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Latest podcast episodes about HF

icqpodcast's Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast
ICQ Podcast Episode 391 - Kick Start Ham Radio for 2023

icqpodcast's Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 73:19


In this episode, we join Martin Butler M1MRB, Dan Romanchik KB6NU, Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT and Ed Durrant DD5LP to discuss the latest Amateur / Ham Radio news. Colin Butler (M6BOY) rounds up the news in brief and in the episode's, feature is Kick Start Ham Radio for 2023. We would like to thank our monthly and annual subscription donors for keeping the podcast advert free. To donate, please visit - http://www.icqpodcast.com/donate Dr. Ulrich Rohde, N1UL/DJ2LR/DL1R, to Be Inducted to the Indian National Academy of Engineering YOTA Month Big Promise from Ultra-Tiny Battery Santa HF Net is Coming to Town Filmmaker makes a Documentary - Documentary makes a Future Ham 146/147MHz NoV Extension FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 Special Event Stations How to Set Up a High Frequency (HF) Radio Station

Foundations of Amateur Radio
Attenuators, the missing link...

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 5:32


Foundations of Amateur Radio Having been able to call myself an amateur for over a decade, it might come as a surprise to you that it wasn't until a couple of weeks ago that I thought about attenuators for the first time. They're a curious tool and once you come across them, you'll never be quite the same. Before I dive in you should know that an amplifier is an active tool that makes things bigger and an attenuator is a passive tool that makes things smaller. To look at, attenuators are diminutive to say the least. The ones I have in my kit look like barrel connectors, a male and female connector and seemingly not much else, but looks can be deceiving and I'll mention that shape isn't universal. The purpose of an attenuator is to reduce the power of an RF signal by a known amount, preferably without distortion or any impedance mismatches. When you go out hunting and gathering, your choice of connector is the first obvious selection, but soon after you'll be asked for a frequency range, an impedance, a power level and an attenuation level, so let's take a look. I have some attenuators with N-type and SMA connectors. There's options for every connector under the sun, so consider what you're using with your gear and remember to think about your measuring equipment connectors as well. In my case my shack is pretty much SMA the whole way, but a friend had some broadcast N-type attenuators and I was unable to resist. The next thing is impedance. In my case 50 Ohm, but there's options for other choices like 75 Ohm for TV based attenuators. The purpose of an attenuator is to reduce power. It does so by converting power into heat and more power handling means more heat. Too much heat and the attenuator starts letting out the magic smoke, so consider how much power your RF source is generating. Putting out 5 Watts? Then make sure that you don't connect a 1 Watt attenuator to that radio. Now for the attenuation level. It's described in dB or decibel. At first the numbers look bewildering, but pretty soon you'll be familiar with how it hangs together. A 3 dB attenuator will halve the signal, so a 10 Watt signal will be reduced to 5 Watts and a 200 mW signal will be reduced to 100 mW. If you have a 6 dB attenuator, it will halve again, so 10 Watts becomes 2.5 Watts and 200 mW becomes 50 mW. A 10 dB attenuator is a little more than 9 dB, so you could try something along the lines of a bit more than half again, but you don't need to. 10 dB attenuation is essentially moving the decimal point. A 10 Watt signal with 10 dB attenuation becomes 1 Watt. A 200 mW signal becomes 20 mW. If you have a 20 dB attenuator, it moves the decimal point two places, 10 Watts becomes 0.1 of a Watt, or 100 mW and 200 mW with 20 dB attenuation becomes 2 mW. You can connect two attenuators together and combine their values by adding them together. For example, combining a 10 dB attenuator with a 3 dB attenuator makes for 13 dB attenuation which moves the decimal point and then halves that. All that's fine and dandy, but what's the point? Well, imagine that you want to measure the actual power output of your radio. If you were to pump the minimum power level of my Yaesu FT-857d into a NanoVNA you'd blow it up, but if you added say 20 dB attenuation, that 5 Watt would become 0.05 Watts or 50 mW which is half the power rating of the NanoVNA. If you're not confident that your radio is actually putting out 5 Watts, you could add 30 dB attenuation and have a safe margin at an expected output of 5 mW. I mentioned that attenuators don't all look like an innocent barrel connector. That's because if you have to attenuate something with higher power levels, you'll need a way to dissipate heat, in much the same way as a dummy load has cooling fins, higher power attenuators can come with cooling fins too. On the inside of this contraption is a simple circuit made from three or four resistors which combine to attenuate your signal. If you're inclined to build your own, there are plenty of online calculators to be found that show how to put an attenuator together. One thing I've skipped over is the frequency range. Most of us are having fun with HF, VHF and UHF, generally below 1 GHz, so most attenuators will be fine, but if you are playing at higher frequencies you should take note of the frequency range specified for the attenuator. While on the subject of frequency range. You can easily measure the actual performance of an attenuator using a NanoVNA. Connect Port 1 to Port 2 through your attenuator and using the magnitude trace you can see just how much attenuation it provides. Be sure to set the intended frequency range and calibrate without the attenuator before measuring. Now that I know about attenuation, I cannot imagine a life without, but to be fair, I was in blissful ignorance for more than a decade, so this might not apply to you, yet, but one day perhaps you'll find yourself thinking about adding some attenuation to your tool kit. I'm Onno VK6FLAB

QSO Today - The oral histories of amateur radio
Episode 428 Mooneer Salem K6AQ

QSO Today - The oral histories of amateur radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 65:35


Mooneer Salem, K6AQ,  discovered that amateur radio provides plenty of opportunities for hams who also love computers and computer programming.  K6AQ loves open source, contributing to HF digital voice development in the Free-DV Project, and improving on WinLink HF digital email gateways.  Combine all this with Software Defined Radio and you have an active 21st century ham.  K6AQ is my QSO Today.

GB2RS
RSGB GB2RS News Bulletin for December 4th 2022

GB2RS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 13:14


GB2RS News Sunday the 4th of December 2022 The news headlines: Special Contest Calls, Expansion of Qualifying Events Exams and Syllabus Review Group Recruitment Bath-Based Intermediate Licence Distance Learning Ofcom has recently authorised an expansion of the list of Special Contest Call qualifying contests. It now includes the World Wide DIGI contest and the British Amateur Radio Teledata Group Sprint PSK63 contest. Full details of how to apply for a Special Contest Call can be found on the RSGB website at rsgb.org/scc The RSGB is seeking to appoint additional members to the Exams and Syllabus Review Group, formerly known as the Exams Group. Membership of the Group now includes places for club tutors who hold a Full amateur radio licence and have taught the Full Syllabus for at least two years. If you are interested in making an application or require further information, please email the Examination Standards Committee Chair Tony Kent, G8PBH at esc.chair@rsgb.org.uk Further information about the ESRG can be found on the RSGB website at rsgb.org/esrg The closing date for applications for the next Bath Based Distance Learning course for the Intermediate exam is Thursday the 7th of December. Following application, students must complete some short pre-course study and a quiz to ensure they are able to use the Bath Based Distance Learning systems and to see if it suits their needs. That work must be completed by the 21st of December. The course starts on the 4th of January 2023 with exams expected in May. For full details and an application form, please e-mail Steve, G0FUW, via g0fuw@bbdl.org.uk The RSGB's final Tonight@8 webinar of 2022 is this Monday the 5th of December. David Palmer, G7URP will explore 100 years of BBC technology and innovation. You can watch the presentation and ask questions live on the RSGB YouTube channel or via BATC. There is more information about the presentation and how to take part on the RSGB website at rsgb.org/webinars The RSGB has released two further RSGB 2022 Convention presentations this week, the first of which wasn't part of the Convention live stream so is brand new to people watching online. Werner Hasemann, DJ9KH explains the preparations and realisation of a low-budget DXpedition in his presentation “Z66DX, Activating Kosovo under special circumstances”. The second presentation is called “Digital ATV, Opening New Horizons” in which Dave Crump, G8GKQ describes how easy it is for the home constructor to transmit and receive digital ATV without the need for the specialist camera or receiving equipment that used to be required. These and other presentations are in the RSGB 2022 Convention playlist on the RSGB YouTube channel at youtube.com/theRSGB There are two big events taking place during December. YOTA Month encourages youngsters to get on the air and the RSGB has supported this for many years. The special callsign GB22YOTA is being hosted by schools, clubs and individuals so listen out for it on the air and have a chat with the young operators. The RSGB's Transatlantic Centenary Tests also run throughout December and there are awards available for working the special stations. There are still opportunities to get involved in both events so go to the RSGB website at rsgb.org/yota-month to find out how to host the YOTA callsign or check out rsgb.org/tct to book an operating slot for the Transatlantic Tests. And now for details of rallies and events The Yeovil Amateur Radio Club Rally will be held on Thursday the 29th of December at Davis Hall, Howell Hill, West Camel, Yeovil, Somerset, BA22 7QX. Doors will be open from 9.30 am to 1 pm and admission is £3. Free parking is available. The event will include bring-and-buy as well as 20 tables for traders. For more information contact Bob on 01963 440 167. We regret to announce that the Callington Amateur Radio Society 2023 Rally, usually held on the last Sunday in March, has been cancelled because of a conflict with an alternative amateur radio-related event at the venue on the same day. Notice of the alternative event will be provided by the organiser. Now the Special Event News On Thursday the 1st of December, GB1WH began operating. The Special Event Station has been established to promote the work done by Wakefield Hospice. For more information, visit the GB1WH QRZ.com page. GB1LJF began its on-air activities on Thursday the 1st of December. The Special Event Station is operating to celebrate the manufacturing of the English Electric Lightning aircraft in Lancashire. More information is available via the GB1LJF QRZ.com page. Now the DX news Ed, N2HX will be active as PJ7PL from Sint Maarten, NA-105, until the 10th of December. He will be operating CW, SSB, RTTY and FT8. QSL via his home call. Ferdy, HB9DSP will be active as 5H3FM from Zanzibar Island, AF-032, Tanzania until the 13th of December. He will operate SSB and some FT8 on the 20, 15 and 10m bands. QSL via Logbook of the World or via his home call. The Qatar Amateur Radio Society has announced that nine special event call signs will be active until the 18th of December to celebrate the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Look out for station HQ A722FWC, as well as eight call signs that contain sequential numbers, from A71FIFA to A78FIFA. The stations are active on the HF bands and via the QO-100 Satellite. QSL via the bureau, Logbook of the World or directly. Now the contest news The UK Six Metre Group Winter Marathon began on Thursday the 1st of December. The contest will run until the 31st of January 2023. Using all modes on the 6m band, the exchange is signal report and locator. The ARRL 160m Contest ends today, the 4th, at 1600UTC. Using CW only on the 160m band, the exchange is a signal report. American and Canadian stations also send their ARRL or RAC section. Today, the 4th, the 144MHz Affiliated Societies Contest runs from 1000 to 1400UTC. Using all modes on the 2m band, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. On Tuesday the 6th of December, the 144MHz UK Activity Contest runs from 2000 to 2230UTC. Using all modes on the 2m band, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. Also on Tuesday the 6th of December, the 144MHz FM Activity Contest runs from 1900 to 1955UTC. Using all modes on the 2m band, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. On Wednesday the 7th of December, the 144MHz FT8 Activity Contest runs from 1900 to 2100UTC. Using FT8 only on the 2m band, the exchange is a report and four-character locator. On Thursday the 8th of December, the 50MHz UK Activity Contest runs from 2000 to 2230UTC. Using all modes on the 6m band, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. The ARRL 10m Contest starts at 0000UTC on Saturday the 10th of December and runs until 2359UTC on Sunday the 11th of December. Using CW and phone, the exchange is signal report and serial number. American, Canadian and Mexican stations also send their state or province code. Now the radio propagation report, compiled by G0KYA, G3YLA, and G4BAO on Friday the 2nd of December 2022 Last week was characterised by unsettled geomagnetic conditions that had not been forecast. The Kp index fluctuated between three and five nearly all week, resulting in reduced HF propagation, especially over polar paths. The solar wind just refused to abate with speeds over 600km/s being commonplace. A southward-facing Bz interplanetary magnetic field just added to the problems. In the CQ Worldwide CW contest last weekend, signals from the west coast and Midwest were badly affected, with one station in Colorado sounding very fluttery and weak. Strong aurorae were also recorded in the polar regions. Nevertheless, some good scores were made in the contest. It was a case of making do with what was available, HF propagation-wise! By Thursday, the Fairford Digisonde was reporting F2-layer critical frequencies in the region of 10MHz, with an extrapolated MUF over 3,000km well above 28MHz around noon. Sunspots remained on the decline all week with the solar flux index struggling to get to 110. But the good news is that could now all change. Solarham.net reports that the beginning of December will see a potential influx of sunspots. A new active region is now beginning to turn into view off the southeast limb and was the source of a number of minor C-Flares on Wednesday. In addition to this, old regions 3140, 3141 and 3145 from earlier in November are about to turn back into view from behind the northeast limb. NOAA predicts the solar flux index could increase to 120-125 next week, which would be a welcome upturn. We may also be entering a more settled phase with regard to the Kp index too, with NOAA predicting a maximum index of two or three all week. However, a solar coronal hole will become Earth-facing on Saturday, so we expect the Kp index to rise perhaps late Sunday or Monday. The ionosonde data server in the States, for the Propquest foF2 graphs, is still having problems, but it is being worked on. In the meantime, you will see a backup plot from Fairford to keep things going. And now the VHF and up propagation news The main weather theme for the coming week is that of colder north-easterly winds, but with some high pressure off the North West to give a chance of slightly enhanced Tropo, at first in western Britain. This will probably be spoiled, in eastern areas, by showers coming in from the North Sea. GHz band rain-scatter options with the North Sea showers should be worth considering but, on this occasion, the showers may be relatively limited. So, don't expect too much. The solar conditions are still showing signs of activity, which can bring some VHF propagation options, such as aurora on 6m to 2m given a good trigger. So, look for high Kp indices above about five or six to make it worth checking. Meteor scatter is, of course, an ever-present option for surprising us with any random activity. These sporadic meteors are more frequent around dawn, and the big Geminids shower in December is less than a fortnight away. Moon declination is positive and increasing this week. So, Moon windows will lengthen and zenith angles will increase. Path losses are high and increasing this week. 144MHz sky noise is low to moderate, reaching 500 Kelvin next Friday. And that's all from the propagation team this week.

