Podcasts about National Commission

  • 304PODCASTS
  • 363EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 25, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about National Commission

Latest podcast episodes about National Commission

Keen On Democracy
Brian Michael Jenkins: Plagues and Their Aftermath: Why Recovering From Covid Is Really “Up to Us”

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 31:45


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Brian Michael Jenkins, author of Plagues and Their Aftermath: How Societies Recover From Pandemics. Brian Michael Jenkins is a senior advisor to the president of the RAND Corporation. He served in the U.S. Army's Special Forces in during the war in Vietnam, before joining RAND in 1972. In 1996, President Bill Clinton appointed Jenkins to the White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security. Jenkins has also served as adviser to the National Commission on Terrorism. He is a frequent commentator on matters of global security and safety for major media outlets including NBC, PBS, NPR, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and others. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Talking Indonesia
Andy Yentriyani - The Law on Sexual Violence

Talking Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 33:04


The #MeToo movement has led to a global reckoning on sexual violence, including in Indonesia. After a series of high profile sexual assault scandals, activists won a landmark legal battle against sexual violence earlier this year, with the passage of Law No. 12 of 2022 on the Crime of Sexual Violence, or UU TPKS. But milestones aren't achieved overnight. In this episode of Talking Indonesia, Dr Jacqui Baker talks to Andy Yentriyani, the head of the National Commission on Violence Against Women (Komnas Perempuan), who takes us behind the scenes of the 12-year battle to get the law passed. What does this law achieve for victims of sexual violence? How does an independent state organisation like Komnas Perempuan build alliances for change? How does it wrestle with the perennial problem of law enforcement? This week's podcast is a collaboration with the Indonesia Update, hosted by the Indonesia Project at the Australian National University, where Andy spoke last week. In 2022, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Jacqui Baker from Murdoch University, Dr Dave McRae from the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society at the University of Melbourne, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, and Tito Ambyo from RMIT. Photo by Andy Yentriyani.

The Leslie Marshall Show
A Holistic Approach to Workplace Health and Safety

The Leslie Marshall Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 42:00


Leslie is joined by Leeann Foster, International Vice President of the United Steelworkers (USW), North America's largest industrial union.  They're 1.2 million members and retirees strong in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean.  They proudly represent men and women who work in nearly every industry there is. The two will discuss the USW's holistic approach to workplace health and safety. This includes their work identifying common trends in fatalities and life altering injuries, as well as laying out a sector specific plan for education and effective hazard identification, controls and communication. The USW's work has been similarly successful in making manufacturing processes safer and helping workers avoid exposure to extreme heat or toxic substances like silica and beryllium. The USW has also been making important strides on other fronts when it comes to health and safety.  One important way is through helping workers who are facing the threat of intimate partner violence.  Domestic violence increased significantly during the pandemic. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine said that domestic violence cases increased by 25 to 33 percent globally.  The National Commission on COVID-19 and criminal justice shows an increase in the U.S. by a little over 8 percent, following the imposition of lockdown orders during 2020. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated that about 20 percent of women and 14 percent of men across the United States have experienced “severe physical violence.”  Workers experiencing domestic violence often need time to focus on getting safe and the security of knowing that they can return to work when they've been able to do so.  That's why the USW is now negotiating domestic violence protections and resources into their contracts across the union.  This includes two recent contracts with major employers in the paper sector: Domtar and Packaging Corp. of America, covering over 29 mills and 44 box plants and thousands of workers. Union-negotiated domestic violence leave helps provide time off for court appearances, relocation, counseling and more without eating up vacation or sick days. Workers also won't need a doctor for an excuse – counselors, domestic shelter employees and spiritual leaders can also speak to what is happening with the employee. In some cases, workers can also request changes to working hours, transfer to alternate worksites or vacation pay advances.  They can also ask for help in safety planning, like identifying hiding places or an escape route. Other sectors are also negotiating this important language.   The USW has been having success with this issue in both the United States and Canada, not just because it's the right thing to do, but also because it is a true workplace health and safety issue. The Department of Labor estimated that domestic violence victims lose nearly 8 million days of paid work per year.  It can also affect the health and safety of other workers if abuses show up in the workplace.  Some USW members even receive training in how to help advocate for their peers, help connect them with community resources, and intervene with management when needed. Because the union believes that gender equality and the right to a safe workplace go hand in hand, the USW is also advocating for other holistic health and safety protections.  These include:  - PPE that fits all body shapes - Resources to combat sexual and other harassment - Comprehensive bathroom, showers and change-room policies  - Pregnancy issues including new motherhood issues and breastfeeding  - Opportunities to address stress,mental health and work-life balance  Not everyone experiences work or their work environment the same way, but the USW believes that all are entitled to health and safety on the job.  Leeann Foster has served the union for more than 25 years, working to negotiate strong contracts, advocate for sound trade policies, facilitate educational opportunities and fight for safer workplaces. She oversees more than 550 locals and more than 30 bargaining councils in the USW's paper sector. She also leads the union's Making and Converting Paper Safely program to build worker-focused health and safety initiatives in the paper sector, as well as overseeing the USW Women of Steel Leadership Development Program. WEBSITE: www.USW.org TWITTER and INSTAGRAM HANDLE: @steelworkers

Progressive Voices
The Leslie Marshall Show - 9/16/22 - A Holistic Approach to Workplace Health and Safety

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 42:00


Leslie is joined by Leeann Foster, International Vice President of the United Steelworkers (USW), North America's largest industrial union. They're 1.2 million members and retirees strong in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean. They proudly represent men and women who work in nearly every industry there is. The two will discuss the USW's holistic approach to workplace health and safety. This includes their work identifying common trends in fatalities and life altering injuries, as well as laying out a sector specific plan for education and effective hazard identification, controls and communication. The USW's work has been similarly successful in making manufacturing processes safer and helping workers avoid exposure to extreme heat or toxic substances like silica and beryllium. The USW has also been making important strides on other fronts when it comes to health and safety. One important way is through helping workers who are facing the threat of intimate partner violence. Domestic violence increased significantly during the pandemic. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine said that domestic violence cases increased by 25 to 33 percent globally. The National Commission on COVID-19 and criminal justice shows an increase in the U.S. by a little over 8 percent, following the imposition of lockdown orders during 2020. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated that about 20 percent of women and 14 percent of men across the United States have experienced “severe physical violence.” Workers experiencing domestic violence often need time to focus on getting safe and the security of knowing that they can return to work when they've been able to do so. That's why the USW is now negotiating domestic violence protections and resources into their contracts across the union.  This includes two recent contracts with major employers in the paper sector: Domtar and Packaging Corp. of America, covering over 29 mills and 44 box plants and thousands of workers. Union-negotiated domestic violence leave helps provide time off for court appearances, relocation, counseling and more without eating up vacation or sick days. Workers also won't need a doctor for an excuse – counselors, domestic shelter employees and spiritual leaders can also speak to what is happening with the employee. In some cases, workers can also request changes to working hours, transfer to alternate worksites or vacation pay advances.  They can also ask for help in safety planning, like identifying hiding places or an escape route. Other sectors are also negotiating this important language.  The USW has been having success with this issue in both the United States and Canada, not just because it's the right thing to do, but also because it is a true workplace health and safety issue. The Department of Labor estimated that domestic violence victims lose nearly 8 million days of paid work per year.  It can also affect the health and safety of other workers if abuses show up in the workplace.  Some USW members even receive training in how to help advocate for their peers, help connect them with community resources, and intervene with management when needed. Because the union believes that gender equality and the right to a safe workplace go hand in hand, the USW is also advocating for other holistic health and safety protections. These include: - PPE that fits all body shapes - Resources to combat sexual and other harassment - Comprehensive bathroom, showers and change-room policies  - Pregnancy issues including new motherhood issues and breastfeeding - Opportunities to address stress,mental health and work-life balance Not everyone experiences work or their work environment the same way, but the USW believes that all are entitled to health and safety on the job. WEBSITE: www.USW.org TWITTER and INSTAGRAM HANDLE: @steelworkers

The Word with Jackie Rae
227: Amid a post-COVID spike in domestic violence, the Women Shelter of Long Beach is providing resources for victims

The Word with Jackie Rae

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 24:05


One of the side effects of COVID was the impact on local domestic violence shelters—limiting how many people they could host at one time.What was happening behind closed doors as the world was on lockdown has been called the “shadow pandemic” by the United Nations after a study done by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence reported a 34.9 % increase in domestic violence globally after lockdown restrictions were removed.The National Commission on COVID-19 and Criminal Justice reported an increase in the United States of just over 8% since lockdowns have been removed. It's a troubling statistic, but it doesn't exist in isolation. The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence reports that 34.9% of California women and 31.1% of California men experience intimate partner physical or sexual violence or stalking in their lifetimes. The study also says domestic violence homicides accounted for 10.7% of all California homicides in 2018.Is the answer to tell victims to “just leave” when they find themselves in a domestic violence situation? If there are children involved or if the abuser controls the money, is leaving that simple?On today's episode of “The Word” podcast, Liliana Lopez, the director of programs at the WomenShelter of Long Beach, is going to answer those questions and provide resources for those who need assistance.

Mental Health Trailblazers: Psychiatric Nurses Speak Up

Dr. Erica Joseph grew up on the Allendale Plantation (former slave quarters) in Port Allen, just outside Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with her single-mother and grandparents. They made their living as sharecroppers picking cotton in a rural community where modern health care was inaccessible and folk relied on home remedies to treat most ailments. (Sharecropping is a type of farming in which families rent small plots of land from a landowner in return for a portion of their crop, to be given to the landowner at the end of each year.)Dr. Joseph's grandmother was particularly adept as a healer, sharing her knowledge and skills for the good of the community. In her later years, however, the impact of chronic diabetes, which remained undiagnosed and without appropriate treatment until it was too late, forced the amputation of her grandmother's legs.  Dr. Joseph credits the community-service oriented values instilled by her family, and her time helping with her grandmother's care, for guiding her towards a career in health care. The realization that had her grandmother been diagnosed and received care sooner she might not have lost her legs, provided additional motivation to focus on improving access to health care in marginalized communities.Today, SAMHSA Minority Fellowship Program at the American Nurses Association alumni, Dr. Erica Joseph, is a DNP and Ph.D. trained psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner and scientist serving as Intensive Case Management (MHICM) Co-Lead at the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Healthcare System. Her research interests include suicide prevention and examining the risk and protective factors of suicide among African American veterans, which comes at a critical moment with suicide rates among African American youth and men on the rise.  Dr. Joseph continues to build on the community service legacy of her family by providing increasingly in-demand counseling and mental health awareness promotion in the parishes of rural Louisiana. She remains a stalwart advocate for ending health care disparities, and has contributed to the National Commission to Address Racism in NursingTune in to Season 2, Episode 12 of Mental Health Trailblazers, Psychiatric Nurses Speak Up! to hear Dr. Erica Joseph's triumphant story of grit, resilience, and fortitude that propelled a young girl growing up on a former slave plantation to becoming an accomplished psychiatric mental health nurse scientist making a difference for marginalized groups, including America's war-hero veterans, in her community and beyond. You can learn more about Dr. Erica Joseph at https://emfp.org/mfp-fellows/erica-joseph. 

