Podcasts about kierkegaard

Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic, and religious author

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Otherppl with Brad Listi
825. Clancy Martin

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2023 107:58


Clancy Martin is the author of How Not to Kill Yourself: A Portrait of the Suicidal Mind, available from Pantheon. Martin is the acclaimed author of the novel How to Sell (FSG) as well as numerous books on philosophy, and has translated works by Friedrich Nietzsche, Søren Kierkegaard, and other philosophers. A Guggenheim Fellow, his writing has appeared in The New Yorker, New York, The Atlantic, Harper's, Esquire, The New Republic, Lapham's Quarterly, The Believer, and The Paris Review. He is a professor of philosophy at the University of Missouri in Kansas City and Ashoka University in New Delhi. He is the survivor of more than ten suicide attempts and a recovering alcoholic. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Available where podcasts are available: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, iHeart Radio, etc. Subscribe to Brad Listi's email newsletter. Support the show on Patreon Merch @otherppl Instagram  YouTube TikTok Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lush Life
How to Write about Drinks with Millie Milliken

Lush Life

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2023 58:00


Do you remember Plato's work, Symposium? Yep, that took place at a drinks party. Philosopher David Hume said that drinking was an antidote to philosophical depression, and Kierkegaard wrote an entire treatise on wine. Our guest today is another student of philosophy who found her calling in the drinks industry.I am so pleased to have my friend and fellow drinks journalist, Millie Milliken, on the program today. Not does she have nearly 10 years of food, drink, and events writing experience in print and online, but in 2022 she won both the IWSC Spirits Communicator of the Year award as well as The Alan Lodge Young International Drinks Writer of the Year Award. Needless to say, she is a great writer. How did she become specialized in drinks? Well, I will let her tell you.You can always find a video of this episode, plus all the other Lush Life episodes, as well as a whole lot more; just head to youtube.com/@lushlifemanual.Our cocktail of the week is the Savoury Martini:INGREDIENTS5 parts Capreolus Garden Swift gin1 part Noilly Prat VermouthCitizens of Soil Olive OilMETHODAdd all the ingredients to a mixing glassAdd iceStir, stir, stirStrain into a martini glass Garnish with Citizens of Soil Olive OilYou'll find this recipe, more Gin Martini cocktail recipes, and all the cocktails of the week at alushlifemanual.com, where you'll also find most of the ingredients in our shop.Full Episode Details: https://alushlifemanual.com/drinks-writing-with-millie-milliken-----Become a supporter of A Lush Life Manual for as little as $5 - all you have to do is go to patreon.com/lushlife.Lush Life Merchandise is here - we're talking t-shirts, mugs, iPhone covers, duvet covers, iPad covers, and more covers for everything! And more! Produced by Simpler MediaFollow us on Twitter and InstagramGet great cocktail ideas on PinterestNew episodes every Tuesday, usually!!

Countermelody
Episode 188. Sarah Reese

Countermelody

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2023 82:35


Greatness expresses itself in different ways. Sometimes in indisputable artistic talents, and other times in profound displays of humanity. And sometimes, as in the case of today's subject, Sarah Reese, it's both. The soprano, who just this week celebrated a landmark birthday, is a singer of rare gifts whose career encompassed some of the world's greatest stages and concert halls who later in life returned to the region where she grew up (in Sarah's case, South Carolina), to give back to the community as a music teacher and choir director, in which capacity she has positively impacted the lives of countless students who came into contact with her warmth, skill, and generosity of spirit. Earlier on in her personal saga, Sarah made history when in the late 1960s she was the first female Black student at Furman University in Greenville. Through her persistence, courage, and determination, she rose above the ostracism and abuse she experienced there to become enshrined as a legend, with the school's theater recently permanently renamed in her honor. Though her voice and artistry were acknowledged worldwide, her recorded legacy is small, with only one commercial recording (Samuel Barber's Prayers of Kierkegaard) which nevertheless won a Grammy award in 1993. It is our great good fortune that in recent years a number of precious live recordings have emerged that show quite clearly the range and extent of her gifts. I present all of them here on this episode: from a concert recording of Verdi's rare 1848 opera Il corsaro co-starring legendary Italian tenor Carlo Bergonzi, to a broadcast concert with the Detroit Symphony led by Isaiah Jackson in which she sings Mozart and Verdi arias, as well as Barber's Knoxville: Summer of 1915. The episode concludes with a recently resurfaced 1988 performance of Brahms's Ein deutsches Requiem led by Herbert von Karajan the year before his death, one in which Sarah Reese's heavenly soprano bestows a comforting benediction upon us all. Blessings upon this living legend, and gratitude galore! Countermelody is a podcast devoted to the glory and the power of the human voice raised in song. Singer and vocal aficionado Daniel Gundlach explores great singers of the past and present focusing in particular on those who are less well-remembered today than they should be. Daniel's lifetime in music as a professional countertenor, pianist, vocal coach, voice teacher, and journalist yields an exciting array of anecdotes, impressions, and “inside stories.” At Countermelody's core is the celebration of great singers of all stripes, their instruments, and the connection they make to the words they sing. By clicking on the following link (https://linktr.ee/CountermelodyPodcast) you can find the dedicated Countermelody website which contains additional content including artist photos and episode setlists. The link will also take you to Countermelody's Patreon page, where you can pledge your monthly support at whatever level you can afford. Bonus episodes available exclusively to Patreon supporters are currently available and further bonus content including interviews and livestreams is planned for the upcoming season.  

New Books in Intellectual History
Dalia Nassar and Kristin Gjesdal, "Women Philosophers in the Long Nineteenth Century: The German Tradition" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2023 63:16


The long nineteenth-century--the period beginning with the French Revolution and ending with World War I--was a transformative period for women philosophers in German-speaking countries and contexts. The period spans romanticism and idealism, socialism, Nietzscheanism, and phenomenology, philosophical movements we most often associate with Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Marx--but rarely with women. Yet women philosophers not only contributed to these movements, but also spearheaded debates about their social and political implications. While today their works are less well-known than those of their male contemporaries, many of these women philosophers were widely-read and influential in their own time. Their contributions shed important new light on nineteenth-century philosophy and philosophy more generally: revealing the extent to which various movements which we consider distinct were joined, and demonstrating the degree to which philosophy can transform lives and be transformed by lived experiences and practices. In the nineteenth century, women philosophers explored a wide range of philosophical topics and styles. Working within and in dialogue with popular philosophical movements, women philosophers helped shape philosophy's agenda and provided unique approaches to existential, political, aesthetic, and epistemological questions. Though largely deprived formal education and academic positions, women thinkers developed a way of philosophizing that was accessible, intuitive, and activist in spirit.  Dalia Nassar and Kristin Gjesdal's Women Philosophers in the Long Nineteenth Century: The German Tradition (Oxford UP, 2021) makes available to English-language readers―in many cases for the first time―the works of nine women philosophers, with the hope of stimulating further interest in and scholarship on their works. The volume includes a comprehensive introduction to women philosophers in the nineteenth century and introduces each philosopher and her position. The translations are furnished with explanatory footnotes. The volume is designed to be accessible to students as well as scholars. Kristin Gjesdal is a Norwegian philosopher and Professor of Philosophy at Temple University. She is known for her expertise in the field of hermeneutics, nineteenth-century philosophy, aesthetics, and phenomenology. Gjesdal is a member of The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube channel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Gender Studies
Dalia Nassar and Kristin Gjesdal, "Women Philosophers in the Long Nineteenth Century: The German Tradition" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2023 63:16


The long nineteenth-century--the period beginning with the French Revolution and ending with World War I--was a transformative period for women philosophers in German-speaking countries and contexts. The period spans romanticism and idealism, socialism, Nietzscheanism, and phenomenology, philosophical movements we most often associate with Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Marx--but rarely with women. Yet women philosophers not only contributed to these movements, but also spearheaded debates about their social and political implications. While today their works are less well-known than those of their male contemporaries, many of these women philosophers were widely-read and influential in their own time. Their contributions shed important new light on nineteenth-century philosophy and philosophy more generally: revealing the extent to which various movements which we consider distinct were joined, and demonstrating the degree to which philosophy can transform lives and be transformed by lived experiences and practices. In the nineteenth century, women philosophers explored a wide range of philosophical topics and styles. Working within and in dialogue with popular philosophical movements, women philosophers helped shape philosophy's agenda and provided unique approaches to existential, political, aesthetic, and epistemological questions. Though largely deprived formal education and academic positions, women thinkers developed a way of philosophizing that was accessible, intuitive, and activist in spirit.  Dalia Nassar and Kristin Gjesdal's Women Philosophers in the Long Nineteenth Century: The German Tradition (Oxford UP, 2021) makes available to English-language readers―in many cases for the first time―the works of nine women philosophers, with the hope of stimulating further interest in and scholarship on their works. The volume includes a comprehensive introduction to women philosophers in the nineteenth century and introduces each philosopher and her position. The translations are furnished with explanatory footnotes. The volume is designed to be accessible to students as well as scholars. Kristin Gjesdal is a Norwegian philosopher and Professor of Philosophy at Temple University. She is known for her expertise in the field of hermeneutics, nineteenth-century philosophy, aesthetics, and phenomenology. Gjesdal is a member of The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube channel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in History
Dalia Nassar and Kristin Gjesdal, "Women Philosophers in the Long Nineteenth Century: The German Tradition" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2023 63:16


The long nineteenth-century--the period beginning with the French Revolution and ending with World War I--was a transformative period for women philosophers in German-speaking countries and contexts. The period spans romanticism and idealism, socialism, Nietzscheanism, and phenomenology, philosophical movements we most often associate with Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Marx--but rarely with women. Yet women philosophers not only contributed to these movements, but also spearheaded debates about their social and political implications. While today their works are less well-known than those of their male contemporaries, many of these women philosophers were widely-read and influential in their own time. Their contributions shed important new light on nineteenth-century philosophy and philosophy more generally: revealing the extent to which various movements which we consider distinct were joined, and demonstrating the degree to which philosophy can transform lives and be transformed by lived experiences and practices. In the nineteenth century, women philosophers explored a wide range of philosophical topics and styles. Working within and in dialogue with popular philosophical movements, women philosophers helped shape philosophy's agenda and provided unique approaches to existential, political, aesthetic, and epistemological questions. Though largely deprived formal education and academic positions, women thinkers developed a way of philosophizing that was accessible, intuitive, and activist in spirit.  Dalia Nassar and Kristin Gjesdal's Women Philosophers in the Long Nineteenth Century: The German Tradition (Oxford UP, 2021) makes available to English-language readers―in many cases for the first time―the works of nine women philosophers, with the hope of stimulating further interest in and scholarship on their works. The volume includes a comprehensive introduction to women philosophers in the nineteenth century and introduces each philosopher and her position. The translations are furnished with explanatory footnotes. The volume is designed to be accessible to students as well as scholars. Kristin Gjesdal is a Norwegian philosopher and Professor of Philosophy at Temple University. She is known for her expertise in the field of hermeneutics, nineteenth-century philosophy, aesthetics, and phenomenology. Gjesdal is a member of The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube channel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Dalia Nassar and Kristin Gjesdal, "Women Philosophers in the Long Nineteenth Century: The German Tradition" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2023 63:16