ACCEL Lite: Featured ACCEL Interviews on Exciting CV Research
ACCEL Lite: Improving characterization of Stage A and B HF by adding strain

ACCEL Lite: Featured ACCEL Interviews on Exciting CV Research

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 15:55


Earlier detection of people at risk of HF would enable cardioprotection to be initiated earlier and damage avoided. Current imaging tools (eg. ejection fraction) are not sensitive enough to identify early disease. While GLS has been shown to predict outcomes, this study shows that its use improves the predictive power of the current definition of stage B HF. In this interview, Professor Tom Marwick  MBBS, PhD, MPH, FAHMS and John Gorcsan III MD, FACC discuss improving characterization of Stage A and B HF by adding strain. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | Subscribe on Google Play | Subscribe to ACCEL

Anomia - le partenaire Business des avocats
"Avant de devenir avocat, j'étais probablement un entrepreneur en puissance." - François Fagot, associé et fondateur du cabinet HF Avocats

Anomia - le partenaire Business des avocats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 36:00


Le micro d'Advocat reçoit fièrement aujourd'hui maître François Fagot !Avocat depuis maintenant 13 ans, François introduit son parcours en nous présentant sa vision du métier. Il considère les avocats comme des "chef d'entreprise".François Fagot est toujours à l'aguets des évolutions du métier et à l'écoute des besoins des clients.Il commence sa carrière chez STC Partners en 2010, collaborateur d'une équipe dédiée au capital investissement et levée de fonds. Après 2 ans dans la capitale, il décide de s'installer en Province et rejoint le cabinet Fidal en 2012.Il nous partage les enjeux auxquels il a dû faire face : le développement de sa propre clientèle tout en gardant un lien avec son expérience à Paris...Francois décide de quitter Fidal après 5 ans et demi de collaboration et décide d'axer sa pratique autour de l'expérience client.Il monte alors son cabinet HF Avocats en 2017.Suite à des enquêtes faites auprès des clients d'avocats, les axes d'amélioration étaient quasiment toujours les mêmes : le manque d'écoute des cabinets, le manque de personnalisation des dossiers, le manque de lisibilité sur l'affaire et de coordination entre le client et l'avocatPour François, un avocat doit toujours écouter sans jugement, en tant qu'opérationnel afin de cibler les objectifs et enjeux de son interlocuteur, son activité et également d'identifier ses appréhensions.La disponibilité d'un avocat n'est pas toujours assurée c'est pourquoi François a mis en place au sein du cabinet HF Avocats des conditions afin de garantir un retour au client sans trop d'attente.François nous partage ses ambitions pour son cabinet axées sur la réponse aux besoins des clients et par conséquent le déploiement de HF sur le territoire.Chez Anomia, nous sommes fiers d'accompagner des avocats aussi brillant que François Fagot ! Un podcast a dévoré pour tous les avocats qui veulent suivre le pas de François Fagot, que nous remercions chaleureusement pour sa franchise, sa transparence et également son aide précieuse.Vous retrouvez les ressources du podcast ci-dessous :

CEConversations
IV Iron Expert Exchange: Data-driven Debates on the Revolutionary Role of IV Iron in Heart Failure

CEConversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 96:50


To receive up to 1.0 CME/CE credit please complete the evaluation and request form here: https://www.ceconcepts.com/iv-iron-expert-exchange-podcastIn this Expert Exchange-based format, activity attendees will be immersed in a lively discussion between key thought leaders in the world of HF. Expert discussion will include an exploration of clinical trial data for intravenous (IV) iron therapies in HF and recently-updated expert consensus HF management guidelines, with emphasis on the emerging role of IV iron on improved clinical endpoints in HFrEF. Key teaching points up for debate include the safety and efficacy profiles of next-generation IV iron products, established and emerging clinical trial data in HF, and a comparative analysis of currently-available IV iron products.

Foundations of Amateur Radio
How low can you go?

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 3:59


Foundations of Amateur Radio It's common knowledge that power, as in output power, makes your signal heard in more places. If you've followed my adventures you'll also know that I'm a firm believer in low power or QRP operation. It all started when I was told that my shiny new amateur license was rubbish because I was only allowed to use 10 Watts. Seemingly the whole community around me shared that opinion and slogans like "life's too short for QRP" are still commonly heard. As a direct result of that sentiment I decided to explore and document just how much I could actually do with my so-called introductory license, the Australian Foundation License. I've now held it for over a decade and I'm still exploring and writing. One of my first acts of rebellion was to lower my radio output power to its minimum setting of 5 Watts and half legal power was sufficient to prove my point. Although I'm still regularly being encouraged to upgrade, my second act of defiance is to keep my Foundation License until I decide that I need more. I'll let you know if it ever happens. One more well known so-called "fact" about our hobby is that if you use low power you'll really only get anywhere on the higher bands, 2m, 70cm and above. There's plenty of reports of amateurs using a low power handheld radio to talk to the International Space Station and my own satellite internet used 1 Watt to get to geostationary orbit. On HF on the other hand, 5 Watts is as low as you really want to go. Making contacts is a struggle and often frustrating, but when you do, bliss! About a year ago I took delivery of a WSPR beacon. It's capable of transmitting on all my accessible HF bands using 200 mW. Given my antenna situation I've configured it to transmit on the 10m band, 24 hours a day, thunderstorms excepted. When making the purchase decision I had no insight into how my beacon would perform. 200 mW is stretching even my love of low power, but I hooked it up and turned it on and waited. It came as quite a surprise that my beacon was heard over 15 thousand kilometres away, not once, not a couple of times, but regularly. When I came up with my November challenge to see if I could improve on that I made an almost throw away comment about reducing power to see if I could still make the distance. A couple of weeks ago I hooked up a 6 dB attenuator to my beacon, reducing the power from 200 down to 50 mW. It came as quite a surprise that my signal made it to the same receiver in the Canary Islands. My kilometre per Watt calculation shot up, quadrupling my previous record. Just imagine, 50 mW making its way over a third of the way around the globe, bouncing between the ionosphere and the planet, just like any other HF signal. At that point I realised I had learnt a few things. You don't need stupid power to make a distant contact on HF either. I started wondering just how little power was needed to get out of the shack. Yesterday I hooked up a 10 dB attenuator and within ten hours my now 20 mW beacon broke my own kilometre per Watt record again and based on the signal to noise numbers from previous contacts, I see no reason for that record to stand for very long. Once that happens I've got plenty more attenuators to play with and I'm not afraid to use them. Now I'm on the hunt for an attenuator that will reduce my main radio output from 5 Watts. I'm told I should aim for double the power rating, but I also have to consider how to connect my antenna coupler which needs 10 Watts to tune, but that's a project for another day When was the last time that you used really low power? I'm Onno VK6FLAB