AUHSD Future Talks
AUHSD Future Talks: Episode 68 (Barnett Berry)

AUHSD Future Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 27:44


During the talk Professor Berry discusses his drivers, teachers as the most significant asset at schools, moving beyond test scores, the joy of learning, innovation within the classroom and school districts, community schools, the Magnolia Agriscience Community Center (MACC), and scaling up successful models.Professor Berry's work in the 1990s with the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future led to his founding of the Center for Teaching Quality in 1999, a non-profit that focused on igniting teacher leadership to transform public education for more equitable outcomes for students. Professor Berry is author of over 150 peer review articles, book chapters, and trade journal publications focused on teaching policy, teacher leadership, and systemic change in education. His two books, TEACHING 2030 and Teacherpreneurs: Innovative Teachers Who Lead But Don't Leave, frame a bold vision for the profession's future. Professor Berry also serves as a Senior Research Fellow for the Learning Policy Institute, which seeks to advance evidence-based policies that support empowering and equitable learning for each and every child. In 2021, he was honored with the James A. Kelly Award for Advancing Accomplished Teaching by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

Business Drive
Germany To Return Hundreds Of Nigeria's Benin Bronzes

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 0:44


Germany has signed an agreement to transfer ownership of 512 Benin Bronzes, hailed as the largest return of cultural artefacts looted from the continent in the 19th century. The agreement was signed between the Foundation of Prussian Cultural Heritage and Nigeria's National Commission for Museums and Monuments. The foundation says the first objects will be returned to Nigeria this year from the Ethnological Museum in Berlin.

City Cast Pittsburgh
New Review Asks: Why Do People Keep Dying in Pittsburgh's Jail?

City Cast Pittsburgh

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 12:25


Five people have died in custody at the Allegheny County Jail this year, putting it on track for the deadliest year in recent memory. County Executive Rich Fitzgerald announced a new contract with the National Commission on Correctional Health Care to look into what happened, but there's almost no transparency about the process. Brittany Hailer, the director for the Pittsburgh Institute for Nonprofit Journalism, joins us again to talk about the last time the NCCHC stepped in, how it helped (and didn't), and what she expects from this latest review. Check out our last conversation with Hailer from March 14: https://pod.link/citycastpittsburgh/episode/a0ad088bf379a45e00e1a0ac2c6f0c13 NOW HIRING: If you're looking for a full-time, temporary audio job, then we've got the project for you. Apply to work with the City Cast team here: https://citycast.fm/audio-producer-city-cast-pittsburgh-temporary/ VOTE FOR US: City Cast Pittsburgh is among the finalists for City Paper's annual “Best of Pittsburgh” contest. Scroll down to Best Podcast and smash that vote button here: https://bit.ly/voteforCCP Our newsletter is fresh daily at 6 a.m. Sign up here. We're also on Twitter @citycastpgh & Instagram @CityCastPgh! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Confluence
A year later, an Afghan journalist helps local refugees resettle in Pittsburgh

The Confluence

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 22:30


On today's episode of The Confluence: We speak with an Afghan journalist who fled the country after the U.S. withdrew its military presence, and has spent the last year in Pittsburgh; as Allegheny County is contracting with consultants at the National Commission on Correctional Health Care to review fatalities at the county jail, we ask a researcher what might come of the review; and author David Maraniss has a new biography of Jim Thorpe, one of America's greatest athletes, who grew up at the Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Today's guests include: Zubair Babakarkhail, Afghan-born journalist and interpreter; Robin Mejia, director of the Statistics and Human Rights Program at Carnegie Mellon University.

Own It! from Women Lead Change
Owning it with Dr. José-Marie Griffiths: Communication

Own It! from Women Lead Change

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 31:37


Tiffany O'Donnell talks to Dr. José-Marie Griffiths, the president of Dakota State University in Madison, SD. President Griffiths has spent her career in research, teaching, public service, corporate leadership, workforce and economic development, and higher education administration, with special focus on work in STEM fields. She has served in presidential appointments to the National Science Board, the U.S. President's Information Technology Advisory Committee, and the U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. She is a member of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, part of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 2020.On today's episode, Dr. José-Marie Griffiths tells us about what led her to Dakota State University, the importance of allyship and mentorship, and that everyone has Imposter Syndrome.  Follow Women Lead Change on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn and visit wlcglobal.org for more information. Own It! from Women Lead Change is sponsored by Mount Mercy University.Support the show

The Nurse Keith Show
Addressing Racism in Nursing, Part 2 of 2

The Nurse Keith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 58:53


On episode 382, the second in a 2-part series of The Nurse Keith Show nursing and healthcare career podcast, Keith interviews Daniela Vargas, MSN, MPH, MA, RN, PHN; Ruth Francis, MPH, MCHES; and Cheryl Peterson, MSN, RN, all members of the National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing. In the course of this episode, Keith and his esteemed guests discuss the American Nurses' Association reckoning with its own structural racism, data from the commission's National Survey on Racism in Nursing, the commission's foundational report, and much more. On January 25, 2021, leading nursing organizations launched the National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing. The Commission examines the issue of racism within nursing nationwide focusing on the impact on nurses, patients, communities, and health care systems to motivate all nurses to confront individual and systemic racism. The Commission members and organizations represent a broad continuum of nursing practice, racially and ethnically diverse groups, and regions across the country. The Commission is led by the American Nurses Association (ANA), National Black Nurses Association (NBNA), National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurse Associations (NCEMNA), and National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN).Before joining forces to address racism in nursing, the organizations that make up the National Commission to Address Racism (the Commission) have for years raised their individual voices to condemn all forms of racism within our society and health care system. Nurse Keith is a holistic career coach for nurses, professional podcaster, published author, award-winning blogger, inspiring keynote speaker, and successful nurse entrepreneur. Connect with Nurse Keith at NurseKeith.com, and on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram. The Nurse Keith Show is a proud member of The Health Podcast Network, one of the largest and fastest-growing collections of authoritative, high-quality podcasts taking on the tough topics in health and care with empathy, expertise, and a commitment to excellence.

Daily News Brief by TRT World

*) Ceasefire takes effect between Israel, Palestinian group An Egyptian-brokered ceasefire in Gaza between Israel and the Palestinian group Islamic Jihad has taken effect late on Sunday. The ceasefire agreement came after three days of Israeli air strikes on Gaza. The attacks left at least 44 Palestinians, including 15 children dead and over 360 others injured, according to the Palestinian Health Ministry. Egyptian state news agency MENA reported that Egypt was exerting efforts to release Palestinian prisoners Khalil Awawdeh and Bassam al Saadi. *) Senate Democrats pass $740B 'Inflation Reduction Act' package in US The US Senate has passed a sweeping $430 billion bill intended to fight climate change, lower drug prices and raise some corporate taxes. Amid Republican efforts to derail the package, the Senate approved the legislation known as the Inflation Reduction Act by a 51-50 party line vote. Vice President Kamala Harris cast the tie-breaking ballot. That is a major victory for President Joe Biden that Democrats hope will aid their chances of keeping control of Congress in this year's elections. *) Gustavo Petro sworn in as Colombia's first leftist president Gustavo Petro has taken the oath of office as Colombia's first-ever leftist president. He was sworn in before a crowd of hundreds of thousands of people in Bogota. Petro takes over from the deeply unpopular Ivan Duque for a four-year term during which he will enjoy support from a left-leaning majority in Congress. *) Any attack on a nuclear plant in Ukraine 'suicidal' — UN Any attack on a nuclear plant is "suicidal", United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres has warned. His statement comes after fresh reports suggested shelling hit a huge atomic power complex in southern Ukraine. The fighting on Friday at the plant has prompted the UN's nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency to warn of "the very real risk of a nuclear disaster". Guterres said "any attack to a nuclear plant is a suicidal thing,” adding that he hopes the “attacks will end." And finally… *) UK museum agrees to return looted Benin Bronzes to Nigeria A London museum has agreed to return a collection of Benin Bronzes looted in the late 19th century from what is now Nigeria. The decision comes after Nigeria's National Commission for Museums and Monuments formally asked for the artefacts to be returned earlier this year. Since then, cultural institutions throughout Britain have come under pressure to repatriate artefacts acquired during the colonial era.

The Nurse Keith Show
Addressing Racism in Nursing, Part 1 of 2

The Nurse Keith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 69:58


On episode 381 — the first in a 2-part series — of The Nurse Keith Show nursing and healthcare career podcast, Keith interviews Dr. Rumay Alexander, EdD, RN, FAAN; Dr. Laura Fennimore, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, CNE,FAAN; and Dr. Debra Toney, PhD, RN, FAAN, all members of the National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing. In the course of this episode, Keith and his three esteemed guests discuss a wide range of topics related to structural systemic racism, the purpose of the commission, definitions of important terms, how racism impacts both nurses and patients, potential solutions, and much more. On January 25, 2021, leading nursing organizations launched the National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing. The Commission examines the issue of racism within nursing nationwide focusing on the impact on nurses, patients, communities, and health care systems to motivate all nurses to confront individual and systemic racism. The Commission members and organizations represent a broad continuum of nursing practice, racially and ethnically diverse groups, and regions across the country. The Commission is led by the American Nurses Association (ANA), National Black Nurses Association (NBNA), National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurse Associations (NCEMNA), and National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN).Before joining forces to address racism in nursing, the organizations that make up the National Commission to Address Racism (the Commission) have for years raised their individual voices to condemn all forms of racism within our society and health care system. Nurse Keith is a holistic career coach for nurses, professional podcaster, published author, award-winning blogger, inspiring keynote speaker, and successful nurse entrepreneur. Connect with Nurse Keith at NurseKeith.com, and on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram. The Nurse Keith Show is a proud member of The Health Podcast Network, one of the largest and fastest-growing collections of authoritative, high-quality podcasts taking on the tough topics in health and care with empathy, expertise, and a commitment to excellence.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
Has the “Great Bargain” Worked? Well … It's Complicated

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 31:01


Continuing our discussion of the 50th anniversary of the National Commission on State Workmen's Compensation (as it was called) report. We've come a long way, but … it's complicated. Guest Abbie Hudgens, Administrator of the State of Tennessee Bureau of Workers' Compensation, shares her thoughts on how far we've come with the “great bargain” that balances workers' rights and the need to file a lawsuit for any injury on the job. It's a bit messy to this day. Fifty states, 50 systems. Are higher-paid workers being shortchanged? Should older, rural, or less educated workers receive more than others when they are injured and can't work. And what's the goal of a Workers' Comp system, security for life, or helping workers get back on the job. There remain many questions about disability and impairment, and even partial disability. It's a fragile balance. As we've said, it's complicated. Mentioned in This Episode: “AMA Guides® to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment: an overview” Workcomp Central

Workers Comp Matters
Has the “Great Bargain” Worked? Well … It's Complicated

Workers Comp Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 31:01


Continuing our discussion of the 50th anniversary of the National Commission on State Workmen's Compensation (as it was called) report. We've come a long way, but … it's complicated. Guest Abbie Hudgens, Administrator of the State of Tennessee Bureau of Workers' Compensation, shares her thoughts on how far we've come with the “great bargain” that balances workers' rights and the need to file a lawsuit for any injury on the job. It's a bit messy to this day. Fifty states, 50 systems. Are higher-paid workers being shortchanged? Should older, rural, or less educated workers receive more than others when they are injured and can't work. And what's the goal of a Workers' Comp system, security for life, or helping workers get back on the job. There remain many questions about disability and impairment, and even partial disability. It's a fragile balance. As we've said, it's complicated. Mentioned in This Episode: “AMA Guides® to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment: an overview” Workcomp Central

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Conservationists focus on community reforestation efforts to save Mexico's wetlands

