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American automotive manufacturing company

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  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about General Motors

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Latest podcast episodes about General Motors

Moody's Talks - Inside Economics
Vehicles and More Vehicles

Moody's Talks - Inside Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 72:24


Elaine Buckberg, Chief Economist of General Motors, joins Mark, Ryan, and Cris to discuss the vehicle industry. They breakdown what is going on with vehicle prices, supply chains, and the outlook for electric vehicles.

Autoline After Hours
AAH #585 - How GM Developed The Electric Chevrolet Silverado In Record Time

Autoline After Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 59:53


GUEST: Nichole Kraatz, 2024 Silverado EV Chief Engineer PANEL: Joann Muller, Axios; Gary Vasilash, on Automotive; John McElroy, Autoline.tv

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1348: 20 Jan 2022 | NIO Opens First Battery Swap Station Outside China

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 28:14


Show #1348 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Thursday 20th January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon Executive Producer KESTER SANDBACH NIO OPENS THEIR FIRST SWAPPING STATION OUTSIDE OF CHINA - NIO did open their first Power Swap Station (PSS) outside of China at Lier close to Drammen in Norway today. Nio says that the station will make it possible to replace the battery in NIO's cars with a charged one in five minutes and is, therefore, an alternative to spending time charging the car. PSS is also part of NIO's investment in Battery as to Service (BaaS) and an essential part of NIO's goal of separating electric cars and batteries. You buy the car you want, and then rent or buy the battery suiting you best at the moment. - The station will replace the battery in all NIO's models. The first NIO model to find its way to Norway is the big SUV ES8, launched here in the autumn of 2021. - I think the combination of battery swapping and Battery as a Service is the most significant benefit of technology here in Norway. For everyday use, you can manage with a small battery in the car, and then it is possible the swap to a larger battery when going for longer journeys or in periods of more intense use of the car. - Another benefit of battery swapping is to reduce the "battery anxiety" many experiences when going electric. Batteries are an expensive part of the car, 15-20 % of total cost, NIO says, and the development is going fast. By renting the battery, it is possible to reduce the risk and easily upgrade to a more modern battery as they develop. - Many of the cars they sell today will be on the road in 15 years. Thanks to Battery Swap, they will always have the latest battery technology. Original Source : https://www.emobilitynorway.com/post/nio-opens-their-first-swappin-station-outside-of-china VW PLANS TO RESTART SALES OF E-UP - Volkswagen plans to restart sales of the battery-powered version of its Up minicar to meet growing demand for affordable electric cars. - VW stopped selling the e-Up in 2020 when government incentives to encourage EV purchases caused a surge in demand. The model was not designed for high volumes and selling it with discounts was not profitable, according to German press reports. - "We had temporarily taken the e-Up off the market in 2020 because delivery times had risen dramatically due to high demand," VW said in an emailed statement to German IT news website Golem. "Now it has been decided to reintroduce the e-Up into the order program." - The electric car rental company Nextmove said the e-Up in the "Style Plus" version is about to make a comeback with a list price of about 26,500 euros ($30,000) and a range of roughly 250 km (155 miles). The final customer price would be around 17,000 euros after government incentives offered in Germany. Original Source : https://europe.autonews.com/automakers/vw-plans-restart-sales-e-electric-minicar-demand-surges-affordable-evs PORSCHE INTRODUCES NEW TAYCAN SPORTS TURISMO MODEL IN THE UK - Porsche is adding to its Taycan range with the introduction of a new Sport Turismo in the UK – middle-ground between the standard model and estate Cross Turismo. - This sportier version of the Cross Turismo retains the same practical estate-like body without increasing the car's ride height or the addition of chunky wheelarch protection. - Prices for the rear-wheel-drive Taycan Sport Turismo which costs from £73,650. - The more powerful 4S will go on sale for £84,830, then £104,990 for the GTS. - Above this is the £117,670 Turbo and, at the top of the range, the Turbo S flagship which brings all-wheel-drive and starts from £140,080. - 0-60mph time of just 2.6 seconds before powering on to a top speed of 162mph Original Source : https://cardealermagazine.co.uk/publish/porsche-introduces-new-taycan-sports-turismo-model-in-the-uk/252445 - The GTS Sport Turismo is to be launched at the end of February, the other versions – from the rear-wheel-drive to the Turbo S – will follow in mid-March. - The version with the longest range is not the rear-wheel-drive model, but the Taycan 4S Sport Turismo. It is specified with a WLTP range of 498 kilometres. According to Porsche, this is possible thanks to some further developments in the drive system. In the “Normal” and “Range” driving modes, the front electric motor is almost completely disconnected and de-energised in the partial load range – and this more efficiently than before. Thermal management and charging functions have also been improved. All in all, the 4S can keep drag losses low compared to the rear-wheel-drive car, but recuperate more energy via the front axle during deceleration. Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/01/19/porsche-taycan-sport-turismo-to-launch-for-e86495/ BLINK CHARGING TO SUPPLY EV CHARGERS TO GENERAL MOTORS DEALERSHIPS - Blink Charging, an electric vehicle charger manufacturer, will be deploying EV chargers at General Motors dealerships across the U.S. and Canada, according to the company. The startup will be teaming up with facility solutions provider ABM to supply its new IQ 200 Level 2 chargers to GM. - There are no target charging station amounts for this agreement, nor is there a date for widespread deployment, because the purchase and installation are on a dealer-by-dealer basis. So far, Blink has seen “nearly 1,000 orders from GM dealers totaling 1,505 EV chargers,” according to a spokesperson for the company. - Blink's IQ 200 chargers are designed for fleets and built with local load management that can allow for up to 20 chargers on a single shared circuit without overwhelming the power grid. Original Source : https://techcrunch.com/2022/01/18/blink-charging-to-supply-ev-chargers-to-general-motors-dealerships/ STELLANTIS CEO SAYS POLITICIANS, NOT AUTOMAKERS PUSHING FOR EVS - According to Stellantis CEO Carlos Tavares, the rush to electrification isn't coming from automakers but politicians. - Automotive News reports that Tavares told a European media scrum that "the brutality" of Europe's ban 2035 ban on internal combustion engines could create "social risk." The deadline is forcing automakers to quickly transform their factories and supply chains in order to meet the new government regulations. He had previously promised not to shut down any European plants, but he also noted that Stellantis would "need to remain competitive" in the recent interview. - Tavares also noted that there are better ways to reduce carbon emissions that are cheaper and faster than transitioning to electric vehicles. Tavares said that an EV would need to drive 43,000 miles (70,000 kilometers) to begin compensating for its carbon footprint. Light hybrid vehicles could significantly reduce carbon emissions while being cheaper for customers to buy and for automakers to design and manufacture. Original Source : https://www.motor1.com/news/561891/stellantis-ceo-electric-push-politicians/ VALEO STEP INTO BATTERY POWER: HOPES FOR A LOW-COST ROUTE TO ELECTRIC BIKES - Valeo might not be a household name but they're among the world's biggest automotive parts suppliers with 187 production facilities and 67 R&D bases across 33 countries – so their intention to start supplying low-cost electric powertrains for motorcycles could lead to a host of affordable battery-powered bikes. - The new powertrain comprises an air-cooled electric motor that's good for 9.4kW (12.6bhp), mounted into compact package with a single-speed transmission and electronic control unit. - It's designed to work with 48V batteries, which are fast becoming something of a benchmark for small electric motorcycles. Original Source : https://www.motorcyclenews.com/news/new-tech/valeo-48v-electric-motorbike-powertrain/ IKEA CANADA IN BIG ROLLOUT OF ELECTRIC DELIVERY TRUCKS Original Source : https://chainstoreage.com/ikea-canada-big-rollout-electric-delivery-trucks YAMAHA EXPANDS PORTFOLIO OF GOGORO-POWERED VEHICLES   Original Source : https://www.gogoro.com/news/pbgn-yamaha-emf/ HONDA AND V2X SUISSE CONSORTIUM TO ADVANCE VEHICLE-TO-GRID Original Source : https://hondanews.eu/eu/en/cars/media/pressreleases/362145/honda-and-v2x-suisse-consortium-to-advance-vehicle-to-grid-charging-technology-in-switzerland EASELINK BOLTS AHEAD WITH €8.3 MILLION FOR ITS AUTOMATED EV CHARGING SOLUTION   Original Source : https://www.eu-startups.com/2022/01/graz-based-easelink-bolts-ahead-with-e8-3-million-for-its-automated-ev-charging-solution/ UTAH COULD TAX ELECTRIC VEHICLE DRIVERS FOR USING STATE ROADS Original Source : https://www.fox13now.com/news/politics/utah-could-tax-electric-vehicle-drivers-for-using-the-states-roads OVER $12 MILLION ADDED TO STATE'S ELECTRIC VEHICLE REBATE PROGRAM   Original Source : https://cnycentral.com/news/local/over-12-million-added-to-states-electric-vehicle-rebate-program THOR VISION VEHICLE CONCEPT RV IS BOTH EV AND FUEL-CELL VEHICLE Original Source : https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a38818818/thor-vision-vehicle-concept-phev-rv/ AIRSTREAM UNVEILS THE ESTREAM ELECTRIC TRAILER CONCEPT Original Source : https://hypebeast.com/2022/1/airstream-estream-concept-electric-camping-trailer-reveal QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM What TV, Print or Digital advertising have you seen for EVs recently which you noticed, or thought was memorable? Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Founders
The Essays of Warren Buffett