The long nineteenth-century--the period beginning with the French Revolution and ending with World War I--was a transformative period for women philosophers in German-speaking countries and contexts. The period spans romanticism and idealism, socialism, Nietzscheanism, and phenomenology, philosophical movements we most often associate with Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Marx--but rarely with women. Yet women philosophers not only contributed to these movements, but also spearheaded debates about their social and political implications. While today their works are less well-known than those of their male contemporaries, many of these women philosophers were widely-read and influential in their own time. Their contributions shed important new light on nineteenth-century philosophy and philosophy more generally: revealing the extent to which various movements which we consider distinct were joined, and demonstrating the degree to which philosophy can transform lives and be transformed by lived experiences and practices. In the nineteenth century, women philosophers explored a wide range of philosophical topics and styles. Working within and in dialogue with popular philosophical movements, women philosophers helped shape philosophy's agenda and provided unique approaches to existential, political, aesthetic, and epistemological questions. Though largely deprived formal education and academic positions, women thinkers developed a way of philosophizing that was accessible, intuitive, and activist in spirit.  Dalia Nassar and Kristin Gjesdal's Women Philosophers in the Long Nineteenth Century: The German Tradition (Oxford UP, 2021) makes available to English-language readers―in many cases for the first time―the works of nine women philosophers, with the hope of stimulating further interest in and scholarship on their works. The volume includes a comprehensive introduction to women philosophers in the nineteenth century and introduces each philosopher and her position. The translations are furnished with explanatory footnotes. The volume is designed to be accessible to students as well as scholars. Kristin Gjesdal is a Norwegian philosopher and Professor of Philosophy at Temple University. She is known for her expertise in the field of hermeneutics, nineteenth-century philosophy, aesthetics, and phenomenology. Gjesdal is a member of The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube channel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Mere Mortals Book Reviews
What The Psychoanalysts Got Wrong! | The Denial Of Death (Ernest Becker)

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2023 20:59


Are you denying your anality?'The Denial Of Death' by Ernest Becker is a psychology theory that posits that civilisation and individuals behave in ways to obscure the knowledge of our mortality. This is done through transference to heroism, becoming immortal by participating in something that is bigger than ourselves.I summarised the book as follows. "From almost the beginning the main theory seemed unclear. If I concentrate I can put a positive spin on it, but required extra materials outside of the book to make sense of it. There are quite a few out of date conjectures and some loaded words which also don't help. I had higher hopes for this book and ended up skipping some sections towards the end."I hope you have a fantastic day wherever you are in the world. Kyrin out!Timeline:(0:00) - Intro(0:29) - Synopsis(2:45) - Heroism: Transference away from mortality(8:45) - Observations/Takeaways(15:31) - Similarity to Either/Or by Kierkegaard(17:24) - SummaryConnect with Mere Mortals:Website: https://www.meremortalspodcast.com/Discord: https://discord.gg/jjfq9eGReUInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/meremortalspodcast/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@meremortalspodcast

Standard Deviations
Dr. Sam Sivarajan - Ancient Wisdom Meets Modern Behavioral Science

Standard Deviations

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2023 44:17


Tune in to hear:- In his new book, why did Dr. Sivarajan feel that a story was the best means to convey behavioral and philosophical truths?- What steps can we take to ensure we are “climbing the right ladder” and why do we often get this so wrong?- If we find ourselves pursuing the wrong goals and being motivated by the wrong things how can we start fresh?- What is the story of Ferrari vs. Lamborghini for those who don't know and how does Dr. Sivarajan relate this to mimetic desire and mimetic competition?- In a particularly bad year, how do we encourage our clients to embrace the idea that markets, and life more generally, are just this way sometimes and there's not much we can do about it?- What interesting takeaways did Dr. Sivarajan find in his research on risk tolerance questionnaires?Compliance Code: 0355-OAS-2/7/2023Copy: 0356-OAS-2/7/2023https://www.linkedin.com/in/samsivarajanhttps://www.samsivarajan.com

Real Talk With Susan & Kristina
Using ChatGPT: The Quagmire and Benefits for Students