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022


Conservationist Arturo Pantoja Garcia loves to give tours of the forest around Casa del Agua, or House of Water, a research and environmental education center on the edge of the Centla swamp in Mexico's southeastern Tabasco state. Casa del Agua attributes its reforestation success to community involvement since the beginning. Credit: Courtesy of Casa del Agua Amid a multitude of trails, with trees that reach dozens of feet overhead, Pantoja Garcia tells stories about the forest that he and his team have planted over three decades.“People said I was crazy when I was planting trees,” he said. “In those days, no one cared for them.”Pantoja Garcia used to make a living hunting deer, rodents, lowland paca (larger rodents), ducks, turtles and fish in the wetlands.“I hunted everything, to sell and to eat. Who would have guessed that after all that, I would become a conservationist?”When the Casa del Agua conservation project began 30 years ago, much of the land served as pasture for grazing cattle. There are now lush mangrove forests, thanks to Casa del Agua's reforestation and community education efforts.Wetlands are the foundation for 75% of fisheries around the world, said Juan Carlos Romero Gil, a biologist with Mexico's National Commission of Protected Natural Areas, who helped to found Casa del Agua. But they're some of the least understood ecosystems, he said.On the weekends, conservationists host a steady stream of visitors who take a nature tour or check out the environmental education displays. They emphasize how wetlands restoration can go a long way toward helping to remove carbon from the atmosphere, because mangrove forests can store three to four times the amount of carbon per acre than neighboring rainforests, which is backed by a recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report.The group's reforestation project has made a big impact on local residents' respect for the wetlands.Just after dawn at Casa del Agua, workers water plants in one of the three nurseries on the property — about 15,000 baby trees stand in tiny rows and they're all native species: Tinto, or blackwood, and a tree the Mayans called Pukte. Some saplings go to the reforestation teams and others get handed out to residents in the dozens of communities spread out across the wetlands. Casa del Agua has three nurseries on the property with about 15,000 baby mangrove trees. Credit: Michael Fox/The World Lucrecia Jimenez Hernandez, from a community just up the road, has worked on several reforestation projects over the last two years.“Before, plants didn't really matter to me,” she said. “Not now. Now I care. And those of us who work on the reforestation, benefit financially and we also know how important it is to have our trees, to care for them and to plant them.”The project pays those involved about $10 a day, which is over Mexico's minimum wage. Lucrecia said it's an important source of revenue for her and her family.Asuncion Hernandez Garcia, an independent tour guide, fisherman and restaurant owner who goes by the name Negro Chon, often takes groups out on the water, where two of Mexico's largest rivers pass on the way to the ocean, carrying a third of the country's fresh water. “This reforestation is important,” he said. “We've noticed a difference, because the fish reproduce within these mangrove forests, and all sorts of other reptiles and amphibians also feed on the fish. So, this is a blessing for us.”Local fishermen used to set fire to vegetation along the waterfront in order to more easily access fishing holes. But this practice is less frequent, in large part, due to the organization's work. Asuncion Hernandez Garcia, a tour guide and fisherman who goes by the name Negro Chon, often takes groups out on the water in his boat.  Credit: Michael Fox/The World Since the beginning, Casa del Agua has promoted reforestation and environmental education as methods that yield financial benefit. And the group attributes much of its reforestation success to community involvement from the start.This September, Casa del Agua is planning a week of activities to accompany the 30th anniversary of their conservation and reforestation project. Biologist Romero Gil said they've planted roughly a million trees on more than 2,500 acres of land.“Sustainability takes time,” he said.Related: In Cancun, this man is turning seaweed trash into natural-building treasures

WyoLawPod
Lessons from a Life in the Practice of Law with Hon. Alan K. Simpson

WyoLawPod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 99:50


Time Schedule:  140 minutesSummary of Topics Covered:Lesson and stories from six decades practicing lawProsecutorial discretionSmall town problem solving for lawyersLearning from MistakesSeizing opportunitiesInstructor Hon. Alan K. Simpson, Esq. BioHon. Alan Simpson served in the U.S. Senate (R-Wyoming) from January 1979 to 1997, where he was the Assistant Republican Leader, 1984-1994; Chairman of the Subcommittee of Immigration and Refugee Policy of the Senate Judiciary Committee, 1980-1984; Nuclear Regulation Subcommittee of Environmental and Public Works, 1980-1984; Chairman of the Subcommittee on Social Security and member of the Committee on Aging; Chairman of the Veterans Affairs Committee, 1980-1984. From 1994-1996, he was a member of the Finance Committee; 1965-1977, Wyoming State Legislature, 1965-1978, Assistant Majority Leader, Majority Leader, and Speaker Pro Tem.Mr. Simpson served as Assistant Attorney General, State of Wyoming in 1959, and was City Attorney of Cody, Wyoming, from 1959-1969. Partner: Simpson & Simpson (with father Milward L. Simpson who also served as Governor and U.S. Senator for Wyoming ); Simpson Kepler & Simpson, 1960-1978. Additionally, Mr. Simpson served in the U.S. Army, 1st Lieutenant, 2nd Armored Division “Hell on the Wheels” and the 5th Division, U.S. Armed Forces, Germany.Alan Simpson is currently with the Washington Speakers Bureau in Washington, D.C. He is a very popular speaker and travels the country and abroad to speak to a wide variety of groups and associations regarding current affairs and politics in remarks entitled “Politics is a Contact Sport”.Mr. Alan Simpson is Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Trustees of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming.Mr. Simpson was a member of the Board of Visitors for the Folger-Shakespeare Library and the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. 1994-1996. From 1998 to 2000 Mr. Simpson was the Director of the Institute of Politics at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University; and he was a Visiting Lecturer at the Shorenstein Center on Press, Politics and Public Policy, 1997-2000.Mr. Simpson served on the Board of Trustees of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 1996 and he has been a member of the Screen Actor's Guild since 1994. He served on the Board of Directors for the Biogen Corporation (now BiogenIDEC Corporation), Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1997-2004 and he was a member of the Board of Directors of American Express Funds, now RiverSource Funds, a subsidiary of Ameriprise Financial, Minneapolis, Minnesota from 1997 through 2006.In March 2010, Mr. Simpson was appointed by the President as the Co-Chairman of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform and he also served on the ten-member Iraq Study Group formed under the auspices of the congressionally chartered U.S. Institute of Peace in 2006.J.D., University of Wyoming, 1958B.S., University of Wyoming, 1954

DANIELE GANSER - DER PODCAST
WTC7: Feuer oder Sprengung? (Berlin 28.11.2017) | Dr. Daniele Ganser

DANIELE GANSER - DER PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 95:32


Der Schweizer Historiker und Friedensforscher Dr. Daniele Ganser sprach am 28. November 2017 in Berlin über die Terroranschläge vom 11. September 2001 und den Einsturz von WTC7, den er als ungeklärt einstuft. Wenn wir unsere Zeitgeschichte verstehen wollen, müssen wir den so genannte „Krieg gegen den Terror“ kritisch durchleuchten. Dieser begann mit den Terroranschlägen vom 11. September 2001, kurz 9/11. Immer mehr Menschen setzen sich kritisch mit 9/11 auseinander. Was ist damals in New York wirklich passiert? Wurde das dritte Gebäude WTC7 gesprengt oder ist es wegen Feuer eingestürzt? Seit Jahren beschäftigt sich Ganser mit 9/11, weil dieser Terroranschlag ohne jede Frage ein ganz zentrales Ereignis der Zeitgeschichte ist. Die historische Forschung zu 9/11 und spezifisch zu WTC7 hat in den letzten Jahren wichtige Fortschritte gemacht. Bis jetzt wissen die Forscher mit Sicherheit, dass WTC7 am 11. September 2001 eingestürzt ist. Dir Forschung weiss auch mit Sicherheit, dass WTC7 nicht durch ein Flugzeug getroffen wurde. Die Forschung weiss zudem, dass WTC7 ein massiver Stahlbau mit 81 senkrechten starken Säulen war, der in sieben Sekunden einstürzte, davon die ersten zwei Sekunden im freien Fall. Zudem ist bekannt, dass die BBC Journalistin Jane Stanley den Einsturz von WTC7 rund 20 Minuten zu früh vermeldet hat, nämlich in den fünf Uhr Nachrichten, während das Gebäude in der Realität erst um 17:20 Uhr einstürzte. Die historische Forschung zu 9/11 weiss auch, dass der 567 Seiten lange offizielle 9/11 Untersuchungsbericht, der im Juli 2004 publiziert wurde (Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist attacks upon the United States), zwar WTC7 beiläufig erwähnt, aber erstaunlicherweise den Einsturz von WTC7 völlig verschweigt. Im offiziellen Untersuchungsbericht - immerhin die Basis für den so genannten „Krieg gegen den Terror“ und den Einsatz der Bundeswehr in Afghanistan - wird nur über den Einsturz der Twin Towers WTC1 und WTC2 berichtet, der Einsturz von WTC7 wird verschwiegen. Auch die 9/11 Gedenkstätte in New York erinnert nur an den Einsturz der Twin Towers, nicht an WTC7. In anderen Punkten ist die WTC7 Forschung noch offen. Gestritten wird heute vor allem noch über die Kernfrage, ob WTC7 durch Sprengung oder durch Feuer zum Einsturz gebracht wurde. In diesem wichtigen Punkt gibt es bisher keinen Konsens in der Forschung und es ist daher ratsam, ergebnisoffen die Fakten zu prüfen. Ganser präsentiert im Vortrag die wichtigsten Fakten zu dieser Kernfrage. Ganser regt seine Zuhörer dazu an, die Terroranschläge vom 11. September kritisch zu durchleuchten. In seinem Fazit erklärt er, dass wir die grössten Probleme im 21. Jahrhundert nicht mit Gewalt lösen können.Daniele Ganser hat neu eine Community! Er sagt: "Ich würde mich sehr freuen, Dich dort zu begrüssen! Mein Ziel ist, in diesen bewegten Zeiten den inneren und äusseren Frieden zu stärken!" Hier erfährst Du mehr zu diesem spannenden neuen Projekt: https://community.danieleganser.online/Daniele Ganser:https://www.danieleganser.chhttps://twitter.com/danieleganserhttps://www.facebook.com/DanieleGanserhttps://www.instagram.com/daniele.ganser/https://t.me/s/DanieleGanser See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Student Paramedic Podcast
Spotting Paediatric Sepsis in the Prehospital Environment w/ Dr Amanda Harley

The Student Paramedic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 37:05


This week we have a chat to Dr Amanda Harley, a Clinical Nurse Consultant for Paediatric Sepsis Queensland, completed her PhD in Paediatric Sepsis Recognition, Escalation and Management in ED, is involved with the National Commission for Healthcare and Safety around sepsis and liaises with the Global Sepsis Alliance.  DISCLAIMER: All of the opinions of each individual on 'The Student Paramedic Podcast' are their own.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Health Hats, the Podcast
Apples to Apples, Risk Adjusted for Cost & Quality of Care