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 32:55


What I learned from reading The Essays of Warren Buffett by Warren Buffett and Lawrence Cunningham.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 235 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Greater Than Code
267: Handling Consulting Businesses and Client Loads

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:06


00:36 - Panelist Consulting Experience and Backgrounds * Debugging Your Brain by Casey Watts (https://www.debuggingyourbrain.com/) * Happy and Effective (https://www.happyandeffective.com/) 10:00 - Marketing, Charging, and Setting Prices * Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/) * Chelsea's Blog (https://chelseatroy.com/) * Self-Worth by Salary 28:34 - GeePawHill Twitter Thread (https://twitter.com/GeePawHill/status/1478950180904972293) - Impact Consulting * Casey's Spreadsheet - “Matrix-Based Prioritization For Choosing a Job” (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qVrWOKPe3ElXJhOBS8egGIyGqpm6Fk9kjrFWvB92Fpk/edit#gid=1724142346) * Interdependence (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interdependence) 38:43 - Management & Mentorship * Detangling the Manager: Supervisor, Team Lead, Mentor (https://dev.to/endangeredmassa/detangling-the-manager-supervisor-team-lead-mentor-gha) * Adrienne Maree Brown (https://adriennemareebrown.net/) 52:15 - Explaining Value and Offerings * The Pumpkin Plan: A Simple Strategy to Grow a Remarkable Business in Any Field by Mike Michalowicz (https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Plan-Strategy-Remarkable-Business/dp/1591844886) * User Research * SPIN Selling: Situation Problem Implication Need-payoff by Neil Rackham (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/833015.SPIN_Selling) 55:08 - Ideal Clients Reflections: Mae: The phrase “indie”. Casey: Having a Patreon to help inspire yourself. Chelsea: Tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes to in terms of a person's needs. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: CHELSEA: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode 267. I'm Chelsea Troy, and I'm here with my co-host, Mae. MAE: And also with us is Casey. CASEY: Hi, I'm Casey. And today's episode, we are our own guests. We're going to be talking to you about our experiences in consulting. To get this one started, how about we share what got us into consulting and what we like, don't like about it, just high-level? Chelsea, would you mind going first? CHELSEA: Sure. So I started in consulting, really in a full-time job. So for early in my programming career, I worked for several years for a company called Pivotal Labs and Pivotal Labs is chiefly, or was chiefly at the time, a software engineering consulting organization. My job was to pair program with folks from client teams, various types of clients, a lot of health insurance companies. At the time, there was a restaurant loyalty app that we did some work for. We did some work for General Motors, various clients, a major airline was also a client, and I would switch projects every three to six months. During that time employed by Labs, I would work for this client, pair programming with other pivots, and also with client developers. So that was my introduction to consulting and I think that it made the transition to consulting later, a little bit easier because I already had some consulting experience from under the Labs' umbrella. After I worked for Labs, I moved on to working at a product company for about 2 years and my experience at that product company burned me out on full-time programming for a little while. So in my last couple of months at that job, I realized that I was either going to have to take some time off, or I was going to have to find an arrangement that worked better for me for work, at least for the next little while. And for that next little while, what I decided I wanted to try to do was work part-time because I was uncomfortable with the idea of taking time off from programming completely. I felt that I was too early in my career and the skill loss would be too great if I took time off completely, but I knew I needed some space and so, I quit my full-time job. After I quit the full time—I probably should have done this before I quit the job, but I didn't—I called an organization that I had previously done some volunteer work with, with whom I discussed a job a couple of years prior, but for a couple of different reasons, it didn't work out. I said to them, “I know that you're a grant-funded organization and you rarely have the funding and capacity to bring somebody on, but just so you're aware, I like working with you. I love your product. I love the stuff that you work on. All our time working together, I've really enjoyed. So if you have an opening, I'm going to have some time available.” The director there emailed me that same day and said, “Our mobile developer put in his two weeks' notice this morning. So if you have time this afternoon, I'd really like to talk to you,” [chuckles] and that was my first client and they were a part-time client. I still work with them. I love working with them. I would consider them kind of my flagship client. But then from there, I started to kind of pick up more clients and it took off from there after that summer. I spent that summer generally working 3 days a week for that client and then spending 4 days a week lying face down in a park in the sun. That helped me recover a little bit from burnout. And then after that, I consulted full-time for about 2 years and I still consult on the side of a full-time job. So that's my story. Is anyone feeling a penchant for going next? MAE: I can go. I've been trying to think how am I going to say this succinctly. I've had at least two jobs and several club, or organization memberships, or founding, or positions since I was 16. So wherever I go, I've always been saying, “Well, I've done it these 47 ways already [laughs] even since I was a teenager.” So I've sort of always had a consulting orientation to take a broader view and figure out ways in which we can systematize whatever it is that's happening around me. Specifically for programming, I had been an administrator, like an executive leader, for many years. I just got tired of trying to explain what we as administrators needed and I just wanted to be able to build the things. I was already a really big Microsoft access person and anybody who just got a little [laughs] snarky in there knows I love Microsoft Access. It really allowed me to be able to offer all kinds of things to, for example, I was on the board of directors of my Kiwanis Club and I made a member directory and attendance tracker and all these things. Anyway, when I quit my executive job and went to code school in 2014, I did it because I knew that I could build something a lot better than this crazy Access database [laughs] that I had, this very involved ETL things going on in. I had a nonprofit that I had been involved with for 15 years at that point and I had also taken a database class where I modeled this large database that I was envisioning. So I had a bunch of things in order. I quit my full-time job and went to an income of $6,500 my first year and I hung with that flagship customer for a while and tailored my software. So I sort of have this straddling of a SaaS situation and a consulting situation. I embed into whoever I'm working with and help them in many ways. Often, people need lots of different levels of coaching, training, and skills development mixed with just a place to put things that makes sense to them. I think that's the brief version [laughs] that I can come up with and that is how I got where I am and I've gone in and out of also having a full-time job. Before I quit that I referenced the first year I worked a full-time job plus at least 40 to a 100 hours on my software to get it ready for prime time. So a lot of, a lot of work. CASEY: Good story. I don't think I ever heard these fuller stories from either of you, even though I know roughly the shape of your past. It's so cool to hear it. Thanks for sharing them. All right, I'll share about me now. So I've been a developer, a PM, and I've done a lot of design work. I've done all the roles over my time in tech. I started doing programming 10, 15 years ago, and I'm always getting burnt out everywhere I go because I care so much and we get asked to do things that seem dumb. I'm sure anyone listening can relate to this in some organization and when I say dumb, I don't use that word myself directly. I'm quoting a lot of people who would use that word, but I say either we're being asked to do things that don't make sense, aren't good ideas, or there are things that are we're being asked to do that would make sense if we knew why and it's not being communicated really well. It's poor communication. Either one, the other, or both. So after a lot of jobs, I end up taking a 3-month sabbatical and I'm like, “Whatever, I got to go. I can't deal with caring so much anymore, and I'm not willing to care less either.” So most recently, I took a sabbatical and I finished my book, Debugging Your Brain, which takes together psychology ideas, like cognitive behavioral therapy and programming ideas and that, I'm so proud of. If you haven't read it yet, please check it out. Then I went back to my job and I gave them another month where I was like, “All right, look, these are things need to change for me to be happy to work here.” Nothing changed, then I left. Maybe it's changing very slowly, but too slowly for me to be happy there, or most of these past companies. [laughs] After I left, this last sabbatical, I spent three to six months working on a board game version of my book. That's a lot of fun. And then I decided I needed more income, I needed to pay the bills, and I can totally be a tech consultant if I just deal with learning marketing and sales. That's been my… probably six months now, I've been working on the marketing in sales part, thinking a lot about it. I have a lot of support from a lot of friends. Now I consult on ways to make teams happier and more effective and that's my company name, Happy and Effective. I found it really easy to sell workshops, like diversity, equity, and inclusion workshops to HR departments. They're pretty hungry for those kinds of workshops and it's hard to find good, effective facilitators. It's a little bit harder to get companies to pay for coaching for their employees, even though a new EM would love coaching and how to be a good leader. Companies don't always have the budget for that set aside and I wish they would. I'm working with a lot of companies. I have a couple, but not as many as I'd like. And then the hardest, my favorite kind of client is when I get to embed with the team and really work on seeing what's going on me on the ground with them, and help understand what's going on to tell the executives what's happening and what needs to change and really make a big change. I've done that once, or twice and I'd love to do that more, but it's the hardest. So I'm thinking about easy, medium, hard difficulty of selling things to clients. I would actually make plenty of money is doing workshops, honestly, but I want the impact of embedding. That's my bigger goal is the impact. MAE: Yeah. I basically have used my software as a Trojan horse for [laughs] offering the consulting and change management services to help them get there because that is something that people already expect to spend some money on. That, though has been a little problematic because a few years in, they start to think that the line item in the budget is only for software and then it looks very expensive to them. Whereas, if they were looking at it as a consultant gig, it's incredibly inexpensive to them. CASEY: Yeah. It's maybe so inexpensive that it must not be a quality product that they're buying. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Put it that way implicitly. MAE: Definitely, there's also that. CASEY: When setting prices, this is a good general rule of thumb. It could be too low it looks like it'll be junk, like a dollar store purchase, or it can be too high and they just can't afford it, and then there's the middle sweet spot where it seems very valuable. They barely can afford it, but they know it'll be worth it, and that's a really good range to be in. MAE: Yeah. Honestly, for the work that I do, it's more of a passion project. I would do it totally for free, but that doesn't work for this reason you're talking about. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Like, it needs to hurt a little bit because it's definitely going to be lots and lots of my time and it's going to be some of their time and it needs to be an investment that not hurt bad [laughs] but just be noticeable as opposed to here's a Kenny's Candy, or something. CASEY: I found that works on another scale, on another level. I do career coaching for friends, and friends of friends, and I'm willing to career coach my friends anyway. I've always been. For 10 years, I've reviewed hundreds, thousands of resumes. I've done so many interviews. I'm down to be a career coach, but no one was taking me up on it until I started charging and now friends are coming to me to pay me money to coach them. I think on their side, it feels more equitable. They're more willing to do it now that I'm willing to take money in exchange for it. I felt really bad charging friends until I had the sliding skill. So people who make less, I charge less for, for this personal service. It's kind of weird having a personal service like that, but it works out really well. I'm so happy for so many friends that have gotten jobs they're happy with now from the support. So even charging friends, like charging them nothing means they're not going to sign up for it. MAE: Yes, and often, there is a bias of like, “Oh, well, that's my friend.” [laughs] so they must not be a BFD.” CASEY: Yeah. But we are all BFDs. MAE: Exactly! How about you Chelsea? How did you start to get to the do the pricing thing? CHELSEA: Yeah, I think it's interesting to hear y'all's approaches to the marketing and the pricing because mine has been pretty different from that. But before I get off on that, one thing I do want to mention around getting started with offering personal services at price is that if it seems too large a step to offer a personal service to one person for an amount of money, one thing that I have witnessed folks have success with in starting out in this vein is to set up a Patreon and then have office hours for patrons wherein they spend 2 hours on a Sunday afternoon, or something like that and anyone who is a patron is welcome to join. What often ends up happening for folks in that situation is that people who are friends of theirs support their Patreon