Real Talk With Susan & Kristina

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2023 27:07


In this episode of Real Talk, KJK Student Defense Attorneys Susan Stone and Kristina Supler are joined by Professor Antony Aumann, a professor of philosophy at Northern Michigan University.  Topics that they discuss are related to ChatGPT and students.  The conversation includes the ethical quagmire for students who use Artificial Intelligence to cheat, how ChatGPT can be beneficial and even necessary, and what role, if any, God and religion play in the rising number of students who are cheating. Links: ChatGPT Website: https://openai.com/blog/chatgpt/ Professor Antony Aumann's Webpage: https://nmu.edu/philosophy/antony-aumann Show Notes: (00:47) What is ChatGPT? (02:24)  How a suspicious paper propelled Professor Aumann in the Public Eye (03:30)  How Professor Aumann proved the student was cheating (04:51)  How Artificial Intelligence (AI) is being used to prove student cheating (06:31)  Can ChatGPT be used to help students write better papers? (07:48)  Will AI replace graphic designers? (10:11)  Are students just lazy today? (10:49)  Are professors guilty of being lazy? (11:55)  Why we can't go back to hand-written essays (13:44)  Professor Aumann's unorthodox solution on ChatGPT (15:27)  Why students should learn to use ChatGPT (16:38)  Do we need more God in lives to keep us honest? (18:50)  What are people turning to for spiritual peace? (20:30)  Why do students really go to college (21:44)  Are college students becoming nihilist? (24:10)  What is our role as parents with ChatGPT? (24:37)  Advice for stressed-out students (25:29)  How Professor Aumann handles all the media attention Transcript: Susan Stone: We are talking about ChatGPT today. As you know, Kristina and I represent students accused of misconduct. And a lot of the work we do is defending students when they're accused of cheating. And since last November ChatGPT has been all over the news outlets, including the New York Times, talk about this is the new way students cheat. Susan Stone: Kristina, why don't you describe what ChatGPT is?  Kristina Supler: Sure. So I don't at all profess to be a, a tech expert on any level, but reality has forced me to learn more about ChatGPT. It's essentially an AI tool that uses natural language processing techniques to respond to user-generated prompts. Really what you do is you ask a question or give it a prompt. And then it just replies using natural language. Kristina Supler: It's pretty fascinating.  Susan Stone: Well, it's how students are getting around writing their own essays. They're actually putting in the prompt in the computer, and then the GPT actually spits out the essay for you.  Susan Stone: And it's not without controversy. Places like the New York City schools have banned it. So we're here today to talk more about it. Susan Stone: Why don't you, with that prompt, to introduce our esteemed guest? Kristina Supler: Sure. We are joined today by Anthony Aumann who's a professor of philosophy at Northern Michigan University. He teaches courses on aesthetics, religion, existentialism. His research focuses primarily on the writings of Kierkegaard, as well as issues in contemporary philosophy of art. And recently he's gained significant notoriety cause he was featured in a New York Times article discussing our very topic today. ChatGPT. Welcome. Welcome.  Professor Antony Aumann: Thanks so much for having me on. It's a real pleasure to be here.  Susan Stone: Okay, I'm gonna start with the low brow question. Ready for this. How does a professor at Northern Michigan University who teaches philosophy and art and Kierkegaard get featured in the New York Times to talk about a tech app? Professor Antony Aumann: I think that it all started because I caught a student who used the chat to write an essay for my class. And yeah, there was a Facebook post by my friend, uh, who also caught someone that went viral and they were looking for other people who had a similar story. Professor Antony Aumann: And I was one of those people. They liked my story.  Susan Stone: That's crazy. So you basically, and I read about that in the New York Times, figured out that the student wrote something that just didn't seem appropriate for, was it that student or just in general?  Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah, well, so it was that student. I can tell you this story. Professor Antony Aumann: It's kind of funny.  Kristina Supler: So yeah, tell a funny story.  Professor Antony Aumann: I'm already laughing. The student submitted an essay that was just a little bit too good to be true, like the grammar was perfect and the structure was just impeccably logically sound, and it was really insightful. And frankly it was a little bit better than what my most of my students are capable of. Professor Antony Aumann: But of course, that in and of itself is a red flag, but it's not proof. So what I did is I took the student's essay and I pasted it into ChatGPT. And I said, Hey, did you write this? And it came back and it says there's a 99.9% chance that it did write it . And so what I did, it had like some other things.  Professor Antony Aumann: So I cut and pasted the chat G P T thing, and I emailed it back to the student and I said, Hey, you can send me a chat thing. I'm gonna send you a chat thing back. What do you say about this ?  Susan Stone: Wait, did you own, wow. So we just were looking into this. Did you pay for it or how did you even have it?  Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah, so this is the same company that invented Dolly, which, uh, was all the rage last year because it can create its art images, unique art images, original art images from any prompt that you give it. Professor Antony Aumann: And as an artist myself, I was really fascinated by that. So when they came out with this essay writing chat bot, I was like, oh, I have to hop on this.  Kristina Supler: It's interesting. It seems like every year, 18 months, there's a new development in tech that somehow impacts significantly the academic landscape. So tell us now, what strategies are professors using to detect cheating, plagiarism? Susan Stone: Other than turn it in, we know about Turn it in. Sure. .  Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah. I have a, I have a lot to say about this largely because I don't think that we're very good at detecting things. So there are a bunch of programs out there, including a program that has been made famous by this student, Edward Tian from Princeton University. Professor Antony Aumann: You may have heard of him. Oh, I read about it, yes. who has this program called GPTZero. And so you can plug the students essay into it and it's supposed to give you a percent chance or a likelihood that it was written by the computer rather than the student. You can a ChatGPT has its own sort of detector too. Professor Antony Aumann: The problem is that there's a lot of false positives. Mm-hmm. , um, and a lot of false negatives. And even more seriously, it's actually really, really easy to circumvent the detectors. And so I'll tell you, it's actually kind of funny a little bit. So the way the, the way the detector works is it, uh, it looks for regularity in thinking and writing. Professor Antony Aumann: Computers are very regular in the organization of their thoughts. Human beings, we're kind of a little bit chaotic. We're a d d, right? And so it deter, yeah, so it looks for that. But all you have to do is just insert some errors, like grammatical errors and spelling errors into it, and all of a sudden it thinks it's written by a human being. Susan Stone: Well, let me challenge you on this because are there acceptable uses that students can take that software and maybe it helps them create an outline or think of words that they wouldn't have? I mean, can you use it as a learning tool?  Professor Antony Aumann: A hundred percent. And in my other media appearance is I've been touting it's positive use as a tool to help students learn. Students help students how to write.  Professor Antony Aumann: So for me, there's like a big gulf between like naughty uses of it and non naughty uses of it. So like the bad use is just to cut and paste the essay that the chat wrote, uh, and present it as your own. But I'll tell you what I do, which is, so I'll write a rough draft of something. Professor Antony Aumann: I'll submit it to the chat and I'll ask it for feedback. Hey, what are some potential objections that I need to consider? What are some grammatical errors that I need to fix? And the chat often has really good things to say. And then I'll do the work of incorporating them myself. And I think that's a totally acceptable way for my students to use it. Susan Stone: Do you think, I'm gonna give a, an art example. My high schooler wants to go into art design, um, and she's really interested in illustration and she asked me a very interesting question and, What you talked about, your use of the, uh, tools in art. She's like, mom, do you think I'm gonna go to art school and my job will be taken over by computers and there will be no need for original art? Susan Stone: And of course I said no. Because you will always need human creativity. But am I wrong in saying that? Will her job be taken over? Will we need writers or will it all be created by computers?  Professor Antony Aumann: That is, uh, that's scary. The big question. I think the art question's a little bit easier to answer partly because I have skin in the game. Professor Antony Aumann: My wife is a graphic designer.  Kristina Supler: oh,  Susan Stone: I love this. I love this.  Professor Antony Aumann: So there's still a need for human beings when it comes to taste. Dolly is the name of the program that the same company puts out that'll gener generate the art images for you. But it generates a wide range of images and some of them are good and some of them are horrible. Professor Antony Aumann: You still need, and some of them might be good, but not good for that client. So you still need someone who has a good kind of aesthetic sensibility to figure out, okay, which of these things are helpful? Which of these things are good or bad? What are gonna reach people? What isn't gonna reach people? And so maybe the role of the graphic designer is gonna shift a little bit. Professor Antony Aumann: But that's not gonna go away. And I think there's always gonna people be people who want clients who want a personal touch. And Dolly can't give you that.  Susan Stone: Could Dolly create a Disney character?  Professor Antony Aumann: Absolutely. That's interesting. But you're gonna need someone to figure out whether, which Disney character is worth preserving and which one it wouldn't. It'll give you a hundred Disney characters.  Kristina Supler: That's really interesting. Susan and I, given the work that we do, working with students across the country of all different ages, we speak with a lot of educators and particularly in higher ed. And, and we're regularly involved in this discussion about students and pressure and work ethic. And some people say, oh, students just, they, they just don't wanna work anymore. There's some laziness. Kristina Supler: It seems to me, Susan, wouldn't you agree that there's also maybe a counter-argument that professors who are recycling tests year after year and essay prompts Oh, that's kind of lazy too. I mean, you  Susan Stone: know. Right. And before ChatGPT, and I'm dating this back to when I went to college, there have always been test banks housed by different sports organizations and Greek organizations. So if you were taking Professor Almond's class, you could access his test for 20 years and, you know, maybe Professor Alman needs to change his test period.  Kristina Supler: I did not propose, uh, advocating for cheating, but I, I sort of think it can cut both way. Susan Stone: Right, right. How about challenging students a little differently? Professor .  Professor Antony Aumann: So I guess I have a couple of things to say. I don't think my students are lazy. I just don't.  Kristina Supler: Good. I think that's stressed. I thank you. I, I think that's really important for students to hear that.  Professor Antony Aumann: They're overworked. They've got, my students have one, two jobs. Professor Antony Aumann: Mm-hmm. , they're trying to learn how to become adults. They're taking a really heavy load of classes. You know, maybe they're also on a sports team. And that's just like a lot of pressure when you're 18 or 19 years old. I mean, yeah, of course there are lazy people who exist in the world. But I like any kind of generalization about kids these days that just doesn't fly with me.  Professor Antony Aumann: But by the same token, like we as professors are also overtaxed, like the amount of administrative stuff we have to do. And I'm supposed to write another book and coming up with those tests, I think that you don't appreciate just like the astronomical amount of work that goes into it and yeah, we're gonna have to write new things going forward. Professor Antony Aumann: We're all, we're all really, really stressed.  Susan Stone: You know, that's very helpful because a lot of people don't know what faces higher ed. And so there's a reason that you write that one test and it's a great test and you wanna use it for year to year to free you up to do other creative work. Okay. Can I just offer, and you tell me what you think a low lowbrow solution to this problem? Kristina Supler: Ooh, I'm curious to hear .  Susan Stone: I, I, you know, I like the low hanging fruit Supler. You know, that. What's wrong with just having kids come in, hand them the, a little essay book, ask them a question and have them hand write an essay response to a test.  Kristina Supler: What a crazy idea. I can't imagine an educational environment with those conditions. Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah. You wanna go old school? Uh, I'll tell you two reasons why that's not gonna work. Please. The first reason it's not gonna work is that it made sense in perhaps your generation and my generation, where we were raised to write by hand. We were trained to write cursive. This generation of students didn't have that kind of training. And very few of my students can write neatly and quickly for any length of time at all. Professor Antony Aumann: So that's just like a practical concern. They just can't do it. The second thing is the bigger thing.  Kristina Supler: That's a mic drop. I apologize for interrupting you. That's a mic drop. But that has literally never occurred to me and I think that's it's really obvious. But yet it didn't occur to me and I think it's really insightful that just the handwriting barriers and challenges in our tech age now, students can't write and write and write. Susan Stone: You know what? The special ed attorney in me is very upset about that because you get specific brain function development by handwriting. And so what are we doing? But keep going. I, I'm just, I, I'm like, that's never occurred  Kristina Supler: to me. And that's really interesting to think about that. It's shocking.  Professor Antony Aumann: So the bigger thing is I'm not sure that just by having all of our assignments be handwritten in class, we're really teaching students how to write in the way that we want to write. Professor Antony Aumann: What that really exercises is your like speed journalistic abilities. But real writing is like taking your time to think about exactly what word is the right word and revising and revising and revising. And you just don't have the time to do that in the classroom. That's not what's going on there. Susan Stone: So what's the solution? Professor Antony Aumann: I have a utopian vision. . Okay.  Susan Stone: Share with us please. We're getting all Waldenesque here.  Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah. Well, I think that school has become, for lots of reasons that aren't bad reasons, a lot of hoop jumping. And maybe the dawn of ChatGPT is gonna remove all of that hoop jumping because now of course the chat can just jump through them for us. And maybe eventually return to what school ought to be about, which is love of learning for learning own sake. Susan Stone: You took the next question out of my mouth. Really. And it's funny because Kristina, last night we were talking about this, that. I, I would've never used ChatGPT. I've got, I've done a lot of soul searching and thinking back to me as a human being. But I didn't go to school with pressure from my parents to get the "A".  Kristina Supler: Well, I would say that I, I mean, regardless of family, external pressure for performance, for me, I, I too would like to think that if I were a student now, I wouldn't succumb to these temptations. Kristina Supler: But I also don't have any. I, I didn't go to college in a time when, you know, there was such easy, quick access to data. Yeah. Literally at my fingertips everywhere. And so again, I'm not condoning or justifying cheating, plagiarism, any academic cutting of corners. But I also recognize that students now, it's just, it's just a really different time in education. Kristina Supler: And I, I'm wondering what are your thoughts on how professors should adjust their teaching style to just be cognizant of the changing reality of the technology that is, you know, ever present?  Susan Stone: Well, especially since we don't like the pen and paper type solution. .  Professor Antony Aumann: I think that you have to lean into it. I would tell you if you were a student and you're like, you would never use it, I think you're making a big mistake. Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah. It's a tool that can be used for evil. But it's also a tool that can be used for good. And that tool is gonna exist out there whether we like it or not. The second this student graduates or leaves the halls in my classroom or whatever else, they're gonna be using it. Their next employer is gonna be asking them to use it. Professor Antony Aumann: So we have a responsibility to teach them how to use it well, rationally, competently in the classroom. So that's, I think that's where I'm going to as a teacher.  Susan Stone: Can we talk about, you do teach religion - God. Susan Stone: With, we are seeing a lot of cheating cases. Our, our practice started one or two a year, and now that aspect of our practice is almost weekly. We get an inquiry. I've been accused of cheating. Do you think students have lost a fear of God? And I'm not just talking about ChatGPT, but just cheating in general? Susan Stone: Do, do we need more God in our lives to keep us more on the straight and narrow?  Professor Antony Aumann: I don't know. It's this that's, Susan Stone: You are a religion professor. We're going deep.  Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah. I don't know. Certainly God provides a powerful motivation to do good if you believe that God is watching or that God will reward you or punish you. Or if not God, karma, like that does give you an extra incentive. Professor Antony Aumann: But I don't know if, somehow humanity has gotten worse as religion recedes to the background in our society. Like I, I don't think my students are somehow like worse human beings because they're less religious than they were a generation ago.  Susan Stone: Are they less religious?  Professor Antony Aumann: They're less affiliated with institutional religion. And that's pretty well established with empirical data. Professor Antony Aumann: We can ask people if they affiliate with some kind of institutional religion. We can ask them how often they go to worship services. And there has been like a really market downturn in that, at least in the United States since the 1950s and sixties. Why? I don't know. I mean, that's, that's an interesting question. Professor Antony Aumann: One thing to say is that there is a correlation between being religious and facing difficult times, financially, personally, health-wise and whatever else. Uh, and this is true not just in the United States, but across the world. The least religious countries in the world are these Scandinavian countries which have the highest standards of living. Professor Antony Aumann: In the United States, the least religious states are the ones with the highest standards of living. The most religious ones are the ones with the least. So you might think that as standards of living go up, people's felt need for some kind of security blanket diminishes. That's one explanation. I'm not saying it's the best. Susan Stone: Yeah. You know what's interesting about that? I remember going to a lecture and they said there's. Um, Atheist in a foxhole. And that when you're facing a military situation or a crisis, even the, the most pronounced atheist will say, Dear God, help me. And why is, you know, so that's really interesting that we lose that sense of, and I'm not saying God in any particular religion. Susan Stone: I like how you included karma, but do we lose gratitude when things are good? Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah, I think there's a lack of gratitude there, but I will say a flip side of us becoming less religious is that I do think that we are looking for peace of mind in the face of, um, the anxiety that modern life brings upon us. And so there does seem like an increased interest in spiritual practices like meditation. Professor Antony Aumann: Like mindfulness that are, if not, our western religions of old still quasi-religious because they help us on another front, even if it's not like I'm in a foxhole. Kristina Supler: Do you feel, I, I wanna connect back to a comment that you made earlier in this episode about when we were discussing laziness in students. And you said that students just have a lot of pressure, both externally and in the school environment. Do you think that, what are your thoughts about the amount of pressure that higher ed institutions are placing on students? Kristina Supler: Do you think it's the right amount? Do you think it's too much pressure? I mean, what are your thoughts on the realities of many students who are struggling to get by and paying their way through school? But also you're in college to learn and struggle with tough concepts and master skills.  Susan Stone: I don't know, Kristina. Are we in college to learn or do we go to college so we can get a career and get a good job? Susan Stone: Because college now is around 80,000 a year in some institutions. And I, I wanna challenge that notion. You can learn by going to an art museum. You can learn by reading a book. But are we going to college so we can get a job?  Professor Antony Aumann: I think that that's a little bit of both, right? I mean, if I ask my students, yes, to some degree they're there just because they want a piece of paper so they get a good job. Professor Antony Aumann: And especially with the cost of education on their minds. I think that that's like an extra stressor just to focus on the good grades. But I don't think that we can say it. It's just like one or the other. Even in any individual student, I think a lot of them, when they have a good class with a good professor, Art will say to me like, oh yeah, like I really, I really learned something in this class. Even if I won't use it. Professor Antony Aumann: And to be honest, most of the classes I teach in philosophy or religion are not directly related to the jobs that these students will have when they graduate. Uh,  Kristina Supler: European history major here with a degree from a very, very expensive institution. I loved my college years. No bearing or relevance whatsoever to my job. But it was a night, it was an enjoyable four year time,  Susan Stone: and I had a very practical mm-hmm. undergraduate education that I use every day. So, do college students have a sense of self? I mean, are they really, are they spiritual beings or are they nihlist?. Oh, Kristina Supler: Big question.  Susan Stone: Has anyone else asked you that? On a podcast to a professor? .  Professor Antony Aumann: I think that a lot of them have those nihilistic worries. And maybe it's tied to the lack of religion. Because religion isn't just solace in difficult times. It also gives us a sense of purpose and direction in our lives. It tells us why are we here and what are we supposed to be doing and where are we going and why does it all matter? Professor Antony Aumann: And so if you lose a lot of that and when is the time, then people really have their religious doubts? Late adolescence, early adulthood, that's when a lot of it sets in. And so I ask a lot of my students, you know, is , does nothing matter anymore? And I think a lot of 'em will admit that they worry about that. But they're, I think within that like overwhelming worry, there's a lot of 'em still trying to carve out some sense of significance in their lives and hoping for that. Susan Stone: Would the temptation to cheat be reduced if we could regain in students a sense of purpose in self? Professor Antony Aumann: I don't know. I think that a lot of crimes are crimes of opportunity. You know, like that's where Christine  Kristina Supler: says, I totally agree. I just as an aside, I have a background in criminal defense and Yes, I agree with that a hundred percent.  Susan Stone: That's what we were talking about last night. Getting ready for this podcast. Professor Antony Aumann: Well that forces you to think about it a little bit. You know, you're like, oh, I have to go through all this work to cheat. I have to find it. You know, someone who will write the paper for me and pay them. But if it's just. , it's free and it'll take you 30 seconds. I don't know if even that reflects as much on students' characters as cheating did in the past where it was a lot of work. Professor Antony Aumann: It now seems more like an impulsive action by a stressed out individual.  Susan Stone: What other thoughts do you have on this topic? Because you have such an interesting perspective that you'd like to share with parents out there listening to this podcast.  Kristina Supler: And I, I like that a lot of your feedback is not just solely rooted in, how dare they and the judgment for, because let's face it, in my opinion, that's not helpful. Kristina Supler: So I, I'm really grateful for a discussion that is considering more in the bigger picture.  Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah. That's not to treat them as human beings, just to, to look at it. I also think that that's like just all those professors out there that just wanna play cop and catch the students who are cheating. I really think that that's naive. That this technology exists, whether we like it or not, it's gonna be out there. Professor Antony Aumann: Students are gonna be using it. Again, we have an obligation as parents, as teachers to help our students learn how to use it well, rather than just say it's forbidden fruit.  Susan Stone: Any other thoughts? Because I just love that.  Kristina Supler: I think that's well said though. The, the analogy, it's forbidden fruit. I guess what words of advice or encouragement would you have for those stressed out students? Susan Stone: I love that. Good question.  Professor Antony Aumann: Talk to your professors. . I think that most of us are pretty understanding human beings if you continue to keep the lines of communication open. What I don't like is the student who just drops off and doesn't talk to me at all. If you're saying, Hey, I'm stressed out. I can't do it today, I need an extension. I'm more than happy to provide that.  Professor Antony Aumann: No, not everybody's like that. But I think most of us are pretty understanding human beings. We're not the boogeyman that some students worry that we are.  Susan Stone: I wish that I would've had the opportunity to take your class, you know? So I, I really appreciate you coming on and I know you've been exploding since. Susan Stone: What, tell us about how your, uh, career's changed since the New York Times article.  Kristina Supler: I have to think it's been a whirlwind, right? I mean, all of a sudden your name is everywhere.  Professor Antony Aumann: There's been a lot of a lot of media appearances. And it's been fun. It's been nice but it's hard to do that and continue to do my regular job. Professor Antony Aumann: It's not like all of a sudden I don't have to teach. And so what gives on that front is my personal life. It continues to hard, be hard to have work-life balance and you know, without an incredible wife who's happy to support me and love me, even while I come home stressed out at the end of the night, uh, I don't know if I'd get through this. Susan Stone: Is this gonna change your career?  Kristina Supler: Do you have new thoughts for research or,  Professor Antony Aumann: I don't know. I don't think so.  Kristina Supler: Or is that, is that confidential?  Professor Antony Aumann: Yeah, , I, uh, I tried to send President Biden an email telling him I would head up his ta, his ChatGPT Task Force, but he didn't get back to me.  Kristina Supler: It was busy last night, but maybe today. Kristina Supler: Check your email. Check your right. Yeah. Right. . Well, thank you. This was really such a pleasure. We, we, we laughed. We talked about technology. We talked about religion and philosophy. We covered it all.  Susan Stone: I was gonna say, is there anything we didn't cover?  Professor Antony Aumann: No, I think this was great. It was so much fun. Thanks for having me on. Kristina Supler: Thank you. Thank you.  