Health Hats, the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 32:43


Cost & quality. Compare & risk adjust. Measurement that serves people is complex, fraught, in its infancy. Chat with Dr. Bob Phillips to make some sense of it. Blog subscribers: Listen to the podcast here. Scroll down through show notes to read the post. Subscribe to Health Hats, the Podcast, on your favorite podcast player Please support my blog and podcast. CONTRIBUTE HERE Episode Notes Prefer to read, experience impaired hearing or deafness? Find FULL TRANSCRIPT at the end of the other show notes or download the printable transcript here Contents with Time-Stamped Headings to listen where you want to listen or read where you want to read (heading. time on podcast xx:xx. page # on the transcript) Proem.. 1 Introducing Bob Phillips 01:42. 1 Tension between accessibility and continuity 05:17. 2 Comparing and burnout 07:15. 3 Measuring what's important? 08:30. 3 Care Compare.gov. Primary care referral. 10:10. 4 Comparing quality in its infancy 11:54. 4 Trust, always trust 13:44. 5 Cost, always cost 15:26. 5 Risk adjustment for payment 18:02. 6 Risk adjustment for quality 22:39. 7 Census tracts 23:45. 7 Risk adjustment controversy - one hand gives, and the other takes away 25:36. 8 Measures across time 26:47. 8 Reflection 29:56  9 Please comment and ask questions at the comment section at the bottom of the show notes on LinkedIn  via email DM on Instagram or Twitter to @healthhats Credits Music by permission from Joey van Leeuwen, Drummer, Composer, Arranger Web and Social Media Coach Kayla Nelson @lifeoflesion The views and opinions presented in this podcast and publication are solely the responsibility of the author, Danny van Leeuwen, and do not necessarily represent the views of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute®  (PCORI®), its Board of Governors or Methodology Committee. Sponsored by Abridge Inspired by and grateful to Bill Lawrence, Matthew Hudson, Matthew Pickering, Robyn Tiger, Cheryl Damburg, Adam Thompson, Jennifer Bright Links Center for Professionalism & Value in Health Care at the American Board of Family Medicine Foundation  COGME (the Council on Graduate Medical Education) Population Health on the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics Relationship Between Physician Burnout And The Quality And Cost Of Care For Medicare Beneficiaries Is Complex Care Compare Yelp for physicians Person-centered Primary Care Measure hospital price transparency Risk adjustment: what is it and how does it impact Healthcare for 2022. Census tracts The Joint Commission certifies hospitals and health care facilities, National Commission for Quality Assurance (NCQA) certifies health plans The Joint Commission certifies healthcare providers Related podcasts https://health-hats.com/pod145/ https://health-hats.com/pod163/ https://health-hats.com/pod160/ About the Show Welcome to Health Hats, learning on the journey toward best health. I am Danny van Leeuwen, a two-legged, old, cisgender, white man with privilege, living in a food oasis, who can afford many hats and knows a little about a lot of healthcare and a lot about very little. Most people wear hats one at a time, but I wear them all at once.  I'm the Rosetta Stone of Healthcare. We will listen and learn about what it takes to adjust to life's realities in the awesome circus of healthcare.  Let's make some sense of all this. To subscribe go to https://health-hats.com/ Creative Commons Licensing The material found on this website created by me is Open Source and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution. Anyone may use the material (written, audio, or video) freely at no charge.  Please cite the source as: ‘From Danny van Leeuwen, Health Hats. (including the link to my website). I welcome edits and improvements.  Please let me know. danny@health-hats.com.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
50 Years After a Review of Workplace Protections, Time for Another Look?

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 25:51


July marks the 50th anniversary of the National Commission on State Workmen's Compensation laws. The system we have in place wasn't always so. Even after the passage of protections for workers, it took years to develop today's standards. In 1972, a federal panel released a comprehensive review of state Workmen's Compensation (as it was then called) laws and guidelines. As Alan explains, several states had to readjust their systems. Our current system is a complex and delicate balance of federal and state oversight, adequate protections, and employer insurance costs. Fifty years after the initial report, is it time to review Workers' Compensation? The workplace has changed, the shift to gig working may be leaving many behind in the “new economy.” On July 11, the U.S. Department of Labor hosts a public roundtable on the topic featuring Alan Pierce.You can register to join online as stakeholders across the workplace safety and protection community discuss the future of Workers' Compensation.

Workers Comp Matters
50 Years After a Review of Workplace Protections, Time for Another Look?

Workers Comp Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 25:51


July marks the 50th anniversary of the National Commission on State Workmen's Compensation laws. The system we have in place wasn't always so. Even after the passage of protections for workers, it took years to develop today's standards. In 1972, a federal panel released a comprehensive review of state Workmen's Compensation (as it was then called) laws and guidelines. As Alan explains, several states had to readjust their systems. Our current system is a complex and delicate balance of federal and state oversight, adequate protections, and employer insurance costs. Fifty years after the initial report, is it time to review Workers' Compensation? The workplace has changed, the shift to gig working may be leaving many behind in the “new economy.” On July 11, the U.S. Department of Labor hosts a public roundtable on the topic featuring Alan Pierce.You can register to join online as stakeholders across the workplace safety and protection community discuss the future of Workers' Compensation.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Advanced Practice Providers - APPs 101: What and Who Are Advanced Practice Providers (APPs)?