and then the friends can show up. So effectively, folks are paying a monthly fee for access to this office hours, which they might attend, or they might not attend. But there are two nice things about it. The first thing about it is that you're not – from a psychological perspective, it doesn't feel like charging your friends for your time with them. It feels more indirect than that in a way that can be helpful for folks who are very new to charging for things and uncomfortable with the idea. The second thing is that the friends are often much more willing to pay than somebody who's new to charging is willing to charge. So the friends are putting this money into this Patreon, usually not because they're trying to get access to your office hours, but because they want to support you and one of the nice things about Patreon is that it is a monthly amount. So having a monthly email from Patreon that's like, “Hey, you we're sending you—” it doesn't even have to be a lot. “We're sending you 40 bucks this month.” It is a helpful conditioning exercise for folks who are not used to charging because they are getting this regular monthly income and the amount is not as important as receiving the regular income, which is helpful psychological preparation for charging for things on your own, I think. That's not the way that I did it, but I have seen people be effective that way. So there's that. For me, marketing was something that I was very worried about having to do when I started my business. In fact, it was one of those things where my conviction, when I started my consulting business, was I do not want to have to sell my services. I will coast on what clients I can find and when it is no longer easy, I will just get a full-time job because selling traditionally conceptualized is not something that I enjoyed. I had a head start on the marketing element of things, that is sort of the brand awareness element of things, my reputation and the reason for that is that first of all, I had consulted at Labs for several years, which meant that every client team that I had ever worked with there, the director remembered me, the product owner remember me. So a lot of people who had been clients of Labs – I didn't actually get anybody to be a client of mine who was a client of Labs, but the individuals I had worked with on those projects who had then changed jobs to go to different companies, reached out to me on some occasions. So that was one place that I got clients from. The other place that I gotten clients from has been my blog. Before I started my business, I had already been writing a tech blog for like 4, or 5 years and my goal with the tech blog has never actually been to get clientele, or make money. My goals for the blog when I started it were to write down what I was learning so that I would remember it and then after that, it was to figure out how to communicate my ideas so that I would have an easier time communicating them in the workplace. After that, it became an external validation source so that I would no longer depend on my individual manager's opinion of me to decide how good I was at programming. Only very recently has it changed to something like, okay, now I'm good enough at communicating and good enough at tech that I actually have something to teach anybody else. So honestly, for many years, I would see the viewership on my blog and I would be like, “Who are all these people? Why are they in my house?” Like, this is weird, but I would get some credibility from that. CASEY: They don't expect any tea from me. CHELSEA: Yeah. I really hope. I don't have enough to go around, [laughs] but it did help and that's where a lot of folks have kind of come from. Such that when I posted on my blog a post about how I'm going to be going indie. I've quit my job. I didn't really expect that to go anywhere, but a few people did reach out from that and I've been lucky insofar is that that has helped me sustain a client load in a way that I didn't really expect to. There's also, I would be remiss not to mention that what I do is I sling code for money for the majority of my consulting business, at least historically and especially in the beginning was exclusively that, and there's enough of a demand to have somebody come in and write code that that helped. It also helped that as I was taking on clients, I started to niche down specifically what I wanted to work on to a specific type of client and to a specific type problem. So I quickly got to the point where I had enough of a client load that I was going to have to make a choice about which clients to accept, or I was going to have to work over time. Now, the conventional wisdom in this circumstance is to raise your rates. Vast majority of business development resources will tell you that that's what you're supposed to do in this situation. But part of my goal in creating my consulting business had been to get out of burnout and part of the reason for the burnout was that I did not feel that the work that I was doing was contributing to a cause that made me feel good about what I was doing. It wasn't morally reprehensible, but I just didn't feel like I was contributing to a better future in the way that my self-identity sort of mandated that I did. It was making me irritable and all these kinds of things. MAE: I had the same thing, yeah. CHELSEA: Yeah. So it's interesting to hear that that's a common experience, but if I were to raise my rates, the companies that were still going to be able to afford me were going to be companies whose products were not morally reprehensible, but not things that coincided with what I was trying to get out of my consulting business. So what I did instead was I said, “I'm specifically looking to work with organizations that are contributing to basic scientific research, improving access for underserved communities, and combating the effects of climate change,” and kept my rates effectively the same, but niche down the clientele to that. That ended up being kind of how I did it. I find that rates vary from client to client in part, because of what you were talking about, Casey, wherein you have to hit the right price in order to even get clients board in certain circumstances. CASEY: Right. CHELSEA: I don't know a good way to guess it. My technique for this, which I don't know if this is kosher to say, but my technique for this has been whoever reached out to me, interested in bringing me on as a consultant for that organization, I ask that person to do some research and figure out what rate I'm supposed to pitch. That has helped a lot because a lot of times my expectations have been wildly off in those circumstances. One time I had somebody say to me, this was for a custom workshop they wanted. I was like, “What should I charge?” And they were like, “I don't know, a few thousand.” I was like, “Is that $1,200? Is that $9,000? I don't know how much money that is,” and so they went back and then they came back and they were able to tell me more specifically a band. There was absolutely no way I would've hit that number accurately without that information. CASEY: Yeah, and different clients have different numbers. You setting your price standard flat across all customers is not a good strategy either. That's why prices aren't on websites so often. CHELSEA: Yeah. I find that it does depend a lot. There's similarly, like I said, a lot of my clients are clients who are contributing to basic scientific research are very often grant funded and grants funding is a very particular kind of funding. It can be intermittent. There has to be a skillset on the team for getting the grant funding. A lot of times, to be frank, it doesn't support the kinds of rates that somebody could charge hourly in a for-profit institution. So for me, it was worth it to make the choice that this is who I want to work with. I know that my rate is effectively capped at this, if I'm going to do that and that was fine by me. Although, I'm lying to say it was completely fine by me. I had to take a long, hard look in the mirror, while I was still in that last full-time job, and realize that I had become a person who gauged her self-worth by the salary that she commanded more than I was comfortable with. More than I wanted to. I had to figure out how to weaken that dependency before I was really able to go off and do my own thing. That was my experience with it. I'm curious whether y'all, well, in particular, Casey, did you find the same thing? CASEY: The self-worth by salary? CHELSEA: Yeah. CASEY: I felt that over time, yeah. Like I went from private sector big tech to government and I got a pay cut and I was like, “Ugh.” It kind of hurt a little and it wasn't even as much as I was promised. Once I got through the hiring process, it was lower than that and now I'm making way less. When I do my favorite impact thing, the board game, like if I made a board game about mental health for middle schoolers, which is something I really want to do, that makes less than anything else I could with my time. I'll be lucky to make money on that at all. So it's actually inverse. My salary is inversely proportional to how much impact I can have if I'm working anyway. So my dream is to have enough corporate clients that I can do half-time, or game impact, whatever other impact things I'm thinking about doing. I think of my impact a lot. Impact is my biggest goal, but the thing is salary hurts. If I don't have the salary and I want to live where I'm living and the lifestyle I have, I don't want to cut back on that and I don't need to, hopefully. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: I'm hoping eventually, I'll have a steady stream of clients, I don't need to do the marketing and sales outreach as much and all those hours I kind of recoup. I can invest those in the impact things. I've heard people can do that. I think I'll get there. CHELSEA: No, I think you absolutely will. Mae, I'm curious as to your experience, because I know that you have a lot of experience with a similar calculation of determining which things are going to provide more income, which things are probably going to provide less income, and then balancing across a bunch of factors like money, but also impact, time spent, emotional drain, and all that stuff. MAE: Well, Chelsea. [laughter] I am a real merry go round in this arena. So before I became a programmer, I had a state job, I was well paid, and I was pretty set. Then I was a programmer and I took huge pay cut because I quit. I became a programmer when I was 37 years old. So I already had a whole career and to start at the beginning and be parallel with 20-year-old so it's not just like my salary, but also my level and my level of impact on my – and level of the amount of people who wanted to ask me for my advice [laughs] was significantly different. So like the ego's joking stopped and so when you mentioned the thing about identity. Doing any kind of consulting in your own deal is a major identity reorganization and having the money, the title, the clout, and the engagement. Like a couple years, I have spent largely alone and that is very different than working at a place where I have colleagues, or when I live somewhere and have roommates. But I have found signing up for lots and lots of different social justice and passion project things, and supporting nonprofits that I believe in. So from my perspective, I'm really offering a capacity building grant out of my own pocket, my own time, and my own heart and that has been deeply rewarding and maybe not feel much about my identity around salary. Except it does make me question myself as an adult. Like these aren't the best financial decisions to be making, [chuckles] but I get enough out of having made them that it's worth it to me. One of the things probably you were thinking of, Chelsea, we worked together a little bit on this mutual aid project that I took on when the pandemic started and I didn't get paid any dollars for that and I was working 18 hours a day on it, [chuckles] or something. So I like to really jump in a wholeheartedly and then once I really, really do need some dollars, then I figure something else out. That is kind of how I've ebbed and flowed with it. But mostly, I've done it by reducing my personal overhead so that I'm not wigged about the money and lowering whatever my quality-of-life spending goals [chuckles] are. But that also has had to happen because I have not wanted to and I couldn't get myself to get excited about marketing of myself and my whole deal. Like I legit still don't have a website and I've been in operation now since 2014 so that's a while. I meet people and I can demonstrate what it is and I get clients and for me, having only a few clients, there's dozens of people that work for each one. So it's more of an organization client than a bunch of individuals and I can't actually handle a ton. I was in a YCombinator thing that wanted me to really be reporting on income, growth rates, and all of these number of new acquisition things, and it just wasn't for me. Those are not my goals. I want to make sure that this nonprofit can help more people this year and that they can get more grant money because they know how many people they helped and that those people are more efficient at their job every day. So those are harder to measure. It's not quite an answer to your question, [laughs] but I took it and ran a little. CHELSEA: No, I appreciate that. There is a software engineer and a teacher that I follow on Twitter. His name is GeePawHill. Are y'all familiar with GeePawHill? MAE: No. CHELSEA: And he did a thread a couple of days ago that this conversation reminds me of and I found it. Is that all right if I read like a piece of it and paraphrase part of it? MAE: Yes, please. CHELSEA: Okay. So this is what he says. He says, “The weirdest thing about being a teacher for young geek minds: I am teaching them things…that their actual first jobs will most likely forbid them to do. The young'uns I work with are actually nearly all hire-able as is, after 18 months of instruction, without any intervention from me. The problem they're going to face when they get to The Show isn't technical, or intellectual at all. No language, or framework, or OS, or library, or algorithm is going to daunt them, not for long. No, the problem they're going to face is how to sustain their connection to the well of geek joy, in a trade that is systematically bent on simultaneously exploiting that connection while denying it exists and refusing any and all access to it. It is possible, to stick it out, to acquire enough space and power, to re-assert one's path to the well. Many have done it; many are doing it today. But it is very hard. Very hard. Far harder than learning the Visitor pattern, or docker, or, dart, or SQL, or even Haskell. How do you tell