飛碟電台
《飛碟早餐 唐湘龍時間》2023.02.27《管理》審校者 侯秀琴《管理》/ 彼得‧杜拉克 / 博雅出版

飛碟電台

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2023 42:03


國泰證券App美股ETF專區,精選熱門美股ETF排行榜,以產業分類介紹一目瞭然,一手掌握國際發燒議題!現在不限交易金額,美股ETF手續費一律只要3美元! 馬上下載>>https://cathaysec.tw/qGj80q8 ----以上訊息由 SoundOn 動態廣告贊助商提供---- 飛碟聯播網《飛碟早餐 唐湘龍時間》2023.02.27 週一閱讀單元 《管理》審校者 侯秀琴 《管理》/ 彼得‧杜拉克 / 博雅出版 ※主題:《管理》/ 彼得‧杜拉克 / 博雅出版 ※來賓:《管理》審校者 侯秀琴 ◎節目介紹: 《管理: 任務、責任、實務》(Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices)初版於1973 年問世。此後32 年間,杜拉克持續寫作、教學、擔任管理顧問。本修訂版加入1974 至2005 年間,杜拉克發表的有關管理這個主題的著作,更新了初版內容。 第一至第五部論述經理人的責任,以及組織的領導團隊的責任。第六至第九部論述盡責的經理人,必須做到的無數相互關聯的任務與實務。第十部詳述資訊革命及知識型社會的進步,對經理人與管理層的新要求。這些新要求在初版有預示,但並未充分論述。 修訂版沿襲初版,是針對多種讀者而寫。經驗豐富的高階主管及顧問,或可在面對特定問題或課題時,把本書當做參考之用。運用本書各項洞見最有效的方法,便是付諸實際應用。這是從管理的諸多原則中獲得最多價值的方式。 新進經理人則應該設法把書中談論的議題,連結到本身的職位或組織上,這樣做時要很用心。這些原則在長達65 年期間,全都在實際組織中成功實行過。因此,如果你能把原則與實務融會貫通,你會有更多體悟。所以新進經理人應著眼於自身特有的責任,好好思考每一章的內容。第六部至第九部或許會立即讓他們有切身的體悟。 ◎來賓介紹:彼得‧杜拉克(Peter F. Drucker) 彼得‧杜拉克生長於一個文化環境優越的家庭,薰陶於猶太–基督教信仰傳統。1937 年移居美國,2002 年6 月20 日榮獲美國「總統自由勳章」。杜拉克一生好學,以逾40 部著作享譽世界;治學精進、不拘框條,觸類旁通、不落窠臼。他早年學金融,1931 年獲法蘭克福大學法學博士。經濟學上,他尊敬凱因斯(John M. Keynes 1883-1946),但跟隨熊彼德(Joseph A. Schumpeter 1883-1950)。政治學上,他主張多元化和去中心化,對極權主義持嚴肅的批判態度。他對存在主義哲學與生存神學,特別是齊克果(S. Kierkegaard 1813-1855)的思想研究,造詣頗深。 杜拉克自稱為「旁觀者」,始終持守立場清醒、思維冷靜、人格獨立、思想自由以及責任意識。做為「社會生態學家」,他具有明心慧眼、洞察力強,為世人的社會與組織守望的美德、正直與良知,勇於在批判中追求創新。他創立了「現代管理學」,主張管理的理論創新與實踐探索、走「知信行」合一之路,因此被譽為「現代管理學之父」和「管理大師中的大師」。 ▶ 《飛碟早餐》FB粉絲團 https://www.facebook.com/ufobreakfast/ ▶ 飛碟聯播網FB粉絲團 https://www.facebook.com/ufonetwork921/ ▶ 網路線上收聽 http://www.uforadio.com.tw/stream/stream.html ▶ 飛碟APP,讓你收聽零距離 IOS:https://reurl.cc/3jYQMV Android:https://reurl.cc/5GpNbR ▶ 飛碟Podcast SoundOn : https://bit.ly/30Ia8Ti Apple Podcasts : https://apple.co/3jFpP6x Spotify : https://spoti.fi/2CPzneD Google 播客:https://bit.ly/3gCTb3G KKBOX:https://reurl.cc/MZR0K4