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 37:14


Partners in cancer care – who are advanced practice providers? In the first episode of ASCO Education's podcast series on Advanced Practice Providers (APPs), co-hosts Todd Pickard (MD Anderson Cancer Center) and Dr. Stephanie Williams (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine), along with guest speaker, Wendy Vogel (Harborside/APSHO), discuss who advanced practice providers are, share an overview of what they do, and why they are important to oncology care teams. If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org   TRANSCRIPT Todd Pickard: Hello everyone, and welcome to the ASCO Education Podcast, episode number one of the 'Advanced Practice Providers' series, 'APPs 101: What and Who Are Advanced Practice Providers?' I'd like to introduce my co-host for this series, Dr. Stephanie Williams. My name is Todd Pickard. I'm an advanced practice provider, I'm a PA, and I work at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. I'm also the Executive Director of Advanced Practice and my clinical practice is in urology. Dr. Williams, how about you introduce yourself? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Thanks, Todd, and thanks for this opportunity to present this incredibly important topic. I am currently retired from clinical practice. I had been in practice for over 35 years both in an academic setting, a private practice, and more recently in a large institutional, multi-specialty institutional type of practice. My primary clinical care has been in stem cell transplants and cellular therapy. And we have used APPs, both PAs and NPs for a couple of decades in our particular area. Todd Pickard: Great, thanks for that. I'd also like to introduce you to our guest panelist today, Wendy Vogel from Harborside, who is a certified oncology nurse practitioner with over 20 years of clinical experience and expertise. We're excited to be chatting with Wendy today about the basics of advanced practice providers and who they are. This will be an introduction for the rest of the upcoming episodes of APP Podcasts. Wendy, why don't you tell us a little bit about yourself and your practice. Wendy Vogel: Thanks, Todd. It is a pleasure to be here. I appreciate you asking me to talk. I am an oncology nurse practitioner as you said. I do a high-risk cancer clinic and do that a couple of days a month. And I am also the executive director of APSHO, the Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology. Todd Pickard: Great! We're looking forward to a robust and informative discussion today between the three of us. So, I'd like to get started with some basics. Wendy, do you want to always start with a definition of advanced practice registered nurse? Wendy Vogel: Okay, great question! So, APRNs or advanced practice registered nurse include nurse practitioners. It can include clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives. And generally, APRNs hold at least a master's degree in addition to some initial nursing education as a registered nurse. Some APRNs have doctorates like the DNP or Doctorate of Nursing Practice. But licensure for APRNs generally falls under the State Board of Nursing.   So, we're also required to have a board certification, usually as some sort of generalist as in family medicine, pediatrics, geriatrics, women or acute care. But in oncology, many APRNs also carry oncology certification. Todd Pickard: Excellent! Thanks for that. I'll go ahead and add to the conversation by defining physician assistant. So, physician assistants are individuals who are trained in the medical model and are licensed to practice medicine in team-based settings with physicians. Very much like advanced practice registered nurses, we come from a variety of backgrounds, and our education model is really focused on thinking about the patient the same way that our physician colleagues do. We're trained in really taking a very broad look at patient care, and our education as a generalist model. PAs are certified by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants, which is one national certification that includes all of the content areas in which we will practice. Dr. Stephanie Williams: For those out there who don't know, what are the differences between a physician assistant and an APRN? Or are there differences in practical terms, in terms of how we practice our field? Wendy Vogel: That is a great question, Stephanie, thanks for asking that. We function very much the same. The main difference is just in our educational background, where nurse practitioners come from a nursing background and the nursing model of care, and I'll let Todd speak to where PAs come from, but basically, our functions are very much the same. Todd Pickard: I very much agree. If you are in a clinical setting, and for some reason, Wendy or myself failed to identify who we are, you wouldn't really detect a distinction between the care either of us provide, because we are there in that provider setting and we're really there to assess the conditions you have like appropriate history in physical examination, think through differential diagnosis or a workup, create a diagnosis and then a therapeutic plan and also to educate you as the patient or to make an appropriate referral. So, really, when APPs, PAs, and NPs work side by side, there's really not a lot of difference in what people detect in what we're doing and how we're doing things. But there are some educational differences, which are pretty minimal. So, for example, one small difference is that PAs include surgical assisting as part of our core fundamental training, and our APRN colleagues generally don't. So, in my institution, we do have nurse practitioners that go to the OR and do assisting, but in order to get there, they did a Registered Nursing First Assist Program, it's a certification. So, they learn those fundamentals of sterile technique and surgical technique. So, in essence, there's really not a whole lot of difference. Dr. Stephanie Williams: I think what I was struck with about the difference was the history and the fact that PAs came out of the Mobile Army Surgical Hospitals. To me, that was just fascinating. I think Duke was the first graduating class. Wendy Vogel: You know, the role of the APRN has really changed drastically. It began in the 1960s, because there were not enough primary care providers, particularly for children in the urban and rural areas of the US, and the first nurse practitioner program was in 1965, at the University of Colorado. So, gosh! Have we come a long way since then, both the PA role or the NP role. When was the first PA role, Todd, when was that? Todd Pickard: We were born at the same time in 1965, we just happened to be at Duke University and y'all were in Colorado. You know, I think that the most important thing about working with advanced practice providers is that you look to work with somebody who has the competencies, the skills, interpersonal communication, and the pertinent experiences because honestly, I know fantastic APRNs, I know fantastic PAs, and I know some of either profession that really just don't quite fit a particular role. And so, there is some kind of mythology around PAs and APRNs, and who should work where, like PAs should be more procedural and more in surgery, and nurse practitioners should be more in medicine in the hospital. And really, there's nothing in our training that defines that per se, I think it's just a natural progression of we're over 50 now, so our professions are middle-aged. And we're starting to really have our feet underneath us. And I think people who've worked with PAs or NPs really understand, it's about the individuals and what they bring to the table. It's not really about the initials behind our names, because honestly, that's not what makes me do good work. It's not that I have the PA or NP behind my name. It's my commitment and dedication to my patients and supporting the rest of my team. Wendy Vogel: I think Stephanie, that's why we use the term advanced practitioner, advanced practitioner provider because it doesn't single out either one of us because we are functioning in the same manner. It's easier to say than say, PAs and NPs, so we just say, APPs. Todd Pickard: Yeah. And it doesn't mean that we don't identify as individual professions, because we do. I mean, I'm a PA, but I am part of a larger group. And part of that larger group is identifying as advanced practice provider because, at my institution, there are over 1000 of us, and we are a community of providers, and that's the way that we sense how we function within the team and within the institution. And so, it's really about that kind of joint interprofessional work. And speaking of work, Wendy, tell us a little bit about what are typical things that advanced practice providers do? Wendy Vogel: It might be easier to say what we don't do. I've got a list. Do you want to hear my list? Todd Pickard: Yeah, lay it on us. Wendy Vogel: Okay, here you go. Staff and peer education, survivorship care, palliative care, hospice care, pain management, acute care clinics, case management, research, cancer patient navigator, genetic services, lung nodule clinics, quality improvement. We're writers, we're authors, we're speakers, we mentor, and we do all kinds of public education. We can have clinical roles with faculty and professional organizations. We do procedures like bone marrows, paracentesis and suturing, and all that kind of stuff. We do a lot with all the other things like diagnosing, all the things you said earlier, diagnosing, ordering lab tests, ordering chemotherapy, etc. Todd Pickard: I think what's amazing about advanced practice providers is the flexibility we have to fill in gaps on teams or in service lines, no matter what that is. You know, I like to say and I'm sure everybody thinks that they originated this, but I feel that advanced practice providers are the stem cells of the team because we differentiate into whatever is necessary. At my institution, we recently had a gap in how our peer-to-peers were handled. Many times, you order an MRI or a PET scan, and the payer will, the day of or the day before, say, ‘Oh, I need to talk to somebody.' How that gets to the clinical team and when the clinical team has time to do that, it's really hard to coordinate. So, we created a team of advanced practice providers who spend one day a week doing the regular clinical roles, but then the rest of the time, they are dedicated to facilitating these peer-to-peer conversations. They have over a 95% success rate. And the payers, the medical directors, have actually gotten to know them. And so, they'll say, ‘Hey, I want to talk to so and so because she's fantastic and knows our program, and it's really easy to have these conversations.' And so, patients are taken care of and these business needs are taken care of, and then our clinical teams can really focus on what they're there for, which is to see those patients in and out every day. So, that's the power of advanced practice, its flexibility, filling in gaps; we can bend and morph to whatever we need to do because one of the things that's in our DNA is part of PA and advanced practice RN, we're here to serve, we're problem solvers or doers, too. When we see something, we pick it up and take care of it. That's just in our nature. Stephanie, tell us a little bit about your experience working with an advanced practice provider, is what Wendy and I are saying ringing true, or what's your experience? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Oh, absolutely! As I look back on my career, I'm not certain that I could have accomplished much of what I did, without my team members and advanced practice providers, both PAs and NPs. We also use them in an inpatient setting. And I can't remember Wendy mentioned that to take care of our stem cell transplant patients, because of residency, our requirements were removed from our services, and they became the go-to's to taking care of the patients. It actually improved the continuity of care that the patients received because they would see the same person throughout their 4 to 6-week course in the hospital, they also helped run our graft versus host clinics. I hate that term physician extender because they're really part of our health care team. We are all healthcare professionals working together, as Todd beautifully mentioned, for a common goal to help that patient who's right there in front of us. And not only that, from a kind of selfish viewpoint, they help with a lot of the work, doing the notes, so that we could all split up the work and all get out on time and all have at least some work-life balance. And I think that's a very important part of any team is that we can each find our own work-life balance within the team. So, I feel that they're a very important part of the oncology healthcare team. And I would recommend that everyone who wants to take care of patients, incorporate them into their team. Wendy Vogel: Can I say something right here that you mentioned that I'm so glad you did, which was physician extender. That is a dirty, dirty word in the AP world now because we don't know what part we're extending, that is not what we do. And also, we don't want to be called mid-level providers because – you can't see but I'm pointing from my chest to my belly - I don't treat just the mid-level, nor do I treat in mid-level care. I give superior care. I just give different care. And I give care on a team. And the last one is a non-physician provider. That is also a no-no because I wouldn't describe a teacher as a non-fireman, nor would I describe you, Stephanie, as a non-nurse practitioner. So, I don't want to be a non-physician provider either. Todd Pickard: It is an interesting phenomenon that even after 50 years, so many different places, whether it's the Joint Commission, or the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, whether it's a state legislator, an individual state, an individual institution like Memorial Sloan Kettering or an MD Anderson or a Moffitt, everybody comes up with these different terms. And it's so interesting to me. Physicians are either physicians, doctor, sometimes they're called providers. But as a PA, who's an advanced practice provider, those are the two things that resonate with me: either call me PA or call me advanced practice provider. All these other names seem to just be, it's an alphabet soup, and it really doesn't carry any meaning because some places just come up with these strange terms. And I agree, physician extenders has been the one that always has amused me the most because it reminds me of hamburger helper. Am I some noodles that you add to the main meal so that you can extend that meal out and serve more people? I think what Wendy and I are really trying to get at, I know this has been with a little bit tongue in cheek, but we are part of the team. We work with physicians in a collaborative team-based setting, just like we all work with social workers and schedulers and business people and pharmacists and physical therapists. I think the main message here is that oncology care and taking care of patients with cancer is a team effort because it is a ginormous lift. It's a ginormous responsibility and our patients deserve a full team that works collaboratively and works well and has them in our focus like a laser, and I know that's what APPs do. Dr. Stephanie Williams: I think that's well said, Todd. What I enjoyed in the clinic in particular, was sitting down and discussing patient issues and problems with my APPs. And we worked together to try to figure out how to resolve issues that would come up. But we also learned from each other, you're never too old to learn something from people. I just felt the interaction, the interpersonal interaction was also very satisfying as well. Wendy Vogel: I think that the job satisfaction that comes from being a team player and working together is so much higher and that we're going to experience so much less burnout when we're working together each to the fullest scope of our practice. Todd Pickard: So, Wendy, one of the things that people ask a lot about when they work with advanced practice providers is, ‘Well, gosh! How do I know that they have this training or this experience or this competency?' And then the question arises about certification. So, let's talk a little bit about certification and what that means and what it doesn't mean. So, tell me, are advanced practice providers certified? And are they required to get a variety of certifications throughout their career? Let's talk a little bit about that. Why don't you open up the dialog. Wendy Vogel: Okay, happy to! So, to be able to practice in the United States, I have to have a board certification. And it can vary from state to state, but generally, it has to be either a family nurse practitioner certification, acute care nurse practitioner, geriatrics, women's health, pediatrics, there are about five. So, you are generally certified as one of those. There are a few oncology certifications across the US, board certifications to be able to practice at the state level, but not all states recognize those. So, most of us are educated in a more generalist area, have that certification as a generalist, and then can go on to get an additional certification. So, many nurse practitioners in oncology will also get an advanced oncology nurse practitioner certification. So, that's a little bit different. It's not required to practice. But it does give people a sense that, ‘Hey, she really knows what she's doing in oncology.' Todd Pickard: The PA profession has one national certification, and it is a generalist certification. It's probably similar to USMLE, where you really are thinking about medicine in its entirety. So, whether that be cardiology, orthopedics, family medicine, internal medicine, geriatric, psychiatry, or ophthalmology. I mean it's everything – and oncology is included as well. And that certification really is the entree into getting licensure within the states. It's basically that last examination that you take before you can get that license just to make sure that you have the basic knowledge and fundamentals to practice. And so, I always respond to this kind of question about certification, I say, ‘Well, is it really the experience and the onboarding and the training that one gets on the job and the mentoring and the coaching that one gets from our physician colleagues and other advanced practice providers that brings them the most value? Or is it going through an examination, where basically you're responding to a certain amount of information, and you either pass it or you don't, and you can get a certification? I'm not saying there's not value in that, but I'm also making the argument that if you are working with your APPs well, and they have good mentors, and they have good resources, they're going to be excellent clinicians. And having an additional certification may or may not make some huge difference. Many times I see people use it as a differentiator for privileges or something. It's really an external kind of a pressure or a desire, it doesn't really have anything to do with patient care. I mean, Wendy what has your experience been around that need for additional certification? Wendy Vogel: I've seen it used in practices to merit bonuses, which isn't really fair when a PA does not have that opportunity to have a specialty certification per se. So, I've seen it used negatively. I'm a great believer that any additional education that you can get is beneficial. However, I will say just like you said, if you are getting your mentoring, you have good practice, you're doing continuing education, then it's essentially the same thing. To be able to have an oncology certification, I had to practice for a year and I had to take a test that really measured what I should know after one year. And that's what a certification was for that. Is it beneficial, do I want it? Yeah, I want it. Do I have to have it to practice? No. Todd Pickard: I think that is a great way to segue to having a brief conversation about how you bring APPs in? I mean, just at a very high level, should people expect for an APP to come in right out of school and just hit the ground running without any additional investment? And I could ask the same question about a resident or a fellow who completes an oncology training program. Do you just put those people to work? Maybe that's an older model, and now really mentorship and that additional facilitated work is, I think, critical. So, I'll start with Stephanie, tell us a little bit about what's your experience been with advanced practice providers, or even young physicians as they enter the workforce? What's the role of onboarding or mentoring program? Dr. Stephanie Williams: So, it's important. We had a set process for bringing on our new APPs and it pretty much followed the guidelines from the American Society of Cellular Transplantation in terms of the knowledge base that they would need to know. So, it was a checklist. And we would also have them do modules from ASCO's oncology modules, as well looking at primarily hematologic malignancies, so they could get a background there. And then we would slowly bring them on board. Usually, they would start taking care of autologous patients, a certain subset of patients, and then move on to the more complicated patients. We did the same clinic, whether they were clinic or inpatient APPs. So, it took us about three to four months to onboard our APPs. In terms of a fellow becoming an attending physician, I'd like to say that there's specific onboarding there. Unfortunately, sometimes they're just, ‘Okay, these are your clinic days, this is when you start.' I mean, you're right Todd, we really need to work more on onboarding people. So, that one, they like their jobs, they're not frustrated, and they want to stay and continue to work in this field. I see many times after two or three years, if they're not onboarded properly, they just get frustrated and want to move on to a different area. Wendy Vogel: We know that most of the advanced practitioners who come into oncology don't have an oncology background, PA or NP.  They just don't, and we don't get a lot of that in school. So, it takes months, it would probably, I dare say, take 12 months of full-time practice to feel comfortable in the role. But how many practices particularly in the area that I've practiced in you get this AP, and you throw them in there, and in four weeks, you're supposed to be seeing patients. How can you make those decisions when you haven't been properly mentored? So, absolutely important to have a long onboarding time till that APP feels comfortable. Todd Pickard: Yeah, I think that it is critically important that we set up all of our team members for success, whether they be physicians, or PAs, or nurse practitioners or nurses, or pharmacists, and I think that is the role of onboarding and mentoring, having people who will invest time and energy in what you're trying to accomplish. You know, Wendy is spot on. Advanced practice providers have specific types of training within their educational program. As a PA, my focus in oncology was to screen for and detect it. So, to understand when a patient presents with a mass or some symptoms that may make you think that, oh gosh, maybe they've got acute leukemia or something else and looking at those white counts and, and understanding. But that transition from identifying and screening and diagnosing cancers is very different than how do you care for specific types of tumors and specific disciplines, whether it be radiation oncology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, cancer prevention. There's a lot that folks need to be brought up to speed about the standards of what do we do in this practice and how do we care for these types of cancers? And that really is the role for the onboarding and mentoring. You know, you may be lucky, you might get an advanced practice provider who used to work at a big academic cancer center in the same field, whether it be breast medical oncology or GI, and yeah, that's a much easier task. That person probably really needs mentoring about the local culture, how we get things done, what are the resources, and which hospitals do we refer to. But for the most part, working with an advanced practice provider means that you've got a PA or an NP, who has a strong foundation in medical practice. They know how to care for patients, they know how to diagnose, they know how to do assessments, they know how to critically think, they know how to find resources, and they know how to educate. But they may not know how long does a robotic radical prostatectomy patient going to be in the hospital? And how long does it take to recover and what are some of the things you need to be considering in  their discharge and their postoperative period? That is very detailed information about the practice and the local resources. Every advanced practice provider is going to need to have that kind of details shared with them through mentorship, and a lot of it is just how do we team with each other? What are the roles and responsibilities? Who does what? How do we have backup behaviors to cover folks? So, a lot of this really is just deciding, ‘Okay, we've got a team. Who's doing what? How do they work together and how do we back each other up?' Because at the end of the day, it's all about the team supporting each other and that's what I love about advanced practice. Wendy Vogel: Very well said, yes. I had an AP student yesterday in clinic, who told me - I was asking about her education in oncology and what she got - and she said, ‘Well, so for lymphoma, we treat with R-CHOP. So, a student, of course, raised their hand and said, ‘What's R-CHOP? She's like, ‘Well, the letters don't really line up with what the names of the drugs are, so, just remember R-CHOP for the boards.' So there you go. That's kind of what a lot of our education was like specific to oncology. And again, I'm a little tongue in cheek there also. But Todd, are you going to tell everybody about the ASCO Onboarding tool that's now available? Todd Pickard: Absolutely! ASCO has done a really great job of trying to explore what advanced practice is, and how teams work together. All of us are part of the ASCO Advanced Practice Task Force. One of the things we did was really to look at what are some best practices around onboarding, orientation, scope of practice, and team-based cancer care, and we created a resource that is available on the ASCO website, and I think that it is a great place to start, particularly for practices, physicians, or other hospital systems that don't have a lot of experience with advanced practice. It's a  great reference, it talks about the difference between orientation and onboarding. It gives you examples of what those look like. It talks about what are the competencies and competency-based examinations. So, how you assess people as they're going through the onboarding period. It has tons of references, because ASCO has done a lot of great research in this field, around collaborative practice and how patients experience it, and how folks work on teams, and what do those outcomes look like. So, I highly recommend it. Wendy, thank you for bringing that up. It's almost like you knew to suggest that. Well, this has been a really, really good conversation. I'm wondering, what are some of those pearls of wisdom that we could all provide to the folks listening? So, Stephanie, what are some of your observations that, you know, maybe we haven't just thought about, in your experience working as a physician with advanced practice providers? Dr. Stephanie Williams: One, it's important to integrate them into the team, and, as Wendy mentioned, to mentor them – mentor anybody correctly, in order for them to feel that they're contributing the most that they can to the care of the patient. I think there are other issues that we'll get into later and in different podcasts that come up that make physicians hesitant to have nurse practitioners or physician assistants. Some of those are financial, and I think we'll discuss those at a later time. But really, that shouldn't keep you from employing these particular individuals for your team. It really is a very rewarding type of practice to have. You're not alone. You're collaborating with other providers. I think it's just one of the great things that we do in oncology. Todd Pickard: I wanted to share a moment as a PA, advanced practice provider, when I most felt grateful for the opportunity to work as an advanced practice provider. My clinical practice has been in urology for the past 24 years for the main part. I've had a few little other experiences, but mainly urology, and I'll never forget a patient who was a middle-aged lady who had been working with transitional cell bladder cancer. It was superficial. So, the treatment for that is BCG and repeat cystoscopies and surveillance. And I walked into the room and I was going to give her BCG installation, and she was so angry. I wanted to know what was going on. I thought, gosh, should I make her wait too long or something else? So, I asked her, I said, ‘How are you doing today? You seem to be not feeling well.' And she said, ‘Well, I'm just so tired of this. I don't understand why y'all don't just fix me. Why don't y'all just get this right? Why do I have to keep coming back?' And as I looked at the medical record, this patient had had superficial bladder cancer for years. And I thought, ‘Has nobody ever really kind of sat down and mapped this out for her?' So, I asked her to get off the examining table, and I pulled the little paper forward, so I had someplace to draw. And I drew a big square and I said, ‘This is a field, just think of any big field anywhere near you. And it's full of weeds.' And I drew some weeds on there. And I said, ‘You know we can pull them out and we can pluck them, and we can put some weed killer in that field,' I said,  ‘do you think that if you come back in three months and there will be any weeds on that field?' She said, ‘Of course, there will be. There are always weeds because they always come back. It's very hard to get rid of.' And I said, ‘Well, this field is your bladder. And the type of cancer you have are like these weeds, and we have to constantly look for them, remove them, and then put this treatment down, that's why you come.' And she started crying. And I thought, ‘Well, I've blown it.' Because this was in the first couple of years of working as a PA in urology. And I said, ‘I'm so sorry. I really apologize.' She said, ‘Don't you dare apologize to me.' I said, ‘Man, I've really blown it now.' She said, ‘Todd, I've had this disease now for this many years. This is the first time I've ever fully understood what's happening to me. I am so grateful to you.' I will never forget this patient. I will never forget this experience. And I'm extraordinarily proud. It's not because I'm the smartest person in the world. I just happened to investigate, take the time, and I drew it out. I explained it in the simplest of terms because I wanted her to understand. And then whenever she came back, she always wanted to see me. So, it was great. I really developed a really lovely relationship with this patient. It was very rewarding. Wendy, can you think of a story that you have about an advanced practice provider that makes you particularly happy or where some big lesson was learned? Wendy Vogel: Yeah. I love your analogy. That's a great analogy. I think that part of what I love to do is similar to you, Todd, in that I like to make things understandable because I consider myself an East Tennessee southern simple person, I want to understand things in the language that I understand. So, I like using a language that a patient understands. I think if I was to say about some of the proudest things, or what makes me so excited about oncology is what we've seen in our lifetime. So, Todd, you and I practice probably about the same number of years and we could say we remember when Zofran came out, and how that revolutionized chemotherapy nausea and vomiting – Stephanie's nodding here, too. We all know that. And then wow! When we found out that we could maybe cure CML, that we're having patients live normal lives in our lifetime, that we've seen non-small cell lung cancer patients living past a year that are metastatic – Oh my gosh! This is such an exciting field and we learn something every day. There's new drugs, there's new treatments, there's new hope, every single day, and that's what makes me proud to be a part of that. Todd Pickard: Yeah, I think that oncology and the work that we get to do as a team is so incredibly rewarding. It's challenging, and we have losses, but we also have wins, and those wins are amazing, and transformative, not only for us but for our patients. So, some final pearls of wisdom. I'll share and then Wendy, I'll turn it over to you. One thing that I really want to convey to folks is to know about the state that you work in and what are the practice acts for advanced practice providers. Because, unlike our physician colleagues who have a very standard scope of practice across the country, advanced practice can drastically change from state to state and place to place even from institution to institution. So, be aware of that, so that you can build your team-based practice around what are the constraints, what is the scope of practice, and you can comply with that. It just takes a little bit of pre-work at the beginning. It's not daunting. These things are written in English. We're all smart folks. We can understand them and we can build our teams in the right way. So, just keep that in the back of their mind. It is not an obstacle. It's the instruction manual of how to build your team. That's all it is if you just think about it simplistically like that. So, Wendy, what's one or two things that you would say you really want our listeners to understand about advanced practice? Wendy Vogel: I loved what you said, Todd, both of our PA Associations and our Nurse Practitioner Associations have that information online, so it's very easy to find. But I think I would say, don't be afraid to stand up for yourself as an advanced practitioner or as a physician who wants an advanced practitioner. Don't be afraid to stand up for yourself and your scope of practice, know what you can do, know what you can't do, know and demand the respect that you deserve. I would always say that just don't forget that ‘no' is the first step to a ‘yes,' and keep on trying. Todd Pickard: I think we can all appreciate that sentiment, whether we be a PA an NP or a physician. Many times, we're advocating for our patients within our systems or our practices or with our payers or insurance providers. And yeah, sometimes you start from a place of ‘no' and then you work until you get to that ‘yes', or at least a compromise, if you can get to a 'maybe,' that's a good place too. Stephanie, any particular last words of wisdom or wrap us up with our conclusion? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Thanks, Todd and Wendy, for sharing your insights today. It's always a pleasure chatting with you both. Stay tuned for upcoming episodes where we plan to dig deeper into the various types of APPs, how they are trained, what a day in the life looks like for an oncology APP, their scope of practice, and the importance of team-based care, especially in oncology. Thank you to the listeners as well. Until next time. Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education Podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive education center at education.asco.org.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product , service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.  