people you've watched “become” as they bathed in the cool clear water that, for some long time, 5 years or more, they must…navigate the horrors of extractive capitalist software development? The best answer I have, so far, is to try and teach them how and where to find water outside of work. It is a lousy answer. I feel horrible giving it. But I'd feel even more horrible if I didn't tell them the truth.” CASEY: I just saw this thread and I really liked it, too. I'm glad you found it. MAE: Oh, yeah. I find it honestly pretty inspiring, like people generally who get involved in the kinds of consulting gigs that we three are talking about, which is a little different than just any random consulting, or any random freelancing. CASEY: Like impact consulting, I might call that. MAE: Yeah. It's awesome if the money comes, but it's almost irrelevant [chuckles] provided that basic needs are meant. So that's kind of been my angle. We'll see how – talk to me in 20 more years when I'm [chuckles] trying to retire and made a lot of choices that I was happy with at the time. CASEY: This reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who's an executive director of an orchestra in the nonprofit space and he was telling me that so many nonprofits shoot themselves in the foot by not doing enough fundraising, by not raising money, and that comes from not wanting to make money in a way because they're a nonprofit, money is not a motive, and everybody's very clear about that. That's noble and all, but it ends up hurting them because they don't have the money to do the impactful things they would as a nonprofit. Money is a necessary evil here and a lot of people are uncomfortable with it. Including me a lot of the time. Honestly, I have to tell myself not to. What would I tell a friend? “No, charge more money.” Okay, I guess I'll tell myself to do that now. I have this conversation with myself a lot. MAE: Yeah. I've been very aware that when I become anti-money, the well dries up. The money well. [laughs] CASEY: Yeah. MAE: And when I am respectful of and appreciative of money in the world, more comes my way. There is an internal dousing, I think that happens that one needs to be very careful about for sure. CASEY: One of the techniques I use with myself and with clients is a matrix where I write out for this approach, this thing that I'm thinking about how much money will it make, how much impact will it have on this goal, and all the different heuristics I would use to make the decision, or columns and all the options arose. I put numbers in it and I might weight my columns because money is less important than impact, but it's still important. It's there. I do all this math. In the end, the summary column with the averages roughly matches what's in my head, which is the things that are similar in my head are similar on paper, but I can see why and that's very clarifying for me. I really like being able to see it in this matrix form and being able to see that you have to focus on the money some amount. If you just did the high impact one, it wouldn't be on the top of the list. It's like, it's hard to think about so many variables at once, but seeing it helps me. CHELSEA: It is. GeePaw speaks to that some later in the thread. He says, “You've got to feed your family. You've got to. That's not negotiable. But you don't got to forget the well. To be any good at all, you have to keep finding the well, keep reaching it, keep noticing it. Doesn't matter whether it's office hours, or after hours. Matters whether you get to it. The thing you've got to watch, when you become a professional geek, isn't the newest tech, and it sure as hell isn't the org's process. You've got to watch whether, or how you're getting to the well. If you're getting to the well, in whatever way, you'll stay alive and change the world.” I think I'm curious as to y'all's thoughts on this, but like I mentioned earlier, I have a full-time job and I also do this consulting on the side. I also teach. I teach at the Master's program in computer science at University of Chicago. I do some mentoring with an organization called Emergent Works, which trains formerly incarcerated technologists. The work situation that I have pieced together for myself, I think manages to get me the income I need and also, the impact that I'm looking for and the ability to work with people and those kinds of things. I think my perspective at this point is that it's probably difficult, if it's realistic at all, to expect any one position to be able to meet all of those needs simultaneously. Maybe they exist, but I suspect that they're relatively few and far between and I think that we probably do ourselves a disservice by propagating this idea that what you need to do is just make yourself so supremely interview-able that everybody wants to hire you and then you get to pick the one position where you get to do that because there's only one in the entirety of tech, it's that rare. Sure, maybe that's an individualist way to look at it. But when we step back and look more closely, or when we step back and look more broadly at that, it's like, all right, so we have to become hypercompetitive in order to be able to get the position where we can make enough while helping people. Like, the means there seem kind of cutthroat for the ends, right? [laughs] CASEY: This reminds me of relationships, too and I think there's a lot of great parallels here. Like you shouldn't expect your partner to meet all of your needs, all of them. MAE: I was thinking the same thing! CASEY: Uh huh. Social, emotional, spiritual, physical, all your needs cannot possibly by one person and that is so much pressure to put on that person, CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's like not healthy. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: You can choose some to prioritize over others for your partner, but you're not going to get a 100% of it and you shouldn't. CHELSEA: Well, and I find that being a conversation fairly regularly in monogamous versus polyamorous circles as well. Like, how much is it appropriate to expect of a partner? But I think it is a valid conversation to have in those circles. But I think that even in the context of a monogamous relationship, a person has other relationships—familial relationships, friend relationships—outside of that single romantic relationship. CASEY: Co-workers, community people, yeah. CHELSEA: Right. But even within that monogamous context, it's most realistic and I would argue, the most healthy to not expect any one person to provide for all of your needs and rather to rely on a community. That's what we're supposed to be able to do. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Interdependence, not independence. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's more resilient in the face of catastrophe, or change in general, mild, more mild change and you want to be that kind of resilient person for yourself, too. Just like you would do a computer system, or an organization. They should be resilient, too. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Your relationship with your job is another one. MAE: Totally. CHELSEA: Right. And I think that part of the reason the burnout is so quick – like the amount of time, the median amount of time that somebody spends at a company in tech is 2.2 years. MAE: I know, it's so weird. CHELSEA: Very few companies in tech have a large number of lifers, for example, or something like that. There are a number of reasons for that. We don't necessarily have to get into all of them, although, we can if you want. But I think one of them is definitely that we expect to get so much out of a full-time position. Tech is prone. due to circumstances of its origin, to an amount of idealism. We are saving the world. We, as technologists, are saving the world and also, we, as technologists, can expect this salary and we, as technologists, are a family and we play ping pong, and all of these things – [laughter] That contribute to an unrealistic expectation of a work environment, which if that is the only place that we are getting fulfillment as programmers, then people become unsatisfied very quickly because how could an organization that's simultaneously trying to accomplish a goal, meet all of these expect for everybody? I think it's rare at best. CASEY: I want to bring up another example of this kind of thing. Imagine you're an engineer and you have an engineering manager. What's their main job? Is it to get the organization's priorities to be done by the team, like top-down kind of thing? We do need that to happen. Or is it to mentor each individual and coach them and help them grow as an engineer? We need that somewhere, too, yeah. Or is it to make the team – like the team to come together as a team and be very effective together and to represent their needs to the org? That, too, but we don't need one person to do all three of those necessarily. If the person's not technical, you can get someone else in the company to do technical mentorship, like an architect, or just a more senior person on, or off the team somewhere else. But we put a lot of pressure on the engineering managers to do that and this applies to so many roles. That's just one I know that I can define pretty well. There's an article that explains that pretty well. We'll put in the show notes. MAE: Yes! So what I am currently doing is I have a not 40 hours a week job as an engineering manager and especially when I took the gig, I was still doing all of these pandemic charity things and I'm like, “These are more important to me right now and I only have so many hours in the day. So do you need me to code at this place? I can, but do you need me to because all those hours are hours I can go code for all these other things that I'm doing,” and [laughs] it worked. I have been able to do all three of the things that you're talking about, Casey, but certainly able to defer in different places and it's made me – this whole thing of not working full-time makes you optimize in very different ways. So I sprinkle my Slack check-ins all day, but I didn't have to work all day to be present all day. There's a lot that has been awesome. It's not for everyone, but I also have leaned heavily on technical mentorship happening from tech leads as well. CASEY: Sounds good. MAE: But I'm still involved. But this thing about management, especially in tech being whichever programmer seems like the most dominant programmer is probably going to be a good needs to be promoted into management. Just P.S. management is its own discipline, has its own trajectory and when I talk to hiring managers and they only care about my management experience in tech, which is 6 years, right? 8, but I have 25 years of experience in managing. So there's a preciousness of what it is that we are asking for the employees and what the employees are asking of the employer, like you were talking about Chelsea, that is very interesting. It's very privileged, and does lead a lot of people to burnout and disappointment because their ideas got so lofty. I just want to tie this back a little bit too, something you read in that quote about – I forget the last quote, but it was something about having enough to be able to change the world and it reminded me of Adrienne Maree Brown, pleasure activism, emergent strategy, and all of her work, and largely, generations of Black women have been saying, “Yo, you've got to take care [chuckles] of yourself to be able to affect change.” Those people have been the most effective and powerful change makers. So definitely, if you're curious about this topic, I urge you to go listen to some brilliant Black women about it. CASEY: We'll link that in the show notes, too. I think a lot about engineering managers and one way that doesn't come up a lot is you can get training for engineering managers to be stronger managers and for some reason, that is not usually an option people reach for. It could happen through HR, or it could happen if you have a training budget and you're a new EM, you could use your training budget to hire coaching from someone. I'm an example. But there's a ton of people out there that offer this kind of thing. If you don't learn the leadership skills when you switch roles, if you don't take time to learn those skills that are totally learnable, you're not going to have them and it's hard to apply them. There's a lot of pressure to magically know them now that you've switched hats. MAE: And how I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have a therapist, [laughs] I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have multiple job coaches at any time. Like why are we not sourcing more ideas and problem-solving strategies, and thinking we need to be the repository of how to handle X, Y, Z situation? CASEY: For some reason, a lot of people I've talked to think their manager is supposed to do that for them. Their manager is supposed to be their everything; their boss. They think the boss that if they're bad, you quit your job. If they're good, you'll stay. That boss ends up being their career coach for people, unless they're a bad career coach and then you're just stuck. Because we expect it so strongly and that is an assumption I want everyone listening to question. Do you need your manager at work to be that person for you? If they are, that's great. You're very fortunate. If not, how can you find someone? Someone in the community, a friend, family member, a professional coach, there's other options, other mentors in the company. You don't have to depend on that manager who doesn't have time for you to give you that kind of support. CHELSEA: So to that end, my thinking around management and mentorship changed about the time I hit – hmm. It was a while ago now, I don't know, maybe 6 years as a programmer, or something like that. Because before that, I was very bought into this idea that your manager is your mentor and all these types of things. There was something that I realized. There were two things that I realized. The first one was that, for me, most of my managers were not well set up to be mentors to me and this is why. Well, the truth is I level up quickly and for many people who are managers in a tech organization, they were technologists for 3 to 5 years before they became managers. They were often early enough in their career that they didn't necessarily know what management entailed, or whether they should say no based on what they were interested in. Many managers in tech figure out what the job is and then try to find as many surreptitious ways as possible to get back into the code. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: Additionally, many of those managers feel somewhat insecure about their weakening connection to the code base of the company that they manage. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: And so it can be an emotionally fraught experience for them to be mentor to someone whose knowledge of the code base that they are no longer in makes them feel insecure. So I learned that the most effective mentors for me – well, I learned something about the most effective mentors for me and I learned something of the most effective managers for me. I learned that the most effective managers for me either got way out ahead of me experience wise before they became managers, I mean 10 years, 15 years, 20 years, because those are not people who got promoted to management because they didn't know to say no. Those are people who got promoted to management after they got tired of writing code and they no longer staked their self-image on whether they're better coders than the people that they manage. That's very, very important. The other type of person who was a good manager for me was somebody who had never been a software engineer and there are two reasons for that. First of all, they trended higher on raw management experience. Second of all, they were not comparing their technical skillset to my technical skillset in a competitive capacity and that made them better managers for me, honestly. It made things much, much easier. And then in terms of mentors, I found that I had a lot more luck going outside of the organization I was working for mentors and that's again, for two reasons. The first one is that a lot of people, as they gain experience, go indie. Just a lot of people, like all kinds. Some of my sort of most trusted mentors. Avdi Grimm is somebody I've learned a lot from, indie effectively at this point. GeePawHill, like I mentioned, indie effectively at this point. Kenneth Mayer, indie effectively at this point. And these are all people who had decades of experience and the particular style of programming that I was doing very early in my career for many years. So that's the first reason. And then the second reason is that at your job, it is in your interest to succeed at everything you try—at most jobs. And jobs will tell you it's okay to fail. Jobs will tell you it's okay to like whatever, not be good at things and to be learning. But because if I'm drawing a paycheck from an organization, I do not feel comfortable not being good at the thing that I am drawing the paycheck for. MAE: Same. CHELSEA: And honestly, even if they say that that's the case, when the push comes to shove and there's a deadline, they don't actually want you to be bad at things. Come on! That doesn't make any sense. But I've been able to find ambitious projects that I can contribute to not for pay and in those situations, I'm much more comfortable failing because I can be like, “You know what, if they don't like my work, they can have all their money back.” And I work on a couple projects like that right now where I get to work with very experienced programmers on projects that are interesting and challenging, and a lot of times, I just absolutely eat dirt. My first PR doesn't work and I don't know what's wrong and the whole description is like somebody please help and I don't feel comfortable doing that on – if I had to do it at work, I would do it, but I'm not comfortable doing it. I firmly believe that for people to accelerate their learning to their full capacity for accelerating their learning, they must place themselves in situations where they not only might fail, but it's pretty likely. Because that's what's stretching your capacity to the degree that you need to get better and that's just not a comfortable situation for somewhere that you depend on to make a living. And that ended up being, I ended up approaching my management and my mentorship as effectively mutually exclusive things and it ended up working out really well for me. At this particular point in time, I happened to have a manager who happened to get way out ahead of me technically, and is willing to review PRs and so, that's very nice. But it's a nice-to-have. It's not something that I expect of a manager and it's ended up making me much more happy and manage relationships. MAE: I agree with all of that. So well said, Chelsea. CHELSEA: I try, I try. [laughs] Casey, are there things that you look for specifically in a manager? CASEY: Hmm. I guess for that question, I want to take the perspective inward, into myself. What do I need support on and who can I get that from? And this is true as also an independent worker as a consultant freelancer, too. I need support for when things are hard and I can be validated from people who have similar experiences, that kind of like emotional support. I need technical support and skills, like the sales I don't have yet and I have support for that, thank goodness. Individuals, I need ideally communities and individuals, both. They're both really important to me and some of these could be in a manager, but lately, I'm my own manager and I can be none of those things, really. I'm myself. I can't do this external support for myself. Even when I'm typing into a spreadsheet and the computer's trying to be a mirror, it's not as good as talking to another person. Another perspective that I need support on is how do I know what I'm doing is important and so, I do use spreadsheets as a mirror for that a lot of the time for myself. Like this impact is having this kind of magnitude of impact on this many people and then that calculates to this thing, maybe. Does that match my gut? That's literally what I want to know, too. The numbers aren't telling me, but talking to other people about impact on their projects really kind of solidifies that for me. And it's not always the client directly. It could be someone else who sees the impact I'm having on a client. Kind of like the manager, I don't want to expect clients to tell me the impact I'm having. In fact, for business reasons, I should know what the impact is myself, to tell them, to upsell them and continue it going anyway. So it really helps me to have peers to talk through about impact. Like that, too types of support. What other kinds of support do you need as consultants that I didn't just cover? MAE: I still need – and I have [laughs] hired Casey to help me. I still need a way to explain what it is that I am offering and what the value of that really is in a way that is clear and succinct. Every time I've gone to make a website, or a list of what it is that I offer, I end up in the hundreds of bullet points [laughs] and I just don't – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, yeah. MAE: Have a way to capture it yet. So often when people go indie, they do have a unique idea, a unique offering so finding a way to summarize what that is can be really challenging. I loved hearing you two when you were talking about knowing what kinds of work you want to do and who your ideal customer is. Those are things I have a clearer sense of, but how to make that connection is still a little bit of a gap for me. But you reminded me in that and I just want to mention here this book, The Pumpkin Plan, like a very bro business book situation, [chuckles] but what is in there is so good. I don't want to give it away and also, open up another topic [laughs] that I'll talk too long about. So I won't go into it right now, but definitely recommend it. One of the things is how to call your client list and figure out what is the most optimal situation that's going to lead toward the most impact for everybody. CASEY: One of the things I think back to a lot is user research and how can we apply that this business discovery process. I basically used the same techniques that were in my human computer interaction class I took 10, or 15 years ago. Like asking open ended questions, trying to get them to say what their problems are, remembering how they said it in their own words and saying it back to them—that's a big, big step. But then there's a whole lot of techniques I didn't learn from human computer interaction, that are sales techniques, and my favorite resource for that so far is called SPIN selling where SPIN is an acronym and it sounds like a wonky technique that wouldn't work because it's just like a random technique to pull out. I don't know, but it's not. This book is based on studies and it shows what you need to do to make big ticket sales go through, which is very different than selling those plastic things with the poppy bubbles in the mall stand in the middle of the hallway. Those low-key things they can manipulate people into buying and people aren't going to return it probably. But big-ticket things need a different approach than traditional sales and marketing knowledge and I really like the ideas in SPIN selling. I don't want to go into them today. We'll talk about it later. But those are two of the perspectives I bring to this kind of problem, user research and the SPIN selling techniques. I want to share what my ideal client would be. I think that's interesting, too. So I really want to help companies be happier and more effective. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective, and that has the impact on the users of the company, or whoever their clients are. It definitely impacts that, which makes it a thing I can sell, thankfully. So an organization usually knows when they're not the most happy, or the most effective. They know it, but my ideal client isn't just one that knows that, but they also have leadership buy-in; they have some leader who really cares and can advocate for making it better and they just don't know how. They don't have enough resources to make it happen in their org. Maybe they have, or don't have experience with it, but they need support. That's where I come in and then my impact really is on the employees. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective. That's the direct impact I want, and then it has the really strong, indirect impact on the business outcomes. So in that vein, I'm willing to help even large tech companies because if I can help their employees be happier, that is a positive impact. Even if I don't care about large tech companies' [chuckles] business outcomes, I'm okay with that because my focus is specifically on the employees. That's different than a lot of people I talk to; they really just want to support like nonprofit type, stronger impact of the mission and that totally makes sense to me, too. MAE: Also, it is possible to have a large and ever growing equitably run company. It is possible. I do want to contribute toward that existing in the world and as much as there's focus on what the ultimate looking out impact is, I care about the experience of employees and individuals on the way to get there. I'm not a utilitarian thinker. CASEY: Yeah, but we can even frame it in a utilitarian way if we need to. If we're like a stakeholder presentation, if someone leaves the company and it takes six months to replace them and their work is in the meantime off board to other people, what's the financial impact of all that. I saw a paper about it. Maybe I can dig it up and I'll link to it. It's like to replace a person in tech it costs a $100K. So if they can hire a consultant for less than a $100K to save one person from leaving, it pays for itself. If that number is right, or whatever. Maybe it was ten employees for that number. The paper will say much better than I will. CHELSEA: I think that in mentioning that Casey, you bring up something that businesses I think sometimes don't think about, which is some of the hidden costs that can easily be difficult to predict, or difficult to measure those kinds of things. One of the hidden costs is the turnover costs is the churn cost because there's how much it takes to hire another person and then there's the amount of ramp time before that person gets to where the person who left was. CASEY: Right, right, right. CHELSEA: And that's also a thing. There's all the time that developers are spending on forensic software analysis in order to find out all of the context that got dropped when a person left. CASEY: Yeah. The one person who knew that part of the code base, the last one is gone, uh oh. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's a huge trust. And then engineering team is often really interested in conveying that risk. But if they're not empowered enough and don't have enough bandwidth time and energy to make the case, the executive team, or whoever will never hear it and they won't be able to safeguard against it. MAE: Or using the right language to communicate it. CASEY: Right, right. And that's its own skill. That's trainable, too thankfully. But we don't usually train engineers in that, traditionally. Engineers don't receive that training unless they go out of their way for it. PMs and designers, too, honestly. Like the stakeholder communication, everybody can work on. MAE: Yeah. CASEY: That's true. MAE: Communication. Everyone can, or not. Yes. [laughs] I learned the phrase indie today. I have never heard it and I really like it! It makes me feel cool inside and so love and – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, I have no record label, or I am my own record label, perhaps. MAE: Yo! CASEY: I've got one. I like the idea of having a Patreon, not to make money, but to have to help inspire yourself and I know a lot of friends have had Patreons with low income from it and they were actually upset about it. So I want to go back to those friends and say, “Look, this prove some people find value in what you're doing.” Like the social impact. I might make my own even. Thank you. MAE: I know I might do it too. It's good. That's good. CHELSEA: Absolutely. Highly recommended. One thing that I want to take away is the exercise, Casey, that you were talking about of tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes in terms of a person's needs. Because I think that an exercise like that would be extremely helpful for, for example, some of my students who are getting their very first tech jobs. Students receive a very one-dimensional message about the way that tech employment goes. It tends to put set of five companies that show remain unnamed front and center, which whatever, but I would like them to be aware of the other options. And there is a very particular way of gauging the value of a tech position that I believe includes fewer dimensions than people should probably consider for the health of their career long-term and not only the health of their career, but also their health in their career. CASEY: One more parting thought I want to share for anyone is you need support for your career growth, for your happiness. If you're going to be a consultant, you need support for that. Find support in individuals and communities, you deserve that support and you can be that support for the people who are supporting you! It can be mutual. They need that, too.

