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Mountain range in Asia

  • 1,199PODCASTS
  • 5,243EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 7, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about himalaya

Terra X
Abenteuer Freiheit - Wüste bis zum Himalaya

Terra X

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 43:30


Kali Mandir Satsang
Devi Gita ”The Beginning of Sadhana” (class 7) 1:20-21 by Swami Bhajanananda Saraswati

Kali Mandir Satsang

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 79:11


Scripture class by Rev. Dr. Swami Bhajanananda Saraswati on Devi Gita, chapter 1, verses 20 & 21 giveento students of the Ramakrishna Seminary at Kali Mandir on 27 April 2022. इत्यादिश्य सुरान्सर्वान्महाविष्णुः स्वजायया | संयुतो निर्जगामाऽशु देवैः सह सुराधिपः || २० || ityādiśya surān-sarvān-mahā-viṣṇuḥ svajāyayā | saṃyuto nirjagāmā'śu devaiḥ saha surādhipaḥ || 20 || 20. "Thus enjoining all the gods and accompanied by his wife, the great Vishnu, as chief of the gods, set forth at once with his fellow lords." आजगाम महाशैलं हिमवन्तं नगाधिपम् | अभवंश्च सुराः सर्वे पुरश्चरणकर्मिणः|| २१ || ājagāma mahā-śailaṃ himavantaṃ nagādhipam | abhavaṃśca surāḥ sarve puraścaraṇa-karmiṇaḥ || 21 || 21. "He came to the great rocky crag, Himalaya, Lord of mountains, and all the gods commenced the preliminary acts of worship." ___________ https://www.ramakrishnaseminary.org/ https://kalimandir.org/ Support the work of the Ramakrishna Seminary at Kali Mandir

Hoagartn - Der Podcast aus Garmisch-Partenkirchen
#34 Billi Bierling // Bergsteigerin // Journalistin

Hoagartn - Der Podcast aus Garmisch-Partenkirchen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 54:30


Have A Sip
#88 Travel blogger Hoàng Lê Giang: Chúng ta chẳng phải có cả đời để đi?

Have A Sip

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 67:16


Với những người yêu du lịch, đặc biệt thích trekking và chinh phục những đỉnh núi thì Hoàng Lê Giang có lẽ không phải là cái tên xa lạ.Anh từng 8 lần trekking dãy Himalaya, cắm lá cờ đỏ sao vàng trên đỉnh Elbrus (nóc nhà châu Âu) và đặt chân lên đỉnh Kilimanjaro cao nhất châu Phi. Năm 2016, cộng đồng đam mê du lịch còn tự hào về Hoàng Lê Giang khi là người Việt đầu tiên hoàn thành chặng đường 300km chinh phục Bắc Cực.Nhiều thành tích ấn tượng là vậy, thế nhưng khi tìm kiếm cái tên Hoàng Lê Giang trên Google, kết quả chúng ta nhận được sẽ là những bài viết xung quanh scandal lời nói dối của anh vào năm 2019. Sự việc đó liệu có tác động đáng kể lên niềm đam mê của anh với trekking và chia sẻ những trải nghiệm quý giá?Cùng nghe những trải lòng của Travel blogger Hoàng Lê Giang với host Thùy Minh trên Have A Sip nhé!Đừng quên có thể xem bản video của podcast này tại: YouTubeVà đọc những bài viết thú vị tại website: Vietcetera

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Tim Matheson Live On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 65:43


If you look up “fun,” it'll take you right to this thing right here. Exceeding my high expectations, Tim Matheson is even more gorgeous, charming, intelligent, animated, accessible, and fabulous than I could've imagined. Don't think I've ever had more fun at 11 in the morning. Squeezing us in on a busy day of meetings, and a table read for Netflix's #1 smash, Virgin River, which Tim both stars in, and oft directs, he was relaxed, gave us his full attention, energy, passion, and focus, and, what a treat it was after all these years of adoring him. We jumped into Animal House, how it went down, how he got it, what almost was, Chevy Chase, John Belushi, Peter Reigert, Karen Allen, Mark Metcalf, who, thanks to his extreme kindness, introduced me to Tim, making today possible. We circled back through this Burbank boys' start, My Three Sons, Leave it to Beaver, voicing Jonny Quest, the Western years, Bonanza, The Virginian, co-starring with Kurt Russell in The Quest, opposite Henry Fonda, and Lucille Ball in Yours, Mine and Ours, studying at every turn, including a year of Improv, leading to the big stretch, comedy and portraying the good bad boy, working with Landis and then Speilberg and again Belushi in 1941. All the while absorbing and honing his craft, whilst learning from the masters. We talked The West Wing, composer Snuffy Walden, our 2 degrees, Aaron Sorkin, Rob Lowe, Allison Janney, Bradley Whitford, Martin Sheen, Tommy Schlamme, the brilliance, professionalism, and frenetic pace. With our time swiftly waning we touched on This Is Us and landed on VIrgin River, currently readying to roll on Season 5, as I and many binge the just dropped Season 4. I could've talked with Tim all day and still have longed for more. What a great spirit! Such joie de vivre, not to mention ridiculously easy on the eyes, ears, and I suspect, all five senses. Put it all together- it was FUN! Two thumbs way up. Tim Matheson Live on Game Changers With Vicki Abelson *** Wednesday, 8/3/22, 11 am PT, 2 pm ET*** Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here:
https://bit.ly/3JsAJK5 All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for the best tressed. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/ And, Blue Microphones

Escuchando Documentales
Ancient Aliens (T15): 2- El Reino Perdido #documental #leyendas #ovnis #podcast

Escuchando Documentales

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 40:11


Según las tradiciones tibetanas más antiguas, escondido en lo alto de las montañas del Himalaya se encuentra un reino de los dioses: Shambhala. ¿Es posible que este reino místico realmente exista y se pueda alcanzar a través de prácticas antiguas diseñadas para acceder a otras dimensiones? Los seguidores de la teoría de los antiguos astronautas piensan que sí y que en lo alto de las cumbres del Himalaya ha habido actividad extraterrestre desde hace milenios.

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析
劉必榮教授一周國際新聞評論 2022.8.2

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 12:38


#裴洛西亞洲行 美國眾議院議長裴洛西(Nancy Pelosi)7/31展開亞洲行,表定行程分別為新加坡、馬來西亞、韓國、日本,而隱藏版的行程,也就是全球注目的焦點,她是否會來台灣?裴洛西事前放話要來台灣,但基於安全理由始終不願確認,她過去曾兩次計畫訪問台灣… #中美經濟與國防 7/20-7/22美國主持2022年供應鏈部長級論壇,包括美國、歐盟、法國、德國、日本、韓國、印度等18個經濟體發表了聯合聲明,表示要建立集體長期且有韌性的供應鏈;7/28美國通過《晶片科技法案》(CHIPS-plus,Chips and Science act),希望投資2800億美元發展晶片;7/29美國及日本舉行經濟版2+2會談,表示美日將主導基於建立自由主義的經濟秩序,強調半導體重要物資的供應鏈;7/25-7/27印太四國展開國防部長會議…7/28-7/29上合組織(上海合作組織)於烏茲別克塔什干舉行,此次會議談及中亞問題,而我們特別關心的是中俄外長的互動,以及中印之間邊界問題等… #印尼外交與國防 印尼總統佐科威代表不結盟領袖,也是G20的輪值主席,因此他上週二到東北亞進行旋風式訪問中、日、韓三天,展現不結盟領袖的雄心,先後會見習近平、岸田文雄、尹錫悅,雙方會面皆論及經濟合作;訪問完,8/1印尼同時和日、韓、美、英等國進行軍事演習… Himalaya:www.himalaya.com/drliu 和風談判學院:www.tanpan.com.tw

FAZ Podcast für Deutschland
Abenteuer Himalaya: Tiger in Nepal, Skibergsteigen am Himlung

FAZ Podcast für Deutschland

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 43:52


Der Skibergsteiger und Tourenski-Pionier Benedikt Böhm nimmt uns mit auf die Karwendelspitze und erzählt von seiner bevorstehenden Expedition nach Nepal, die die F.A.Z. begleiten wird.

CQFD - La 1ere
Dermatologie et Himalaya

CQFD - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 55:53


En nouvelle diffusion: Rencontre avec Florence Hoareau, une spécialiste du traitement des peaux foncées Tous les vendredis, "CQFD" reçoit un homme ou une femme de science pour parler de son travail et de ses recherches. En juin 2021, Anne Baecher invitait la médecin dermatologue Florence Hoareau, qui assure une consultation spécialisée dans les peaux foncées à Paris et au Centre hospitaliers universitaire vaudois (CHUV). Une heure pour faire connaissance avec cette spécialiste et parler des spécificités de la dermatologie des peaux foncées. Risque dʹinondation dans lʹHimalaya Une étude sur lʹimpact du réchauffement climatique sur la chaine de lʹHimalaya est alarmiste. Elle stipule que les risques de crues liées à la rupture de lacs glaciaires vont être trois fois plus élevés dans les décennies à venir, avec des risques dʹinondations qui vont également tripler. Une mauvaise nouvelle pour ces régions dont certaines sont déjà instables politiquement et qui vont avoir un problème supplémentaire à régler. On en parle avec Markus Stoffel Bonjour, professeur à lʹInstitut des sciences de lʹenvironnement de lʹUniversité de Genève (Unige), interrogé par Bastien Confino.

New Books in South Asian Studies
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

New Books Network
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Ray Parker Jr. & Fran Strine Live On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 55:05


50 years ago yesterday, Ray Parker Jr. and I were in the same room… well, it was Madison Square Garden, he was 18, playing with Little Stevie Wonder, who was opening for The Stones, and, it was Mick's birthday. That's some cool shared history… I, a mere speck in the story am claiming my seat. Today was not quite so historic, yet any time in Ray's company is a huge treat. Add IIFC Award-Winning Filmmaker, Fran Strine to the mix, whose documentary, Who You Gonna Call, about Ray, just dropped, and well, it gets even more special. We talked about how they met on Fran's previous doc, Hired Gun, which also featured Ray, and where the idea for WYGC was borne. Ray's story was just too big to not tell. Known internationally, cross-generation for Ghostbusters, there's so much more to the story. Growing up in Detroit, police brutality firsthand, playing the clarinet and the sax, how he got his first guitar, and his 10,000 hours before he hit 13 when he had his first big gig with The Spinners. Crazy. Barry White, Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, Gladys Knight, and Bill Withers, followed, while he was still a kid. How Stevie changed his life, how his mother motivated him, moving to LA, doing his own thing, getting no credit for his Grammy-winning #1 You Make Me Feel Like Dancing, Raydio, his hit, Jack and Jill, to Ghostbusters––a last minute do or don't get paid stroke of genius. This story is at the heart of Who You Gonna Call, but like Grammy-Winning Hollywood Walk of Famer Ray, there's so much more to the story. I loved the doc and this time with these two exceedingly talented and charming men. You can catch the film on Prime and Peacock https://www.amazon.com/Who-You-Gonna-Call-Ultra/dp/B0B2Q4FCX7 Run! It's that good. Ray Parker Jr. & Fran Strine Live on Game Changers With Vicki Abelson Wednesday, 7/27/22, 5 pm PT, 8 pm ET Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here: https://bit.ly/3OKtPRn All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for the best tressed. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/ And, Blue Microphones

New Books in History
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Geography
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in British Studies
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

Asian Review of Books
Lachlan Fleetwood, "Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