Smart Women, Smart Power
Should Women Be in the Selective Service?

Smart Women, Smart Power

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 28:30


Host Kathleen McInnis sat down with the Honorable Shawn G. Skelly, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness, for a conversation on her role as the principal advisor to the Secretary of Defense and the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (USD(P&R)). In addition, she discussed her decision to endorse the recommendation to require women to register for the Selective Service System while serving as a commissioner on the National Commission for Military, National, and Public Service. 

The LabAroma Podcast by Colleen Quinn
116 David Crow - Spiritual insights into sacred plants

The LabAroma Podcast by Colleen Quinn

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 60:04


David Crow, L.Ac., graduated from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in 1984; he is a California state licensed acupuncturist and nationally certified by the National Commission for the Certification of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. In this episode, David talks about his years of studying with elders from varying traditions in their native environments in Nepal and India. He stresses the need to revive the lost tradition of intertwining botanical medicine with spirituality and valuation for the sacredness of all life. David has been a clinician, consultant, researcher, and educator for over 35 years. He has travelled extensively to study traditional medicinal systems, including spending several years studying Tibetan and Ayurvedic medicine in Nepal and India. David is the author of four books, including In Search of the Medicine Buddha, about his time with traditional doctors in the Himalayas, and Sacred Smoke, about his ethnobotanical research in Ecuador. He is the founder and owner of Floracopeia, Inc., a company devoted to supporting sustainable ecological agriculture through the production of essential oils. As an educator, he has taught extensively for over two decades in the US and Canada, and online internationally; over 7,000 students have attended his online courses in the last five years, and over 300,000 have attended his popular annual Plant Medicine Telesummit hosted at The Shift Network. Useful Linkshttps://www.floracopeia.com/https://www.crowconsultations.com/In Search of the Medicine BuddhaSacred Smoke: The Magic and Medicine of Palo SantoTo learn more about plants & your health from Colleen at LabAroma check out this informative PDF https://mailchi.mp/2fe0e426b244/osw1lg2dkhDisclaimer: The information presented in this podcast is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace professional medical advice. Please consult your doctor if you are in need of medical care, and before making any changes to your health routine.