Women Shifting Gears Driven by Hemmings with Amanda Busick
Laura Wontrop Klauser - Sports Car Racing Program Manager for GM

Women Shifting Gears Driven by Hemmings with Amanda Busick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 45:38


Laura Wontrop Klauser is the Sports Car Racing Program Manager at General Motors overseeing the Corvette C8.R, Cadillac DPi-V.R, and Camaro GT4.R cars that race globally. Her responsibilities from prior Cadillac and Camaro GT4.R Racing Program Manger roles have carried over with the additional responsibility for Corvette C8.R program and all future sportscar racing programs.   Laura started working at General Motors as a summer co-op student then hired full time in 2008 after graduation from RPI. Prior to her racing program manager roles, she held various positions on different platforms including advanced design on the Corvette C7, releasing suspension parts for the Cadillac CT6, and noise and vibration on the Chevrolet Cruze, Buick Encore, and Chevrolet Spark.At only 35 years of age, Klauser is already considered a GM veteran.  She chats with host Amanda Busick about how she handles the responsibility of being a young female leader in a male-dominated field.  A self-proclaimed “confectionery creator”, Laura shares how sweet her life is on and off the track including the development of a recipe for success at the 2023 Le Mans as Cadillac returns to the 100th anniversary of the race.

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1345: 17 Jan 2022 | China's #1 EV Sold 400,000 Units Last Year