The Ezra Klein Show
Taking Nietzsche seriously

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2023 65:07 Very Popular


Sean Illing talks with political science professor Matt McManus about the political thought of Friedrich Nietzsche, the 19th-century German philosopher with a complicated legacy, despite his crossover into popular culture. They discuss how Nietzsche's work has been interpreted — and misinterpreted — since his death in 1900, how his radical political views emerge from his body of work, and how we can use Nietzsche's philosophy in order to interpret some key features of our contemporary politics. Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area Guest: Matt McManus (@MattPolProf), lecturer, University of Michigan; author Referenced works by Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900): Ecce Homo (1888; published posthumously), Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1883), Beyond Good and Evil (1886), Twilight of the Idols (1888), The Birth of Tragedy (1872), The Antichrist (1888; published posthumously), The Gay Science (1882) References:  Nietzsche and the Politics of Reaction: Essays on Liberalism, Socialism, and Aristocratic Radicalism, ed. Matthew McManus (Palgrave; 2023) The Political Right and Equality: Turning Back the Tide of Egalitarian Modernity by Matthew McManus (Routledge; forthcoming) Nietzsche's Great Politics by Hugo Drochon (Princeton; 2016) Nietzsche's Letter to Georg Brandes (Dec. 2, 1887) Nietzsche: Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist by Walter Kaufmann (Princeton; 2013) “God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers?” from Nietzsche's The Gay Science, §125 (1882; tr. W. Kaufmann) "Atheist bus campaign spreads the word of no God nationwide" by Riazat Butt (The Guardian; Jan. 6, 2009) "Since Copernicus man has been rolling from the center toward X," from Nietzsche's The Will To Power, published posthumously in 1901. Immanuel Kant, Metaphysics of Morals (1797) Kierkegaard's Attack Upon "Christendom", 1854-1855 (tr. Walter Lowrie) Nietzsche, the Aristocratic Rebel by Domenico Losurdo (Brill; 2019) Joseph de Maistre, Considerations on France (1797) "Does Liberalism Mean Supporting Communism?" by Matthew McManus (Liberal Currents; Jan. 4, 2022) Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth (1963) United States of Socialism by Dinesh D'Souza (All Points; 2020) "The alt-right is drunk on bad readings of Nietzsche. The Nazis were too" by Sean Illing (Vox; Dec. 30, 2018) The Third Reich series by Richard J. Evans Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged (1957)   Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app. Support The Gray Area by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Engineer: Patrick Boyd Editorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Inédita Pamonha
Inédita Pamonha 149 – 360 graus de escolhas

Inédita Pamonha

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2023 15:26


Neste podcast: Clóvis de Barros Filho conta a história do dinamarquês Kierkegaard e fala sobre amor e o peso das escolhas.

The Do Gooders Podcast
[Rebroadcast] 91 Pathway of Hope: What hope does for our minds and bodies with Dr. Suzanne Phillips

The Do Gooders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2023 25:46


We spent a season discovering The Salvation Army's Pathway of Hope—a national initiative to provide individualized services to families with children, addressing their immediate material needs and providing long-term engagement to stop the cycle of poverty. But let's take a step back. What is hope?   Kierkegaard called it a passion for the possible. Psychologist C.R. Snyder said it's a reservoir of determination. Emily Dickinson said it's the thing with feathers that perches in the soul and sings the tunes without the words.  It's hope.  And it's an essential ingredient, part of the namesake of The Salvation Army's Pathway of Hope.  Dr. Suzanne Phillips is a licensed Psychologist, Psychoanalyst, and Fellow and Co-chair of Community Outreach for the American Group Psychotherapy Association (AGPA). She has been a psychologist for more than 35 years and is a newly retired Adjunct Full Professor of Clinical Psychology at LIU Post, a private university in New York. And as someone in the business of hope, she's on the show to help us better understand hope and what it does psychologically and physiologically—plus how we can recognize it and find more of it in our lives.  It's not magic, she says, but a mindset, a propeller for action and possibility. And, it's contagious.  WHAT'S YOUR CAUSE? Take our quiz. RECEIVE A GOOD WORD. Get the daily affirmation email.  STUDY SCRIPTURE. Get inside the collection. GATHER WITH CARING MOMS. Join the group. BE INSPIRED. Follow us on Instagram. FIGHT FOR GOOD. Give to The Salvation Army.

Fundación Juan March
La singular pluma de Kierkegaard. Su obra filosófica. Begonya Saez Tajafuerce

Fundación Juan March

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2023 73:13


Ciclos de conferencias: Kierkegaard: su vida, su obra, su tiempo (II). La singular pluma de Kierkegaard. Su obra filosófica. Begonya Saez Tajafuerce. La particularidad de la pluma de la que hace gala Soeren Kierkegaard imprime en la filosofía un carácter inusitado hasta mediados del s. XIX, no solo gracias a la red de pseudónimos que atraviesa el vastísimo corpus que ha quedado, incluida la obra póstuma, sino también gracias a la estructura del mismo y, finalmente, al papel que juega en dicho corpus el lenguaje. En esta conferencia veremos en qué medida todo ello queda en una mera cuestión de estilo. Explore en canal.march.es el archivo completo de Conferencias en la Fundación Juan March: casi 3.000 conferencias, disponibles en audio, impartidas desde 1975.

Fundación Juan March
Kierkegaard: un hombre (no solo) de su tiempo. Vida de un filósofo. Begonya Saez Tajafuerce

Fundación Juan March

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2023 70:24


Ciclos de conferencias: Kierkegaard: su vida, su obra, su tiempo (I). Kierkegaard: un hombre (no solo) de su tiempo. Vida de un filósofo. Begonya Saez Tajafuerce. Soeren Kierkegaard fue un hombre de su tiempo, aunque solo en la medida en que excedió lo que de un culto danés acomodado podía esperarse entonces. En esta conferencia, situaremos su pensamiento en el contexto de la filosofía europea de mediados del s. XIX, con vistas a lo que de ella queda hoy para destacar los desafíos teóricos y conceptuales que la lectura de su obra todavía comporta a la hora de pensar la subjetividad en sus múltiples dominios y dimensiones. Explore en canal.march.es el archivo completo de Conferencias en la Fundación Juan March: casi 3.000 conferencias, disponibles en audio, impartidas desde 1975.

A Pastor and a Philosopher Walk into a Bar
Reconstruction: An Interview with Brad Jersak

A Pastor and a Philosopher Walk into a Bar

Play Episode Play 44 sec Highlight Listen Later Feb 10, 2023 68:25 Transcription Available


Brad Jersak is an Eastern Orthodox theologian, author, and great friend of this podcast. Brad recently published a book called Out of the Embers: Faith After the Great Deconstruction. In this interview, we chat about what Brad calls the Great Deconstruction, the history and tradition of deconstruction within and outside of our faith tradition, why Brad is a devotee of Simone Weil, and how to move forward in your faith after deconstruction (if you can).In this episode, we tasted Hooten Young's 6 Year Cabernet Cask Finished Whiskey from our friends at Story Hill BKC in Milwaukee, WI.Cheers!=====Want to support us?The best way is to subscribe to our Patreon. Annual memberships are available for a 10% discount.If you'd rather make a one-time donation, you can contribute through our PayPal. Other important info: Rate & review us on Apple & Spotify Tweet us at @PPWBPodcast, @robertkwhitaker, and @RandyKnie Follow & message us on Facebook & Instagram Watch & comment on YouTube Email us at pastorandphilosopher@gmail.com Cheers!

The Cunning of Geist
066 - Kierkegaard vs. Hegel: The Existentialism/Absolute Idealism Debate

The Cunning of Geist

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2023 28:50


19th century Danish theologian and philosopher Søren Kierkegaard was a towering figure not only in philosophy and religion, but in psychology as well.  He is commonly considered to be the father of Existentialism, with the importance he place on individual subjectivity in finding meaning and truth.  He was also a fierce critic of Hegel.  By examining the differences between the two, one can hopefully see the distinctiveness of each.  This podcast episode will examine two main themes of Kierkegaard, that of subjectivity and the "leap of faith," to show where some commonalities exist, where their difference was a matter of emphasis, and where there exists an unbridgeable gap between the two.  I hope to show how their differences cannot be reduced to the old "individual vs. society" or "head vs. the heart" debate; but what I believe to be a faulty/incomplete portrayal of Hegel's philosophy by Kierkegaard.  Support the show

Being in the World
Being in the World 069: Eric Kaplan

Being in the World

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2023 81:30


Eric Kaplan is an American television writer and producer. His work has included shows such as Late Show with David Letterman, Andy Richter Controls the Universe, Malcolm in the Middle, Futurama, The Simpsons and Rick and Morty. He also worked on The Big Bang Theory throughout its run. Kaplan was raised in a Jewish family in Flatbush, Brooklyn where his father was a "storefront lawyer" and his mother taught high school biology at Erasmus Hall. Kaplan graduated from Hunter College High School and Harvard College (where he wrote for the Harvard Lampoon) in 1989. Prior to committing to a career in professional writing, Kaplan had been an English teacher in Thailand. After that he took five years of philosophy graduate school at Columbia and UC Berkeley. Starting in 1986, Kaplan interned for Spy magazine, where his duties included mopping the floors and writing blurb-length film reviews. Career in television Eric Kaplan's first television writing job was with Late Show with David Letterman which he worked on for a year and a half before quitting and moving to Hollywood to look for a job in "half-hour" work. It was at this time that Kaplan learned of Matt Groening doing a show set in the year 3000. This show would turn out to be Futurama. After applying for work on the show using some writing samples, Eric would have to, as he says, "sweat it out", for over a month before getting the job. Upon Futurama's cancellation, Kaplan went to work for the short-lived comedy series Andy Richter Controls the Universe, writing just one episode. After Fox dropped Andy Richter, Eric Kaplan then began work on the hit show Malcolm in the Middle, Eric also wrote the "Girlfriends" episode of the popular HBO series, Flight of the Conchords. Futurama In his first year with Futurama, which was also the show's first season, Kaplan served as story editor on every episode. Though having an input on many aspects of the entire first season, Kaplan would not get a writing credit until 9 episodes in. After this premiere season, he would be promoted to producer status. This was a role that he would keep through the show's end. He returned to those roles in the Futurama DVD movies. Work in Philosophy, Does Santa Exist? Kaplan's "Does Santa Exist?: A Philosophical Investigation" was published by Dutton Books in 2015. It is a serious and humorous work of philosophy. He has also contributed to "The Stone", The New York Times philosophy blog. Kaplan has a PhD. in philosophy from UC Berkeley. His doctoral thesis discusses the humour in Søren Kierkegaard. Kaplan was interviewed in 2020 by lifelong friend Roger Kimmel Smith (whose father, Robert Kimmel Smith, wrote the book The War with Grandpa, which in 2020 was adapted into a motion picture starring Robert De Niro). Their conversation about humor and philosophy was released over the YouTube channel When Humanists Attack.