New Books in Biography
Marc Raboy, "Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 71:24


The life and legacy of a young Argentinian woman whose disappearance in 1976 haunts those she left behind It started with a coincidence--when Marc Raboy happened to discover that he shared a surname with a young leftwing Argentinian journalist who in June 1976 was ambushed by a rightwing death squad while driving with her family in the city of Mendoza. Alicia's partner, the celebrated poet and fellow Montonero Francisco "Paco" Urondo, was killed on the spot. Their baby daughter was taken and placed in an orphanage. Her daughter ultimately rescued but Alicia was never heard from again.  In Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel (Oxford University Press, 2022), Raboy pursues her story not simply to learn what happened when the post-Perón government in Argentina turned to state terror, but to understand what drove Alicia and others to risk their lives to oppose it. Author and subject share not only a surname--a distant ancestral connection--but youthful rebellion, journalistic ambition, and the radical politics that were a hallmark of the 1960s. Their destinies diverged through a combination of choice and circumstance. Using family archives, interviews with those who knew her, and transcripts from the 2011 trial of former Argentine security forces personnel involved in her disappearance, Raboy reassembles Alicia's story. He supplements his narrative with documents from Argentina's attempts to deal with the legacy of the military dictatorship, such as the 1984 report of the National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons, Nunca Más ("Never Again"); as well as secret diplomatic correspondence recently made public through the U.S. State Department's Argentina Declassification Project. Looking for Alicia immerses readers in the years of the so-called "Dirty War," which, decades later, cast their shadow still. It also gives an unforgettably human face to the many thousands who disappeared during that dark era, those they left behind, and the power of the memories that bind them. Candela Marini is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies and Spanish at MSOE University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in History
Marc Raboy, "Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 71:24


The life and legacy of a young Argentinian woman whose disappearance in 1976 haunts those she left behind It started with a coincidence--when Marc Raboy happened to discover that he shared a surname with a young leftwing Argentinian journalist who in June 1976 was ambushed by a rightwing death squad while driving with her family in the city of Mendoza. Alicia's partner, the celebrated poet and fellow Montonero Francisco "Paco" Urondo, was killed on the spot. Their baby daughter was taken and placed in an orphanage. Her daughter ultimately rescued but Alicia was never heard from again.  In Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel (Oxford University Press, 2022), Raboy pursues her story not simply to learn what happened when the post-Perón government in Argentina turned to state terror, but to understand what drove Alicia and others to risk their lives to oppose it. Author and subject share not only a surname--a distant ancestral connection--but youthful rebellion, journalistic ambition, and the radical politics that were a hallmark of the 1960s. Their destinies diverged through a combination of choice and circumstance. Using family archives, interviews with those who knew her, and transcripts from the 2011 trial of former Argentine security forces personnel involved in her disappearance, Raboy reassembles Alicia's story. He supplements his narrative with documents from Argentina's attempts to deal with the legacy of the military dictatorship, such as the 1984 report of the National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons, Nunca Más ("Never Again"); as well as secret diplomatic correspondence recently made public through the U.S. State Department's Argentina Declassification Project. Looking for Alicia immerses readers in the years of the so-called "Dirty War," which, decades later, cast their shadow still. It also gives an unforgettably human face to the many thousands who disappeared during that dark era, those they left behind, and the power of the memories that bind them. Candela Marini is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies and Spanish at MSOE University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Women's History
Marc Raboy, "Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Women's History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 71:24


The life and legacy of a young Argentinian woman whose disappearance in 1976 haunts those she left behind It started with a coincidence--when Marc Raboy happened to discover that he shared a surname with a young leftwing Argentinian journalist who in June 1976 was ambushed by a rightwing death squad while driving with her family in the city of Mendoza. Alicia's partner, the celebrated poet and fellow Montonero Francisco "Paco" Urondo, was killed on the spot. Their baby daughter was taken and placed in an orphanage. Her daughter ultimately rescued but Alicia was never heard from again.  In Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel (Oxford University Press, 2022), Raboy pursues her story not simply to learn what happened when the post-Perón government in Argentina turned to state terror, but to understand what drove Alicia and others to risk their lives to oppose it. Author and subject share not only a surname--a distant ancestral connection--but youthful rebellion, journalistic ambition, and the radical politics that were a hallmark of the 1960s. Their destinies diverged through a combination of choice and circumstance. Using family archives, interviews with those who knew her, and transcripts from the 2011 trial of former Argentine security forces personnel involved in her disappearance, Raboy reassembles Alicia's story. He supplements his narrative with documents from Argentina's attempts to deal with the legacy of the military dictatorship, such as the 1984 report of the National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons, Nunca Más ("Never Again"); as well as secret diplomatic correspondence recently made public through the U.S. State Department's Argentina Declassification Project. Looking for Alicia immerses readers in the years of the so-called "Dirty War," which, decades later, cast their shadow still. It also gives an unforgettably human face to the many thousands who disappeared during that dark era, those they left behind, and the power of the memories that bind them. Candela Marini is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies and Spanish at MSOE University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Marc Raboy, "Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 71:24


The life and legacy of a young Argentinian woman whose disappearance in 1976 haunts those she left behind It started with a coincidence--when Marc Raboy happened to discover that he shared a surname with a young leftwing Argentinian journalist who in June 1976 was ambushed by a rightwing death squad while driving with her family in the city of Mendoza. Alicia's partner, the celebrated poet and fellow Montonero Francisco "Paco" Urondo, was killed on the spot. Their baby daughter was taken and placed in an orphanage. Her daughter ultimately rescued but Alicia was never heard from again.  In Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel (Oxford University Press, 2022), Raboy pursues her story not simply to learn what happened when the post-Perón government in Argentina turned to state terror, but to understand what drove Alicia and others to risk their lives to oppose it. Author and subject share not only a surname--a distant ancestral connection--but youthful rebellion, journalistic ambition, and the radical politics that were a hallmark of the 1960s. Their destinies diverged through a combination of choice and circumstance. Using family archives, interviews with those who knew her, and transcripts from the 2011 trial of former Argentine security forces personnel involved in her disappearance, Raboy reassembles Alicia's story. He supplements his narrative with documents from Argentina's attempts to deal with the legacy of the military dictatorship, such as the 1984 report of the National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons, Nunca Más ("Never Again"); as well as secret diplomatic correspondence recently made public through the U.S. State Department's Argentina Declassification Project. Looking for Alicia immerses readers in the years of the so-called "Dirty War," which, decades later, cast their shadow still. It also gives an unforgettably human face to the many thousands who disappeared during that dark era, those they left behind, and the power of the memories that bind them. Candela Marini is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies and Spanish at MSOE University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Latin American Studies
Marc Raboy, "Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 71:24


The life and legacy of a young Argentinian woman whose disappearance in 1976 haunts those she left behind It started with a coincidence--when Marc Raboy happened to discover that he shared a surname with a young leftwing Argentinian journalist who in June 1976 was ambushed by a rightwing death squad while driving with her family in the city of Mendoza. Alicia's partner, the celebrated poet and fellow Montonero Francisco "Paco" Urondo, was killed on the spot. Their baby daughter was taken and placed in an orphanage. Her daughter ultimately rescued but Alicia was never heard from again.  In Looking for Alicia: The Unfinished Life of an Argentinian Rebel (Oxford University Press, 2022), Raboy pursues her story not simply to learn what happened when the post-Perón government in Argentina turned to state terror, but to understand what drove Alicia and others to risk their lives to oppose it. Author and subject share not only a surname--a distant ancestral connection--but youthful rebellion, journalistic ambition, and the radical politics that were a hallmark of the 1960s. Their destinies diverged through a combination of choice and circumstance. Using family archives, interviews with those who knew her, and transcripts from the 2011 trial of former Argentine security forces personnel involved in her disappearance, Raboy reassembles Alicia's story. He supplements his narrative with documents from Argentina's attempts to deal with the legacy of the military dictatorship, such as the 1984 report of the National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons, Nunca Más ("Never Again"); as well as secret diplomatic correspondence recently made public through the U.S. State Department's Argentina Declassification Project. Looking for Alicia immerses readers in the years of the so-called "Dirty War," which, decades later, cast their shadow still. It also gives an unforgettably human face to the many thousands who disappeared during that dark era, those they left behind, and the power of the memories that bind them. Candela Marini is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies and Spanish at MSOE University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

Podcast Historias with Alphecca Perpetua
Friars, Matriarchs, Tres de Abril, and the Virgin Mary | Podcast Historias with Alphecca Perpetua

Podcast Historias with Alphecca Perpetua

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 19:03


"Friars, Matriarchs, Tres de Abril, and the Virgin Mary" BLAST FROM THE PAST (feat. Amiel "Cortz" Cortes) An Excerpt: Season 1, Episode 02, Rated-PG13 "Lay Back" | Music by Brian Withycombe SPONSORED BY: Studio Historias, Broadcasting & Multimedia Productions https://show.studiohistorias.com AMIEL "Cortz" CORTES is a Cebu-based Historical Researcher & Consultant. He graduated with a degree in AB History at the University of San Carlos, Philippines in 2015, and worked as a Program Officer for Research at the Ramon Aboitiz Foundation where he contributed as a Principal Researcher, Indexer, Editorial Assistant, and Field Researcher for various local and regional events, exhibits, academic publications, and projects. THE VIRGIN MARY SYMBOLISM. In 1986, it was believed that the Lady of Fátima—the Catholic title of Mary that's based on the Marian apparitions of three shepherd children at Fátima, Portugal in 1917—"miraculously mediated" a peaceful revolution against former Philippine president Ferdinand Marcos Sr, where demonstrators largely consisted of Roman Catholic nuns who offered flowers to soldiers while praying the rosary. Two years later, a "Holy Ground" marker known as the EDSA Shrine was built as an act of thanksgiving to the Virgin Mary. In 2019, the National Commission for Culture and the Arts of the Philippines declared the church as an "Important Cultural Property". PHILIPPINES, A MATRIARCHAL NATION. Stemming from pre-colonial social structures, the Philippines already allowed equal importance among kinships, where women inherited property, commanded as religious leaders, composed the military forces, and led villages in the absence of a male heir. Today, Filipino women still contribute to the decision-making process within families, businesses, and the country. The Philippines currently ranks 7th in the Gender-Equality List for Southeast and East Asia in the 2022 SDG Gender Index by Equal Measures 2030, with an overall score of 69.8 just after Malaysia and Thailand. THE MANILA GALLEON. For two and a half centuries, Spanish trading ships sailed between Acapulco and Manila that brought cargoes of luxury items such as tobacco, spices, and porcelain to the Americas. During the Spanish empire, priests and missionaries were mobile. And also aboard the galleons were deportees, prisoners, exiles, and among other undesirables from the colonies; making a diverse variety of crewmen traveling between Spain, Peru, and the Philippines. THE BATTLE OF TRES DE ABRIL. In March 1898, Filipino revolutionary leader Lt.-Gen. Pantaleón "León Kilat" Villegas agreed to revolt against the Spaniards with the Cebuano Katipuneros (KKK); plotted on April 10th, an Easter Sunday. After the Spaniards caught wind of the scheduled rebellion, armed with bolos (machete) and some guns, 6,000 revolutionists fought a week earlier on Palm Sunday, April 3rd, and won; now known as the 'Battle of Tres de Abril'. DESCRIPTION: Podcast Historias with @alpheccaperpetua • Presented/Hosted by Alphecca Perpetua • Arranged, Mixed, and Mastered by Alphecca Perpetua • Produced by Alphecca Perpetua & Brent Kohnan • Distributed by Studio Historias • https://about.studiohistorias.com • Cebu, Philippines 6000 • All Rights Reserved © 2022 DISCLAIMER: The assumptions, views, opinions, and insinuations made by the host and guests do not reflect those of the show, the management, and the companies affiliated. A few information in this podcast episode may contain errors or inaccuracies; we do not make warranty as to the correctness or reliability of the content. If you think you own the rights to any of the material used and wish for the material not be used, please contact Studio Historias via email at askstudiohistorias@gmail.com.

Moving the Needle
Addressing Racism in Nursing with Dr. Ernest Grant

Moving the Needle

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 20:49


In 2021, the National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing found more than nine out of ten Black nursing professionals have experienced racism in the workplace. Dr. Dina Velocci, president of AANA, sits down with Dr. Ernest Grant, co-lead of the Commission and president of the American Nurses Association, to unpack and discuss the treatment of racism in nursing.