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 23:11


Show #1345 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Monday 17th January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon Executive Producer MARK RICHARDS ELECTRIC CAR SALES PASS ‘TIPPING POINT' IN SWITZERLAND - The number of new electric cars sold in Switzerland continues to accelerate – even faster than predicted, according to the Touring Club Switzerland (TCS) car association. - For the September to November period, fully electric vehicles accounted for 18.3% of new registrations and plug-in vehicles (electric and plug-in hybrids) hit a record 28% - The TCS described the 18.3% threshold as a milestone. Electric vehicles had clearly gone beyond a “tipping point” and moved into the mainstream, it said. - In Switzerland incentives for plug-in vehicles are not coordinated and vary between cantons. Top 5 Models: 1.       Tesla Model 3 2.       Volkswagen ID.3 3.       Škoda Enyaq 4.       Renault Zoe 5.       Fiat 500 · Original Source : https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/sci-tech/electric-cars-pass--tipping-point--in-switzerland/47260170 APPLE'S DIGITAL CAR KEYS MAY WORK WITH HYUNDAI AND GENESIS MODELS THIS SUMMER - Apple's digital car key feature might soon be useful for unlocking more than a handful of BMW models. - Hyundai and its upscale Genesis badge will support Apple CarKey "by the summer." It's not certain which models would provide the option, but it's notable that some trim levels of the Ioniq 5 and other Hyundai cars include NFC for a (currently proprietary) digital key. - CarKey (and its Android equivalent) treats the phone more like a physical key. You just have to bring your phone or Apple Watch to the door handle to unlock it, and you can even place your phone in a given area to start the car. People with ultra-wideband iPhones (such as the iPhone 11 and newer) can even leave their phone in their pocket when opening and starting the vehicle. Original Source : https://www.engadget.com/apple-carkey-hyundai-genesis-cars-172130052.html DEVELOPER HACK PUTS CARPLAY ON TESLA USING A RASPBERRY PI - A developer has come up with a way to get CarPlay running on a Tesla, with a workaround allowing drivers access to their iPhones while behind the wheel. - Polish developer Michal Gapinski came up with his own way.  In images and video posted to Twitter on Friday, Gapinski shows his Tesla running CarPlay on the display of his vehicle. The clips, spotted by Tesla North show the feature as being quite functional, including Apple Maps and Apple Music. - Gapinski instead bypasses Wi-Fi restrictions so that the Tesla's browser can connect to a secondary device. In turn, the browser displays what is shown on the host device as a live video feed. - Currently in its early stages, the developer says he plans to release it to the public "when it's polished." - the project actually relies on a Raspberry Pi running a custom build of Android. That build runs an interface that works with CarPlay, enabling Apple's UI to be usable from the larger screen. Original Source : https://appleinsider.com/articles/22/01/15/developer-hack-puts-carplay-on-tesla-using-a-raspberry-pi TRITIUM GOES PUBLIC TO EXPAND TO THREE PLANTS GLOBALLY - The Australian charging column manufacturer Tritium has launched on the US stock exchange Nasdaq. Tritium plans to invest the capital generated by the IPO in its expansion to three global manufacturing facilities and the development of global sales and service teams. - . Going public by merging with an already listed company has become the most utilized method for electric mobility companies to shorten the lengthy IPO process in the US. - Tritium currently has manufacturing facilities in Australia and is currently building manufacturing facilities in the USA. Tritium CEO Jane Hunter recently told Bloomberg that Tritium is ramping up speed to get its US manufacturing facility ready Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/01/14/tritium-goes-public-to-expand-to-three-plants-globally/ 400,000 UNITS OF SAIC-GM-WULING'S MINI EV WERE SOLD IN 2021 - General Motors' Chinese joint venture SAIC-GM-Wuling was the number one purveyor of electric vehicles in China last year, selling nearly 400,000 units of its sensible MINI EV hatchback. - numbers published by the China Passenger Car Association, SAIC-GM-Wuling sold a total of 395,451 examples of its MINI EV between January and December last year. This made it the best-selling EV in China ahead of the BYD Qin, which sold 187,227 units. - The MINI EV is priced from the equivalent of just over $4,000 USD in China, with each unit carrying a minuscule profit margin of $14 for SAIC-GM-Wuling. While the margins are small, sales of the vehicle allow the automaker to earn carbon credits, saving it money in the long term. Original Source : https://gmauthority.com/blog/2022/01/almost-400000-units-of-saic-gm-wulings-mini-ev-were-sold-in-2021/ CHINESE EVS FIND A NICHE MAKING SHORT-HAUL DELIVERIES IN JAPAN - Logistics companies in Japan, striving to cut costs and make the most out of the pandemic-inspired online shopping boom, are finding an unlikely white knight in Chinese electric-vehicle manufacturers, whose vans make last-mile deliveries not only cheaper, but cleaner as well. - Tokyo's SBS Holdings Inc., a listed logistics company that offers deliveries, recently struck a deal to buy 2,000 light EV trucks over five years from Japanese EV startup folofly. The cars will be made by a unit of Dongfeng Motor Group Co - Although Japan isn't currently a huge market for electric vehicles — EV penetration runs at just 1% versus 30% in some cities in China — Chinese automakers sense an opportunity. - "If Japanese companies just stick to producing cars, foreign companies will come in,” said Hiroyasu Koma, CEO of folofly, the company working with SBS and Dongfeng Motor on the former's fleet-electrification strategy. Original Source : https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2022/01/17/business/corporate-business/japan-buying-china-ev/ NEW 2023 PEUGEOT E-308: EV HATCHBACK TO BRING 250-MILE RANGE - Peugeot has confirmed the battery-electric variants of its 308 hatchback and SW estate will be more powerful, more efficient and have a longer range than its existing e-208 supermini. - The e-308 will join pure-combustion and plug-in hybrid variants of the family hatchback to complete the Peugeot 308 line up when it goes on sale next year. - The battery is only 4kWh bigger than the one in the smaller e-208 but Peugeot is claiming that a new NMC811 battery chemistry will give the car increased efficiency, of 5mi/kWh (12.4kWh/100km), - That would give the e-308 a test cycle range of nearly 250 miles. - The e-308 will go into full production in July 2023, with deliveries shortly afterwards. Pricing will be announced nearer the time. Original Source : https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/new-2023-peugeot-e-308-ev-hatchback-bring-250-mile-range CATL TO UNVEIL BATTERY SWAP BRAND EVOGO - CATL, a leading Chinese battery firm, has officially confirmed it will hold a launch event for a new battery swap brand called EVOGO on Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. Beijing time. - In a post on popular domestic microblogging platform Weibo, a picture showing CATL's power exchange station looking somewhat rough was recently exposed. CATL responded on Monday: “This is a test station, which is different from what we will release on Tuesday.” Original Source : https://pandaily.com/catl-to-unveil-battery-swap-brand-evogo/ OLA ELECTRIC SCOOTER PRODUCTION SOARS, OPENING NEW PAYMENT WINDOW - Despite running into initial delays, Ola has significantly ramped up production of its high-speed smart electric scooters. Now the Indian company says it will be opening up a new payment window soon to complete more orders of its Ola S1 and S1 Pro electric scooters. - Production rates appeared to have soared though, as the company boasted a daily rate of nearly 1,000 scooters at the beginning of the year. - The scooters are produced in a megafactory known as the Ola Futurefactory. It has an intended designed capacity of two million electric scooters per year, or around 5,500 per day. Original Source : https://electrek.co/2022/01/14/ola-production-blows-past-1000-electric-scooters-per-day-opening-more-orders-soon/ JAGUAR I-PACE SALES SHRUNK TO BELOW 10,000 IN 2021 Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/561066/jaguar-ipace-sales-2021/ PRODRIVE FEARS AUDI COULD "KILL" DAKAR COMPETITION IN 2023 Original Source : https://www.motorsport.com/dakar/news/prodrive-audi-kill-competition-2023-dakar/7275480/ EV SALES CAN OVERTHROW GAS-GUZZLERS IN EUROPE BY 2025, STUDY FINDS   Original Source : https://thenextweb.com/news/ev-sales-can-overthrow-gas-guzzlers-europe-2025-study-finds WHAT ELECTRIC VEHICLE TO BUY? FINALLY TV ADS CAN HELP Original Source : https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-01-15/what-electric-vehicle-to-buy-finally-tv-ads-can-help QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM What TV, Print or Digital advertising have you seen for EVs recently which you noticed, or thought was memorable? Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Small Axe Podcast
#Takeprofits and Invest in Cash-Flowing Assets

Small Axe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:09


Welcome back to the show! Today's guest is my dear friend Travis who has been one of our first guests in the show. I am glad to have him the second time around. Here's some interesting about Travis: Travis is an experienced real estate investor and managing partner of Freeman Equity with over $40M in assets under management. He has 25 years of experience in real estate investing in several markets across the United States in both the residential and commercial spaces. He focuses on cash-flowing properties to create significant passive income for investors. He is a Software engineer by trade and has spent over 25 years in IT management positions for several Fortune 500 firms including Apple. He applies that experience when identifying investment opportunities and markets. Travis comes from blue-collar roots in Saginaw, Michigan. After the General Motors plant that employed his parents were shut down in the mid-seventies the family was forced to migrate to Sacramento, California in pursuit of the American dream. His parents worked diligently to purchase their first single-family home and ultimately a portfolio of over 30 homes in the area. It is during this time that he learned the work ethic for finding the best deals and the power of investing in cash-flowing real estate. He currently resides in Elverta, California with his wife of over twenty years, three children, and one grandchild. Travis has presented at companies like One Finance, ECMC, & Apple where he teaches employees how to generate passive income while minimizing their tax liabilities in order to achieve their financial goals. Let's dive a little deeper and learn more from Travis!   [00:01 – 07:05] Opening Segment  I introduce our guest, Travis Gibson Connect with Travis through the links below Travis shares about his previous and current deals Important lessons [07:06 – 30:49] Mr. Take Profits The rumors of interest rates going up What to do when you look at data Having to see a deal for yourself Travis tells the investors everything he knows about On walking away from deals Take care of the investors! Travis' Houston deals Projecting and closing deals Bad things about generational wealth How to be aggressive with deals Travis talks about his other investments The equity machine Make capital in safer assets Checkout the calculator and ebook Travis made! [30:50 – 36:08] Closing Segment Travis shares his plans for 2022 Connect with Travis through the links below Final words   Tweetable Quotes: “2021 is a very interesting year for me.” - Travis Gibson   "You do not want that bank account to be low when something happens and you need capital.” - Travis Gibson   "Thanksgiving is difficult if you lose your uncle's, your grandparents, or your parent's money.” - Travis Gibson Find out more and connect with Travis through email travis@freemanequity.com   You can also follow his Facebook, LinkedIn, and his website https://freemanequity.com/ Travis isn't also hard to find on Instagram, TikTok, and Twitter, just look for @freemanequity LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode. I believe that you only need a small axe to build a lasting empire. Let's start building yours! To know more about me and all the real estate opportunities you can find, you can connect with me on LinkedIn, Instagram, and Facebook or check out my website https://smallaxecommunities.com/ and book a call with me.