Asian Review of Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:51


Today, the idea that the Himalayas have the world's tallest peaks—by a large margin—is entirely uncontroversial. Just about anyone can name Mount Everest and K2 as the world's tallest and second-tallest mountains respectively. But the idea that this mountain range had the highest summits used to be quite controversial. Mountaineers claimed that the Himalayas could not be taller than peaks in Europe or South America, like Ecuador's Chimborazo. Even when it was proven that the Himalayas were taller, mountaineers would praised the aesthetic quality of European and South American peaks—essentially giving the nineteenth-century equivalent of “height isn't everything” That's merely one of the historical details from Lachlan Fleetwood's Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya (Cambridge University Press, 2022), which studies the first attempts to survey this mountain range. Fleetwood's book examines not just the expeditions themselves, but also how surveyors procured their equipment, how they handled altitude sickness, and the fossils they found (among other details), in order to analyze the connection between knowledge, the frontier, and empire. Lachlan Fleetwood is a historian of science, empire, geography and environment. He holds a PhD in history from Cambridge University, and is currently a research fellow at University College Dublin. He is currently developing a new project that examines climatic sciences and environmental determinism in imperial surveys of Central Asia and Mesopotamia in the long nineteenth century. In this interview, Lachlan and I talk about the Himalayas, how the first surveyors studied them, and why these early efforts to understand this mountain range are important to how we understand the history of science. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Science on the Roof of the World. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/asian-review

Radio Bremen: Das Feature
Neustart am Himalaya – Der Tourismus kehrt zurück nach Nepal

Radio Bremen: Das Feature

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 30:06


Der Tourismus in den Himalayabergen ist ein entscheidender Wirtschaftsfaktor in Nepal, einem Land, dass die Weltbank immer noch zu den ärmsten Nationen zählt. Durch die Covid-Pandemie brach der Tourismussektor fast komplett zusammen. 2022 – beginnend mit der Frühjahrssaison sollte der Tourismus in Nepal wieder durchstarten.

Relax with Meditation
How to make Tempeh for your daily probiotics?

Relax with Meditation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022


 Tempeh are fermented beans that are packed in bulk with white spores from fermentation... Looks like Camembert cheese and taste cheesy… Tempeh is a delicious cheese.You can add tempeh to your salad or fermented veggies, like kimchi... Easy to do and full of healthy probiotics. The recipe is at the end.The original recipe is soy-based, and you can literally use any kind of dry beans. When using chickpeas, use split chickpeas, because normal chickpeas are too large and thus do not stick together. You have to soak the beans then boil them in water.After boiling, the beans need not be too tender and not too hard. You have to add white vinegar or I like apple vinegar better. Because Tempeh starter is a mould that loves an acidic environment and vinegar protects beans against bacteria. Keep the Tempeh above 25 C and below 35 C for the first 12 hours. Afterwards, the Tempeh generates enough heat...You need organic, no GM soy... 600g dry whole soya. 5Tbsp Vinegar.1 teaspoon 3-5 grams of tempeh starter.1 teaspoon salt, I prefer pink Himalaya salt. Clean beans thoroughly in water, we do not want them with insects... Soak them for eight to twelve hours.Rinse again in freshwater. You don't need to dehull the beans, that is too time consuming. Take a Power-pressure-pot, put them inside, and add sufficient water for them to be covered with water. Add your 5 Tablespoon vinegar and 1 Teaspoon salt. Soy needs about 30 minutes to cook. Remove the water and the hulls that are floating on the water. Put the beans back carefully on the heat, stir with a wooden spoon to evaporate the remaining liquid. The best is to put them on a towel or dry them with a hair dryer, but this is too much work. Allow the beans to dry and cool to 35 ºC. Add 1 teaspoon of tempeh powder and mix thoroughly for 1 minute.  You put them in a zip-lock-bag that you punctured every inch or 2.5 cm with a bamboo or metal skewer...The bag should not be filled thicker than 2.5 cm full of soybeans.Another option is to use banana leaves. -So, I have done it. "I have so many banana plants, and it's much easier.Cut the leaf stem and patch both sides, so that the banana leaf is sufficiently large.  Don't perforate the banana leaf. Cut them into whatever size you want.Wrap the soybeans in the banana leaf...You can use a toothpick to glue the bundle together... Or simply place 100g of weight on it, like a bag with dry soybeans...  Keep the beans for 12 hours between 25-35 C approx... Then the mold should produce its own heat... The tempeh should be fermented for 30-40 hours, all time included. Verify the result.Tempeh can be refrigerated for a week or frozen for 1/2 year. When you freeze the Tempeh for six months, the probiotics will stay alive. My Video: How to make Tempeh for your daily probiotics? https://youtu.be/C6RH2ypAy5oMy Audio: https://divinesuccess.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/Podcast2/How-to-make-Tempeh-for-your-daily-probiotics.mp3

Success Through Failure with Jim Harshaw Jr | Goal Setting, Habits, Mindset and Motivation for  Sports, Business and Life
#362 Tragedy, Triumph, and Leadership: Absurd Stories and Ironclad Lessons from the World's Highest Mountains with Chris Warner

Success Through Failure with Jim Harshaw Jr | Goal Setting, Habits, Mindset and Motivation for Sports, Business and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 39:37


Action Plan: https://jimharshawjr.com/ACTION Free Clarity Call: https://jimharshawjr.com/APPLY Chris Warner has been at the top of the world— literally and figuratively. Buckle up as he takes us through some of the most absurd, most challenging, and most rewarding leadership expeditions one could ever imagine. Chris Warner is a climber, entrepreneur, and leadership educator. He's led over 230 mountaineering expeditions in Asia, North and South America, Africa, and Antarctica.  He guided the first-ever reality TV show on Mount Everest, filmed an Emmy-nominated documentary about his team's K2 climb, and pioneered new routes throughout the Himalaya.  In 1990, Chris started a business with $592 and grew it into the first national chain of indoor climbing gyms. When he retired as CEO, the company had 1,000 employees serving 2 million customers annually.  Today, he's an investor in private companies, a mentor to CEOs, and a real estate developer in Aspen, Colorado.  During his 25+ years as a leadership educator, he's worked with Google execs, NFL and NHL teams, Fortune 500 firms, Silicon Valley startups, and thousands of CEOs and their senior leadership teams.  What you're about to hear in this episode are stories from a man who has lived through probably the most unbelievable leadership challenges that I've heard of in the six years of the Success Through Failure podcast. Tune in and discover how someone like Chris climbed his way to the top, backed by some actionable tactics that you can use in your own climb to the summit. Listen now! If you don't have time to listen to the entire episode or if you hear something that you like but don't have time to write it down, be sure to grab your free copy of the Action Plan from this episode— as well as get access to action plans from EVERY episode— at http://www.JimHarshawJr.com/Action.  

Life on Planet Earth
CRYPTO'S SECOND COMING? JESSE BROWN, CEO, Himalaya Exchange, lays out a bright future for cryptocurrency, fights back criticism, explains how a Ferrari was bought with his Himalaya Dollar stable coin

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 46:34


Jesse Brown is CEO, Himalaya Exchange, a cryptocurrency exchange specialized in the Himalaya Dollar the Himalaya Coin. The exchange lists its headquarters in the British Virgin Islands Brown has years of technical experience as a lead blockchain architect in several start-ups and award-winning Wall Street blockchain projects. One project he was leading was recognized as a top 50 Blockchain in 2020 by Forbes. What is the Himalaya Ecosystem? The world is undergoing a financial revolution, with the advent of blockchain technology and cryptocurrency establishing a new monetary paradigm, according to the Himalaya Exchange. "The Himalaya Exchange is at the heart of this revolution," it says. "Our values, mission, and company spirit is to create a world where people have complete control over their money, data, and destinies." The ambition to create world-changing financial solutions fuels our innovation; the Himalaya Exchange is not just a coin or an exchange but an infrastructure of the world's first true crypto ecosystem. We are the first and only company building an end-to-end, blockchain-based integrated financial system, encompassing a unique cryptocurrency (Himalaya Coin), a stable coin (Himalaya Dollar), an exchange platform (Himalaya Exchange), and a payment application (Himalaya Pay). A new financial system that provides freedom for all​, using blockchain technology to deliver innovative, affordable, and secure services. Source: https://blog.himalaya.exchange/himalaya-exchange-envisioning-the-future-e9e9e4e78da6 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Ed Begley Jr. Live On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 61:13


I've had the great good fortune to sit down with innumerable heroes. Not sure anyone is more beloved by… everyone… than Ed Begley Jr. Notes and messages flooded in before, during, and after the Live. Besides being a gifted actor in all genres, 7x Emmy Award Nominee, Ed's a spectacular human who walks the talk like no one I've ever known. We addressed the Covid, how it impacted his life, and career––not much it turns out, the man who never stops working, didn't! Even getting the virus recently barely slowed him down. Ed's miraculous one-hour post-Paxlovid cocktail “cure” is hopeful and inspiring. Currently, on the air in Better Call Saul, and Young Sheldon, Ed's got an exciting film in the can he couldn't yet talk about, a memoir in the works with a hinted-at story alone worth the price of admission, a film he's about to say, “yes” to, and, a promised Part 2 here with us. We went back to Ed's youth, his Academy Award Winning brilliant father, Ed Begley, a conservationist of a somewhat different variety who instilled in Ed the activism he's carried forth with gusto from the first Earth Day to today… with everything from the car he drives, the food he grows and eats, the home he built, the products he uses, we'd be hard pressed to find Ed cheating on his beliefs, anywhere. His unwavering commitment to being of service was modeled by his beloved sister. A hysterical walk down memory lane, from his first gig (My Three Sons at 10!) to the rocky next 6 years––HA! Partnering and killing with Michael Richards, yeah, that one, to opening rock shows for 18 thousand people, to the drinking and pot, which had gotten quite excessive, to how he gave it up and got sober 42 or is it 43, years ago. Scratching the surface of his brilliant career with The In-Laws, his relationship with Alan Arkin and Peter Falk, when the clock struck 6. A promised Part 2 awaits, and I promise, I shan't let it slip. Ed is a human to admire, adore, emulate, and if lucky, hang with. I cherish this time with him, and all time with him, and can't wait for more. Ed Begley Jr. Live on Game Changers With Vicki Abelson Wednesday, 7/20/22, 5 pm PT, 8 pm ET Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here: https://bit.ly/3yOz6S0 All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for the best tressed. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/

Le Temps d'un Bivouac
La quête spirituelle de Matthieu Ricard en Himalaya

Le Temps d'un Bivouac

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 54:01


durée : 00:54:01 - Le temps d'un bivouac - par : Daniel FIEVET - A l'occasion de la parution de ses mémoires, Matthieu Ricard, l'ancien chercheur devenu moine bouddhiste raconte sa quête spirituelle et les rencontres qui ont changé sa vie - réalisé par : Stéphanie TEXIER, Etienne BERTIN

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析
劉必榮教授一周國際新聞評論 2022.7.19

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 12:30


#拜登中東行 7/13-7/16至中東訪問以色列、沙烏地阿拉伯,這是拜登就任總統以來首次的中東行,相當具有意義。到訪以色列時,發表聯合聲明強化與以色列的安全關係,加強軍事合作等;下一站到了沙烏地阿拉伯時,談的是美沙關係及參加海灣國家合作理事會峰會… #義大利情勢 7/14義大利總理德拉吉(Mario Draghi)向總統請辭,即使總統慰留,局勢依然顯得緊張。德拉吉曾是歐洲央行總裁,並於2021年2月開始領導義大利聯合政府,縱使他相當能幹且具國際聲望,但義大利政局動盪不安,這次聯合政府中的五星運動黨不支持他提出的幾個經濟紓困方案… #熱浪席捲歐洲 歐洲除了政局變化萬千外,近期熱浪席捲整個歐洲,7/18四十國領袖在柏林討論如何因應氣候變遷。分析家認為,在事發當頭召開會議,可以使富國與窮國就減排達成一些共識… Himalaya:www.himalaya.com/drliu 和風談判學院:www.tanpan.com.tw