Leadership Conversations
Leadership Conversation- Episode 148 with Isvari Maranwe

Leadership Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 53:24


Name: Isvari MaranweCurrent title: President and Co-FounderCurrent organisation: Dweebs GlobalI'm the President of Dweebs Global. I am also a national and cyber security lawyer, an ex-physicist, and a writer. I have held many positions with the U.S. government (Department of Defense, Department of State, National Commission on Service, FCC), worked for businesses (Sidley Austin, Ingenico, iKeyVault), written columns for several different outlets, and researched particle and astrophysics (CERN, Fermilab, Lawrence Berkeley Lab). I have taught Python, given two TEDx talks, and volunteered around the world. I write novels. I have played the piano for twenty years, sing, and speak Hindi, Spanish, German, French, Kannada, and English. Most of all, I help people.Janani Mohan, Nathan Maranwe, and I founded Dweebs Global, an international mentorship organization with thousands of mentors around the world. Starting to help people through COVID 19, our services will always be 100% free. No paid content. No sponsorships. No nonsense. If you are reaching out for free personalized resume edits, career tips, or anything else, please go through www.dweebsglobal.org/contact. We have helped thousands of people with life and mental health advice, resume editing, and boosting their careers and network. We will continue to help for free, especially in these dark times. If you are also willing to be a mentor, please reach out to me.Resources mentioned in this episode:Free Download of The Leadership Survival Guide (10 World-Class Leaders Reveal Their Secrets)The Leadership Conversations PodcastThe Jonno White Leadership PodcastThe Leadership Question of the Day PodcastClarity Website7 Questions on Leadership SeriesWe'd Love To Interview YOU In Our 7 Questions On Leadership Series!Subscribe To Clarity's Mailing ListJonno White's eBook Step Up or Step OutJonno White's Book Step Up or Step Out (Amazon)

SENIA Happy Hour
Get Involved with Special Olympics

SENIA Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 25:04


Overview: Today, host Lori Boll speaks with the Chief Global Education Officer for the Special Olympics, responsible for global education and youth leadership.Jacqueline Jodl, PhD. Lori and Jackie discuss the history of the Special Olympics, the evidence that backs up these programs that lessens bullying and bias, and how we, in our international schools, can get more involved. With a program like Unified Sports, we can create inclusive opportunities. Connect Website Twitter Instagram LinkedIn Resources Mentioned in Today's Podcast: Social Inclusion of Students With Intellectual Disabilities: Global Evidence From Special Olympics Unified Schools Bio Jacqueline Jodl, PhD, is the Chief Global Education Officer for the Special Olympics, responsible for global education and youth leadership. Previously, Dr. Jodl was an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia's School of Education and Executive Director at the Aspen Institute leading the National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development. Dr. Jodl's life is dedicated to helping organizations like Special Olympics that help children and young people who advocate for a more inclusive world where differences are celebrated, not feared. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/seniapodcast/message

MTR Podcasts
Sandra L. Gibson

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 50:19


About the guestSandra L. Gibson's arts and culture training, teaching and practice over three decades have given her a unique understanding of partnership, creativity and collaboration. Gibson's professional experience began with her role as program representative for UCLA Extension's Department of the Arts, where she developed and managed 180-200 nationally recognized programs annually. Gibson later became Director, West Coast Operations at American Film Institute, where she also served Director, NEA's Independent Filmmaker Program and Director, Center for Advanced Film and Television Studies. Gibson's work as the executive director of the Long Beach Regional Arts Council in California developed her gifts for working with diverse cultural communities, individual artists and patrons of arts and culture. Gibson directed the city's first Cultural Masterplan and launched the first Smithsonian Institution Program Affiliation in the US with the City of Long Beach. In 1995 Gibson served on the steering committee that formed Americans for the Arts and as a founding board member, and was recruited for the position of executive vice president and COO at the organization in 1998. In 2000, she was appointed the fourth president and CEO of the Association of Performing Arts Presenters, the leading service and advocacy organization for the presenting industry worldwide. Gibson realized the need for a more comprehensive assessment of the performing arts in the context of a rapidly changing world and partnered with the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to sponsor the first nationwide survey of the performing arts presenting field. Gibson engaged the association in new technologies and expanded its reach globally and across industry sectors, including partnerships with the leadership of Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y las Artes in Mexico; the French Embassy Cultural Services Division; the Netherlands Consulate and the Cultural Ministry of Colombia, among others. Gibson served as a Commissioner on the Culture Committee of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO from 2005-2009 and testified with cellist Yo-Yo Ma about the challenges with nonimmigrant visa processing before the House of Representatives Government Reform Committee in 2005. Gibson served on NEA's Music Creativity panel in July 2002, the Regional Partnership Agreements panel in February 2006, the State Partnerships Agreements panel in January 2009, and State Partnerships Stimulus funding panel in March 2009. In 2004 Gibson launched the Creative Campus Initiative with a landmark meeting of the American Assembly at Columbia University, and in 2007 established the Creative Campus Innovations Grant Program to support exemplary cross-campus, interdisciplinary projects that integrate the arts into the academy. Gibson also led the development of an eco-leadership forum that advances the goals and action agenda of Culture|Futures, an international collaboration of organizations and individuals in the nonprofit, for-profit, philanthropic, economic development, political and policy arenas who are shaping and delivering proactive support for the transition towards an Ecological Age by 2050.Gibson became an independent consultant in July 2011 and in 2012 formed Sandra L. Gibson and Associates, LLC, a consulting practice dedicated to advancing the arts, culture and education globally. Gibson serves as Executive Director of the Maryland Film Festival/Stavros Niarchos Foundation Parkway Theatre in Baltimore, Maryland, as a Consulting Advisor to the DeVos Institute for Arts Leadership founded by Michael Kaiser at the University of Maryland, and as a Consulting Advisor to The Canales Project founded by opera singer Carla Dirlikov. From 2012-2018 Gibson served as the first executive director of the National China Garden Foundation in Washington, DC, overseeing the development, fundraising and construction design for a priority U.S.-China government initiative to establish the National China Garden, a 12-acre classical Chinese garden center in the historic U.S. National Arboretum. She has served as a consultant to the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African American History and Culture, Northwoods Nijii Enterprise Corporation, Theatre Forward, and as an advisor to the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, as a consultant to the Smithsonian Office of the Assistant Secretary for Education and Access, and the National Museum of American History, as well as a Senior Artistic Advisor to the China International Performing Arts Fair, Guangzhou, China. Currently Gibson serves as President and Chair, Friends of the British Council, Board Member and Chair of the Artistic Committee of the Sphinx Organization, and as Vice Chair of the National Advisory board for Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. An ethnomusicologist and musician with a Master's Degree in Music from Northwestern University, Gibson believes the arts are critical to personal, community and national well being, essential to an advanced democracy and vital to global cultural exchanges. She has worked tirelessly to raise dynamic conversations about the intrinsic value and impact of art and art making, their contributions to a high-quality education, to economic livelihood and to a historic legacy woven intricately into the very fabric of life.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episodeSNF ParkwayPhotography by Mike MorganTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

EcoJustice Radio
Indigenous Peoples of Mexico Unite Against Corporate Mega-Projects

EcoJustice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 58:06


For bonus content and other benefits, become an EcoJustice Radio patron at https://www.patreon.com/ecojusticeradio Indigenous, social justice, and environmental groups have come together in a caravan to speak out against destructive mega-projects and mining across eight states in Central and Southern Mexico. Our guests are Victorino Torres Nava, Professor of the Náhuatl language [http://www.kalmekak.org] at the Anahuacalmecac Academy and Marcos Aguilar, Head of School of Anahuacalmecac Academy [http://www.dignidad.org] and Executive Director of Semillas del Pueblo. The Caravan has been traveling from town to town, making visible the local and regional struggles for clean water and the defense of territories. It began on International Water Day March 22nd in the state of Puebla and will arrive in the state of Morelos, south of Mexico City, at the end of April. The Caravan has called for a time of Rebellious Dignity, to build a new nation by and for all, to strengthen the power of the people. The mega-projects include privatization of water wells and aquifers, construction of highways and rail lines, oil and gas pipelines, and massive rare-earth mineral mining projects that will have an irreversible impact on human health, Indigenous cultures and autonomy, and ecosystems across the region. On this show we discuss how Indigenous Peoples of Mexico are participating in the Caravan for Water and Life to bring awareness to environmental and social rights struggles they are experiencing. Victorino Torres Nava, Professor of the Náhuatl language at the Anahuacalmecac Academy, and a resident of the village of Cuantepec in Morelos, Mexico. Marcos Aguilar, Masewalli Mexicano, co-founder and Executive Director of Semillas Sociedad Civil, Anahuacalmecac International University Preparatory of North America and of the American Indian Resurgence Initiative. Formerly Los Angeles collective coordinator for the National Commission for Democracy in Mexico, Marcos most recently became a community-nominated Commissioner to the National Forum of Mexico on Constitutional Reform for the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Afromexicans held in Mexico City in August 2019-2021. Podcast Website: http://ecojusticeradio.org/ Podcast Blog: https://www.wilderutopia.com/category/ecojustice-radio/ Support the Podcast: https://www.patreon.com/ecojusticeradio Executive Producer: Jack Eidt Host and Producer: Jessica Aldridge Engineer and Original Music: Blake Quake Beats Show Created by Mark and JP Morris Episode 133 Image: Witness

Interviews: Tech and Business
Ukraine Information Technology 2022: Resilience and Leadership

Interviews: Tech and Business

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 39:27


What are the prospects for the IT industry in Ukraine? How will it respond to the challenges of today? If you're interested in finding out more about what is happening with Ukraine IT — this episode is for you.To learn more, we speak with Executive Director of the Ukraine IT association, Konstantin Vasyuk. The organization was established in 2004 to "unite the interests of business, the state and international partners for the development of the IT industry in Ukraine."We are joined by guest co-host, Dr. David A. Bray, Distinguished Fellow with the Stimson Center, a foreign policy research institute located in Washington, DC. The conversation includes these topics:-- About life in Ukraine today-- Maintaining professional communities during time of conflict-- Maintaining professional IT technology deliverables during times of conflict-- How can global IT providers help Ukraine?-- Business continuity planning in the Ukraine conflict-- What kinds of investment does Ukraine need to rebuild?Keep up to date on CXOTalk shows: https://www.cxotalk.com/subscribeRead the full transcript: https://www.cxotalk.com/episode/ukraine-information-technology-2022-resilience-leadershipKonstantin Vasyuk has been developing the Ukrainian IT industry as the Executive Director of the IT Ukraine Association, the largest association of the tech industry in Ukraine. Prior to heading the IT Ukraine Association, he held the position of Director of Public Projects at the IT company Itera Ukraine. For more than 5 years he was the head of the IT committee of the European Business Association.Dr. David A. Bray is a Distinguished Fellow with the Stimson Center. He is Principal at LeadDoAdapt Ventures and has served in a variety of leadership roles in turbulent environments, including bioterrorism preparedness and response from 2000-2005, Executive Director for a bipartisan National Commission on R&D, providing non-partisan leadership as a federal agency Senior Executive, work with the U.S. Navy and Marines on improving organizational adaptability, and with U.S. Special Operation Command's J5 Directorate on the challenges of countering disinformation online. He has received both the Joint Civilian Service Commendation Award and the National Intelligence Exceptional Achievement Medal.