GB2RS
RSGB GB2RS News Bulletin for November 27th 2022

GB2RS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 14:06


GB2RS News Sunday the 27th of November 2022 The news headlines: 146 to 147MHz NoV Extension HF DXpedition FundTrustee Required RSGB Convention Presentations Ofcom has agreed to the RSGB request to extend the 146 to 147MHz Notice of Variation for a further year. It is available on a non-interference basis and the NoV is subject to a 30-day notice period of change or withdrawal. Full licence holders can apply for the 146 to 147MHz NoV via the RSGB website at rsgb.org/nov The RSGB assists HF DXpeditions to the rarer countries through a fund that is supported each year from the proceeds of a raffle held at the annual RSGB Convention, as well as income from legacies and donations. The Society is looking to appoint a fifth Trustee for the HF DXpedition Fund who, given the increasing number of applications, will also act as Secretary to the group. Applicants should be enthusiastic HF DXers with an interest in DXCC and IOTA. For further information about the role and how to apply, go to the volunteer vacancies section of the RSGB website at rsgb.org/volunteers The RSGB has released two individual 2022 Convention presentations. In the first, Professor Alwyn Seeds, G8DOH talks about “Building a VHF/UHF Contest Station”. The second presentation is by Hans Summers, G0UPL who explains “The QCX CW transceiver kit story: design, development, five years of production and evolution”. Part of the second presentation was live-streamed during the Convention but you can now watch it all on the RSGB YouTube channel – go to youtube.com/theRSGB and choose the RSGB 2022 Convention playlist. On Saturday 3 December at 1400UTC, AMSAT SA and the South African Radio League are hosting a webinar about Hamprojects. This is a platform to facilitate complex projects that are beyond the possibility of individuals or even one amateur radio society or club. The concept was developed by Willi Vollenweider, HB9AMC as part of the IARU Region 1 Shaping the future of Amateur Radio initiative. During the webinar, Willi will explain Hamprojects in detail and how individual radio amateurs and groups, or amateur radio cubs, can participate or initiate their own projects and attract international participation. The webinar is free to attend and open to anyone who has an interest in technology and a desire to become part of future innovation. Register as soon as possible, as participation is limited to 150 persons, via tinyurl.com/hamrprojects Don't forget the Transatlantic Centenary Tests event that starts at 0000UTC on Thursday the 1st of December and runs for the whole month. There are awards available for working the special stations and, if you are an RSGB Member and hold a Full Licence, still opportunities to book an operating slot. Go to rsgb.org/tct for full information. And now for details of rallies and events Bishop Auckland Radio Amateur Club Rally will be held today, the 27th, at Spennymoor Leisure Centre, High Street, Spennymoor, County Durham, DL16 6DB. Doors open at 10.30 am for everyone and 10 am for disabled visitors. Admission is £2 and free to under-14s who are accompanied by an adult. Talk-in will be on 2m channel V44. Contact Bob Dingle, G0OCB on 07710 023 916 for further information. The Midlands Round Table event will be held on Saturday the 3rd of December. The day will follow a relaxed schedule with talks aimed primarily at Microwave, Amateur Television, Amateur Satellite and other innovative areas of amateur radio. There will be tables provided free of charge for the junk sale and for any free items attendees wish to give away. The event is being held at Eaton Manor, Eaton-under-Heywood, Church Stretton, Shropshire, SY6 7DH. The event venue will be open from 9 am and proceedings will start at 10 am. Questions and requests should be directed to Paul, G8AQA on 01694 771 441. The Yeovil Amateur Radio Club Rally will be held on Thursday the 29th of December at Davis Hall, Howell Hill, West Camel, Yeovil, Somerset, BA22 7QX. Doors will be open from 9.30 am to 1 pm and admission is £3. Free parking is available. The event will include bring and buy as well as 20 tables for traders. For more information contact Bob on 01963 440 167. Now the Special Event News Leyland and District Amateur Radio Club will be active as GB9LD for Lancashire Day today, the 27th of November. Activity will take place on the 40m to 70cm bands. At 1500UTC the club will read the Lancashire Day Proclamation on HF and toast His Majesty King Charles III, Duke of Lancaster. All are welcome to join in. Enquiries to ladar@mail.com On Thursday the 1st of December, GB1WH will begin operating. The Special Event Station has been established to promote the work done by Wakefield Hospice. For more information, visit the GB1WH QRZ.com page. GB1LJF begins its on-air activities on Thursday the 1st of December. The Special Event Station is operating to celebrate the manufacturing of the English Electric Lightning aircraft in Lancashire. More information is available via the GB1LJF QRZ.com page. Now the DX news Today, the 27th is the last chance to work Alex, K6VHF. He is active as 4L1FP from Tbilisi Georgia. He is operating SSB, CW and FT8 on the 80 to 10m bands. QSL via Logbook of the World, Club Log or directly to K6VHF. Don, K6ZO will be active as 7Q6M from Malawi until the 29th of November. He will be available on the 160 to 6m bands using SSB and CW. QSL via Logbook of the World or directly to K6ZO. Special Event Station CX100B will be active until the 30th of November. The station is operating to celebrate the centenary of the first radio broadcast in Uruguay which took place on the 6th of November 1922. QSL via CX1AA and Logbook of the World. Special callsign ZW200ESQ is active until the 30th of November to celebrate the bicentennial of the Brazilian Navy. Operations will take place from the premises of the Brazilian Naval School's Communication Group. Activity will be on all bands from 80m to 70cm using CW, SSB, digital modes and FM on satellite. QSL via the bureau or directly to PY1JR. Bob, W7YAQ and Al, K7AR will be active as K8H from Tutuila Island, OC-045, American Samoa until the 1st of December. They will be operating two stations on the 160 to 10m bands. QSL via Club Log, Logbook of the World or via W7YAQ. Now the contest news Today, the 27th, the CQ Worldwide DX CW Contest ends its 24-hour run at 2359UTC. Using CW only on the 160 to 10m bands, where contests are permitted, the exchange is signal report and CQ Zone. On Monday the 28th of November the RSGB FT4 Contest runs from 2000 to 2130UTC. Using the 80, 40 and 20m bands, the exchange is a report and four-character locator. Thursday the 1st of December sees the start of the UK Six Metre Group Winter Marathon. The contest will run until the 31st of January 2023. Using all modes on the 6m band, the exchange is signal report and locator. The ARRL 160m Contest begins at 2200UTC on Friday the 2nd of December and finishes at 1600UTC on Sunday the 4th of December. Using CW only on the 160m band, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. American and Canadian stations also send their ARRL or RAC section. Next Sunday, the 4th of December, the 144MHz AFS Contest runs from 1000 to 1400UTC. Using all modes, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. Now the radio propagation report, compiled by G0KYA, G3YLA, and G4BAO on Friday 25th November 2022 We dodged a bullet last week when a large coronal hole failed to produce a geomagnetic disturbance. Despite many predictions that we could expect an upturn in the Kp index, it looks like the solar wind missed the Earth, probably because the hole was too low in the Sun's southern hemisphere. As a result the Kp index never went higher than 4, actually 3.67 globally, and things remained calm. This was good news for HF, although a low solar flux index below 120 all week was nothing to get excited about. At the same time, the improvement in low-band conditions, as we head into late Autumn, is making up for it. Top Band contacts have been recorded with 3B8 Mauritius, and Peter, G3PHO has even made it into the USA in the late afternoon on 160m FT8. So, if you've never worked much on Top Band, and you have the antenna for it, give it a try. Failing that, try the top end of 80m SSB around sunrise in the UK for contacts with the USA. Next week, NOAA predicts that the solar flux index will remain around the 120-125 mark. The good news is that there are no large coronal holes currently visible and there have only been minor C-class flares with CMEs that have not been Earth-directed, so geomagnetic conditions are likely to be good. That is, at least until the 1st of December when we have a predicted Kp index of four, which may disrupt contacts mainly on polar paths. This is good news for this weekend's CQ Worldwide CW contest, which is a great opportunity for you to up your country totals or for your Worked All States award. Now a footnote for those occasions when the propquest.co.uk graphs are not updating. It can be a local effect at one of the stations, such as Chilton, which has been offline recently. Usually selecting one of the tick boxes in the top right of the graphs will show Fairford or Dourbes when available. However, last week and maybe still, we have a complete blank for all three ionosonde station plots, which is much more likely to be a server issue in the States where the data is hosted. You can check the Propquest server is working by selecting the “Archive” or “Averages” tabs. In any event, the ionosonde data plots will come back automatically once any issues have been resolved. And now the VHF and up propagation news The unsettled spell of weather continues into the first half of next week so could provide some further rain scatter opportunities on the GHz Bands. The broad south-westerly pattern may well switch over to an easterly after midweek as high pressure builds across Scotland. This could bring a return of Tropo for some parts, but looks a bit weak, while the south will continue to be affected by low-pressure systems. It will feel colder, with some models hinting at wintry conditions being a possibility, so wrap up well if you plan to do any portable operation! The Alpha Monocerotids meteor shower noted last week is over but the small November Orionids, active until the 6th of December, reaches its peak on Monday the 28th. Get ready for the big Geminids meteor shower in December. It commences on the 4th reaching a ZHR of over 100 between the 14th and 15th. More about this closer to the shower peak. Moon declination is increasing again and goes positive on Friday. So Moon windows will lengthen and zenith angles will increase. Path losses, on the other hand, start to increase again this week after last Friday's perigee. We have to wait until mid-2026 before maximum declination coincides with the lowest path loss, but we are moving in that direction again. 144MHz sky noise is low all week, not getting above 300 Kelvin until next Sunday. And that's all from the propagation team this week.

QSO Today - The oral histories of amateur radio
Episode 426 Michael Fluegemann KE8AQW

QSO Today - The oral histories of amateur radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 54:27


Michael Fluegemann, KE8AQW, is a next generation ham, active on HF and CW.  Michael is an engineer at Ford, likes the Long Island CW Club, and made a training video on the popular Morserino Arduino training device on this YouTube channel.  KE8AQW provides some insight into how we might attract the next generation of hams in this QSO Today.

GB2RS
RSGB GB2RS News Bulletin for November 20th 2022

GB2RS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 12:33


GB2RS News Sunday the 20th of November 2022 The news headlines: December is YOTA Month Transatlantic Centenary Tests 2022 RSGB Construction Competition   December is Youngsters On The Air month. This is an opportunity for individuals, clubs, groups and schools to run an amateur radio station with the aim of getting youngsters active on the air. The RSGB is inviting applications to host the special callsign GB22YOTA. To register your interest email Jamie, M0SDV at yota.month@rsgb.org.uk with details of the activity you are planning. Please include your name, organisation and the callsign of the Full licensee who will host the activation. To see the GB22YOTA activation schedule, visit the GB22YOTA page at qrz.com. The RSGB is hosting the Transatlantic Centenary Tests 2022 on the HF bands for the month of December. Unlike those of the 1920s, which consisted of one-way communication, this event will encourage worldwide two-way communication with UK and Crown Dependency stations. There will be a series of awards available for making QSOs with those who are activating historic RSGB callsigns. The Club Log team has kindly agreed to provide the supporting infrastructure for this. The Society is looking for RSGB members to take part and make this historic event a success. You can read more on page 54 of the December RadCom and be inspired by the RSGB Convention Transatlantic Test presentation on the RSGB YouTube channel. To find out how to take part, go to rsgb.org/tct Do you enjoy amateur radio construction? Would you like to try making something for the first time? The RSGB's Construction Competition welcomes entries in four categories – Beginners, Construction Excellence, Innovation, and Software. Special recognition will be given to entries submitted by radio amateurs under the age of 24, and to those who have just gained their Foundation licence. A cash prize will be awarded for the winner of each section, with a bonus for the overall winner who will also be declared the winner of the Pat Hawker G3VA Trophy. The deadline for entries is 1 March 2023 so you have plenty of time to construct something during the long winter evenings. To find out more, including how to enter, see the full details on the RSGB website at rsgb.org/construction-competition Most of you will have experienced RF interference problems of one sort or another over the years. In this world of advanced digital technology and increasing wireless connectivity, the probability of interference is high and increasing rapidly. This is giving rise to an ever-increasing pollution of the radio spectrum which is threatening all wireless communication. To counter these problems, the RSGB EMC Committee makes the relevant authorities aware of issues by taking measurements and surveying any available documents and reports. The committee needs volunteers to help with that task. Deep technical knowledge or experience in EMC work is not necessary, but ideally, candidates should have a good understanding of radio. If you are an RSGB member and would like to help, please contact emc.chairman@rsgb.org.uk The RSGB's National Radio Centre at Bletchley Park will be closed from Tuesday the 22nd of November until Friday the 25th of November for the upgrading of essential equipment and the installation of a new fire alarm system. The Society apologises for any inconvenience this causes. The RSGB's Examination Standards Committee has published its annual report, covering the operation of amateur radio exams during the calendar year of 2021. Search for Examination Standards Committee on the RSGB website at rsgb.org and you can read the report in the minutes, papers and reports sub-page. The RSGB was saddened to learn that John Bazley, G3HCT passed away on the 11th of November in a nursing home in Queensland, Australia. John was President of the RSGB in 1979 and was a Life Member. In 1995 he was made a Life Vice President. He was also the IARU Region 1 representative to the CEPT Working Group on Frequency Management. Our thoughts are with his family and friends. And now for details of rallies and events The 43rd Coulsdon Amateur Transmitting Society Radio and Electronics Bazaar will be held today the 20th of November. The venue will be Oasis Academy, Homefield Road, Coulsdon, Surrey CR5 1ES. For more information contact bazaar@catsradio.org.uk Bishop Auckland Radio Amateur Club Rally will be held next Sunday, the 27th, at Spennymoor Leisure Centre, High Street, Spennymoor, County Durham, DL16 6DB. Doors open at 10.30 am for everyone and 10 am for disabled visitors. Admission is £2 and free to under-14s who are accompanied by an adult. Talk-in will be on S22. Contact Bob Dingle, G0OCB on 07710023916. Now the Special Event News Leyland and District Amateur Radio Club will be active as GB9LD for Lancashire Day on Sunday the 27th of November 2022. Activity will take place on the 40m to 70cm bands. At 1500UTC the club will read the Lancashire Day Proclamation on HF and toast His Majesty King Charles III, Duke of Lancaster. All are welcome to join in. Enquiries to ladar@mail.com On Thursday the 1st of December, GB1WH will begin operating. The Special Event Station has been established to promote the work done by Wakefield Hospice. For more information, visit the GB1WH QRZ.com page. GB1LJF begins its on-air activities on Thursday the 1st of December. The Special Event Station is operating to celebrate the manufacturing of the English Electric Lightning aircraft in Lancashire. More information is available via the GB1LJF QRZ.com page. Now the DX news Christopher, HB9FIY will be active as ZD7CA from Saint Helena Island, AF-022, until the 26th of November. He will be operating SSB, PSK, RTTY, VarAC and CW on the 40 to 10m bands. QSL via EA5GL. Don, K6ZO will be active as 7Q6M from Malawi until the 29th of November. He will be available on the 160 to 6m bands using SSB and CW. QSL via Logbook of the World or direct to K6Z0. Ed, N2HX will be active as PJ7PL from Sint Maarten, NA-105, until the 10th of December. He will be operating SSB, CW, RTTY and FT8. QSL via his home call. Now the contest news On Thursday the 24th of November, the Autumn Series CW Contest runs from 2000 to 2130UTC. Using CW only on the 80m band, the exchange is signal report and serial number. On Tuesday the 22nd of November, the SHF UK Activity Contest runs from 1930 to 2230UTC. Using all modes on the 2.3GHz band, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. Next weekend the CQ Worldwide DX CW Contest runs for 24 hours from 0000UTC on Saturday. Using CW only on the 160 to 10m bands, where contesting is permitted, the exchange is signal report and CQ Zone. Now the radio propagation report, compiled by G0KYA, G3YLA, and G4BAO on Friday the 18th of November 2022. The good HF conditions continued last week with a low Kp index and a reasonable solar flux. But is that all about to change? The problem is a large coronal hole in the Sun's southern hemisphere, which became geoeffective on Thursday. The hole is at mid-latitude, so is not completely in line with Earth. But its large size means that we could see a strong solar wind, which may hit the Earth this weekend, potentially pushing the Kp index up for a couple of days at least. Sunspots have been adequate rather than outstanding. The main active groups have now rotated out of view, but there are some new ones just appearing over the Sun's limb. The HF bands have been excellent and many newer amateurs have had their first taste of 10m in full flow. Next week NOAA predicts that the solar flux index could decline to the range 105-115. The Kp index is predicted to rise to four at least until the 22nd. We may then get respite for a day or two before it rises again to three or four. In other words, we have probably seen the best of the settled HF conditions for a while. Just what effect the enhanced solar wind and increased Kp index this weekend will have on maximum usable frequencies is hard to predict. Typically, an increased Kp index can result in reduced MUFs, but whether we will see it impact 10 metres, especially with the predicted lower SFI, we will just have to wait and see. And now the VHF and up propagation news After last weekend's excellent tropo, with 24GHz propagation from the South East of England to the near continent, we now have a seemingly never-ending period of unsettled weather continuing through the coming week. This is driven by a strong jet stream flow across the Atlantic. Since it's a low pressure and rain scatter period once again, it's worth a reminder that, although we are way out of season with regards to Sporadic-E, it can still be seen on the foEs graphs on the Propquest.co.uk website and can be particularly useful for the LF bands. Focusing back on VHF and above, the prevalence of low pressure during the week suggests Tropo is unlikely to entertain us. The only modes remaining to discuss are meteor scatter as we slowly fade from the peak of the Leonids, and finally the prospect of a random aurora if we have further disturbed solar conditions. This week's active meteor showers are the Alpha Monocerotids which are active until November the 25th and reach a low ZHR maximum on Monday the 21st of November. Also, the November Orionids, are active until December the 6th but don't peak until the 28th. Moon declination went negative on Saturday so Moon windows will shorten and zenith angles decrease. Path losses are still low but with perigee on Friday, path losses will fall all week. 144MHz sky noise slowly increases, reaching a maximum of over 2,500 Kelvin on Friday. And that's all from the propagation team this week.

ReachMD CME
Direct from the Heart Failure Clinic: Novel Device Therapy for Patients with HFrEF

ReachMD CME

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022


CME credits: 0.25 Valid until: 18-11-2023 Claim your CME credit at https://reachmd.com/programs/cme/direct-from-the-heart-failure-clinic-novel-device-therapy-for-patients-with-hfref/14473/ Despite the use of guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT), many heart failure (HF) patients may experience worsening symptoms and disease progression. There is now an FDA-approved device that works with GDMT and uses the baroreflex to improve HF-related physiological effects and clinical consequences. Tune in to keep up with baroreflex activation therapy, its mechanism of action, and the associated improved patient outcomes.

Shift naar EnergyJoy en daar Voorbij! met Lisette Lucas
146. Word Ook High-Frequency Coach & Succes Medium, Ontdek De Impact Van De 3-jarige Opleiding Waarin Je Leert Je Frequentie Te Shiften Zodat Je Het Op Professioneel Niveau Kan Gaan Uitdragen + Gratis HF-Potential Reading

Shift naar EnergyJoy en daar Voorbij! met Lisette Lucas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 19:40


146. Word Ook High-Frequency Coach & Succes Medium, Ontdek De Impact Van De 3-jarige Opleiding Waarin Je Leert Je Frequentie Te Shiften Zodat Je Het Op Professioneel Niveau Kan Gaan Uitdragen + Boek Jouw Gratis HF-Potential Reading (beperkt plaats beschikbaar) - Ben je zoekende naar meer? Naar iets nieuws? Verlang je naar iets anders? Iets unieks? Voel je een onverklaarbare aantrekkingskracht richting de wereld van energie? Ervaar je een bubbly nieuwsgierigheid? Of heb je behoefte aan nieuwe grensverleggende tools & skills voor je bestaande business? Of wil je je eigen HF Coaching business starten? - Ontdek dan de kracht van de 3-jarige opleiding waarin je op High-Frequency level wordt klaargestoomd. - Zodat je met een vliegende start je eigen business kan starten of je bestaande business met HF tools & skills kan verrijken. - En onthoud: Jij hebt alle tools al in je, werken met energie is het meest natuurlijke wat er is! Het moet alleen weer worden ge(her)activeert zodat je transformatie naar HF level zal accelereren. - Shownotes: www.LisetteLucas.com/146 Download gratis mijn Lisette Lucas app iOS / Android hier vind je ook alle gratis meditaties zodat je ze makkelijk bij de hand hebt. - Wil jij ook krachtig Shiften? DM me dan het woord: OPLEIDING via Instagram  of via email: info@lisettelucas.nl met podcastnummer 146

Foundations of Amateur Radio
What's in a VFO?

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 5:06


Foundations of Amateur Radio One of the many acronyms that define the world of amateur radio is VFO. It stands for Variable Frequency Oscillator. That doesn't explain much if you're not familiar with the purpose of it and just how special this aspect of amateur radio is. Much of the world of radio beyond our hobby, like broadcast television, WiFi and Citizen Band or CB, to name a few, uses radio spectrum in a particular way. On a television you change channels to switch between stations. Similarly, a WiFi network uses specific channels to make your wireless network a reality and the same goes for CB, different channels to make yourself heard. Looking specifically at CB for a moment, if you look at channel 8 for example, depending on which type of equipment you have, your radio might be using 27.055 MHz, or 476.575 MHz, or 476.6 MHz. Each of those frequencies can be described as CB channel 8. The first is on the 27 MHz or 11m band, the second is if you're using a 40 channel radio, which is now depreciated and the third is if you're using an 80 channel radio. If you look at digital broadcast television, channel 8 is on 191.5 MHz. On WiFi, channel 8 is on 2.447 GHz or 5.040 GHz. You get the point, depending on where you are as a user of radio spectrum, channel 8 might mean a whole host of different things and as I've described with CB radio, that might even change over time. Harry Potter needed magic to reach Platform Nine and Three-Quarters at Kings Cross Station to get to school. In a channelised world, getting to an in-between frequency is not possible if you're using licensed equipment, unless you're a radio amateur, then you can use magic to get into the gaps. That magic is called the VFO. You might recall that our radios use many different frequencies internally to be able to filter out specifically what signal you want to hear. Most of those frequencies are fixed, in fact in the vast majority of cases these are actually tuned and calibrated to work in a very specific way. The one exception is the VFO, it's by nature variable. It's likely calibrated, but it's not fixed and that allows our community to tune our equipment to any frequency we desire. The traditional user interface for this is a big knob on the front of your radio, colloquially referred to as the dial, as-in turn the dial to change frequency. This allows us something quite rare in radio land. We can be frequency agile. It means that if there's interference at a specific frequency, we can tweak our VFO and slightly modify where our radio is tuned. You use this almost subconsciously when you're on HF trying to tune to a particular station. In the world of software radio there's likely no knob. You type in a number and the variable frequency oscillator in the radio is tuned to another frequency and the output signal, or transmit signal if you're making noise on-air, changes to another frequency. Digital modes like WSPR, which generally use a very specific frequency also vary that frequency but in a different way. You set your radio to the appropriate so-called dial frequency, let's say 28.1246 MHz on the 10m band and then the software alters the signal by up to 200 Hz to change within the available audio range of your radio, altering between a low of 1400 Hz and a high of 1600 Hz, making the actual WSPR frequency on 10m between 28.1260 and 28.1262 MHz. I'm mentioning the WSPR example because while we're frequency agile in our hobby, we do use channels as well. There's a specific set of frequencies set aside, channels if you like, for WSPR, FT8 and other modes. We do the same on the 2m and 70cm bands where we have rules for where repeaters are allowed to be. It means that we get the best of both worlds. We have the stability and institutional knowledge where repeaters or some modes go, but we also get to play in any spot we want. For example, there's nothing stopping me and a friend setting our radio to some random frequency within our license allocation and outside pre-allocated space and run a WSPR transmitter there. Only the two of us will know about it, well at least at first, but it allows us to experiment away from any other users who might experience interference from our tests and exploration. The VFO is what makes our hobby so very interesting and it's what makes it possible to do weird and wonderful experiments. I'm Onno VK6FLAB

GB2RS
RSGB GB2RS News Bulletin for November 13th 2022

GB2RS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 13:56


GB2RS News Sunday the 13th of November 2022 The news headlines: Transatlantic Centenary Tests A Signal Across Space RSGB Convention Videos   The RSGB is hosting the Transatlantic Centenary Tests 2022 on the HF bands for the month of December. Unlike those of the 1920s, which consisted of one-way communication, this event will encourage worldwide two-way communication with UK and Crown Dependency stations. There will be a series of awards available for making QSOs with those who are activating historic RSGB call signs. The Club Log team has kindly agreed to provide the supporting infrastructure for this. The Society is looking for RSGB members to take part and make this historic event a success. You can read more on page 54 of the December RadCom and be inspired by the RSGB Convention Transatlantic Test presentation on the RSGB YouTube channel. To find out how to take part, go to rsgb.org/transatlantic-tests The Wales Millennium Centre is hosting a 360-degree virtual reality experience inspired by the wireless signals Marconi and Kemp exchanged between Flat Holm Island and Lavernock Point in 1897. Called ‘A Signal Across Space', the experience takes the audience on a multi-layered journey that includes the history, mythology, language and nature of the area surrounding Lavernock. RSGB Regional Representative Glyn Jones, GW0ANA recorded a talk about Marconi which appears in snippets throughout the piece. In Welsh and English, it runs until the 20th of November and is free but you need to book tickets in advance. Go to www.wmc.org.uk and search for ‘A Signal Across Space'. The RSGB has just released two videos that feature a wide range of interesting interviews that took place at its recent convention. In the first, you can hear from three amateur radio Presidents, RSGB Board members and other volunteers, as well as representatives of the European Space Agency and AMSAT-UK. The RadCom team introduce themselves, Convention attendees explain what they were looking forward to, and the RSGB General Manager and Convention Chair, Steve Thomas M1ACB, talks about the importance of the event. The second video focuses on the RSGB-affiliated special interest groups and introduces RSGB SIG Manager Philip Hosey, MI0MSO. It was great to talk to them all and find out what they do and how you can get involved. You can find both videos in the RSGB 2022 Convention playlist on the Society's YouTube channel at youtube.com/theRSGB The Bath Based Distance Learning team has helped over a thousand students to pass UK amateur radio exams with pass rates consistently above the national average. Their next course will be for the Intermediate level and it will run from January to May 2023. The deadline for applications is the 7th of December 2022. There will be no charge for the training but students will need to provide their own textbook, scientific calculator, electronic parts and tool kit. As well as weekly work packages via a virtual classroom, there will be weekly online tutorials, revision quizzes and lots of practical exercises to bring the theory to life. Students will also have access to one of the remote tutors who will provide feedback and additional guidance when required. As part of the application process, there will be some pre-course work to ensure students are able to use the online learning systems and ensure they are ready to study in January. To find out more and receive course application details, email Team Leader Steve, G0FUW via g0fuw@bbdl.org.uk  The team will also run a Full Licence course, which will start in August 2023, but a further announcement will be made when that course is ready for enrolment. The RSGB's National Radio Centre at Bletchley Park will be closed from Tuesday the 22nd of November until Friday the 25th of November for the upgrading of essential equipment and the installation of a new fire alarm system. The Society apologises for any inconvenience this causes. Earlier in the year, the RSGB was approached by the BBC to find experts to contribute to two episodes of its planned series, ‘The Secret Genius of Modern Life'. In this week's episode, Neil Smith, G4DBN re-created the Great Seal Bug. The RFID technology developed for the bug is what allows contactless card payments to work. You can catch up with the programme on BBC iPlayer. And now for details of rallies and events The Rochdale and District Amateur Radio Winter Rally will take place on Saturday the 19th of November. The venue will be Saint Vincent De Paul's Hall, Norden, Rochdale OL12 7QR. Doors open at 10 am with entry for £3. The usual traders and caterers will be there and plenty of free parking is available. For more information, contact rozallin@gmail.com or dave@cardens.me.uk The 43rd Coulsdon Amateur Transmitting Society Radio and Electronics Bazaar will be held on Sunday the 20th of November. The venue will be Oasis Academy, Homefield Road, Coulsdon, Surrey CR5 1ES. For more information contact bazaar@catsradio.org.uk Now the Special Event News Leyland and District Amateur Radio Club will be active as GB9LD for Lancashire Day on Sunday the 27th of November 2022. Activity will take place on the 40m to 70cm bands. At 1500UTC the club will read the Lancashire Day Proclamation on HF and toast His Majesty King Charles III, Duke of Lancaster. All are welcome to join in. Enquiries to ladar@mail.com On Thursday the 1st of December, GB1WH will begin operating. The Special Event Station has been established to promote the work done by Wakefield Hospice. For more information, visit the GB1WH QRZ.com page. GB1LJF begins its on-air activities on Thursday the 1st of December. The Special Event Station is operating to celebrate the manufacturing of the English Electric Lightning aircraft in Lancashire. More information is available via the GB1LJF QRZ.com page. Now the DX news Stan, LZ1GC and Ivan, LZ1PM will be active as A35GC from Tongatapu, OC-049, Tonga until the 20th of November. They will operate CW, SSB, RTTY and FT8 on the 160 to 6m bands. QSL via Club Log, Logbook of the World or via the Bureau. Janusz, SP9FIH and Lech, SP9FUY will be active as FJ/SP9FIH and FJ/SP9FUY, respectively from Saint Barthelemy, NA-146, until tomorrow, Monday the 14th. They will be active on the 30, 20, 15 and 12m bands using SSB. QSL via Club Log. Now the contest news The Worked All Europe DX RTTY Contest ends its 24-hour run at 2359UTC today, the 13th. Using the 80 to 10m bands, where contesting is permitted, the exchange is signal report and serial number. Today, the 13th, the UK Microwave Group Low Band Contest runs from 1000 to 1400UTC. Using all modes on the 1.3 to 3.4GHz bands, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. On Tuesday the 15th of November, the 1.3GHz UK Activity Contest runs from 2000 to 2230UTC. Using all modes, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. On Wednesday the 16th of November, the Autumn Series SSB Contest runs from 2000 to 2130UTC. Using the 80m band, the exchange is signal report and serial number. On Thursday the 17th of November, the 70MHz UK Activity Contest runs from 2000 to 2230UTC. Using all modes, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. On Saturday the 19th of November, the 1.8MHz Contest runs from 1900 to 2300UTC. Using CW only, the exchange is signal report, serial number and District Code. Now the radio propagation report, compiled by G0KYA, G3YLA, and G4BAO on Friday the 11th of November 2022 Last week was a mixed bag in terms of space weather. Yes, the solar flux index increased to 138 by Thursday the 10th, but at the same time, we had a fast solar wind and a solar flare from active region AR 3141 to contend with. The Kp index hit five on Monday the 7th after a prolonged period with the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field pointing south. When the Bz points south it more easily couples with the Earth's magnetic field, allowing solar plasma to flood in. The Bz component of the IMF then shifted north, which helped conditions improve over the week. In fact, the Kp index was down to zero for the latter half of Wednesday and Thursday. With no coronal holes, this was about as good as it could get for HF and the bands didn't disappoint. The MUF over a 3,000km path reached 38MHz around lunchtime on Thursday. DX worked from the UK including A35GC in Tonga, 7X3WPL in Algeria and P29RO in Papua New Guinea. The KQ2H 10m FM repeater on 29.620MHz is acting like a beacon this Autumn, often hitting S9 plus in the early afternoon. Running 1.5kW from the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York, it is a good indicator of trans-Atlantic conditions. Next week NOAA predicts that the solar flux index will decline a little, placing it in the region of 120. Geomagnetic conditions may remain settled, at least until the 18th when NOAA predicts the Kp index could rise to five. That said, it would only take a solar flare, and associated coronal mass ejection, from one of the large sunspots visible at the moment to spoil things. And now the VHF and up propagation news The main weather theme for this weekend is the very long moist airflow from the Azores to the UK and onwards to western Scandinavia. Because high pressure will be just to the east of the UK at first this will probably lead to some potentially long-range Tropo conditions from western Europe down to the Canaries and Spain/Portugal. A cold front will probably cut the Azores out of the best conditions. However, we should also be able to make use of good conditions into Europe and particularly across the North Sea to southern Scandinavia and perhaps parts of the Baltic. All this is fine until the next change-over to unsettled weather rolls in from the Atlantic on Monday night and during Tuesday. After then, it will be windy with rain or showers and a small chance of some fast-moving rain-scatter from heavy showers. The Leonids meteor shower peaks on Thursday the 17th, plus expect an encounter with a dust trail on November the 19th. It's predicted to occur at around 0600UTC with a short-lived high ZHR between 50 and 200, but activity level is uncertain. This is a good week to check out meteor scatter options and there have continued to be some occasional reminders that the solar conditions are capable of sending some higher Kp indices our way with an attendant chance of auroral conditions, so stay alert to the Kp index values. The Moon is at maximum declination so we have long Moon windows and zenith angles up to 65 degrees in the UK. Path losses are still low but with apogee today, path losses are at their highest. 144MHz sky noise is low all week. And that's all from the propagation team this week.

Hotflush On Air Podcast
Hotflush On Air #027 - Buena Tarde Guest Mix

Hotflush On Air Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 63:52


This week on HF on Air w/ @isaacreuben we have composer and sound manipulator @buena-tarde-203751691 Hailing from Mexico, his sound borders on the experimental, with inflections of Pop and Bass music. Shouts to @machinewoman for the tip! Now broadcast fortnightly on Thursdays! Full tracklist: hotflushrecordings.com/discord Send your music to: isaac@hotflushrecordings.com Check out Buena Tarde: @buena-tarde-203751691 https://www.instagram.com/buenatardemx/ https://www.instagram.com/kremamx/

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne
Le Pôle emploi propose deux postes en Dordogne

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 1:08


durée : 00:01:08 - Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne - Le pôle emploi propose les postes (H/F) suivants : on cherche un mandataire judiciaire à la protection des majeurs à Sarlat et un ouvrier polyvalent d'entretien des bâtiments à Bergerac

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne
Deux offres d'emploi en Dordogne

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 0:47


durée : 00:00:47 - Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne - En Dordogne, Pôle emploi recherche un vendeur (H/F) en boulangerie-pâtisserie à Bergerac et propose un emploi pour un-e secrétaire médicale sur Périgueux

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne
Un boulanger et un psychologue de l'Education Nationale sont recrutés

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 0:37


durée : 00:00:37 - Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne - Une boulangerie « Aux caprices d'antan » à Nontron recherche un boulanger (H/F) et un-e psychologue de l'Education Nationale est recruté-e par le CIO d'Etat de Périgueux antenne de Ribérac

GB2RS
RSGB GB2RS News Bulletin for November 6th 2022.

GB2RS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 11:01


  GB2RS News Sunday the 6th of November 2022 The news headlines: Next RSGB Tonight@8 Webinar RSGB Annual General Meeting RSGB Morse Test Coordinator   The next RSGB Tonight@8 webinar will be live-streamed on Monday the 7th of November at 8 pm. Terry, G4POP, will present ‘Log4OM: The first decade' – a look at the popular free logging software Log4OM. Suitable for all levels of expertise, Terry's talk will consider the software's history, its developers and its in-built features. There will be a live demonstration and a chance to ask questions. Tonight@8 webinars are live-streamed on BATC and on the RSGB YouTube channel. For more information about all RSGB webinars go to rsgb.org/webinars The RSGB has announced that its 96th AGM will take place on Saturday the 15th of April 2023. Full details of the AGM, the voting process and the calling notice will appear in the April 2023 issue of RadCom. In the coming weeks, the Society will publish details of the roles that will form part of the elections and how you can get involved. The RSGB has appointed Eric Arkinstall, M0KZB as its Morse Test Coordinator. Eric has been interested in electronics since he was young and he built his first crystal set when he was about 11 years old. Eric now teaches Morse code on the air each week. For further information about Morse and the Morse test, see the RSGB website at rsgb.org/morse Amateur Radio Digital Communications is a private foundation that exists to support amateur radio and digital communication science and technology. It has two standing committees for which it seeks volunteers each year: the Technical Advisory Committee and the Grants Advisory Committee. Applications should be received by the 12th of November 2022. International applications are welcome. Details of how to apply can be found under the News tab at ampr.org The Bath Based Distance Learning team has helped over a thousand students to pass UK amateur radio exams with pass rates consistently above the national average. Their next course will be for the Intermediate level and it will run from January to May 2023. The deadline for applications is the 7th of December. There will be no charge for the training but students will need to provide their own textbook, scientific calculator, electronic parts and tool kit. As well as weekly work packages via a virtual classroom, there will be weekly online tutorials, revision quizzes and lots of practical exercises to bring the theory to life. Students will also have access to one of the remote tutors who will provide feedback and additional guidance when required. As part of the application process, there will be some pre-course work to ensure students are able to use the online learning systems and ensure they are ready to study in January. To find out more and receive course application details, email Team Leader Steve, G0FUW via g0fuw@bbdl.org.uk The team will also run a Full Licence course, which will start in August 2023, but a further announcement will be made when that course is ready for enrolment.   And now for details of rallies and events The Holsworthy Radio Rally will take place today Sunday the 6th of November, at Holsworthy Leisure Centre, Well Park, Western Road, Holsworthy, Devon EX22 6DH. There will be traders, a bring-and-buy sale and catering. The venue has disabled access. Doors open for traders at 8 am and to the public at 10. For more information email m0omc@m0omc.co.uk Now the Special Event News On Thursday the 1st of December, GB1WH will begin operating. The Special Event Station has been established to promote the work done by Wakefield Hospice. For more information, visit the GB1WH QRZ.com page. GB1LJF begins its on-air activities on Thursday the 1st of December. The Special Event Station is operating to celebrate the manufacturing of the English Electric Lightning aircraft in Lancashire. More information is available via the GB1LJF QRZ.com page. Now the DX news Today, the 6th is the last chance to catch Eiki JH8JWF operating as 5R8AS from Madagascar, AF-013. Eiki will be operating using SSB. QSL via Logbook of the World and Club Log. A team of operators will be active as P29RO from Loloata Island, Papua New Guinea, OC-240, until the 10th of November. They plan to operate the 160 to 6m bands using CW, SSB, RTTY and FT8. QSL via the bureau, Club Log or directly to DL4SVA. PA900UTR will be active until the 11th of November on various bands and modes. The station is operating to celebrate the 900th anniversary of Utrecht being granted city rights in 1122. QSL via the bureau to PI4UTR. Now contest news Today, the 6th, the 144MHz CW Marconi Contest ends its 24-hour run at 1400UTC. CW only, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. Tuesday the 8th of November, the 432MHz UK Activity Contest runs from 2000 to 2230UTC. Using all modes, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. Also on Tuesday the 8th, the 432MHz FM Activity Contest runs from 1900 to 1955UTC. The exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. Wednesday the 9th of November, the FT8 Activity Contest runs from 1900 to 2100UTC. The exchange is a report and a four-character locator. On Thursday the 10th of November, the 50MHz UK Activity Contest runs from 2000 to 2230UTC. Using all modes, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. Next weekend the Worked All Europe RTTY Contest runs for 24 hours from 0000UTC on Saturday the 12th. Using the 80 to 10m bands, where contests are allowed, the exchange is signal report and serial number. On Sunday the 13th of November, the UK Microwave Group Low Band Contest runs from 1000 to 1400UTC. Using all modes on the 1.3 to 3.4GHz bands, the exchange is signal report, serial number and locator. Now the radio propagation report, compiled by G0KYA, G3YLA, and G4BAO They write, we had yet another week of good HF propagation, despite a strong solar wind that threatened to push the geomagnetic Kp index up, but it generally never managed more than a four in the first half of the week. The solar flux index managed to hit 130 on Thursday, having been in the 120s all week, but the sunspots have been quite weak and small. On Thursday the Kp index rose again, hitting five due to the enhanced solar wind from an Earth-facing coronal hole. Nevertheless, the Fairford Digisonde registered a critical frequency of 9.925MHz, giving a maximum useable frequency in excess of 35MHz over a 3,000km path around lunchtime. This may have been a pre-auroral enhancement as it didn't last very long – the MUF was soon down to 28.8MHz. Please note the Chilton Digisonde has been down again, so if this continues please switch to Fairford at Propquest.co.uk. The upper HF bands have been very lively with much DX being worked. 5V7RU Russian DXpedition team in Togo have made it into many logs, as has J28MD team in Djibouti. Transatlantic 10m signals remain very strong during the daylight, reflecting the good HF propagation at this point in the year, switching to South America as the Sun is setting. Next week, NOAA predicts that the solar flux index will probably remain in the 120s. It also predicts unsettled geomagnetic conditions on the 10th, 11th and 12th when the Kp index may once again rise to five. If you have been putting off getting onto HF you are really missing out! Now the VHF and up propagation news. The unsettled weather pattern is still the dominant story for the coming week with a series of lows either across the country or sitting over the nearby Atlantic, bringing periods of rain and strong winds and showery interludes in between. This raises the issue of rain scatter for another week on the GHz bands. There are probably just two periods with ridges of higher pressure. The first crosses the country on Friday night at the start of the week and the second develops over the English Channel at the end of next week, so limited Tropo options once again. November is a good month for meteor scatter with the Leonids shower starting today and peaking around the 16th. Expect some increasing signs of meteor scatter activity as the week progresses. The solar conditions continue to provide coronal holes and the prospect of geomagnetic storms, so keep a watch on the Kp index, with a high index warning of auroras. As for Sporadic-E, we are in the doldrum month of November which rarely provides anything dramatic, but the usual procedure of monitoring the foEs graphs on Propquest should reveal what's happening. Moon declination is positive again with Moon windows lengthening as the week progresses. Path losses are still low but increasing and apogee is still over a week away. 144MHz sky noise is low in the coming week. And that's all from the propagation team this week.