New Books in Intellectual History
Chris Boesel, "In Kierkegaard's Garden with the Poppy Blooms: Why Derrida Doesn't Read Kierkegaard When He Reads Kierkegaard" (Fortress Academic, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 125:42


The philosophy of deconstruction, most famously pushed forward by Jacques Derrida, has left an undeniable dent on contemporary thought, and even religion has found itself in deconstruction's sights, with Church, faith and even God put under philosophical scrutiny. But is this a one-way street, or is there something faith might teach deconstruction? This way of framing the relation is itself questionable, since deconstruction itself is an indifferent, impersonal force, something that simply happens as part of reality, but this gives it a certain seduction for theorists who don't simply want to bear witness to it's work but to master it as a tool, wielding it as they please, unwittingly falling into the very sort of traps deconstruction often unravels. This is one of the main ideas Chris Boesel wants to remind us of with his new book, In Kierkegaard's Garden With the Poppy Blooms: Why Derrida Doesn't Read Kierkegaard When He Reads Kierkegaard (Fortress Academic, 2021). Written as part academic monograph, part dialogue between a philosophy professor and theology student, the book stages a confrontation between Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling and Derrida's The Gift of Death, where he claims to draw deconstructive lessons from Abraham's famous ‘leap of faith', although Boesel finds the lessons he draws questionable. In fact, Boesel contends, Derrida doesn't seem to have read the text at all! Derrida, renowned for his capacity to find the smallest cracks on the margins and in between the lines of philosophical and literary texts, blatantly misses many of the actual points Kierkegaard was trying to make, and in doing so illustrates the uniqueness of Kierkegaard's inquiries into the nature of faith and subjectivity. In critically analyzing Derrida's work, Boesel finds opportunity to remind us of what deconstruction can (and can't!) do in animating commitments for justice, while also suggesting that a Kierkegaardian faith may offer a more productive possibility for thinking through those same commitments. Chris Boesel is an associate professor of theology at Drew University. His other publications include Reading Karl Barth: Theology That Cuts Both Ways and Risking Proclamation, Respecting Difference: Christian Faith, Imperialistic Discourse, and Abraham. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Chris Boesel, "In Kierkegaard's Garden with the Poppy Blooms: Why Derrida Doesn't Read Kierkegaard When He Reads Kierkegaard" (Fortress Academic, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 125:42


The philosophy of deconstruction, most famously pushed forward by Jacques Derrida, has left an undeniable dent on contemporary thought, and even religion has found itself in deconstruction's sights, with Church, faith and even God put under philosophical scrutiny. But is this a one-way street, or is there something faith might teach deconstruction? This way of framing the relation is itself questionable, since deconstruction itself is an indifferent, impersonal force, something that simply happens as part of reality, but this gives it a certain seduction for theorists who don't simply want to bear witness to it's work but to master it as a tool, wielding it as they please, unwittingly falling into the very sort of traps deconstruction often unravels. This is one of the main ideas Chris Boesel wants to remind us of with his new book, In Kierkegaard's Garden With the Poppy Blooms: Why Derrida Doesn't Read Kierkegaard When He Reads Kierkegaard (Fortress Academic, 2021). Written as part academic monograph, part dialogue between a philosophy professor and theology student, the book stages a confrontation between Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling and Derrida's The Gift of Death, where he claims to draw deconstructive lessons from Abraham's famous ‘leap of faith', although Boesel finds the lessons he draws questionable. In fact, Boesel contends, Derrida doesn't seem to have read the text at all! Derrida, renowned for his capacity to find the smallest cracks on the margins and in between the lines of philosophical and literary texts, blatantly misses many of the actual points Kierkegaard was trying to make, and in doing so illustrates the uniqueness of Kierkegaard's inquiries into the nature of faith and subjectivity. In critically analyzing Derrida's work, Boesel finds opportunity to remind us of what deconstruction can (and can't!) do in animating commitments for justice, while also suggesting that a Kierkegaardian faith may offer a more productive possibility for thinking through those same commitments. Chris Boesel is an associate professor of theology at Drew University. His other publications include Reading Karl Barth: Theology That Cuts Both Ways and Risking Proclamation, Respecting Difference: Christian Faith, Imperialistic Discourse, and Abraham. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Critical Theory
Chris Boesel, "In Kierkegaard's Garden with the Poppy Blooms: Why Derrida Doesn't Read Kierkegaard When He Reads Kierkegaard" (Fortress Academic, 2021)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 125:42


The philosophy of deconstruction, most famously pushed forward by Jacques Derrida, has left an undeniable dent on contemporary thought, and even religion has found itself in deconstruction's sights, with Church, faith and even God put under philosophical scrutiny. But is this a one-way street, or is there something faith might teach deconstruction? This way of framing the relation is itself questionable, since deconstruction itself is an indifferent, impersonal force, something that simply happens as part of reality, but this gives it a certain seduction for theorists who don't simply want to bear witness to it's work but to master it as a tool, wielding it as they please, unwittingly falling into the very sort of traps deconstruction often unravels. This is one of the main ideas Chris Boesel wants to remind us of with his new book, In Kierkegaard's Garden With the Poppy Blooms: Why Derrida Doesn't Read Kierkegaard When He Reads Kierkegaard (Fortress Academic, 2021). Written as part academic monograph, part dialogue between a philosophy professor and theology student, the book stages a confrontation between Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling and Derrida's The Gift of Death, where he claims to draw deconstructive lessons from Abraham's famous ‘leap of faith', although Boesel finds the lessons he draws questionable. In fact, Boesel contends, Derrida doesn't seem to have read the text at all! Derrida, renowned for his capacity to find the smallest cracks on the margins and in between the lines of philosophical and literary texts, blatantly misses many of the actual points Kierkegaard was trying to make, and in doing so illustrates the uniqueness of Kierkegaard's inquiries into the nature of faith and subjectivity. In critically analyzing Derrida's work, Boesel finds opportunity to remind us of what deconstruction can (and can't!) do in animating commitments for justice, while also suggesting that a Kierkegaardian faith may offer a more productive possibility for thinking through those same commitments. Chris Boesel is an associate professor of theology at Drew University. His other publications include Reading Karl Barth: Theology That Cuts Both Ways and Risking Proclamation, Respecting Difference: Christian Faith, Imperialistic Discourse, and Abraham. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

Unblocked
You Don't Need To Be Fixed

Unblocked

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2023 21:12


It's time to witness and un-shame our humanity.  Kierkegaard told us that life is not a problem to be solved but a reality to be experienced.  The same holds true for us.  We are a reality to be experienced.  In the self-help movement, some of us lost the "self" we were intending to help. This episode is an invitation to shift the focus from fixing yourself to getting to know yourself.  We are a 1 in 400 trillion reality to be experienced. It's time to shift from judging, changing, fixing, improving yourself  to *knowing* and experiencing yourself, ALL of yourself.  There is space in the world for a human being that is shaped like you, looks like you, acts like you.  And if it doesn't seem like there is, you get to create and claim it! As you listen to this episode, some of you will feel this in your bones.  You're longing to know you.  You're yearning to touch on self-acceptance, self-like, self-love but it feels out of reach.  That's what I'm here for.  We can't see all of it when we're in it and that's not a problem.  I got you.  Say yes to giving yourself the gift of YOU.  Let's work together to create the story you tell of you to be one that feels true and worthy.  Go to jessicasmarro.com right now and schedule your free call. If you haven't already gotten your FREE digital copy of The Unblocked Journal, click HERE to grab one. Feel free to share this podcast widely if you think it might be useful to someone, and be sure to subscribe so that you don't miss an episode.Also, please take a moment to leave a review.  Constructive feedback, ideas, and praise are welcome.Let's Get Unblocked!

Seekers of Unity
Was Hegel a Mystic?

Seekers of Unity

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 47:17


Exploring Hegel's relationship with Mysticism. Beginning with an introduction and biographical sketch of Hegel's life and a summary of his philosophical system. Next we discuss the various debates in the interpretation of Hegel's work. Following which we present his mystical influences and examine the mysticism in Hegel's own writings, as well as criticism of his 'mysticism'. Dylan Shaul is a PhD candidate in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. His dissertation is titled Hegel's Concept of Reconciliation: On Absolute Spirit. He has also published on Spinoza, Kant, Kierkegaard, Husserl, Adorno, Levinas, Kristeva, and Derrida. See more of his work here: https://www.dylanshaul.com 00:00 1. Introduction 03:04 2. Biographical Background 04:44 3. Summary of Hegel's System 09:51 4. Debates in Hegel Interpretation 12:51 5. Hegel's Mystical Influences 21:28 6. Mysticism in Hegel's Works 34:18 7. Criticism of Hegel 42:39 8. Final Words Join us: https://discord.gg/EQtjK2FWsm https://facebook.com/seekersofunity https://instagram.com/seekersofunity https://www.twitter.com/seekersofu https://www.seekersofunity.com Thank you to our beloved Patrons: Eny, Kim, Michael, Kirk, Ron, Seth, Daniel, Raphael, Daniel, Jason, Sergio, Leila, Wael, jXaviErre, Simona, Francis, Etty, Stephen, Arash, William, Michael, Matija, Timony, Vilijami, Stoney, El techo, Stephen, Ross, Ahmed, Alexander, Diceman, Hannah, Julian, Leo, Sim, Sultan, John, Joshua, Igor, Chezi, Jorge, Andrew, Alexandra, Füsun, Lucas, Andrew, Stian, Ivana, Aédàn, Darjeeling, Astarte, Declan, Gregory, Alex, Charlie, Anonymous, Joshua, Arin, Sage, Marcel, Ahawk, Yehuda, Kevin, Evan, Shahin, Al Alami, Dale, Ethan, Gerr, Effy, Noam, Ron, Shtus, Mendel, Jared, Tim, Mystic Experiment, MM, Lenny, Justin, Joshua, Jorge, Wayne, Jason, Caroline, Yaakov, Daniel, Wodenborn, Steve, Collin, Justin, Mariana, Vic, Shaw, Carlos, Nico, Isaac, Frederick, David, Ben, Rodney, Charley, Jonathan, Chelsea, Curly Joe, Adam and Andre. Join them in supporting us: patreon: https://www.patreon.com/seekers paypal: https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=RKCYGQSMJFDRU