Childless not by Choice
Episode 142 -Seven Year Podcastiversary

Childless not by Choice

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 27:12


Intro: What is today's show about? My Podcastiversary!   Hello Guys and Dolls, welcome to episode 142! And seven years! I had no idea I would still be podcasting. I had no idea I would still like it, never mind the fact that I absolutely still love it!  That clip you just heard, was me responding to the question of the month on The School of Podcasting podcast. It is one of the podcasts for podcasters that I listen to on a regular basis. In fact, I interviewed the host of that show a while back. I will put the link in the show notes.  So, about the podcast: hearts are healing, minds are being refreshed, new people are finding the show, and childless not by choice people are boldly exploring new ways to live the childless not by choice life.  For instance: in episode 141 I spoke with Triathlete Rob Hutchings for our Father's Day episode.  We talked about his journey to adoption and how that journey ended without a successful adoption. But he and his wife have decided to live their best most relevant lives hiking, swimming, and traveling. Oh, and I will be interviewing Rob's wife for a future episode!  In episode 140, Hiding in plain sight? One of my long-time listeners posted in our Childless not by Choice with Civilla Morgan Facebook group that this episode spoke to her.  I really loved hearing that!   Over the past year we have discussed, the need for hope, in episode 139, pre-and peri-menopause, episode 138, and episode 137 where I spoke to Sheri Johnson about worth. Our worth as childless not by choice people. By the way, if you want to hear Sheri interview me, check out her podcast Awakening Worth, episode 57! Whew! I got some serious feedback on that episode. I really enjoyed it!  Going all the way back to January of this year, 2022, there were two episodes that month. Episode 136 where I stop by to say Happy New Year! And episode 135, Where I speak to the one and only Sarah Roberts, founder of The Empty Cradle. That was a lovely episode and a wonderful way to start the new year!  It's been a fabulous year so far! But there is so much more coming! I am not even sure I will take my two-month hiatus! If I decide to, I will stop by to let you know. Stay tuned!    So look, I would like to say a great big THANK YOU to all of you who tune in every month. For those who are just finding the podcast and the platform, for those who tell others about the podcast. Thank you.  Spreading the word is what I really want to happen now. I want more childless not by choice people around the world to feel hopeful about their lives although things did not turn out as expected.   I want you to know that even when you are feeling down or negative about life, those feelings are fleeting. You are worthy. You have as much right to be here as anyone else.  Those thoughts and feelings come to the best of us. The key is to recognize them, but not entertain them. Don't let them hang around for too long.  Manage your mind and your heart regularly. What you entertain and allow to hang around, is what can overwhelm you. So look to be overwhelmed in a positive way.   I want to tell you a couple more things: one, I am on Tik Tok! I fought it for so long, but I finally joined the platform. I am slowly building content and I already have a small following! I will tell you that I get so many jokes from that platform. I can be having a really bad day, but if I tune in just before bedtime, I will definitely get a laugh or two! What I like about the platform is that it really picks up on what I like, so I will seldom get any craziness in my feed. If you are on Tik Tok, please do follow. I would love to hear from you! Drop a hello from time to time! Also, one of the ways I really feel that getting the word out to every part of the world is using a podcast app that acts like a phone. And acting like a phone means the listener has the option to tune into the podcast by dialing in. The only app I am aware of that does this is an app called Bullhorn. If you live in a part of the world or you know someone who lives where data is difficult to obtain, or just plain expensive; try Bullhorn. And no, they are not sponsoring my podcast. I just love that their product can work for those where data can be an issue.  Well, I want to once again thank you for listening to the Childless not by Choice podcast. I hope you are subscribed, or as Apple calls it, following. I hope you are following. Remember, you can subscribe on the Apple app, but there are tons of other podcast apps out there. They are also called podcatchers. I am subscribed to multiple podcatcher apps, such as Stitcher, Gaana (which is an Indian app), Overcast, Himalaya, Bullhorn, Google Play, Podbean, and then of course Spotify, Pandora, and I am sure I am missing someone. So whatever your preference, I am probably there! If you ever have questions about subscribing, episode suggestions, anything, message me! I am happy to help! Happy Podcastiversary! Keep listening! Thank you Patreon contributors: I would like to take a moment to thank the people who make a financial contribution to the platform on a monthly basis, my Patreon Contributors.    Your contributions help pay my podcast producer, my podcast host, Zoom, where I interview most of my guests, etc. So thank you very much!      If you are not yet a Patron, visit patreon.com/childlessnotbychoice to set up your monthly contribution. No matter your giving level, I have a gift for you!   If you prefer to give via PayPal, you can find me there at booksbycivillamorgan@gmail.com.  Your contributions to the platform are greatly appreciated! Thank you! https://www.patreon.com/Childlessnotbychoice  Jordan Morgan The Knights Susie Tiffany Your Name Here   https://www.patreon.com/Childlessnotbychoice Jordan Morgan The Knights Your Name Herehttps://www.patreon.com/Childlessnotbychoice Questions or comments? Contact me at:   Email: Info@civillamorgan.com                                                  Or   Visit the website at www.childlessnotbychoice.net, look to the left on the home screen, and click on the link below the telephone to leave me an up to 90-second voicemail. Articles of interest:   https://childlessnotbychoice.net/episode-141-downriver-nomad-my-conversation-with-rob-hutchings/   https://childlessnotbychoice.net/final-cnbc-ep-140/   https://childlessnotbychoice.net/more-hope-please-and-other-things/   https://childlessnotbychoice.net/episode-137-what-is-your-worth-my-conversation-with-sheri-johnson/   https://childlessnotbychoice.net/episode-135-the-empty-cradle-my-conversation-with-counselor-sarah-roberts/   https://childlessnotbychoice.net/episode-116-my-conversation-with-dave-jackson-3/ Special thank you to: My guests and listeners this past year. My contact information:Website: www.childlessnotbychoice.net and www.civillamorgan.comFacebook: booksbycivillamorganTwitter: @civilla1Instagram: @joyandrelevancePinterest: Civilla M. Morgan, MSMLinkedIn: Civilla Morgan, MSM TikTok: 2podcastertoohttps://www.teepublic.com/stores/childless-not-by-choice

Staying In
Thor: Love and Thunder, FIFA 22 Ultimate Team, and Get on Board - Ep155

Staying In

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 62:24


00:00 - A letter to DEFRA. 03:56 - Thor: Love and Thunder is Taika Waititi second go with the Asgardian and while it's lost a bit of the danger felt in Ragnarok it's still distinctive and well worth watching. 23:32 - FUT! We dip our football-booted toe into the wonderful world of perfect chemistry, aka FIFA Ultimate Team, thanks to Mr. Jones. 43:45 - Eating biscuits the right way… or was it the wrong way? 49:32 - We get on board with, er, Get on Board: New York & London; a roll and write where everyone shares and contributes to the same play space, from Coiledspring Games. 55:13 - Two roll and write reviews in one episode? Oh yes! And it's Hachette's Trek 12: Himalaya, with robust core game and a well thought out legacy mode. 58:41 - Pete's fan is from John Lewis. All that, and when it's too early for a slushie, with Dan (@ThisDanFrost), Peter (@XeroXeroXero), and Sam (@MrSamTurner). Our Spotify Playlist brings together lots of great thematic music inspired by the stuff we talk about. Go check it out, if you like. Links to where you can find us - StayingInPodcast.com Note: sometimes we'll have been sent a review copy of the thing we're talking about on the podcast. It doesn't skew how we think about that thing, and we don't receive compensation for anything we discuss, but we thought you might like to know this is the case.

Historia de Aragón
Especial Tierra de Aventuras. Las cimas a los 14 ochomiles en entredicho

Historia de Aragón

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 22:20


Un estudio del último 'notario' del Himalaya resuelve que solo tres alpinistas han subido realmente las 14 montañas más altas. Analizamos la polémica con Fernan J. Pérez, Angela Benavides y Carlos Suárez.

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析
劉必榮教授一周國際新聞評論 2022.7.12

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 13:22


#日前首相安倍遇刺 7/8日本前首相安倍晉三在奈良縣為同黨參議員佐藤啟站台助講時,遭遇刺殺,刺客山上徹也用自行改造的槍枝在維安漏洞下槍殺安倍晉三,安倍傷重不治,此事震驚日本也震撼全球… #英國情勢 7/7英國首相強森辭去保守黨黨魁一職,由於強森在黨內引發不滿聲浪已有一段時間,恃才傲物卻視人不明,對於一些醜聞時常進行包庇,導致怨聲載道。然而,真正的導火線在於上週二其財政大臣蘇納克(Rishi Sunak)與衛生大臣賈維德(Sajid Javid)相繼辭職,一下子引爆雪崩式辭職,整個內閣約幾十人提出辭呈,包括部長、次長等政治任命的官員… #斯里蘭卡破產 斯里蘭卡政府上週宣布國家破產,總統與總理相繼落跑。斯里蘭卡通貨膨脹相當嚴重,六月份達54.6%,外傳可能上看70%,此外,貨幣貶值,缺油缺電,造成今日破產主因在於,總統拉賈帕克薩(Gotabaya Rajapaksa)在2019上任後進行民粹式減稅,承諾給予各種津貼後卻碰上COVID-19,百業蕭條,觀光停滯… Himalaya:www.himalaya.com/drliu 和風談判學院:www.tanpan.com.tw

il posto delle parole
Giorgio Enrico Bena "Sulle ossa del mondo"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 24:06


Giorgio Enrico Bena"Sulle ossa del mondo"Neos Edizionihttp://www.neosedizioni.it/"Sulle ossa del mondo"A cura di Giorgio Enrico BenaRacconti di: Donatella Actis, Franco Ballatore, Ludovico De Maistre, Paolo Calvino, Paolo Camera, Pierangelo Chiolero, Emilia Coppola, Fernanda De Giorgi, Giorgio Enrico Bena, Maddalena Fortunati, Guido Montanari, Giampiero Pani, Vincenzo Perri, Laura Remondino, Franca Rizzi Martini, Caterina Schiavon, Raffaele Tomasulo, Teodora Trevisan, Maria Vassallo.Fotografie di: Vittorio Sella, Ada Brunazzi, Luca Cagnasso, Chiara Enrico Bena, Silvia Maria Ramasso.Sulla Terra è disteso uno scheletro di pietra; si erge con potenza dalle pianure, come un fossile antico affiora dalla distesa del mare o delle foreste che lo ricoprono. Lungo i suoi fianchi rocciosi, l'umanità da sempre – per imprese ardimentose o per una stentata sussistenza – si confronta con una natura dura e maestosa che ispira meraviglia e sacralità e al tempo stesso sfida.Dalle valli dell'arco alpino ai monti siciliani e calabresi, dall'Everest all'Ecuador e all'Afghanistan fino al sentiero degli Incas, ai monti della Cina e ai Virunga ugandesi, queste pagine ci offrono un avvincente viaggio “in quota”, ricco di storie, di personaggi e di situazioni. Un catalogo vario e a volte bizzarro di viaggiatori e viaggiatrici si inoltra fra le valli, s'inerpica sulle cime, segue percorsi di memoria, di scoperta, di avventura, incontra paesaggi indimenticabili, antiche civiltà, comunità singolari e anche la follia dell'uomo.A regalare ulteriore suggestione, ai diciannove racconti dell'antologia si alternano quattro portfolio fotografici.Introducono il libro, le splendide immagini storiche realizzate da Vittorio Sella a cavallo fra '800 e '900, gentilmente concesse dalla Fondazione Sella.Le montagne raccontate nel libro: Salar de Uyuni, Ande boliviane; Alpi Cozie, Piemonte; Bamiyan, Hindukush afghano; Monti Sicani, Sicilia; Tepui Roraima, Venezuela; Valli di Lanzo, Piemonte; Retempio, Valle d'Aosta; Valle di Susa, Piemonte; Rorà, Val Pellice, Piemonte; Everest, Tibet; Himalaya, Buthan; Monte Heng, Monti Sacri, Cina; Gorges du Verdon, Francia; Dolomiti; Majella, Abruzzo; Sila, Calabria; Virunga, Uganda; Cuzco, Perù; Taita Imbabura, Ecuador; Durmitor, Montenegro.Giorgio Enrico Bena nasce nel 1957 a Torino dove vive e lavora in ambito scientifico. Fin dagli anni Ottanta siinteressa a tutto ciò che riguarda il fumetto, l'illustrazione e le avanguardie artistiche del ‘900, colleziona ingombranti volumi nelle lingue più disparate e disegna. Passioni. Come quelle per il viaggio e per la fotografia naturalistica.Ha al suo attivo numerose esposizioni di disegno e fotografia. Fra queste, una collettiva del 2009 sulla caduta del muro di Berlino con artisti italiani e tedeschi, di cui è stato il curatore, e una personale di fotografia nel 2007 a Millicent (Australia).IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEascoltare fa pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