HFA Cardio Talk
The changing role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Heart Failure patients

HFA Cardio Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 12:08


With Chiara Bucciarelli-Ducci (Interwiee), Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals, London - United Kingdom & Jessica Artico (Interwier), University College of London and Barts Heart Centre, London - United Kingdom. In this podcast, Prof Chiara Bucciarelli-Ducci, interviewed by Dr Jessica Artico, will discuss the enhanced role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Heart Failure Patients and in the new HF guidelines.  It will walk us through the advancements of this imaging technique, what can possibly change after the results of recent HF trials, as well as the role of stress CMR and the future perspectives of CMR for a HF specialist.   

Pharm5
Eliquis v. Xarelto, Adderall shortage, loan forgiveness, and more!

Pharm5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 4:11


This week on Pharm5: Eliquis v. Xarelto for AFib Improve M&M by quickly titrating HFrEF treatments National Adderall shortage Novavax ok'd as booster Student loan forgiveness application Connect with us! Listen to our podcast: Pharm5 Follow us on Twitter: @LizHearnPharmD References: Dawwas GK, Cuker A, Barnes GD, Lewis JD, Hennessy S. Apixaban versus rivaroxaban in patients with atrial fibrillation and valvular heart disease. Annals of Internal Medicine. October 2022. doi:10.7326/m22-0318 Strong-HF study in patients admitted for acute heart failure (HF) terminated early for superior efficacy. STRONG-HF study in patients admitted for acute heart failure (HF) terminated early for superior efficacy. https://prn.to/3sbDrMv. Published October 13, 2022. Accessed October 14, 2022. Safety, tolerability, and efficacy of rapid optimization, helped by NT-probnp testing, of heart failure therapies - full text view. Safety, Tolerability and Efficacy of Rapid Optimization, Helped by NT-proBNP testinG, of Heart Failure Therapies - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov. https://bit.ly/3MQktVd. Accessed October 14, 2022. Brooks M. FDA confirms nationwide Adderall shortage. Medscape. https://wb.md/3DfXS0O. Published October 14, 2022. Accessed October 14, 2022. FDA drug shortages. FDA. https://bit.ly/3yZiAzG. Accessed October 14, 2022. CDC allows Novavax monovalent COVID-19 boosters for adults ages 18 and older. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://bit.ly/3VM10J9. Published October 19, 2022. Accessed October 20, 2022. Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Novavax COVID-19 vaccine. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://bit.ly/3eMcbkC. Accessed October 20, 2022. Federal Student Aid. https://bit.ly/3ToNLwC. Accessed October 20, 2022. Duster C. How to qualify for Biden's new student loan forgiveness plan. CNN Politics. https://cnn.it/3ALjKjF. Published Wednesday August 24, 2022. Accessed August 24, 2022. Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2021 - Pharmacists. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. https://bit.ly/3PObHXm. Published March 31, 2022. Accessed August 24, 2022. Smoot C. What is the average pharmacy school debt in 2022? SuperMoney. https://bit.ly/3PHqZNK. Published April 26, 2022. Accessed August 24, 2022.

Combinate Podcast - Med Device and Pharma
055 - "Critical Tasks and Knowledge Tasks" with Alexandra Benbadis

Combinate Podcast - Med Device and Pharma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 50:55


On this episode, I was joined by Alexandra Benbadis, Usability Leader at Sanofi. Alexandra and I discuss: - Critical Tasks: What the guidance says , how to select them and what it means for HF study design - Knowledge Tasks: Meeting regulatory expectations and evaluation the IFU - Usability, HF Studies and Residual Risk Prior to joining Sanofi as Usability Leader, Alexandra Benbadis was a Senior Human Factors Consultant at Emergo by UL. She's a two-time Tufts alumna and has taught two courses through the Tufts Experimental College focused on the design of public spaces and inclusive design.

Ham Radio Workbench Podcast
HRWB 166 - Parachute Mobile with Carlos KD9OLN

Ham Radio Workbench Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 142:24 Very Popular


In this episode we talk with Carlos Felix, KD9OLN, an avid skydiver and ham radio operator that blends his two hobbies into one !  Carlos works stations on HF and VHF while skydiving from 14,000 feet.  We talk with Carlos about his journey to skydiving and ham radio, the gear he uses and how it works. 

Ham Radio 2.0
E980: Yaesu FT-710 AESS Demonstration with John Kruk, N9UPC

Ham Radio 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:46


Today we have our hands on the newest HF radio from Yaesu, the FT-710 AESS, and I've invited John back onto the livestream to walk us through some menus and talk about the features of this new radio. Bring your questions and join us for the livestream!Purchase link: http://hr2.li/1qyad

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 114: Diabetes Care Update

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 14:32


Episode 114: Diabetes care updateYvette presents updates from ADA on diabetes care regarding SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 receptor agonists, and finerenone. Written by Yvette Singh, MSIV, American University of the Caribbean. Comments and text edition by Hector Arreaza, MD. You are listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California, a UCLA-affiliated program sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care provider for additional medical advice.The American Diabetes Association (ADA) released revisions in May 2022; specifically regarding sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA), and finerenone for cardiovascular and renal comorbidities. What are SGLT2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists?SGLT2 inhibitor class of oral antidiabetic drugs, including empagliflozin, canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and more. They increase the excretion of glucose and sodium in the urine by inhibiting SGLT2 in the kidney, thus lowering blood glucose levels. In other words, it has a glucoretic effect. GLP-1 receptor agonists are a class of non-insulin drugs, including exenatide, liraglutide, semaglutide, and more. They mimic the intestinal hormone incretin and bind to its receptor, which slows the rate at which foods leave the stomach, controls appetite, and regulates insulin and glucagon secretion.What is the NEW use of SGLT-2 Inhibitors and GLP-1 RA in treatment?Traditional glucocentric approaches recommend initial medications such as metformin for most adults with type 2 diabetes, leaving SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists as alternative options mainly for patients with high risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in whom additional glucose lowering was needed after metformin treatment. Current guidelines now recommend these agents (SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 RA) for any T2DM patient with current or high-risk for ASCVD, chronic kidney disease (CKD), or heart failure (HF). This guideline stands regardless of the need for additional glucose lowering and/or metformin use. This has now changed through trials, demonstrating that cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease benefits independent of a medication's glucose-lowering potential.HbA1c has long been used to guide clinical decision-making about type 2 diabetes. However, systematic reviews have revealed minimal benefits in the normalization of HbA1c.Moreover, the cardiovascular and kidney protection of SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists are unrelated to their impact on HbA1c. Double-blinded randomized clinical trials showed that SGLT-2 inhibitors reduced the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure in patients with or without diabetes. Therefore, cardiovascular and kidney risk, rather than HbA1c, constitutes a possible indication for the two medication classes. If patients with ASCVD remain above goal A1C despite the addition of an SGLT-2 inhibitor or GLP-1 RA, then adding the agent the patient is not currently on out of the two is recommended before dipeptidyl peptidase-4 aka (DPP-4) inhibitors, basal insulin, or sulfonylureas because the combined use of an SGLT-2 inhibitor and GLP-1 RA can produce an additive risk reduction for cardiovascular and renal adverse events.What is Finerenone, and how does it help with diabetes? Finerenone (Kerendia®) selectively blocks sodium reabsorption and overactivation of mineralocorticoid receptors within epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. This, in turn, reduces fibrosis and inflammation of both the kidneys and blood vasculature.Finerenone use for patients with advanced CKD, i.e., moderately elevated albuminuria, eGFR of 25- 60 mL/min, and diabetic retinopathy, is encouraged for nephroprotection. However, Patients with less-advanced CKD, i.e., stages 1-2, do not receive any benefit. Regardless of the severity of CKD, SGLT-2 inhibitors remain first-line therapy.Although Finerenone improves cardiovascular outcomes and reduces CKD progression for patients, it is still unknown if there are any additive cardioprotective effects if used with SGLT2 inhibitors and/or GLP-1 receptor agonists.Some Closing Pearls: The use of SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with eGFR > 25 decreased from 30 previously.If the A1c goal is not being met, combination therapy of insulin with a GLP receptor agonist can be considered, as this combination treatment has been shown to increase the efficacy and duration of insulin.Overall, this new change could be very beneficial if accepted internationally. Though understandably, there could be some limitations to this guideline given the availability and cost of these medications, as well as their contraindication of use in specific populations such as pregnancy, ages >65 with concurrent risk factors for hypoglycemia or dehydration, and those with history of acute pancreatitis. ____________________________Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 114 “Diabetes care update.” Yvette explained that the ADA now recommends the use of SGLT2 inhibitors and GLP-1 agonists in any patient with type 2 diabetes with current or at high risk for cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, or heart failure. Primary care physicians should become familiar with the dosing, cautions, side effects, and contraindications of these meds. Also, a newer medication for CKD in diabetes was mentioned: Finerenone. Diabetes treatment continues to evolve, and we hope this information is useful for you. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Yvette Singh, and Fiona Axelsson. Audio edition by Adrianne Silva.Even without trying, every night you go to bed a little wiser. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. We want to hear from you, send us an email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week! _____________________________Lacanlale, Jana K et al. “Notable Revisions in Diabetes Treatment According to ADA Guidelines.” Pharmacy Times, 26 Mar. 2021, https://www.pharmacytimes.com/view/notable-revisions-in-diabetes-treatment-according-to-ada-guidelines.Li, Sheyu, et al. “SGLT-2 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists for adults with type 2 diabetes: a clinical practice guideline.” British Medical Journal 2021; 373:n1091. doi:10.1136/BMJ.n1091Royalty-free music used for this episode: BUrn Flow by Gushito, downloaded on September 22, 2022, from https://www.videvo.net/royalty-free-music-track/burn-flow/1008877/ 

MaulOver Podcast
Dallagli-no

MaulOver Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 72:47


This is becoming too much of a habit. The HF, CL and FDC are back this week to express annoyance at broadcasting, defence and TMO Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Amateur Radio Roundtable
Amateur Radio Roundtable Oct 11, 2022

Amateur Radio Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 119:00


Tonight an update on w5kub-112and 113. Rich W2VU joins us and tells us whats in CQ magazine next month. Dale Klonin KC3TAU tells us about his involvement in ham radio rescue during hurricane IAN. Tonight during the show after the show we all get on HF and work each other. All will be webcasts.

Latinos Out Loud
Myq "Success" Rodriguez's Secrets to His Success

Latinos Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 43:05


On this episode of Latinos Out Loud, the crew interviews talent manager (for clients such as Chicklet.HF and Maleni Cruz) and personal and business branding consultant Myq "Success" Rodriguez about how he got his start, what he looks for in potential clients, and the things creatives need to know if they are seeking representation.