All Souls Unitarian Church
"Let's Stay Together" with Randy Lewis

All Souls Unitarian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 58:54


Perhaps nothing is more desirable for humans than healthy community to hold us, to make our lives more meaningful and bearable, so why is it so hard and rare to find this community? The scarcity of beloved community only highlights our profound need for it. So what does it take? At All Souls, we aren't bound by a creed or a cross, instead we are held together by our covenant - our commitment to each other to love beyond belief. It turns out that our differences aren't problems that keep us from community - they are the very opportunities to reach out and create bridges to one another. As Søren Kierkegaard said, “When one has fully entered the realm of love, the world — no matter how imperfect — becomes rich and beautiful, consisting solely of opportunities for love.” This message was delivered on Sunday, January 29, 2023 at All Souls Unitarian Church in Tulsa, Oklahoma by Randy Lewis in The Point Humanist Hour. SUBSCRIBE TO WATCH SERMONS FROM OUR MINISTERS: WANT TO LISTEN? SUBSCRIBE TO AUDIO PODCAST: GIVE TO SUPPORT LOVE BEYOND BELIEF:  or text LOVEBB to 73256 LET'S CONNECT: Facebook: Instagram: All Souls Church Website:  

Renewing Your Mind with R.C. Sproul

Søren Kierkegaard didn't mince words as he criticized the lack of passion he observed in the church of his day. Today, R.C. Sproul addresses the writings of the father of existentialism. Get R.C. Sproul's 'The Consequences of Ideas' 35-Part DVD Series for Your Gift of Any Amount: https://gift.renewingyourmind.org/2577/the-consequences-of-ideas Don't forget to make RenewingYourMind.org your home for daily in-depth Bible study and Christian resources.

The Tolkien Road
0322 » The Mythic Mind with Andrew Snyder

The Tolkien Road

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 62:36


In episode 322, I'm joined by Andrew Snyder of The Mythic Mind podcast. We talk Middle-earth, Tolkien, Christianity, Kierkegaard, The Shadow, and the consolation that Tolkien provided in Andrew's life during a very dark period. Join us!ANDREW SNYDER » https://linktr.ee/andrewnsnyderEXECUTIVE PRODUCERS » Kaitlyn of Tea with Tolkien, John R, Jacob Lockham, John H, Eru27WATCH THE VIDEO » https://youtu.be/xVL_yySA5Z0FOLLOW & SUPPORT THE TOLKIEN ROAD:PATREON » SUPERFANS!TWITTERFACEBOOKINSTAGRAMLINKS & MATHOMS:take 10% OFF Tolkien Road merch at True Myths Press » https://truemythspress.com/discount/TENOFF (enter code TENOFF at checkout)listen to TOLKIEN'S WORKS for FREE » https://www.audibletrial.com/everonbuy Tolkien's Requiem » https://tolkiensrequiem.com/ buy Tolkien's Overture » https://tolkiensoverture.com/SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING PATRONS:John RKaitlyn of Tea with TolkienJacob LockhamJohn HEru27Ms. AnonymousAndrew TRedhawkShannon SBrian OEmilio PZeke FJames AJames LChris LChuck FAsya VIsh of the HammerTeresa CDavid of Pints with JackJonathan DEric BJohanna TMike MRobert HPaul DJuliaWertyMatthew WJoeBagelManChris KJacob SRichard KMatt RGarret PJohn WEugene DChris BDaniel SAS WELL AS THOSE CELEBRATING THEIR PATRON ANNIVERSARY IN JANUARY OF 2023 JoeBagelManJohn RMike MScott WJason TElina VMelanieTyler W

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
teleological

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 1:58 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 10, 2023 is: teleological • tel-ee-uh-LAH-jih-kul • adjective Teleological (and its less common variant teleologic) is a philosophical term meaning "exhibiting or relating to purpose or design especially in nature." // Their teleological theory on the origin of human beings was heavily challenged. See the entry > Examples: "Hegelianism—at least as [Søren] Kierkegaard understood it ... —treated history as an intelligible process by which humanity progressed toward a state of spiritual freedom. ... To Kierkegaard, this sweeping teleological view left no room for human agency." — Christopher Beha, Harper's, 27 Apr. 2020 Did you know? Perhaps teleological was destined to serve a role in English. The word, along with its close relative teleology, comes to us by way of New Latin, from the Greek root telos, meaning "end or purpose." Both entered English in the 18th century, followed by teleologist in the 19th century. Teleology has the basic meaning of "the study of ends or purposes." A teleologist attempts to understand the purpose of something by looking at its results. A teleological philosopher might argue that we should judge whether an act is good or bad by seeing if it produces a good or bad result, and a teleological explanation of evolutionary changes claims that all such changes occur for a definite purpose.

The Wisdom Of
Existentialism - The Philosophy of Affirmation!

The Wisdom Of

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 23:06


For all its focus on the struggles of the human condition and on our spiritual ailments, ultimately existentialism is a deeply affirmative and constructive philosophy! 

Fularsız Entellik
Kierkegaard, Anksiyete Hikayeleri ve 2023

Fularsız Entellik

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 30:32


Önce kaygı kavramı ve anksiyete bozukluğu hakkında bazı bilgiler, sonra da sizden gelen 3 hikaye.(Hikayelerini gönderen, yorum yazan herkese ve tüm Patreon destekçilerine teşekkürler).Bölümler:(00:05) Kierkegaard'ın "Kaygı Kavramı".(01:15) Adem'in kaygısı.(02:50) Korku vs Kaygı.(04:40) Anksiyete Bozukluğu.(05:50) Sosyal Anksiyete(07:33) "Kadın Sorunu"(08:38) Boomerlar vs yeni neslin sorunları.(10:55) Çözümler.(12:35) Öz: mutlu son.(13:30) Ay: en kötü senaryolara odak.(16:45) İ: bunu bir parçan olarak kabullenmek.(20:10) Mental sis.(21:15) Enerjik depresyon.(27:45) İcraatın İçinden: 2022 Raporu ve 2023..Kaynaklar:Makale: Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Screening in Treatment-Resistant DepressionVideo: What's normal anxietyVideo: 7 Types of Anxiety DisordersVideo: Social Anxiety in the Modern World | Dr. Fallon GoodmanVideo: Living with anxiety at 17 years old - BBCKonuşma: The history of anxiety disorders Yazı: How Your Heart Influences What You Perceive and FearYazı: SerotoninKitap: Kaygı Kavramı, KierkegaardSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tov! A Podcast About
Special Episode: Todd May, Philosopher and Consultant on The Good Place!

Tov! A Podcast About

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 56:31


Our second “insider” conversation with someone who worked on The Good Place! Todd May is a philosopher to whom Michael Schur reached out early in the show because of Professor May's book Death (The Art of Living). Todd talks and laughs with Jon Spira-Savett about a range of topics, including: motivation (of characters on the show, and of Jon); community and ethical growth; whether the show actually has anything to do with the afterlife; Kierkegaard in a nutshell; how the show gravitated in an Aristotelian direction over time; how Todd's writings about death connect with the show; how a professional philosopher thinks about the role of entertainment and clergy people in bringing big ideas to a wider public; Michael Schur's high standards; and the role of Jewish historical experience in cultivating a commitment to justice. Click here for show notes.

Enduring Interest
Matt Dinan on Aristotle's social virtues

Enduring Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 52:22


With this episode Enduring Interest inaugurates a new occasional series on chapters or parts of great books which tend to be ignored or not much talked about. Matt Dinan is back to discuss a series of brief and fascinating chapters in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics on the social virtues: gentleness, friendliness, truthfulness and wittiness. Check out Matt's essay “Be Nice,” first published in the Fall 2018 issue of The Hedgehog Review, where he touches on some of these virtues. Matt is an associate professor in the great books program at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. He does research on classical, Christian, and contemporary political philosophy, and is currently writing a book called Kierkegaard's Socratic Political Philosophy. His essays and reviews have appeared in Perspectives on Political Science and The Review of Politics. Matt is also a contributing writer to The Hedgehog Review. Matt also has a Substack called PREFACES.   Matt discussed Kierkegaard's Two Ages with us about a year ago. When I conceived of the idea for this occasional series on underappreciated parts of great books, I thought each of these episodes would be quite short—brief, quick hitting chats about something very particular. Well, as you'll hear, Matt gets rolling on social virtues—as advertised—but our conversation covers lots of ground! Matt talks about what makes the Ethics such a rich book, Aristotle's distinction between moral and intellectual virtue, and the place of these nameless virtues in his full list of moral virtues. But that's not all. We also hit on the niceness of Atlantic Canadians, the importance of laughter to freedom and community, toddler humor, Norm Macdonald, Shakespearean humor, and a theory of Larry David. No micro-episode can contain Matt—plus I'm much too nice to cut him off. So here's a very nice, normal sized episode, full of wit and wisdom.

Bierkergaard: The Writings of Soren Kierkegaard
Kierkegaard Explains Christmas

Bierkergaard: The Writings of Soren Kierkegaard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 45:07


The end of this Chapter about the conflict between the temporal and eternal aligned very nicely with a parable that Soren told about the Incarnation where the king becomes a servant to show his love to a peasant girl by becoming like her in station; in her suffering.