Podz-Glidz. Der Lu-Glidz Podcast
Bir-Koenig - Philipp Zellner - Podz-Glidz 86

Podz-Glidz. Der Lu-Glidz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 68:37


Philipp Zellner reist jedes Jahr in den Himalaya. Im indischen Bir sorgt er mit Rekordflügen und Biwak-Abenteuern für Aufsehen. +++ Bir Billing ist so etwas wie das Bassano Indiens. Ein Fluggebiet, in dem man vor allem in der Periode Oktober-November fast täglich auf Strecke gehen kann. Entweder reitet man dann die vorderste Kette des südlichen Traufs des Himalayas ab. Das gilt als anfängertauglich. Oder man wagt den Sprung ins Hinterland. Dort wird es wild. Mächtige Berge, tiefe Schluchten, kräftige Talwinde, böse Leefallen, himmelwärts jagende Thermiken und imposante Aussichten. Philipp Zellner, ein Tandem- und Acro-Pilot aus Österreich, kam vor acht Jahren zum ersten Mal nach Bir. Seither verbringt er dort alljährlich mehrere Monate. Bei den Locals hat der 32-jährige mittlerweile den Status einer lebenden Fliegerlegende. Wo er hinkommt, fällt immer wieder ein bewunderndes Wort: record-holder! In puncto Streckenfliegen ist Philipp so etwas wie der ungekrönte König von Bir. Im Mai 2022 schraubte er den Startplatzrekord auf 270 Kilometer. Nur einen Tag später flog er ein FAI-Rekorddreieck über 222 Kilometer und am Folgetag auch noch die weiteste Strecke ab Bir mit einem Tandem. Noch bemerkenswerter ist allerdings ein solo Biwak-Flug über 1300 Kilometer, bei dem er erst in mehreren Etappen Nepal durchkreuzte, um schließlich weiter bis Bir zu fliegen. Von all dem und noch mehr erzählt Philipp Zellner in dieser 86. Folge von Podz-Glidz. Unter anderem geht es um Kung-Fu-Thermiken, die Herausforderungen des Streckenfliegens im Himalaya, die Kunst des Top-Landens im Nirgendwo, sein Umgang mit dem Risiko, hilfreiche Acro-Skills; und wie es sich anfühlt, nach irren Freiheitsmomenten wieder zum alltäglichen Tandem-Business in Tirol zurückzukehren. +++ Wenn Dir Podz-Glidz gefällt, dann unterstütze doch meine Arbeit – als Förderer. Wie das ganz einfach und ohne jede Verpflichtung möglich ist, erfährst Du auf der Website meines Blogs Lu-Glidz, und zwar dort auf der Seite „Fördern“. Wenn Du Podz-Glidz und den Blog Lu-Glidz fördern möchtest, so findest Du alle zugehörigen Infos unter: https://lu-glidz.blogspot.com/p/fordern.html +++ Musik dieser Folge: Track: Namaster Trip | Künstler: Ofshane No Copyright Audio Library Hören & Download: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTEIrFBQQCU

Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast
Episode 174- Dreaming Big, Going Bigger in Pakistan with Aaron Durogati

Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 77:46 Very Popular


Aaron Durogati is no stranger to thinking and doing big, but this time he pulled off what can only be described as outrageous. He and a few friends spent 40 days in the Himalaya in Pakistan to pursue mountaineering "combos". They used their paragliders to take off from lower elevations, put their touring gear (ie skis) on in the air, stuff it in somewhere high, often above 5,000 meters and then ski and fly down. They spent many nights at altitude acclimatizing; they got stuck with heinous walks out on dangerous glaciers; Aaron had a frightening crash; he got so sick he thought he was going to die...and then he somehow managed to fly at 285 km FAI triangle across the biggest terrain in the world...

Penguin Audio
Audiolibro: "Las 8 claves del liderazgo del monje que vendió su Ferrari", de Robin Sharma

Penguin Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 4:56


Esta es una muestra de "Las 8 claves del liderazgo del monje que vendió su Ferrari". La versión completa tiene una duración total de 7 h 14 min. Encuentra este audiolibro completo en https://bit.ly/3PUB5veNarrado por: Horacio MancillaJulian era el monje que decidió vender su Ferrari: abogado de éxito, un buen día abandonó todo y se trasladó al Himalaya. Allí inició un proceso de aprendizaje con los sabios de Sivana, que le abrieron las puertas a nuevas formas de abordar la vida y los negocios. De regreso a su mundo anterior, Julian tiene la ocasión de aplicar sus nuevos conocimientos ayudando a su antiguo amigo Peter, propietario de una empresa de software que está en crisis. De la mano de Julian, a través de fábulas y ejemplos, Peter recibe las ocho lecciones del éxito en los negocios, todas ellas basadas en la generación de un impulso interior que favorezca el establecimiento de un nuevo tipo de relación entre los colaboradores y de estos con la empresa, encaminado al florecimiento de una cultura empresarial más humana y por ello más eficaz y sólida. Una lectura difícil de dejar... y de olvidar.© 2022, Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial, S. A. U.#penguinaudio #audiolibro #audiolibros #Sharma #RobinSharma See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析
劉必榮教授一周國際新聞評論 2022.7.5

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 12:24


#美國情勢 7/4是美國國慶日,但這天對美國來說卻不平靜,這天早上芝加哥海蘭帕克市(Highland Park)國慶遊行才舉行十分鐘就發生重大槍擊案,造成6人喪生,至少31人輕重傷。此慘案也再度使得民主與共和兩黨通過一些共識,起碼得管制一些槍枝… #俄烏戰爭 烏東地區的戰事在上週有了重大變化,7/3烏克蘭東部盧干斯克地區完全淪陷,烏克蘭部隊撤出了利西昌斯克後,俄羅斯全權掌握盧干斯克,因此現在的交戰的重點轉至頓內茨克… #菲律賓情勢 6/30菲律賓總統小馬可仕宣誓就職,中國由國家副主席王岐山代表出席,美國則派副總統賀錦麗的夫婿任德龍(Doug Emhoff)出席,日本由外務大臣林芳正代表;有意思的是,5/10韓國總統尹錫悅就職時,也是此三人參加。菲律賓目前面臨的問題相當大,經濟問題主要聚焦通膨壓力大… #中緬關係 7/3中國外長王毅到訪緬甸,這是緬甸政變後,中國到訪緬甸的最高官員,他到緬甸主持瀾湄合作第七次外長會議,並與緬甸外長溫納貌倫(Wunna Maung Lwin)舉行會談,但卻沒有和緬甸軍頭敏昂來會面,可以看出中國在緬甸政策上還是拿捏一個非常微妙的分寸… Himalaya:www.himalaya.com/drliu 和風談判學院:www.tanpan.com.tw

Kali Mandir Satsang
Video: Devi Gita (Class 1) 1:1-2 by Swami Bhajanananda Saraswati

Kali Mandir Satsang

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 76:43


Scripture class on Devi Gita, Chapter I, verses 1 & 2, by Rev. Dr. Swami Bhajanananda Saraswati given on Zoom to students of Ramakrishna Seminary at Kali Mandir on 9 March 2022.   जनमेजय उवाच janamejaya uvāca Janamejaya said:   धराधराधीश मौलावाविरासीत्परं महः | यदुक्तं भवता पूर्वं विस्तरात् तद्वदस्व मे || १ || dharādharādhīśa maulāvāvirāsīt-paraṃ mahaḥ | yaduktaṃ bhavatā pūrvaṃ vistarāt tad-vadasva me || 1 || "You said earlier that the supreme lustrous power manifested itself on the crest of the Himalaya, the Mountain Lord. This you mentioned only in passing. Now explain it to me in full detail."   को विरज्येत मतिमान् पिबञ्छक्तिकत्ःआमृतम् | सुधां तु पिबतां मृत्युः स नैतच्छृण्वतो भवेत् || २|| ko virajyeta matimān pibañchakti-katḥāmṛtam | sudhāṃ tu pibatāṃ mṛtyuḥ sa naitacchṛṇvato bhavet || 2|| "What thoughtful person would ever tire of drinking the nectarine tales of Shakti? Death comes even to those who drink divine ambrosia, but not to one who hears this act of Hers."  

How to Be Awesome at Your Job
780: How Minds Change and How to Change Minds with David McRaney

How to Be Awesome at Your Job

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 46:15 Very Popular


David McRaney breaks down why it's so difficult to change people's minds—and shares powerful strategies to get others to open their minds. — YOU'LL LEARN — 1) Why facts alone can't persuade others 2) One simple question to make you more persuasive 3) A step-by-step guide to changing even the most stubborn minds Subscribe or visit AwesomeAtYourJob.com/ep780 for clickable versions of the links below. — ABOUT DAVID — Science journalist, podcaster, and internationally bestselling author David McRaney is an expert in the psychology of reasoning, decision making, and self-delusion. His wildly popular blog became the international bestselling book You Are Not So Smart, revealing and celebrating our irrational and thoroughly human behavior. His second bestseller, You Are Now Less Dumb, gives readers a fighting chance at outsmarting their brains. His most recent book, How Minds Change, is a brain-bending and big-hearted investigation into the science of belief, opinion, and persuasion. David is an in-demand speaker whose work has been featured in The Atlantic and many others.He also created and hosted Exploring Genius: In-Depth Study of Brilliant Minds, an audio documentary for Himalaya, and is working on a TV series about how to better predict the psychological impact of technological disruption. • Book: How Minds Change: The Surprising Science of Belief, Opinion, and Persuasion • Website: YouAreNotSoSmart.com • Personal website: DavidMcRaney.com — RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE SHOW — • Book: Cool It: The Skeptical Environmentalist's Guide to Global Warming by Bjorn Lomborg • Book: Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain by David Eagleman • Book: Joe by Larry Brown • Book: The Enigma of Reason by Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber • Video: Why We Fight: Prelude to War See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Steve Postell Live On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 93:45