This Week in Cardiology
Oct 7, 2022 This Week in Cardiology

This Week in Cardiology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 22:10


Post-PCI antiplatelet therapy, palliative care in patients with HF, Watchman information on hospital websites, and HCM in athletes are the topics John Mandrola, MD, covers in this week's podcast. This podcast is intended for healthcare professionals only. To read a partial transcript or to comment, visit: https://www.medscape.com/twic I. Post-Stent Antiplatelet Therapy SMART-CHOICE 3-Year Results Support Dropping Aspirin After PCI https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981741 Long-term Effects of P2Y12 Inhibitor Monotherapy After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/2796902 The Smart(est) Choice for Dual Antiplatelet Therapy is a Patient-Directed One https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/2796904 Effect of P2Y12 Inhibitor Monotherapy vs Dual Antiplatelet Therapy on Cardiovascular Events in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2736564 II. Palliative Care in HF Home-Based Palliative Care Improves Heart Failure Outcomes https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981715 Regional collaborative home-based palliative care and health care outcomes among adults with heart failure https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.220784 III. Watchman Info on Hospital Websites Concern Over US Hospital Patient Information on LAA Closure https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981961 Analysis of Patient-Focused Information About Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion on US Hospital Web Pages https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2797102 IV. HCM and Exercise in Athletes Athletes With Mild HCM Can Likely Continue Competitive Sports https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981782 Impact of Exercise on Outcomes and Phenotypic Expression in Athletes With Nonobstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy https://www.jacc.org/doi/full/10.1016/j.jacc.2022.08.715 A novel clinical risk prediction model for sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM risk-SCD) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24126876/ You may also like: Medscape editor-in-chief Eric Topol, MD, and master storyteller and clinician Abraham Verghese, MD, on Medicine and the Machine https://www.medscape.com/features/public/machine The Bob Harrington Show with Stanford University Chair of Medicine, Robert A. Harrington, MD. https://www.medscape.com/author/bob-harrington Questions or feedback, please contact news@medscape.net

This Week in Amateur Radio
PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio #1231

This Week in Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022


PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio Edition #1231 Release Date: October 1, 2022 Here is a summary of the news trending This Week in Amateur Radio. This week's edition is anchored by Terry Saunders, N1KIN, Dave Wilson, WA2HOY, Rich Lawrence, KB2MOB, Don Hulick, K2ATJ, Fred Fitte, NF2F, Eric Zittel, KD2RJX, Will Rogers, K5WLR, George Bowen, W2XBS, and Jessica Bowen, KC2VWX. Produced and edited by George Bowen, W2XBS. Approximate Running Time: 1:26:33 Podcast Download: https://bit.ly/TWIAR1231 Trending headlines in this week's bulletin service: 1. South African Amateur Radio League Proposed Next Generation Radio Frequency Spectrum Policy 2. FCC Grants an ARRL Emergency Request to Permit Higher Data Rate Transmissions for Hurricane Relief Comms 3. Hurricane Watch Net Update for Ian 4. World Radio Conference 2023 - 23cm Amateur - Radio Navigation Satellite Service Co-Existence Study Report 5. Radio Amateurs of Canada Reorganization Effective January 1, 2023 6. Amateur Radio Operators Continue Response to Hurricane Ian 7. Doreen Bogdan-Martin, KD2JTX, is Elected as Next International Telecommunications Union Secretary General 8. Brian Daly, WB7OML, Receives AT&T Fellows Honor 9. Club Grant Application Period Now Open Until November 4th 2022 10. Still Time To Register For The 2022 NASA International Space Apps Challenge 11. Mid Cornwall Beacon and Repeater Group Activate Three New CW and FT8 Beacons 12. Online Voting For ARRL Southeastern Division Election 13. Hams Assist In A Cross-Border Family Reunion 14. New York Engineering Firm Releases Paper That Pinpoints Facts In The Collapse Of The Arecibo Telescope 15. Radio Society Of Great Britain Unveils New Tool For Amateurs To Measure EMF 16. Radio Club In Tennessee Donates Amateur Radio Books To Local Library 17. Hams Celebrate The Original Voice Mode During The AM QSO Party 18. Amateur News From Australia: World Portable Event / ACMA Seeks Input On New License Class 19. Upcoming contests, conventions, and ham fests 20. Mid Century Television - Live, Local and Unpredictable late 1950s television 21. Electronics Notes publishes a comprehensive how to on building an effective HF dipole antenna 22. Amateur radio satellite carrying APRS from Zimbabwe, ZimSat-1, scheduled for launch from the Space Station 23. Ukraine amateur radio satellite may launch November via SpaceX satellite Plus these Special Features This Week: * Technology News and Commentary with Leo Laporte, W6TWT, will talk about the newly implemented "Snoopers Act", better known as "The Investigatory Powers Act", in the U.K. * Working Amateur Radio Satellites with Bruce Paige, KK5DO - AMSAT Satellite News * Tower Climbing and Antenna Safety w/Greg Stoddard KF9MP, will talk about the various methods of sealing coax connections on your tower and antennas in general. * Foundations of Amateur Radio with Onno Benschop VK6FLAB, will talk about, what he calls, "The Patriot and Amateur Radio" * Weekly Propagation Forecast from the ARRL * Bill Continelli, W2XOY - The History of Amateur Radio. Bill returns to begin his series, The Ancient Amateur Archives, this week, Bill takes us back to the very beginnings of Amateur Radio. ----- Website: https://www.twiar.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/twiari/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/twiar RSS News: https://twiar.net/?feed=rss2 iHeartRadio: https://bit.ly/iHeart-TWIAR Spotify: https://bit.ly/Spotify-TWIAR TuneIn: https://bit.ly/TuneIn-TWIAR Automated: https://twiar.net/TWIARHAM.mp3 (Static file, changed weekly) ----- Visit our website at www.twiar.net for program audio, and daily for the latest amateur radio and technology news. Air This Week in Amateur Radio on your repeater! Built in identification breaks every 10 minutes or less. This Week in Amateur Radio is heard on the air on nets and repeaters as a bulletin service all across North America, and all around the world on amateur radio repeater systems, weekends on WA0RCR on 1860 (160 Meters), and more. This Week in Amateur Radio is portable too! The bulletin/news service is available and built for air on local repeaters (check with your local clubs to see if their repeater is carrying the news service) and can be downloaded for air as a weekly podcast to your digital device from just about everywhere, including Acast, Deezer, iHeart, iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, TuneIn, Stitcher, iVoox, Blubrry, Castbox.fm, Castro, Feedburner, gPodder, Listen Notes, OverCast, Player.FM, Pandora, Podcast Gang, Podcast Republic, Podchaser, Podnova, and RSS feeds. This Week in Amateur Radio is also carried on a number of LPFM stations, so check the low power FM stations in your area. You can also stream the program to your favorite digital device by visiting our web site www.twiar.net. Or, just ask Siri, Alexa, or your Google Nest to play This Week in Amateur Radio! This Week in Amateur Radio is produced by Community Video Associates in upstate New York, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. If you would like to volunteer with us as a news anchor or special segment producer please get in touch with our Executive Producer, George, via email at w2xbs77@gmail.com. Also, please feel free to follow us by joining our popular group on Facebook, and follow our feed on Twitter! Thanks to FortifiedNet.net for the server space! Thanks to Archive.org for the audio space.

The Ham Radio Clubhouse
Ham Radio Clubhouse: Ham Spotlight VA6HEM Ep 79 Sept 20, 2022

The Ham Radio Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 126:25


This week on the Clubhouse we welcome Michel Smith VA6HEM from last weeks QSO. First licensed in 2014 he is active in HF contesting, team contesting and Dxing. Join us in the chat as we get to know Michel. You can reach the show at hamradioclubhouse@gmail.com HRC Monthly Giveaway sign up - https://www.hamradioclubhouse.comWant to catch the show on the go? Well now you can, we are now podcasting each episode. Available on your favorite podcast platform. If you would like to buy us a beer:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/w2hrcGuest YouTube channels:Our Channels:Joe - https://www.youtube.com/c/K5YVYAmateurRadioStationShane - https://www.youtube.com/thissideoftheradioDan BeerSnack- https://www.youtube.com/c/DanKD2FMWDon Izzo - https://www.youtube.com/smokesignalsrfSteve - https://www.youtube.com/c/SteveKO4AFLHamRadioDaniel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNcOZ7LUBddxjB0wGMYGcBwMerch Links:Joe - https://shop.spreadshirt.com/k5yvy/allShane - https://thissideoftheradio.myspreadshop.com/Discord Links:K5YVY & Friends - https://discord.gg/8WGfgJWUuTT.O.A.D.S- https://discord.gg/GaHVfUPwvT#hamradio #hamradioclubhouse #W2HRC

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null - 09.26.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 61:44