The Art of Manliness
The Existential in Red Dead Redemption 2

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 55:05 Very Popular


People sometimes ask me what I think of video games. I think that, in moderation, they're a fine source of the kind of passive entertainment we all need little doses of in our lives. But for me personally, I rarely play video games because there's just too much other stuff I'd rather do instead.There is one notable exception to my ambivalence towards video games, however. A game which I played for hours with thorough enjoyment and zero regret: Red Dead Redemption 2. It's a video game that's more immersive and story-like than most others, and even gets you reflecting on the existential layers of life.Here to discuss those deeper layers of Red Dead Redemption 2 with me is Patrick Stokes, a professor of philosophy and fellow fan of the game. We combine two of my favorite things — Red Dead Redemption 2 and the philosophy of Soren Kierkegaard — in a conversation on the existential themes you can find in the game like nostalgia, freedom, choice and consequences, and the certain uncertainty of death.Resources Related to the EpisodeAoM Podcast #790: Kierkegaard on the Present (Passionless) AgeAoM Podcast #635: The Existentialist's Survival Guide"Art for Trying Times: How a Philosopher Found Solace Playing RedDeadRedemption 2" by Patrick StokesDigital Souls: A Philosophy of Online Death by Patrick Stokes"A Special Way of Being Afraid" — Kathy Behrendt on the fear of non-existence in deathA Very Easy Death by Simone De BeauvoirPhoto of Lewis Powell — conspirator in the Lincoln assassination"The Ruin" poemKierkegaard quote on living life forwardsMimesis as Make-Believe by Kendall WaltonThe Ethical Demand by Knud Ejler LøgstrupPatrick's articles on New Philosopher Connect With Patrick StokesPatrick's WebsitePatrick on Twitter

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 8/10 : Le journalisme et la doxa de la foule selon Kierkegaard

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:47


durée : 00:29:47 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - En 1978, dans le volet 7/10 de la série des "Chemins de la connaissance" consacrée par Jerôme Peignot au philosophe Søren Kierkegaard, il est question de la campagne de diffamation envers le philosophe danois par le journal "Le Corsaire" et de son rapport à la doxa de la foule.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 10/10 : Kierkegaard et l'absolue négativité

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 28:54


durée : 00:28:54 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - La mort, Dieu, la théologie négative sont au centre du 10ème et dernier volet de la série consacrée à Søren Kierkegaard par Jérôme Peignot sous le titre "Kierkegaard et l'absolue négativité", avec l'écrivain Michel Camus. Une série des "Chemins de la connaissance" diffusée en novembre 1978.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 10/10 : La lâcheté de Søren ou le sacrifice de Kierkegaard

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:30


durée : 00:29:30 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - En 1978, Sylviane Agacinsky et Jacques Sojcher sont les invités du 9ème volet de la série des "Chemins de la connaissance" consacré au philosophe danois Søren Kierkegaard. Cet épisode évoque la vie privée de Kierkegaard sous le titre "La lâcheté de Søren ou le sacrifice de Kierkegaard". - invités : Sylviane Agacinski philosophe, a enseigné au lycée Carnot à Paris et à l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales; Jacques Sojcher auteur

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 9/10 : Kierkegaard l'hérétique

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:44


durée : 00:29:44 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - En 1978, dans le volet 8/10 de la série des "Chemins de la connaissance" consacrée à Søren Kierkegaard, avec Jean Brun et Jean-Louis Leuba, il est question du rapport à la théologie du philosophe danois. L'épisode s'intitule "Kierkegaard l'hérétique".

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 4/10 : Critique de la philosophie par Kierkegaard

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:20


durée : 00:29:20 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - Ce troisième volet des "Chemins de la connaissance" sur Søren Kierkegaard, produit en 1978 par Jérôme Peignot, ici en compagnie de l'écrivain Jacques Sojcher, explore le rejet par Kierkegaard de l'habitus du philosophe, du vocable pédant à la prétention épistémologique.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 7/10 : Kierkegaard et le féminin avec Sylviane Agacinski

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 30:44


durée : 00:30:44 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - Kierkegaard misogyne ? Dans le sixième volet de la série des "Chemins de la connaissance consacrée par Jérôme Peignot à Søren Kierkegaard en 1978, c'est la philosophe Sylviane Agacinski qui analyse le rapport du philosophe danois au féminin. - invités : Sylviane Agacinski philosophe, a enseigné au lycée Carnot à Paris et à l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 6/10 : L'éthique de Kierkegaard selon Emmanuel Levinas

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 28:35


durée : 00:28:35 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - Dans ce 5ème volet consacrée à Soren Kierkegaard par Jerôme Peignot pour les "Chemins de la connaissance", diffusé pour la première fois le 6 novembre 1978, c'est le philosophe Emmanuel Levinas, en compagnie de Jean Brun, qui est invité à s'exprimer sur la pensée éthique du penseur danois.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 5/10 : Une exploration de l'esthétique de Kierkegaard

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:40


durée : 00:29:40 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - Dans ce quatrième volet des "Chemins de la connaissance" consacrés à Søren Kierkegaard en 1978, le romancier Jérôme Peignot explore l'esthétique du théologien danois, notamment sa vision du "Don Juan" de Mozart, entre le verbe et l'esprit, la vitalité musicale et la séduction sensorielle.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 3/10 : Le christianisme de Kierkegaard

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:37


durée : 00:29:37 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - Dans ce deuxième volet d'une série des "Chemins de la connaissance" produite par le romancier Jérôme Peignot, diffusée en 1978, Jean Brun, professeur de philosophie à l'université de Dijon, aborde la conception chrétienne du philosophe danois Kierkegaard, de la place de la foi à sa vision de Dieu.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 2/10 : Introduction à la philosophie de Kierkegaard

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:39


durée : 00:29:39 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) est l'auteur d'une œuvre hybride mêlant théologie chrétienne, philosophie, psychologie. En 1978, le romancier et poète Jérôme Peignot consacre 10 émissions au philosophe danois. Premier volet avec Jean Brun professeur de philosophie à l'université de Dijon.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard et l'absolue négativité

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 28:54


durée : 00:28:54 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - La mort, Dieu, la théologie négative sont au centre du 10ème et dernier volet de la série consacrée à Søren Kierkegaard par Jérôme Peignot sous le titre "Kierkegaard et l'absolue négativité", avec l'écrivain Michel Camus. Une série des "Chemins de la connaissance" diffusée en novembre 1978.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 9/10 : La lâcheté de Søren ou le sacrifice de Kierkegaard

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 29:30


durée : 00:29:30 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - En 1978, Sylviane Agacinsky et Jacques Sojcher sont les invités du 9ème volet de la série des "Chemins de la connaissance" consacré au philosophe danois Søren Kierkegaard. Cet épisode évoque la vie privée de Kierkegaard sous le titre "La lâcheté de Søren ou le sacrifice de Kierkegaard". - invités : Sylviane Agacinski philosophe, a enseigné au lycée Carnot à Paris et à l'Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales; Jacques Sojcher auteur

Les Nuits de France Culture
Kierkegaard, philosophe malgré lui 8/10 : Kierkegaard l'hérétique

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 29:44


durée : 00:29:44 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - En 1978, dans le volet 8/10 de la série des "Chemins de la connaissance" consacrée à Søren Kierkegaard, avec Jean Brun et Jean-Louis Leuba, il est question du rapport à la théologie du philosophe danois. L'épisode s'intitule "Kierkegaard l'hérétique".

Les chemins de la philosophie
Qui est donc Socrate ? 4/4 : Pourquoi Socrate divise-t-il les philosophes ?

Les chemins de la philosophie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 58:35


durée : 00:58:35 - Avec philosophie - par : Géraldine Muhlmann - Nietzsche et Kierkegaard : tout éloigne a priori ces deux philosophes de la modernité. Leur point commun ? Un certain rapport à Socrate. À tous deux, le philosophe grec a permis de travailler le négatif à l'œuvre dans toute pensée. De là à y voir le point de départ de toute philosophie... - invités : Emmanuel Salanskis maître de conférences à l'Université de Strasbourg, ancien élève de l'École Normale Supérieure de Paris et agrégé de philosophie; Vincent Delecroix philosophe et romancier

The Two Cities
Episode #147 - Forgiveness: An Alternative Account with Rev. Dr. Matthew Ichihashi Potts

The Two Cities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 51:47


In this episode we talk about forgiveness with Rev. Dr. Matthew Ichihashi Potts, who is Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at Harvard Divinity School, an ordained episcopal priest serving as the minister at the Memorial Church at Harvard, a co-host of the podcast, Harry Potter and the Sacred Text, and the author of the book we discuss on this episode, Forgiveness: An Alternative Account (published by Yale University Press). As Rev. Dr. Potts explains, accounts of forgiveness in broader Christian thinking tend to place the onus of forgiveness on victims, virtually requiring that their feelings of anger or grief change and lead to reconciliation with the one who harmed them. In contrast to this, Rev. Dr. Potts gives an account of forgiveness that is a separate matter from reconciliation, and something that can accommodate an honest recognition of wrongdoing and the feelings of anger and grief that it has caused. Fundamentally, forgiveness for Rev. Dr. Potts is about non-retaliation against one's enemy. As we explore this together, over the course of our conversation, we address how this idea relates to the justice system, social media, literature (including Harry Potter), the philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard, and the teachings of Jesus. Team members on the episode from The Two Cities include: Dr. Amber Bowen, Dr. John Anthony Dunne, Rev. Daniel Parham, and Rev. Dr. Chris Porter.

The Ezra Klein Show
Finding hope in a world on the brink

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 58:38 Very Popular


Sean Illing talks with Jonathan Lear, a psychoanalyst and philosopher, about his new book Imagining the End: Mourning and Ethical Life. How can we continue to live a good life in a world beset by catastrophe, crisis, and chaos? Sean and Jonathan discuss the role of imagination and culture in the ways we make meaning in the world, the idea of mourning as a confrontation with our uniquely human ability to love, and how to turn away from the path of despair, towards hope — and to what Lear calls "committed living towards the future." Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area Guest: Jonathan Lear, author; professor, Committee on Social Thought & Dept. of Philosophy, University of Chicago References:  Imagining the End: Mourning and Ethical Life by Jonathan Lear (Harvard; Nov. 15, 2022) Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics Søren Kierkegaard, The Sickness unto Death (1849; published under the pseudonym Anti-Climacus) Sigmund Freud, Mourning and Melancholia (1917) "The Difficulty of Reality and the Difficulty of Philosophy" by Cora Diamond (2003) Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation by Jonathan Lear (Harvard; 2008) "Envy and Gratitude" by Melanie Klein (1957; published in The Writings of Melanie Klein, Volume III, Hogarth Press; 1975) "A Lecture on Ethics" by Ludwig Wittgenstein (lecture notes from 1929-1930, published in The Philosophical Review v. 74 no. 1, 1965)   Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Patrick Boyd Editorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices