to today's sponsors: Donald Trump Campaign = Text Charlie to 88022 to receive official Trump alerts. https://www.donaldjtrump.com Express VPN = Protect your online activity TODAY and find out how you can get 3 months free at EXPRESSVPN.com/CHARLIE. Netsuite = Netsuite by Oracle handles every aspect of your business in a cloud platform. Visit Netsuite.com/KIRK Vincero Watches = Exceptional watches at a fair price, visit Vincerowatches.com and use code "KIRK" for 15% off your order.

The Savage Nation Podcast
California Burns, Dems Can't Keep the Lights On

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 71:27


Fires rage in California, Pelosi and Feinstein are nowhere to be found. How the California dream caught fire. What if Trump were Governor during this fire? Trump kills ISIS leader, Turkey turned Baghdadi in. Jewish boycott. David Rubin, former Mayor of Shiloh, Israel, joins to discuss the weekend raid that led to the death of ISIS leader Baghdadi. Rubin says Israel applauds the actions of President Trump. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Damage Report with John Iadarola

ISIS leader Al-Baghdadi died in a U.S. raid and Trump got really weird about it. Dr. Greg Fahy LIVE on a new scientific study that found human aging may be able to be reversed. The authenticity of Trump's Baghdadi raid Situation Room photo is being questioned. A gender reveal party in Iowa goes horribly wrong as a 54 year old woman dies in an explosion. Democratic Rep. Katie Hill resigns amid allegations of improper relations with a campaign staff member; Hill accuses her 'abusive husband' of launching this smear campaign against her. Trump was booed at the World Series, with the crowd also chanting 'lock him up;' which Joe Scarborough & Mika Brzezinski think was un-American.Cohost: Brooke ThomasGuest: Dr. Greg Fahy See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Steve Deace Show
What if the Roles Were Reversed? | Guest: Bob Vander Plaats | 10/28/19

Steve Deace Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 98:45


Steve, Todd, and Aaron break down what is perhaps the finest moment of the Trump presidency: the killing of one of the world’s most notorious terrorists, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The leftist media, on the other hand, had an overwhelmingly negative response to this victory for the president, and baseball fans at the World Series in Washington booed the president when he made an appearance. Thus, in Hour Two, the team opens the phone lines for listeners to weigh in on whether or not President Obama would have received the same cold reception from sports fans in a red state following such major victory abroad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Stay Tuned with Preet
CAFE Insider 10/28: Baghdadi Dies & Impeachment Quickens

Stay Tuned with Preet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 12:08


In this clip from the CAFE Insider podcast, "Baghdadi Dies & Impeachment Quickens," co-hosts Preet Bharara and Anne Milgram break down: -- The New York Times report that John Durham’s investigation into the origins of the FBI’s Trump-Russia probe has evolved into a criminal inquiry, raising a range of unanswered questions -- Rudy Giuliani is reportedly the target of two federal investigations and subject of two pocket dialing mishaps  Listen to the full episode with a free 2-week trial of the CAFE Insider membership. REFERENCES & SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS DURHAM’S CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION Attorney General’s guidelines on general crime investigations, Justice.gov "Justice Dept. Is Said to Open Criminal Inquiry Into Its Own Russia Investigation,” The New York Times, 10/24/19 “Justice Department watchdog says highly anticipated FISA report is ‘nearing completion’,” CBS News, 10/24/19 “Barr personally asked foreign officials to aid inquiry into CIA, FBI activities in 2016,” The Washington Post, 9/30/19 RUDY GIULIANI’S MISHAPS “Giuliani probe snowballs,” Politico, 10/25/19 “Is Rudy Giuliani going to jail?,” Politico, 10/24/19 “Giuliani associates Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman plead not guilty in campaign finance case,” The Washington Post, 10/23/19 “Rudy Giuliani butt-dials NBC reporter, heard discussing need for cash and trashing Bidens,” NBC News, 10/25/19

The Buck Sexton Show
Trump Gets Credit For Baghdadi

The Buck Sexton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 116:23


ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is taken out by US troops. What does this mean for the country and how did the media react? Plus the debate on how healthcare in the United States should be handled continues and Joe Biden tries to answer some pressing questions.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Sean Hannity Show
Enemy "Religious Scholars?"

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 103:40


Newt Gingrich, former Speaker of the House and author of the new book, Trump vs. China: Facing America's Greatest Threat, discusses the President’s decision to withhold his decision to take out Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi from the House Intel Committee. This weekend when the news was finally released to the public, WAPO took to their paper to label the murderer and ISIS leader, as a “religious scholar.” The Sean Hannity Show is on weekdays from 3 pm to 6 pm ET on iHeartRadio and Hannity.com.   Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers

FiveThirtyEight Politics
What Should Republicans Do?

FiveThirtyEight Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 61:23


The crew debates the savviest political strategy for Senate Republicans on the issue of impeachment. They also discuss the death of al-Baghdadi and disagreement in the polls.

Pat Gray Unleashed
How the MSM Remembers a Dead ISIS Leader

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 98:24


Death of an ISIS leader. The way news outlets remembered Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. More-On Trivia gets back on track. President Trump booed at the World Series. Elizabeth Warren supporter has some demands. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
The O'Reilly Update, October 28, 2019

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 13:00


President Trump confirms the killing of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in Syria. Europe braces for possible terror strikes in the days ahead. Joe Biden's presidential campaign is running on empty. California declares a state of emergency after wildfires shut-down San Francisco. Florida turns to hunters to help control their exploding python population. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Glenn Beck Program
Trump’s 'Hardest Decision' to Kill a Terrorist WASN’T Hard | 10/28/19

The Glenn Beck Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 126:20


Trump just announced the death of ISIS mastermind Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. And the contrast between Trump’s strength and Obama’s hesitancy to kill Osama bin Laden could not be more apparent. Glenn the “hip-hop master” gets jiggy with the freshest in rap news: Rapper YG shoved a fan offstage for refusing to yell “F*** Donald Trump,” and Kanye West is surprisingly the new voice of reason with his new album, “Jesus Is King.” While the crowd at a World Series game chanted “Lock him up!” to Trump, the media has been predicting “the beginning of the end” since before he took office. And in some 2020 news, Joe Biden is less popular than Bernie, Beto would allow AR-15s at hunting clubs, and Buttigieg may actually have a chance. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Glenn Beck Program
Best of the Program | Guest: Pat Gray | 10/28/19

The Glenn Beck Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 54:01


Trump just announced the death of ISIS mastermind Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. And the contrast between Trump’s strength and Obama’s hesitancy to kill Osama bin Laden could not be more apparent. Glenn reviews his “least favorite” Mercury One gala and the award he received. And in some rap news: Rapper YG shoved a fan offstage for refusing to yell “F*** Donald Trump,” and Kanye West is surprisingly the new voice of reason with his new album, “Jesus Is King.” The media has been predicting “the beginning of the end” of Trump’s presidency since before he took office. And as 2020 approaches, Joe Biden is less popular than Bernie, Beto would allow AR-15s at hunting clubs, and Buttigieg may actually have a chance. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dan Bongino Show
Like a Dog! (Ep 1097)

The Dan Bongino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2019 57:33


In this episode, I address the daring Special Forces raid killing terror leader al-Baghdadi and that outrageous liberal, and media, response to this story. I also discuss the compete failure by failed FBI Director Jim Comey to level with America about his role in Spygate. News Picks:President Trump explains why he kept the details of the ISIS operation from Pelosi.    Lt. General Mike Flynn’s lawyer makes a stunning claim in a court filing.   Former Obama administration photographer starts a photo conspiracy theory and then quickly retracts.    AOC would be banned by Facebook using her own standards.    First Look: Construction begins on brand new border wall.    A great article that dismantles the bogus “climate-change consensus” 97% liberal talking point.   Copyright Dan Bongino All Rights Reserved.