Videos : Those who speak out are shouted down until they are proved right, says Neil Oliver – 10:06 Gad Saad: Why Rational People Fall for ‘Parasitic' Ideas | American Thought Leaders CLIP – 9:11 Scientist Carl Sagan testifying to the U.S. Senate in 1985 on the greenhouse effect: – 2:44 Parent Eviscerates School Board Over Censorship– 4:59 Vitamin C supplementation associated with improved lung function in COPD Medical College of Lanzhou University (China), September 23 2022. The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease published a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials that found improvement in lung function among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who received vitamin C. The disease is characterized by airflow limitation and persistent respiratory symptoms. Ting Lei of Medical College of Lanzhou University in Lanzhou, China and associates identified 10 randomized, controlled trials that included a total of 487 adults with COPD for the meta-analysis. The trials compared lung function and/or antioxidant enzyme or nutrient levels of COPD patients who received vitamin C to a placebo or control group. The meta-analysis found improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage (FEV1%, a measure of lung function) in association with vitamin C supplementation. When dosage was analyzed, it was determined that consuming more than 400 milligrams vitamin C per day was needed experience a significant benefit. The ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (another lung function assessment), and levels of vitamin C and glutathione, both of which are antioxidants, also improved among participants who received vitamin C supplements. The authors remarked that oxidative stress, which is a disturbance of the oxidant to antioxidant balance, has been suggested as playing a role in the development of COPD. The current investigation is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effect of vitamin C supplementation in people with COPD. “We found that supplementing vitamin C to patients with COPD demonstrated vital clinical significance,” Lei and associates concluded. “Vitamin C supplementation could increase the levels of antioxidation in serum (vitamin C and glutathione) and improve lung function (FEV1% and FEV1/FVC), especially in patients treated with vitamin C supplementation greater than 400 mg/day.” Single Flavanoid (Found in 6 Foods) Reduces Cognitive Impairment Drastically Fourth Military Medical University (China), September 19, 2022 A singular flavanoid can protect the brain against cognitive deficit and other cellular damage, according to studies from the Fourth Military Medical University. The news comes from Xi'an, People's Republic of China, and shows great promise for those suffering from mental impairment due to Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and other debilitating cognitive conditions. The study abstract concludes: “Our results provide new insights into the pharmacological actions of rutin and suggest that rutin has multi-targeted therapeutical potential on cognitive deficits associated with conditions with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion such as vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease.” Rutin is a biologically active flavonoid found in the following foods:  Buckwheat – Possibly the best source of rutin, and much better than boiled oats, uncooked buckwheat leaf flower offers about 675 mg in a 1.1 cup serving. Uncooked buckwheat groats contain 230 mg of rutin per 1 kg, dark buckwheat flour has 218 mg per 1 kg and buckwheat noodles provide 78 mg. Elderflower Tea – When dried, the white flowers of the elderflower make a delicious and rutin-filled tea. According to the Czech Journal of Food Science, elderflower tea contains approximately 10.9g/kg of rutin per brewed cup. Amaranth Leaves – In Western cultures, most people are familiar with the edible seeds of amaranth, though in Chinese and Southeast Asian cooking the leaves are also gaining traction, partly due to their high rutin content. You can expect around 24.5g/kg from the dried leaves. Seeds only contain trace amounts of the important nutrient. Unpeeled Apples – Keep the peel on your apples to enjoy lots of rutin. Just be sure that they are organic, since apple peels are especially prone to pesticide build-up. Apple skins are 6x as powerful as the flesh at preventing high blood pressure due to this flavanoid, too. • Unfermented Rooibos Tea – While rooibos tea contains fewer antioxidants than black or green teas, it is a good source of rutin, providing around 1.69 mg/g. • Figs – These little gems contain about the same amount of rutin as apples, so be sure to add them to your diet. The scientists found that rutin works primarily through anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and reducing hypofusion in the brain. Resistance-breathing training found to lower blood pressure University of Colorado and University of Arizona, September 23, 2022 A team of researchers with members from the University of Colorado, the University of Arizona and Alma College, has found that resistance-breathing training can lower blood pressure as much as some medicines and/or exercises. The study is published in the Journal of Applied Physiology. Hypertension, also known as chronic high blood pressure, can lead to a wide variety of health problems, from loss of vision to strokes and heart attacks. For that reason, doctors take it seriously. Typically, patients are directed to modify their diet and to exercise more. If that does not fix the problem, medications are prescribed. In this new effort, the researchers looked into a new type of therapy to reduce blood pressure levels—resistance-breathing training. Resistance-breathing training involves breathing in and out of a small device, called, quite naturally, a POWERbreathe, every day for several minutes. The device forces the patient to use their breathing muscles to push and pull air through it, making them stronger. And that, the researchers found, also reduces blood pressure. The device has been in use for several years as a means to assist athletes, singers and people with weak lung muscles. Several groups of healthy volunteers practiced the training for a few minutes every day for six weeks. Each was breathed in and out with the device 30 times each session. Each of the volunteers had their blood pressure measured before and after the training. The researchers found a sustained average drop of 9 mmHg in systolic blood pressure (the top number in blood pressure readings)—normal pressure is defined as 120/80. They describe the change as significant, as much as some patients see with medication. They also note that it is similar to changes in many patients who begin an aerobic exercise regimen, such as walking, cycling or running. They suggest such training could be used by patients of all ages who are unable to exercise to lower their blood pressure. How To Maintain Peak Brain Health: Scientists Say It Comes Down To These 3 Factors Norwegian University of Science and Technology, September 23, 2022 What's the best way to maintain peak brain health as we age? There are countless studies detailing ways to prevent cognitive decline, so scientists in Norway sought to simplify the science of managing strong brain health to three recommendations. This report is something of a summation covering modern science's current understanding of how best to cultivate robust brain health. The team at NTNU cite 101 references to prior articles in this latest theoretical perspective paper. “Three factors stand out if you want to keep your brain at its best,” Prof. Sigmundsson adds. The three identified keys to strong brain health are: Physical exercise Social activity Strong, passionate interests and hobbies It's common knowledge that spending all day on the couch isn't healthy for the body, but physical activity is also key to brain health. “An active lifestyle helps to develop the central nervous system and to counteract the aging of the brain,” according to study authors. Researchers add that consistency is essential. Do your best to get in at least a little movement each and every day. Even if you work a sedentary job that requires lots of sitting, get moving every hour or so for just a few minutes at the very least. Some people are naturally more social than others, but researchers stress that no one is an island. Even if you prefer a quiet night in to attending a party, make an effort to stay in touch with the people who matter to you. Our brains thrive on social interactions and connections. “Relationships with other people, and interacting with them, contribute to a number of complex biological factors that can prevent the brain from slowing down,” Prof. Sigmundsson explains. Just like bicep curls help us build muscle, keeping the brain active promotes strong lifelong cognition. Consider taking up a new hobby, or learning a new skill. Perhaps most importantly, though, don't force it; find something you're actually passionate about. It's never too late in life to learn something new! “Passion, or having a strong interest in something, can be the decisive, driving factor that leads us to learn new things. Over time, this impacts the development and maintenance of our neural networks,” Prof. Sigmundsson says. “Brain development is closely linked to lifestyle. Physical exercise, relationships and passion help to develop and maintain the basic structures of our brain as we get older,” Prof. Sigmundsson concludes. Calcium supplements may support a healthy colon: Harvard study Harvard School of Public Health, September 18, 2022 Supplements of calcium or non-dairy products fortified with the mineral may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, according to meta-analysis of prospective observational studies by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health. For every 300 mg increase in calcium from supplements was associated with a 9% reduction in risk, wrote NaNa Keum and her co-authors in the International Journal of Cancer . Every 300 mg increase in total calcium was associated with a similar reduction in risk (8%), they added. “Our findings have several important clinical and public health implications,” they explained. “First, according to the 2003 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey in the U.S., median total calcium intake of adults aged over 50 years was approximately 650 mg/day for no calcium-supplement users and 1,000 mg/day for calcium-supplement users. “As the benefit of calcium intake on CRC is expected to continue beyond 1,000 mg/day, not only non-supplement users but also supplement users may further reduce their CRC risk through additional calcium intake.” “Second, while dairy products, especially milk, are the major sources of calcium in many countries, they are a substantial source of calories and contain potentially harmful factors such as saturated fat, hormones, and casein proteins. Since our analyses provide evidence for an equivalent benefit of dietary and supplementary calcium, the benefit of calcium on CRC risk may be obtained through supplements and non-dairy products fortified with calcium.” The Boston-based scientists conducted dose-response meta-analyses of 15 studies involving 12,305 cases of colorectal cancer and calcium intakes ranging from 250-1,900 mg/day. The studies varied in duration from 3.3 to 16 years. The data indicated that both total and supplemental calcium were associated with reductions in the risk of colorectal cancer. “In conclusion, both dietary and supplementary calcium intake may continue to decrease colorectal cancer risk beyond 1,000 mg/day,” wrote Keum and her co-authors. Yoga's Age-Defying Effects Confirmed by Science Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences (India), September 21st 2022 While yoga's longevity promoting effects have been the subject of legend for millennia, increasingly modern science is confirming this ancient technology for spiritual and physical well-being actually can slow aging and stimulate our regenerative potential. One particularly powerful study published lin the journal Age titled, “Age-related changes in cardiovascular system, autonomic functions, and levels of BDNF of healthy active males: role of yogic practice”, found that a brief yoga intervention (3 months) resulted in widespread improvements in cardiovascular and neurological function. Indian researchers studied healthy active males of three age groups (20-29, 30-39, and 40-49 years) by randomly assigning them to practice one hour of yoga daily for 3 months. The observed significant differences between the younger and older participants in the study, specifically: “Significantly higher values of heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), load in heart (DoP), myocardial oxygen consumption (RPP), and total cholesterol (TC) were noted in senior age group.” The yogic practice resulted in significant reductions in all of these parameters (HR, BP, DoP, RPP and TC). Also observed in the older participants were decreases in high frequency (HF), total power (TP), all time domain variables of heart rate variability (HRV), and skin conductance (SC) — all of which increased following yogic practice. Higher levels of catecholamines (“stress hormones”) and low frequency (LF) power of HRV were noted in advancement of age, both of which decreased following yogic practice. Additionally, the senior age group had highest levels of cortisol and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), both of which decreased following yogic practice. Finally, brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), serotonin, and dopamine were low in higher age group, but these increased following yogic practice; an indication of improved brain function and cognition. The researchers concluded: ‘This study revealed that yogic practices might help in the prevention of age-related degeneration by changing cardiometabolic risk factors, autonomic function, and BDNF in healthy male.” There are a number of promising studies revealing the age-defying potential of this ancient practice. Here are some additional benefits confirmed in 2014 alone: Age-Related Respiratory Problems: A 2014 study from the journal of Human Kinetics found that a 3 month yoga intervention in 36 elderly women (average age 63.1) significantly improved pulmonary (respiratory) function. Age-Related Brain Cognitive Decline: A review in the Journals of Gerontology, involving a two month Hatha yoga intervention in the elderly (average age 62.0) resulted in significant improvements in “executive function measures of working memory capacity and efficiency of mental set shifting and flexibility compared with their stretching-strengthening counterparts.” Age-Related Hormone Insufficiency: A study published in Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that a 3 month yogic intervention in men (average age 42.8) and women (average age 44.75) resulted in improvements in the level of growth hormone and DHEAS, two essential hormones that drop off precipitously as we age. Age-Related Sleep Problems: Astudy published in Alternatives Therapies in Health and Medicine found a 12 week yogic intervention (yoga 2x a week) resulted in significant improvements in the quality of sleep in older individuals (average age 60). Age-Related Depression: From the Chinese Journal of Nursing found that not only did yoga improve sleep as found in the study above but also significantly reduced the depressive symptoms of elderly participants…after 6 months. “ This is just a small sampling of the literature. There is older research revealing that yoga has even more benefits for aging populations.

Heart to Heart Nurses
Heart Failure Management: Lifestyle and Self-Care

Heart to Heart Nurses

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 21:49


[CE contact hours--see below.] Improving quality of life for patients with heart failure can include lifestyle modifications and require successful behavior change strategies. Learn best practices to apply into your clinical setting from nurse providers Colleen McIlvennan, PhD, DNP, ANP, FAHA, FHFSA, of the University of Colorado in Denver, and Binu Koirala, PhD, MGS, RN, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore.CE LINK: https://pcna.net/?p=10717&post_type=online-course&preview_id=10717PCNA Behavior Change mini-certifice (CE course): https://pcna.net/professional-development/online-learning/ "Behavior Change mini-certificate"AHA HF Tools & Resources: heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-failure/heart-failure-tools-resourcesAdherence to Healthy Sleep Patterns: ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.050792?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub++0pubmed&Addressing Social Determinants of Health in Patients with HF: ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000767See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Takeaway
A Girlhood: Letter to My Transgender Daughter

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 17:19


2022 has seen more anti-LGBTQ legislation proposed so far than any other year. According to LGBTQ advocacy group Freedom for All Americans, 39 states introduced more than 200 such bills since April. The legislation mainly targets trans youth, running the gamut from healthcare restrictions, exclusion from sports and even equating gender affirming parenting to child abuse.  For Carolyn Hays, that policy threatened her family when an investigator from the Department of Children and Families knocked on her door. In her new memoir, A Girlhood: Letter to My Transgender Daughter, Hays writes: “...we quickly learned that in this southern state with Republican-appointed judges, we could lose custody. We could lose you.” We hear from Carolyn on how raising her daughter expanded her understanding of parenting, faith, science and gender. 

Heart to Heart Nurses
Heart Failure Management: SGLT2i and GLP-1 RA Mechanism of Action

Heart to Heart Nurses

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 24:57


[CE contact hours--see below.] Often prescribed for obesity, SGLT2is and GLP-1 RAs have a role in heart failure management. Learn about their mechanisms of action, and how their use extends beyond weight loss to cardioprotective and renalprotective properties. Guests: Kim Newlin, MSN, ANP, FPCNA, of Sutter Roseville Medical Center in Northern California, and Colleen McIlvennan, PhD, DNP, ANP, FAHA, FHFSA, from the University of Colorado in Denver. CE Link: https://pcna.net/?p=10718&post_type=online-course&preview_id=10718 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA 2022 Guideline for the Managment of HF: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000001063Pocket Guide: Guidelines for Managing CVD Risk in Patients with Diabetes: https://pcna.net/clinical-resources/provider-tools/diabetes-provider-tools/HF Pocket Guide: A Guide to Prevention and Management: https://pcna.net/clinical-resources/provider-tools/heart-failure-provider-tools/ New and Emerging Treatments for Heart Failure: HFrEF and HFpEF (CE course): https://pcna.net/online-course/new-and-emerging-treatments-for-heart-failure-hfref-and-hfpef/ SGLT2is in Heart Failure: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8654149/SGLT2i in HFpEF: multicenter randomized trial: nature.com/articles/s41591-021-01536-xEmpagliflozin in HFpEF: https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa2107038#:~:text=Empagliflozin%20in%20HF%20with%20Preserved%20Ejection%20Fraction&text=Sodium%E2%80%93glucose%20cotransporter%202%20(SGLT2,and%20a%20reduced%20ejection%20fraction. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Takeaway
A Girlhood: Letter to My Transgender Daughter

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 17:19


2022 has seen more anti-LGBTQ legislation proposed so far than any other year. According to LGBTQ advocacy group Freedom for All Americans, 39 states introduced more than 200 such bills since April. The legislation mainly targets trans youth, running the gamut from healthcare restrictions, exclusion from sports and even equating gender affirming parenting to child abuse.  For Carolyn Hays, that policy threatened her family when an investigator from the Department of Children and Families knocked on her door. In her new memoir, A Girlhood: Letter to My Transgender Daughter, Hays writes: “...we quickly learned that in this southern state with Republican-appointed judges, we could lose custody. We could lose you.” We hear from Carolyn on how raising her daughter expanded her understanding of parenting, faith, science and gender. 

This Week in Amateur Radio
PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio #1229

This Week in Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022


PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio Edition #1229 Release Date: September 17, 2022 Here is a summary of the news trending This Week in Amateur Radio. This week's edition is anchored by Chris Perrine, KB2FAF, Terry Saunders, N1KIN, Don Hulick, K2ATJ, Eric Zittel, KD2RJX, Will Rogers, K5WLR, George Bowen, W2XBS, and Jessica Bowen, KC2VWX. Produced and edited by George Bowen, W2XBS. Approximate Running Time: 1:23:40 Podcast Download: https://bit.ly/TWIAR1229 Trending headlines in this week's bulletin service: 1. 23 Centimeter Amateur Band and The Radio Navigation Satellite Service Coexistence September Update 2. WRTH - The World Radio TV Handbook Continues! 3. 104 Year Old Ham is On the Air 4. 100th Anniversary of the Reading Pennsylvania Radio Club 5. Hawaii Big Wind Drill Successfully Tests Emergency Radio Communications 6. Amateur Radio Helps Disabled Sailboat to Port 7. Amateur Radio Takes Center Stage at The Big E Expos