Steve Postell Live on Game Changers With Vicki Abelson Singer/Songwriter/Producer, Steve Postell and I go way back to Bleecker Street in the heady daze of the New York club scene. He's played every club I've booked and guested on every show I've hosted and produced. Whenever we see each other we pick up right where we left off, as comfortable as a pair of favorite faded jeans, and yet, still exciting and new. Incredible songwriter, amazing guitarist, with the voice of an angel, Steve treated us to a mini-concert sprinkled throughout, from his latest pearls to his golden gems. A first long-awaited music lesson at 8 with his first guitar, which he outgrew the first week, to his first gig for $25 when he was 13, how an art class with Bob Dylan may have changed his life, to solo gigs, Broadway touring companies, to Broadway itself, with Patti Lapone's Evita, jingles, record deals, Pure Prairie League, his own bands, recording, engineering, producing, New York to LA, The Night Train Music Club, first meets with Leland Sklar, Waddy Wachtel, Russ Kunkle, and Danny Kortchmar, and how the Immediate Family was born. Danny Tedesco's upcoming doc on them, featuring players Steve idolized, who are now cohorts and friends… James Taylor, Jackson Browne, Carole King… playing with Michael McDonald, David Crosby, and most recently, Kenny Loggins, around a campfire and on stage, plus his sold-out show at McCabe's. Steve's living his dream, always putting in the time with disciplined daily practice, an indefatigable work ethic, and extraordinary talent. Old friends are treasures. This gifted one, a gift to us all. Steve Postell Live on Game Changers With Vicki Abelson Wednesday, 6/29/22, 5 pm PT, 8 pm ET Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here: https://bit.ly/3I39ncU All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for the best tressed. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/ Blue Microphones and Kevin Walt

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Mountaineer and Cancer Survivor Lisa Thompson

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 51:32


Lisa Thompson is a Mountaineer, cancer survivor, and sought-after speaker and coach. She worked for 25 years as an engineer and in leadership roles at technology companies. In 2008, she began climbing and has summited most of the most challenging mountains in the world, including Mount Everest and K2. She's completed the seven summits reaching the top of the highest peak of each of the seven continents. Through her company, Alpine Athletics, and other platforms, Lisa shares her message of strength and resilience with corporate and private groups worldwide. She is also the author of “Finding Elevation” which chronicles her path from novice climber to world class mountain. Learn more about Lisa. Learn more about The Passionistas Project.   Full Transcript: Passionistas: Hi, and welcome to the Passionistas Project Podcast, where we talk with women who are following their Passionistas to inspire you to do the same. We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and today we're talking with Lisa Thompson, a mountaineer, cancer survivor and sought-after speaker and coach. Lisa worked for 25 years as an engineer and in leadership roles at technology companies. In 2008, she began climbing and has summited most of the most challenging mountains in the world, including Mount Everest and K2. She's completed the seven summits reaching the top of the highest peak of each of the seven continents. Through her company, Alpine Athletics and other platforms. Lisa shares her message of strength and resilience with corporate and private groups worldwide. She is also the author of “Finding Elevation,” which chronicles Thompson's path from novice climber to world class mountain. So please welcome to the show. Lisa Thompson. Lisa: Great to be here. Thanks for having me today. Passionistas: We're really excited to have you here and hear your story. And, uh, we always like to start with the question. What's the one thing you're most passionate about? Lisa: Right now, I think this has changed over the years. I'm sure that's just the normal progression of a life, but right now I am most passionate about giving back to. Women in the communities that I love communities in Nepal and in Pakistan where I've, you know, really feel at home in the mountains and have spent a lot of time and have great memories there. And it's important to me to give back to those communities, especially the women. I recently started a nonprofit to support women in Nepal and specifically to support their education. It was shocking to me to learn that something like 58% of women in Nepal over the age of 15 have had. Zero education, none at all, which is just, you know, alarming on many levels. But in one regard, they're really the center of a Nepalese family and community. And the fact that there's been no formal education for so many of those women just felt like something that was, that I wanted to impact in a positive way. Passionistas: Where did you grow up and what was your childhood like? Were you always interested in, in, uh, climbing and being outdoors? Lisa: So I grew up in the great mountaineering state of Illinois, where the highest point I believe is 120 feet. And it's so predominant that it actually has a name. Whereas in most states, if that elevation would not be named, so I didn't grow up. Aspiring to be a Mountaineer. I didn't grow up learning or reading about, you know, sir, Edmond Hillary or other sort of pioneering mountaineers. And I wasn't even really that athletic, you know, looking back, I grew up in a small farming community, uh, called Lincoln in the very center of Illinois. You know, every kid sort of makes the, the softball team or the volleyball team. I think there were a couple years where I did not even make it. I was so uncoordinated and unathletic a and I didn't grow up really with parents who pushed me to Excel. You know, I think part of their sort of distance is what motivated me to prove myself and to, you know, you know, back then it was about getting their attention. Lots of time in therapy talking about that. But one of the positives of that I've realized is that it pushed me to really want to Excel and to push myself mentally and physically. And that translated first, you know, I'm still by my account, but only person in my entire extended family to graduate from college, which is sort of sad, you know, to me, but it pushed me to do things that were unexpected. In my community and with my family. And so, you know, going to college was sort of the first step in that direction. I studied engineering, you know, not because I was super interested in it, but because I felt like that seems hard and I can probably make a decent salary when I graduate. And so I was fortunate to get a job with Hewlett Packard right out of college as an engineer, then it was, you know, that was the mid-nineties. I was the only woman at my level. And that taught me a lot. I was certainly not prepared coming from. You know, a very sort of hardworking farming-oriented family. I was not equipped to be thrown into a corporate environment at that age. I was 24. And so there was a lot of sort of flailing and trying to understand dynamics and politics. And I was often the youngest person in the room, the only female in the room. And. Upon reflection. Um, there were definitely some missteps, some things that I just, frankly didn't understand, cuz I was ill-equipped to be in that kind of environment. But one very positive thing that came of that was that through that job, I eventually moved to Seattle, which is where I live today. And here. You know, mountaineering, we're fortunate to be surrounded by the Cascade mountains and the Olympic mountain range. So climbing and mountaineering and just being in the mountains is really part of the culture in Seattle. When I moved here, uh, for that job still with, you know, it wasn't any longer with Hewlett Packard, but it was a derivation of that company. All the men at my level would go climbing on the weekend. And so I had no idea, right? I no, like I'd maybe been camping with my family, but I didn't like know anything about mountaineering. I didn't know what a crampon was. I had no idea the equipment, the gear, the, the, you know, the sort of aesthetic of climbing, nothing. But these men, you know, would go out on the weekends and they would come back to the office on Monday and they had all. You know, incredible stories. And again, it wasn't that I aspired to be in the mountains, but I aspired to be a part of their group. And I wanted them so badly to see me, the only woman on their team as capable and strong. And I wasn't getting that in the office environment. So this seemed like a way to do that. And instead of doing the totally logical thing, which would've been to say. Like oh, climbing. That sounds really cool. Can I come with you or can you tell me more about it? I just got frustrated. I got mad and eventually just decided I was gonna go climb my own damn mountains. And I had no, I again had no idea what that meant, but I started really just hiking around my house in the cascades. And then eventually in 2008, I attempted Mount Rainier, which is the highest mountain in Washington. And after that I was, I was just hooked spite no spite I was hooked at that. Passionistas: Do they know what you've accomplished since then? Lisa: I've lost track of them. I could probably, you know, through a network, get back to them, but I don't, I don't know. Probably not and they probably don't even, you know, these weren't bad guys at all. It just, I think didn't occur to them to ask me to join. And so they probably would have no reason to wonder like, Hey, I wonder if that girl ever climbed any mountains. Passionistas: You started to do this as, you know, a recreational activity, but then at some point that obviously shifted and you started to set these goals for yourself. So what inspired you to climb Mount Rainier and then to take it further from there? Lisa: Yeah, there was something about, so I didn't summit Rainier. My first attempt, the weather sort of turned bad on our second day and retreated. And, and I was relieved in that moment. I was happy cuz I just, I. Again, no idea what I was doing. Although I was with, you know, I was with a guide company and I was safe and all that, but I really just mentally wasn't prepared to be on a mountain and to just feel sort of the vastness of that challenge. And so I went back the next year before I got back to the parking lot in 2008, I was sure I was coming back. I tend to look at climbs like projects. And so even after that first year, I was like, okay, these are, you know, my backpack needs to be lighter. I need to have, you know, not red boots and have my own boots and just little things like that, that I started to like to learn and to, to tweak and adjust what I knew and my gear and my knowledge of the mountain. So I went back in 2009 and summited, and there was a moment, you know, where I sort of it's dark out and you're, you know, you can't really. Appreciate where you're at on the mountain and the sort of vastness of everything around you and the risk of falling. And because all you can see in the dark is just this little tiny circle of light from your headlamp. And so there was a moment where I remember looking what would've been east and seeing the sun just slowly start to split the horizon from the earth and. Just seeing like colors that were so magnificent and awe inspiring and thinking. This is an incredible experience and such a, a daunting place to be that taught me so much, so much humility to be learned in the mountains. When I got to the summit, I just had this incredible sense of accomplishment that I hadn't found anywhere else. I hadn't really gotten it from my parents as a kid. I hadn't gotten it at work. I, you know, graduated from college, any accomplishment I had had in my life until that point hadn't made me feel that way. And I loved that. I still love that climbing is. Obviously a very physical pursuit, but there is an enormous mental challenge that comes with climbing, you know, in any discipline of climbing. And I really loved that combination and I loved the idea of setting. Lofty goal and working hard and accomplishing it. And so I was completely hooked at that point. In two, I was 2009 and ready to just, I did, again, didn't know a lot about what to climb next, but I was sure that I was gonna keep doing it. Passionistas: You know, you were kind of inspired to do it by this being in this male dominated world. When you got to climbing, were there a lot of other women who were in doing what you were doing? Lisa” No. In fact, I, in the beginning was gonna name my book, the only girl, and it has changed. This is, you know, the late 2000s. It is getting better. You know, there's more diversity that the only, and first all black team summited Everest last month, which is incredible to see. And I was fortunate to play a small role in coaching them. So it's changing the dynamics, the face of, of people who enjoy the mountains is changing. But then I was. I don't always is maybe a strong word, but 95% of the time, I was the only woman on the team. And, you know, I was used to being in male dominated arenas, so that wasn't unusual for me, but I think it, you know, being an intense environment like climbing, just sort of heightened all of the challenges that come with that and made them much more potent. And it took me a long time to realize. Or to think about how I showed up in those roles. There was always the, like people doubted and people would say, oh, it's cute. I think you're gonna climb Mount Everest. That's a whole other conversation, but what I tended to think about myself and how I showed up in those situations. And at first I would just be one of the guys, I mean, so much so that they would undress in front of me and not even like, consider that there was a woman standing next to them. On Everest was the first time that I, that just didn't feel authentic to me anymore. It didn't feel right to laugh at crew. That were often, you know, demeaning to women. It didn't feel right to overlook little comments that just didn't sit well with me anymore. And so that was the first time. And there's a moment. And I talk about it in my book where I, you know, all men and I sort of separated myself from them for a minute because it just, I needed to feel like a woman and I needed to feel like myself in that environment. And, you know, at the time it. We're sort of arguing back and forth about my opinion about something versus theirs. But I realize now that it was me sort of stepping into my own strength and my own sort of persona as a woman and saying like this isn't okay anymore. And I'm not gonna just, you know, sit here and let it happen without saying anything. It's still challenging. It's getting better. But yeah, there were a lot of moments there just being, the only woman was a challenge for me. Passionistas: Do you think there are certain qualities that you, as a woman bring to a climb that's different than the male energy of a, of a climb? Lisa: And again, generalizing. Right. But I, I'm fortunate now that I get to coach mountaineers and I coach men and women. Um, and I, you know, I can see those nuances, even as I'm coaching them, women are much more interested in like the mental side. Of taking on a challenge, like a big mountain and making sure that they're very well rounded in their preparations. They wanna make sure that they're understanding the route. You know, they know where the challenges will be and that mentally they have the tools to get through them. And men generally, again, not always the case, but often just like they wanna like train and work hard and do all the runs and all the hikes and all the preparation climbs. And don't often sort of step back and say, There's a whole other side of this. There's a whole other, you know, facet to climbing big mountains. And, you know, my experience is that when you look at everything holistically is when you're the most prepared and when you're the most successful. And I think even on the mountains, you know, it's tough, there's difficult situations. And I find that women often add just a little bit more compassion to those situations. A little bit more empathy. and sometimes that's what you need to get through something that's difficult. So there's my experience. Yeah. There's a big difference between what men and women bring to those situations. Passionistas: So you, you have the successful Mount Rainier climb in 2009. What happens next? And how do you kind of plan where you go next? Lisa: Yeah, so I didn't do a lot of planning. I just knew, I knew I wanted to keep climbing more challenging things and there's, you know, back in the eighties, I believe it was a couple of mountaineers society. It would be really cool to climb to the highest peak of every single continent. And so I thought, okay, I'll just start doing that. You know, I don't know what to do. I picked the easiest, one of those, which was in Russia, a Mount called Elbrus and was successful there. So I thought, okay, well, Keep sort of on that track and climbing in the cascades as well, sort of, you know, like thinking, okay, I wanna be more independent and learn different skills, like building anchors and self-arrest and rope management. And so I, I would take excursions on the weekends locally to do those things. And then about once a year I would climb something big somewhere else in the world. And I was on that track and I had sort of decided. Mount Everest was kind of the next logical thing for me to climb just in terms of skill and difficulty. And at the time I felt like, oh, Everest is so commercial and there must be more interesting mountains in the Himalaya to climb. And so I had decided, and this really is a big moment. I think, in any mountaineers' career I had decided I was ready to climb in the Himalaya. So, you know, the Himalaya is this huge mountain range that bisects Asia and. It's special for a lot of reasons, but one is that. Most of the highest mountains in the world are there. And when we say high, in terms of mountaineering, we're talking about any mountain that's higher than 26,000 feet or 8,000 meters. And there's only 14 of those in the world. And so I, in 2015 thought, okay, I think I'm ready. Like I'm ready to try an easy one and just see how it goes. So. I picked that mountain, which is called Montes SL. And I was just beginning to prepare for it when I was diagnosed with cancer, you know, we, we've already established that. I'm a very stubborn person and I was a little cocky, you know, I was 42 years old. I thought and, and an athlete, like I ate organic vegetables. I wore my seatbelt. I floss my teeth. Like I, all those things that you are, you are taught to believe will keep you healthy. I thought I was doing it turns out I had a tremendous amount of stress in my job, which is, you know, like looking back and sort of analyzing how my body could get reacted that way to an external thing. It probably was a lot of stress at work, but nonetheless, I was diagnosed with breast cancer at the beginning of 2015. I was determined. Not to let cancer dictate my priorities so much so that I sat with my surgeon and said like, is there any way we could just postpone this whole cancer thing? Like, can we just like, how much could those tumors really grow in eight months? Like I just go do this climb and I'll come back and then you can do whatever you want with my body. When I get back and she very compassionately said that that would be a full hearty decision. I always remember that she used that word. And so I was very fortunate that I was able to get rid of the tumors in my, uh, breast with a bilateral mastectomy from which I did at the beginning in April of 2015. And I was, I mean, determination. Isn't a big enough word for how focused I was on getting my body ready to still travel to Nepal and attempt Montes SL. That autumn. And so I went, um, I was not, I was not a hundred percent. I had all, you know, all my doctors, all my care, healthcare providers knew what I was up to. They all thought I was a little bit crazy, but I had their support to be there. And. You know, their cell phone numbers, if anything went weird. And luckily it didn't, I didn't summit Manaslu in 2015, there was an avalanche above our camp. And, you know, the team felt that it just wasn't safe to continue. So we all turned around and I, I firmly believe that mountains and, you know, nature teaches us things. And so. When I got home, I, you know, I just sort of did some reflection about that climb. And I think sometimes you learn the most when you're not successful when you don't summit. But I realized that, you know, life is so fragile and that it's up to us. Each of us to define the lives that we will live. And so I became determined then to sort of reprioritize my life. My pause, my corporate career actually got a divorce and I decided to climb Mount Everest at that point. And, uh, went back to Nepal in 2016 to do that. Passionistas: So talk about that. Talk about preparing for that and you know, and the mental preparation, especially. Lisa: I learned a lot on Monte SL again, you know, success doesn't always mean you, you gain the most from a situation. And so I learned what my body was capable of. I knew that if I was healthy and trained, that I could be even stronger. And so I, I started working with a sports psychologist to really dig into the mental aspects. I was still a little bit unsure about what my body could do, you know, I, I, and I had. Probably four more surgeries before I went to Everest for reconstruction. So I depended a lot on a sports psychologist to just help me understand why Everest was important to me, what my body was capable of. To give me some really important tools that I use still today when things get difficult in the mountains to have something to focus on and to sort of rationalize what's going on around me and break it down into manageable chunks. So that was hugely helpful. I worked with a, a climbing coach as well to get me ready. You know, it was a very tumultuous time in my life as I was preparing to climb the most difficult mountain that I had climbed to that point. I was in the middle of getting a divorce. I wasn't sure I wanted to keep working. My dog died. Like all these, just so many things happened and looking back. It felt like just a really big reset, like the universe sort of saying, like, you know, that was your life then before cancer, and this is your chance to find your life after cancer. You know, that really is a big gift. I always think that cancer, I am grateful today in the moment I was not, but today I'm grateful for cancer because it showed me so many things about priorities and what life is about and how I want to spend it. I know that there's a book worth of conversation to be had, if not more about actually climbing Mount Everest, but kind of in general, what was the experience like? Passionistas: What was the biggest challenge that you faced in, in the midst of that experience? Lisa: Yeah, so climbing a big mountain, like Everest, I'll just provide a quick sort of background as to how it even. You know, it's, those mountains are so big, right? Your, your body could not possibly function. Even if you're breathing supplemental oxygen. It's not as easy as just walking to base camp and then starting to climb. There's a whole process of a climatization. Where you start at one camp climb to the next highest camp and then return to that first camp. And then you repeat that process gradually moving up the mountain, and that allows your body to change physiologically, to build more red blood cells so that you can survive at those higher elevations. And so for me on Everest as I was going through that process, I really felt in sync with the mountain in contrast to K2, which I'm sure we'll talk about in a little bit, but I really felt like things just went smoothly. I felt like the mountain and I were working together and that we sort of [00:23:00] shared a level of respect. That, you know, ultimately ultimately allowed me to be successful, but that doesn't mean there weren't difficult moments. I recall climbing from camp three to camp four and it had been very, very windy. So, you know, hadn't slept at all the night before was lying in a very cramped tent. That was my side of the tent was actually can levered over the side of the mountain because it, you know, it was so steep. And, you know, a lot of emotional, like, is it too windy? You know, are we gonna have a chance to summit? We need to descend. And then it's a very quick decision by our team to like, we look, it looks like we have a window. We're gonna go up. I had sort of envisioned like having this moment to like get ready. And that was none of that. It was very rushed and harried and chaotic. And I, I walk out of the tent and I clip into the fixed rope with my, with my harness. and it was so incredibly windy that it kept blowing me over. And I remember these moments of just hearing the wind coming towards me from my left side, and then just lying face down on the ice to let it pass me by before I could continue. And that luckily subsided after, I don't know, a couple of hours or something. And, and then. I got to what I knew was gonna be the easiest part of that day, which is sort of a flat section that curves to the left towards a rock feature called the yellow band. And the yellow band is about 25 degrees. So it's not super steep. It's limestone. It would actually be fun to climb it at sea level, but as I'm walking towards it, I realize that I'm moving so slow and I'm actually. Like I get distracted by someone's glove, rolling down the ice. And my friend came up from behind me is like, what, you know, what do you what's going on? And I was like, I don't know. I just, I just wanna like lay down and I had run out of oxygen. So my brain and my, my muscles were not getting the oxygen that they needed to continue. I had a couple, I had a decision to make, I had a few choices in that moment. I could have turned around and gone back to camp three and said, you know, my climbs over or looked for more oxygen. I could have sat there in the snow and asked someone, probably a Sherpa to bring me more oxygen where I could have kept going. And. Those first two options just didn't feel right to me. And so I continued climbing. I will never forget. So climbing this relatively, you know, at sea level, easy section of rock and telling myself to just focus on the climber ahead of me and to never let him outta my sight, like just, he's not gonna get outta my site no matter what it takes. And I don't know how long it took me. I, you know, everything got really fuzzy at that moment. And I was still safe. I still had people around me and people knew that I didn't have oxygen, but I, that made that situation made me realize that we are so much stronger mentally than we believe or that, that we give ourselves credit for, because my body was literally like, it didn't have the gas that needed to continue. And it was just, I think my mind is pushing me, just willing myself forward to get through that situation. And the best feeling in the world. Like I hope nobody has to experience that, but I can't tell you how sweet it is to not have oxygen and have oxygen. Like, as soon as I got a fresh bottle, it was like, the world was right again. So a challenging moment. But like I said, I think mountains teach us things and you know, it taught me that I sort of have this untapped tool in my, you know, mental capacity that I really. You know, even now I feel like there's so much more potential to hone that skill of being mentally strong. Passionistas: We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and you're listening to the Passionistas Project Podcast in our interview with Lisa Thompson. To learn more about her adventures and get a copy of her book, “Finding Elevation,” visit Lisaclimbs.com. We'd like to take a moment to share a special announce. We'll be hosting the third annual Power of Passionistas Summit, this September 21st through September 23rd, 2022. The three-day virtual event is focused on authentic conversations about diversity, equity and inclusion. This unique gathering of intersectional storytellers and panelists harnesses the power of our rich community of passionate thought leaders and activists to pose solutions to the problems plaguing women today. Early bird tickets are on sale now at bit.ly/2022PowerofPassionistasTickets. We'd like to thank our sponsors — Melanie Childers, Natural Born Rebel, The Ossa Collective, Tea Drops, Aaron's Coffee Corner, Flourishing Over Fifty, Edith Espanola, Mermaid's Garden, Sara Fins Coaching, and Tara McCann Wellness. Now here's more of our interview with Lisa. That process of getting in tune with the mountain and going back and forth to the different camps. How long does that take? Lisa: It takes about a month, maybe six weeks. It just depends on weather and how fast people are moving People climbing in sort of the standard style climbing, big mountains and 8,000 meter peaks. Usually it takes about six weeks to, to two months to, to do that. So it's a long time. Passionistas: In 2017, you actually won an Emmy for something related to the Everest climb. Lisa: Right? So we, so this is totally serendipitous. So the expedition leader is named Garrett Madison He had endeavored to capture our climb in virtual reality, you know, technology has changed a lot since 2016. And so the way we did it was to strap all these GoPros sort of in a sphere and then carry that on a wand up the mountain and thereby, you know, create this 360 degree view. Of our climb. And then later some very smart people stitched that together and actually made it a virtual reality film, which is called capturing Everest. And, you know, I didn't know that was gonna happen when I signed up for that climb. There were, you know, a lot of. Sort of deals made and, and it just happened to be purchased by sports illustrated, um, and turned into this really cool documentary that later won an Emmy, not for my acting prowess, surprisingly, but for just the technology. It was the first time that anyone had captured virtual reality footage in that kind of an environment. You can find it on the sports illustrated website and on their app. And it's really, it's really fun if even if you don't have a headset, you can watch it in 360-degree video with your phone. And I will tell you, it will make you dizzy. Like even me having been there, it is very, very real to watch people, you know, climbing or walking across the ladder or climbing a steep part of, of the, the mountain. So I feel. You know, never in my life, if you've said like you could win an Emmy, I would like never thought that. So it was a really, really cool experience and cool to be able to just share that in a very tangible way, with cool technology, to people who, you know, may never endeavor to climb. But now get to have a little bit of a taste of what it's like. Passionistas: So that same year in 2017, you, um, became the first all American women to summit K2. So how did that differ from climbing Mount Everest and what unique challenges did you face on that? Lisa: Yeah. So it was 2017. I, I endeavored to go to K2 for the first time. My team actually fell apart. And so I didn't climb that mountain that year. I went back in 2018 and in 2017, the first American woman did summit. And I felt like, you know, I, I, this is still an important climb for me. It's something. I think being the first is very cool. I think not being the only is even cooler. And so it was important to me to just sort of continue showing what women could do in the mountains. So K2 is the second highest mountain in the world. It's about 800 feet shorter than Mount Everest. K2 is in Pakistan. It's on the border between China and Pakistan. Most people, like if I'm at a dinner party and you know, someone finds out that I've climbed Everest, they get super excited and they wanna know what that's like, and I'll say, yeah, but I climbed this other mountain called K2, which is actually like really, really hard. And they're like, yeah. But tell me about Everest. Did you see any dead people? So most people don't even know. You know, not even heard of K2, it's in a much more remote part of the world. For example, you know, the, the walk to Everest space camp is, you know, in a lovely valley, there are tea houses. There are commercial helicopters. There is an emergency room at Everest space camp. There is none of that. In the Karakoram mountain range in Pakistan, you are farther from any kind of definitive medical care that you'll probably ever be in your life. And that, you know, would involve a Pakistani army helicopter ride to a small hospital in a remote village. So it's, it's much more remote. The weather on K2 is also much more fickle. So it's, you know, known for just monster storms that sort of whip out of nowhere, dump a lot of snow. Cause avalanches. K2 is also steep from like the second you leave base camp. It is just unrelentingly steep and it is also known for a lot of rock fall. So you can imagine that my family was super excited to hear about me. Deciding to climb this mountain, I had just, you know, beat cancer. My father was diagnosed with cancer when I was climbing Mount Everest and, and died about a month after I got home. And so I sort of promised him that K2 would be the last, really dangerous mountain that I climbed. I was very determined to give it a go in 2018. And, and I was so fortunate that. Everything aligned, you know, the, I had a great team, the weather was decent and we were able to make it work. And, and, you know, and I mentioned earlier that I felt very in sync with Mount Everest and on K2. I felt every day like that mountain was trying to kill me, you know, in the form of rock falls in the form of other climbers dying. I just never really felt like I was in sync with that mountain. And there was a moment where again, climbing steep rock much steeper than the rock I describe on Everest. It's a section of the route called the Black Pyramid and it's at 25,000. And so in this moment I'm wearing a down suit. I'm actually breathing bottled oxygen because the climbing is so difficult and I'm attached to a rope. And that section of the mountain is sort of really like chunky, just unstable rock and there's snow and ice. And I wanted to quit. Like I wanted to just turn around. I fantasized about like reversing my direction on the rope and I thought I could be. Back at base camp in a couple of days, and I could get a helicopter to Islamabad and I could take a proper shower and like eat, you know, I'd really just let, like all the things my sports psychologist told me not to do. I just really let that real like play out. I wanted to turn around and I remember, you know, from somewhere there was a voice in my head that said, is this all you were capable of? And I realized that it was not all that I was capable of, that I was, you know, I was frustrated and I was tired and I was mad at myself, but I was capable of more. And so I kept just. Putting one hand above the other one foot above the other. And I knew that would be the hardest point in the mountain. And once I got past that, you know, the, the rocks were relented and it was more snow, which is my comfort zone, but there were many, many moments where I wanted to quit. So then what did that moment feel like when you finally reached the. So I remember climbing. So a couple days after that scene that I described with the Black Pyramid and we attempted the summit and, you know, the night before the summit, you're sort of, you're laying, I was laying in a tent with two other men in the middle position wearing my down suit boots. Like you don't really sleep. You just sort of lay there for a few hours, like waiting and breathing bottle oxygen. I had this sort of like checklist in my mind of like making sure that I had food in the right places, on my, down, in my down suit that I had like turned on my GPS device, like going through all those sort of pre-flight checklist things. And then we, we left for the summit and it's dark out and I knew the climbing initially would not be. The steepest part. I knew it would be a little bit chill for a bit, and then it was gonna get steeper. And I had, you know, that sort of pre-flight checklist. I had put new batteries in my headlamp. And as I'm climbing, I realize that the batteries are about are dying. They're dimmer than everyone else is. And I say, I'm fine. I have a, I have a spare set. It's close to my body. So they're not frozen. I stop, you know, with thick gloves, like fumble around, finally get the batteries in there. Good. Keep climbing, catch up with my team. And it happens again. And I don't have a spare and I can't expect anybody else to give me their spare. They're sort of, you know, they're sort of ethic and climbing that. You need to be self-sufficient up there. You can't rely on anybody else. And so I remember screaming at the guy in front of me, Rob Smith, a fantastic guy from Ireland, and he gave me his spare batteries. You know, it's very delicate exchange, right? If you can imagine we're in these thick gloves, we're on the side of a mountain, it's dark. And I just remember him like pushing that battery into the palm of my glove. And I remember thinking if you dropped this, that's it. The reason it was, I mean, obviously it was important to see, but we were about to cross, what's called the bottleneck traverse on K2, which is, you know, it's actually flat, but it's about, it's less than one boot width. And so you're walking and there's like two miles of air beneath you. And so you cannot make a mistake there. You obviously cannot have compromised vision there. And so literally without Rob's help, I would not have. I wouldn't have made it. And that moment, you know, several hours later, I got to the summit and I remember it was it's light out now and I'm climbing by myself and it's, it's very, um, unconsolidated snow. So I'm sort of take one step and, you know, I'm, I'm putting my boot print in other people's path. So there's a little sort of steps there and sometimes they would just break and you would just slide down and, you know, it's just incredibly frustrating and you exert a lot of energy. But I looked up and I saw where the snow met the horizon. I saw bright colors and I thought, that's it. Like those are other peoples standing there at the summit. And more than anything, I wanted to cry in that moment. But I was like, do not cry. Like you you're not there yet. And just to sort of bring things full circle I had, after my father died, I had, you know, carried his ashes to like every mountain. Sprinkle them on the top. And it was a very, you know, just peaceful sort of full circle moment to spread the last of his ashes on the summative K2, which is, you know, he never in his life could have imagined traveling to Pakistan. So it was fun to just sort of, not only to have him with me, but to be able to share that with him as well was really special. Passionistas: What is the coming down like physically and emotionally? Lisa: So, I'm glad you asked that question, Amy, because most people and I was very, very conscious of writing about this in my book because the summit is halfway like it is literally halfway and more mountaineering accidents occur on the dissent. Then then climbing up and that's because you're tired. Many people push beyond what they're capable of. You're you know, just logistically you're facing away from the mountain. Oftentimes gravity is not working in your favor. And so the dissent to me is very. Harrowing like it's I very consciously at the top of, at any big mountain do not celebrate because it is, you're not done. There is still a lot more work to do. And on K2 in particular, you know, we talked a little bit about like that moment on Everest, where I felt like I was sort of stepping into my own strength and on K2, I'm [00:41:00] descending, very steep ice face and. There are ropes there. And one rope is meant for climbers coming up. There are still some climbers ascending, and the other rope is meant for climbers who are descending. Another climber had, uh, started to ascend the rope that I was about to use to go down. And I scream at him. You know, he's very, he's far down the slope. He can't hear me. He's just sort of laying there. And I sort of looked, my friend Garrett was next to me and he recommended that I descend. Using not the most secure technique, a, a technique arm wrapping where you wrap the rope around your arm and you, um, you're connected to that rope with a safety carabiner. It's locked, but you lean forward and just walk face first down the mountain. And I had done it many times, but, but I, it just didn't feel right. To do it then. And I didn't even, I don't even know where this voice came from, but I just told him no, like I'm not, that's not how I'm gonna do that this today. And so I, you know, set up my repel device, which takes longer, is much safer, but you know, takes longer repel down to this man who's laying face first and the ice, not, he wasn't response, he was alive. I could, you know, he was alive. He did survive by the way, just before I get too far in the story. But he wasn't responsive to my, you know, yelling at him, trying to get him to move. And so I had to execute this very, very delicate sequence of moving my gear, you know, establishing a safe anchor, moving my gear around him on what I know, because I, you know, study this mountain intimately is. The place on that mountain where most people have died and thankfully it went well and he survived and, you know, I was able to continue, but that was a moment that, to me, that just underscores that [00:43:00] the dissent is so in some ways more important than the ascent in terms of difficulty. And that, that moment looking back, or I said to my friend, Garrett, like, that's not how I'm gonna do this today. I really felt like was pivotal in terms of me, sort of, this is a man that I've climbed with for years. I've always trusted him. He knows my capability. And so for me to just, you know, take a different tact, I think was, you know, just more of me, like stepping into my own voice and strength in the mountains, which is a good feeling. Passionistas: Can you compare for us the fear that you faced being diagnosed with cancer versus the fear you faced on a mountain like that? Lisa: Knowing how dangerous it is and if those are different and if you have the same or different tools to deal with both. Yeah, that's an awesome question. They feel to me like somatically, they feel very different. I feel like different kinds of fear. When I was diagnosed with cancer, I felt completely unprepared to deal with that scenario. It was not anything that I ever thought I would have to encounter or deal with in my life. And I felt out of control. I felt like, you know, my body was, had turned against me initially. I, you know, before I had a team of people to support me, I felt alone. And without like a path or a, you know, a guide to get me through this situation. And luckily that changed and I found incredible healthcare. It felt much scarier to be diagnosed with cancer in the mountains. I feel like, you know, I have, I understand what I can control and I have the skills to get myself through it. And I think fear for sure in the mountains. I, I believe that a little bit of fear is a good thing because I think that it keeps you focused. It keeps me alert to what's going on around me. If the weather's changing, if the route is changing, if. You know, someone climbing above me that doesn't look super safe, that little bit of fear sharpens my awareness too much fear. I think in the mountains and in fighting cancer can be stifling. And I think it can actually, you know, sort of stop you from progressing. But that's a, a really important question because they, for me are very different flavors of fear. Passionistas: So what's the next big challenge for you? Lisa: Yeah. So we talked about it a little bit in the beginning. I don't endeavor. I don't have any desire to climb anything more challenging than K2 in my life, but I do wanna keep climbing and it's become more important to me to give back to the communities, particularly in Nepal and in Pakistan, where I have just learned so much about myself and gotten so much from them personally. So I wanna, I wanna start to give back to those communities and in particular to the women who, who live in those communities. So along with some female mountaineering friends of mine, we were setting up a philanthropic climb for this fall to a mountain called Cholatse which is in, uh, Nepal. It's about 6,800 meters. It will not be the hardest mountain we've ever climbed. But the point is that we just wanna show that anything is possible when women support one another in the mountains. And so to us, that means. That our team will be fully comprised of women. I don't know if that's ever happened before. I think there've been some all women's climbs that maybe had support from men, but, and not that we don't like men, but like we just wanna show that women can do everything in the mountains that a man can do. And so we're building that team. We're super lucky to have a great, uh, Nepalese uh, climbing leader. Pasang Lama. She's helping us create a team of all women to, to cook, to carry loads, to plan, to do everything. And we just think it's an incredible sort of opportunity to raise some money for at least one, depending on how, how fundraising goes maybe more, but we want to. We're soliciting input for Nepalese women who have some educational related goal in their life. So if they wanna learn a trade, if they wanna open a tea house, um, if they weren't wanna learn about economics, like we want to be able, we wanna be the catalyst that helps that woman learn those skills so that she can better not just her life. But I think, you know, that sort of has this trickle-down effect and has the potential to positively impact generations. So. I'm, you know, just beyond excited to be a part of this team and we'll see where it goes. We'd love to do it, you know, multiple years, but we're all, you know, just we're dedicated and excited to, to climb with a purpose now. Passionistas: So what inspired you to write your book "Finding Elevation"? Lisa: I had always wanted to write, which I studied engineering in college, you know? I felt like I was very far away from that as, as an adult, but as a kid, I had a desire to write. And in my twenties, I tried out different topics. You know, none of them just sort of seemed to fit. And then when I was diagnosed with cancer, I really relied on journaling to, to get me through that and to be this, you know, sort of outlet for everything that I was feeling. And. Probably two years of journaling, I sort of realized that there were a lot of things that I had encountered that seemed to translate to other people. You know, that if I could share what I had learned, the hard way with another woman that maybe, you know, she would have an easier path than I did. And so it became really important for me to share. Um, and, and, you know, at the time I thought this will just be about cancer. And then as I continued to climb and I continued to learn more about myself and what I'm capable of and how to overcome obstacles, how to find your voice. Most of that through K2, it, it just really turned into a much bigger project than just journaling. . What was the thing you learned about yourself from writing the book that maybe surprised you the. I think I learned a lot about my childhood when I was writing. Um, I, and I, you know, I spent a year studying memoir at the university of Washington, and I remember like my, there was nothing about my childhood in, in an early draft. And my instructor was like, you can't leave that out. Like that's a part of, and I was like, yeah, but it wasn't, you know, it wasn't super, like, it's kind of painful for me. I really don't wanna put it in here. Um, and of course it, you know, needs to be a more balanced story, et cetera, etcetera. And so by me sort of digging through that, I realized, you know, this sort of these traits that I have today and where they came from. And there was a lot of therapy in there as well. And it made me realize that, you know, something that. Because I said, my parents, you know, were not very reliable. They weren't always around. And, and that made me a very independent person. Um, there's certainly some downsides to that, but I think there's, I think there's always a silver lining. There's always some positive. Outcome, even of bad situations. And we often just have to look a little bit harder, like, you know, dig a little bit deeper to find them. But those I think are, you know, the real nuggets and like where, where we really learn why we are the way we are. Passionistas: Thanks for listening to our interview with Lisa Thompson, to learn more about her adventures and get a copy of her book, finding elevation, visit LisaClimbs.com Please visit ThePassionistasProject.com to learn more about our podcast and subscription box filled with products made by women owned businesses and female artisans to inspire you to follow your Passions. Double your first box when you sign up for a one year subscription. Remember to sign up for our mailing list, to get more information about the Power of Passionistas Summit at bit.ly/2022PowerofPassionistasTickets. And be sure to subscribe to the Passionistas Project Podcast, so you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests. Until next time stay well and stay passionate.

Les Baladeurs
#57 — 1978, cordée française à l'Everest, avec Pierre Mazeaud

Les Baladeurs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 31:46


En 1978, l'alpiniste Pierre Mazeaud se lance dans une expédition à Katmandou. Son rêve ? Emmener la première cordée française au sommet de l'Everest. À l'époque, le toit du monde est sauvage et risquée. Outre son objectif, le chef d'expédition n'aura qu'une seule promesse ramener son équipe saine et sauve. 

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析
劉必榮教授一周國際新聞評論 2022.6.28

Dr.Liu國際新聞摘要分析

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 12:38


#國際峰會週 6/23-6/24歐洲理事會在比利時首都布魯塞爾(歐盟總部)舉行峰會,正式給予烏克蘭及摩爾多瓦歐盟候選國的地位,表示歐盟對烏克蘭的支持,也隱約看到地緣政治的改變。緊接而來G7峰會於6/26-6/28在德國巴伐利亞舉行,除七大工業國外,也邀請夥伴國印度、阿根廷、南非、塞內加爾、印尼等國出席。6/29即將登場的北約高峰會議將提出新版北約戰略構想… #俄羅斯情勢 正當西方會議一個接著一個開之時,俄羅斯加強了對基輔的攻擊,攻擊的飛彈甚至從黑海與白俄羅斯發射,攻擊烏克蘭北、中、東部以及基輔內部,藉此示威抗議;然而,俄羅斯自身也遭遇問題,上週末它出現了百年來首次的違約事件… #金磚國家峰會 6/23習近平在北京用視訊主持了第十四次金磚國家峰會,這天也正是歐盟給予烏克蘭歐盟候選國地位的日子。會議中,習近平強調多邊主義,呼籲拋棄冷戰思維與集團對抗,反抗單邊或濫用制裁,保障產業鏈及供應鏈的安全暢通,並防範世界發展面臨的重大挑戰… Himalaya:www.himalaya.com/drliu 和風談判學院:www.tanpan.com.tw

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Martha Bolton On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 88:42


Martha Bolton was Live on Game Changers With Vicki Abelson Now that's edutainment! Emmy-nominated comedy writer Martha Bolton was only Bob Hope's first female staff writer, has only written 13 musicals, 88 books, including her latest, Dear Bob… Bob Hope's Wartime Correspondence with The GIs of WWII, co-written with Linda Hope, only has 13 musicals out there, a few running right now, wrote for Joan Rivers and Phyllis Diller, has won a Golden Scroll Merit Award for Fiction, and has been nominated for a Dove Award, and a WGA Award… what a slacker! How this woman does it… ‘splained here. Self-taught, disciplined beyond fault, up at 3 am, writes most hours of every day, and loves what she does. We got the skinny on Bob, as a boss, a comedian, an American, and a human… George Burns, Johnny Carson, Milton Berle, Danny Thomas, Sonny & Cher, Joan, and Phyllis. Simply fabulous! Talking to a comedy writer is fun. Can't wait to read the book. https://amzn.to/3HMoHuv Talking to a comedy writer is fun. Martha Bolton on Game Changers With Vicki Abelson Wednesday, 6/22/22, 5 pm PT, 8 pm ET Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here: https://bit.ly/3zRWf8u All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for the best tressed. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/ Blue Microphones and Kevin Walt

Will We Make It Out Alive?
S3E2: Reducing Recidivism Through Education, Science and Nature

Will We Make It Out Alive?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 62:25


Season Three is all about the Sustainability in Prisons Project (or SPP), and how they bring education and training into the prisons to reduce recidivism and protect and enhance our environment. In this episode we interview James Jackson, who serves as an education reentry navigator at The Evergreen State College. He shares some of his experiences with the prison system and the importance of education in breaking the cycle of incarceration. We will also hear again from Kelli Bush, Co-Director of the Sustainability in Prisons Project, who shares more about what SPP is all about.IntervieweesJames JacksonJames is the Education Reentry Navigator at The Evergreen State College. He works to match formerly incarcerated students with colleges in the South Puget Sound that best meet their needs, and helps them transition from prison to life on campus.Kelli BushKelli Bush is the co-director of the Sustainability in Prisons Project. She helps bring nature, science and environmental education into prisons in Washington. She also leads staff from the Evergreen State College that coordinate programs in the prisons. She has a Bachelor's degree in Agriculture Ecology from The Evergreen State College.The Prison SystemJames (JJ) Jackson was formerly incarcerated in the US Federal prison system. He graciously shares some of his experiences with the prison system and with education in and out of prison. James starts out by providing some statistics indicating that formerly incarcerated people who earn a college degree are much less likely to recidivate. Similar reports can be found here and here. He then talks through his experience and motivations while incarcerated, including education he had access to and programs such as the Residential Drug Abuse Program (RDAP) that he could have participated in (listen to the episode to find out why he chose not to participate in this program). He also shares a bit about his experience with reentry and some of the challenges people face with reentry, including housing, substance abuse, and jobs. James says education is something the Washington corrections system is doing well. Washington is unique in hiring education navigators to help incarcerated students navigate the college system and the transition from prison to college campuses. Federally, education grants, that were stripped during the Tough on Crime legislation in the 1980's and 1990's, for all currently and formerly incarcerated students are scheduled to be fully reinstated in 2023. We discuss some of the systemic changes needed to improve outcomes for formerly incarcerated people, some of which Washington has implemented including removing the felon checkbox on college applications. James mentions a book, The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander. He discusses several of the author's ideas, including how being charged with a felony follows people throughout their lives, even after they have served their time and paid their debt to society.We have a great discussion about language and how certain terms like convict, offender, and inmate can cause stigma and bias and dehumanize people. Using terms such as incarcerated individuals can help change the narrative and reduce stigma, while making it harder to treat people as numbers and distance yourself from other individuals.What is SPP (and what isn't it)?Kelli talks about some of the benefits participants receive, such as exposure to nature and science, education, training, networking, and college credits. The program also benefits the community, particularly by breaking down barriers. It brings community members inside the prisons and helps break down biases by letting them interact with and get to know incarcerated people. Kelli discusses what SPP is (environmental education and training for incarcerated individuals) and what SPP isn't (cheap labor or sustaining the prison system). She shares that the program does have some constraints, namely that the prison system isn't designed for programs like this so the infrastructure just isn't there. SPP don't let these constraints stop them; they had around 199 projects or programs last year! Some of these are led by the Department of Corrections, and some are led by Evergreen. Others have unfortunately been suspended because of Covid-19 but will hopefully be brought back soon. A large portion of the programs are funded through grants and donations. We encourage our listeners to start thinking about potential projects that might be a good fit for SPP and listen to future episodes for ideas on how to plug in!Coming up nextJoin us in two weeks (July 5) for our next episode, where we will hear more in depth about some of the great partnerships at SPP. We will be talking to Mary Linders, a SPP partner and scientist at WDFW, and Carolina Landa, a former butterfly technician with SPP. We will also hear more from Kelli Bush because she's awesome.Please don't forget to rate, review and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts (like Tune In, Castbox, Himalaya, iheartradio, etc). Please let us know what you think in the comments below or on our Facebook page.

Trek am Dienstag - Der wöchentliche Star-Trek-Podcast

17. Mai 1993: Seit Worf aus der Birthrightschen, klingo-romulanischen Kolonie zurückkehrte, lodert sein Glaube an Kahless, den Unvergesslichen, nur noch auf halber Flamme. Oder hat er je wahrhaftig geglaubt? Um diese innere Krise zu bewältigen, schickt der Chef ihn zum Sabbatical in den Himalaya. Dort erfüllen sich uralte Verheißungen und inspirieren Simon und Sebastian zum Plaudern aus dem religiösen Nähkästchen. In Deutschland: Der rechtmäßige Erbe, ausgestrahlt am 17. Juni 1994.