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation

What is the key that fuels the most successful companies in the world? Our guest this week is Ralf Specht. Ralf was a founding partner of Spark44, a global marketing communications powerhouse. He architected an industry-first joint venture with Jaguar Land Rover which he grew to $100m in global revenue and 1,200 employees. Previously, he consulted for more than 20 years with global companies and brands such as Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse, General Motors, Nestlé, Coca-Cola, Puma and PWC with McCann Erickson. In this episode, we discuss the secret ingredient that contributed to his success – building corporate soul. What is it, how do you know if you've got it – or don't – and what it means for your business going forward. Ralf Specht, called “a visionary business leader” by Fast Company Press, is the creator of the Soul System™, a framework that aligns value-creating employee action with broader corporate strategy through shared understanding and shared purpose. He introduces a new language of success into the world of business based on his mission to make the leadership behaviors which build soul synonymous with the behaviors which build success. His driving vision is to make soulless companies a thing of the past. What We Discuss with Ralf Specht in This Episode The story behind Building Corporate Soul How leaders know whether or not they have corporate soul What's fueling the Great Resignation Change is inevitable The importance of self-reflection as a leader Human Capital as a key to our success Glass Door indicators What people are saying who work inside your company The Soul System™ Defining your shared purpose Translating shared purpose into shared understanding Making it real through shared behaviors How to gain and retain commitment from your team Establishing a solid foundation for success The role of HR as a consulting force The Soul Index Favorite Quote “You have one resource that comes free of charge, and that is commitment.” ~ Ralf Specht Episode Show Notes: https://tinyurl.com/2p8zvr8c 

Founders
The Founder of IKEA: Ingvar Kamprad

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 32:13


What I learned from reading Leading By Design: The Ikea Story by Ingvar Kamprad and Bertil Torekull.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 234 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode.  

Apartment Investing Journey
AIJ164: From Big Brand Marketing Executive to 90 Million in Multifamily Investing - with John Casmon

Apartment Investing Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 32:57


John Casmon launched Casmon Capital Group to help busy professionals invest in real estate without taking on a second job. We've helped families invest in close to $90M in multifamily apartments to create passive income, reduce their tax obligation, and foster generational wealth. John hosts the Target Market Insights: Multifamily + Marketing podcast. In addition, he is the co-founder of the Midwest Real Estate Networking Summit. As a former marketing executive, John oversaw marketing campaigns for General Motors, PepsiCo, and MillerCoors.Join Our Passive Investor NetworkDownload Our Passive Investor Guide to Multifamily SyndicationsWE DISCUSS:His corporate background in marketing.His career shift from corporate to real estate investing.Learning about large commercial multifamily.How his business looks like today.The details of his recent deal.The principles of investing.His biggest challenge.His best advice for someone just starting.KEY QUOTE:“Passive investors typically want to get to know who you are, they wanna understand your track record  and your experience, they wanna know about the market, and then they wanna know about the deal and the opportunity.”CONNECT WITH OUR GUEST:https://www.casmoncapital.com/sampledealCONNECT WITH US! Visit our Website: https://www.canovocapital.com/podcastConnect with us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/apartmentinvestingjourney/?modal=admin_todo_tourFollow us on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpmNIzpEzxGn5ZuNgjAVV-w/featuredFollow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/apartmentinvestingjourney/Listen on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/apartment-investing-journey/id1464256464LOVE THE SHOW? PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE, REVIEW & SHARE

Founders
Heroes: From Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar to Churchill and de Gaulle

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 38:50


What I learned from reading Heroes: From Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar to Churchill and de Gaulle by Paul Johnson. Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 234 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Leadership and Loyalty™
2/2 Tools and Tactics for Tomorrow's Leaders: Alain Hunkins

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 33:09


You may be someone who has, at some time or another, been led by a leader who leads like it's 1955. For that matter, you may be a leader who finds themselves living out the bad habits inherited from previous generations of leaders and wondering how to take ownership and transform. How can we Crack The Leadership Code, to build ourselves and those we serve into Strong Leaders?  Let's find out together. Our guest is Alain Hunkins. Alain believes that he has literally cracked the code on what it takes to lead, not just in 2021, but also far beyond. Alain Hunkins is a faculty member of Duke Corporate Education. Alain's writing has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Inc., Chief Executive, Chief Learning Officer, and Business Insider. He's a leadership speaker and coach who has worked with Walmart, Pfizer, Citigroup, General Electric, State Farm Insurance, IBM, General Motors, and Microsoft. Alain is the bestselling author of, Cracking the Leadership Code: Three Secrets to Building Strong Leaders. Website: https://www.alainhunkins.com Social Media https://www.facebook.com/hunkins. https://twitter.com/AlainHunkins. https://www.linkedin.com/in/alainhunkins Part 2) Tools and Tactics for Tomorrow's Leaders Why We Must Fire Ourselves as Psychic Leaders How Great Leader Always Ask for a Recipes The 4 Needs Every Leader Must Meet Specifically Designing an Environment That Energizes Your People. The Neuro-energetic Loss of Task Switching The Power of an Epic Failure . . . Curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch? Take a look at DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere
Une histoire de l'automobile (3/5)

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 29:12


Le fondateur de la célèbre marque de voiture Chevrolet - un peu tombé dans l'oubli - est pourtant né à La Chaux-de-Fonds et c'est un Ajoulot d'origine: Louis Chevrolet. Ce personnage haut en couleur était aussi l'un des meilleurs pilotes de course de son temps. Mécanicien, ingénieur et inventeur de grand talent mais piètre homme d'affaires, Louis Chevrolet ne touchera pas un dollar sur les millions de Chevrolet vendues dans le monde. Dans "Les vies de Chevrolet" (éditions Zoé), l'écrivain Michel Layaz lui rend hommage en racontant le parcours romanesque de Louis et nous ramène aux débuts de l'histoire de l'automobile. Il est l'invité de Laurent Huguenin-Elie. Photo: Louis Chevrolet en 1914. Né le 25 décembre 1878 à La Chaux-de-Fonds, il fonde avec William Crapo Durant (fondateur de General Motors) la marque d'automobile Chevrolet en 1911. Ruiné par la crise financière de 1929, il meurt dans la misère le 6 juin 1941 à Détroit (États-Unis).

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com
Wednesday, January 12, 2022

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 26:11


DOCUMENTATION AND ADDITIONAL READING PART 1 (0:0 - 11:51): ────────────────── President Biden, Voting Rights, and the Filibuster: What's Behind the Atlanta Speech? NEW YORK TIMES (KATIE ROGERS) ‘We have no option': Biden calls for changing Senate rules to pass voting rights laws. PART 2 (11:52 - 20:18): ────────────────── Does Citizenship Mean Anything? New York City Gives 800,000 Noncitizens the Vote USA TODAY (ASSOCIATED PRESS) Watershed Moment in NYC: New Law Allows Noncitizens to Vote NEW YORK TIMES (GRACE ASHFORD) Noncitizens' Right to Vote Becomes Law in New York City NEW YORK TIMES (JEFFERY C. MAYS AND ANNIE CORREAL) New York City Gives 800,000 Noncitizens Right to Vote in Local Elections PART 3 (20:19 - 26:11): ────────────────── Nothing Lasts Forever: What Blackberry, Apple, General Motors, and Toyota Tell Us about the Transience of Earthly Existence WALL STREET JOURNAL (JOSEPH PISANI) BlackBerry Die-Hards Struggle With Final Blow NEW YORK TIMES (JACK NICAS) Apple Becomes First Company to Hit $3 Trillion Market Value NEW YORK TIMES (NEAL E. BOUDETTE) Toyota Topped G.M. in U.S. Car Sales in 2021, a First for a Foreign Automaker

Marketplace Minute
The U.S. weighs economic sanctions on Russia. - Morning Briefing - Marketplace Minute - January 10, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 1:50


There will be no school today for kids in Chicago's public schools. The teachers union wants to go back to remote learning, with most members refusing to teach in person; General Motors says it will recognize California's authority to set vehicle emissions standards. - January 10, 2022

Founders
Winston Churchill

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 31:54


What I learned from reading Churchill by Paul Johnson. Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 233 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1335: 09 Jan 2022 | Tesla Raises ‘Full Self Driving' Price To $12,000

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 21:11


Show #1335 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Sunday 9th January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon ProducerTIMOTHY PHILLIPS FORD TELLS DEALERS TO STOP UPSELLING F-150 LIGHTNING RESERVATIONS - Ford Motor Co., concerned about its reputation and customer complaints related to the upcoming launch of the F-150 Lightning, is warning dealers not to upsell reservations for the popular EV truck and also wants customers to sign a contract preventing them from reselling it within a year, according to a letter from the automaker to its dealers. - The warning letter, dated Friday and posted online by the F150gen14.com forum, is addressed to all dealer principals, the general manager and sales managers. - "It has come to our attention that a limited number of dealerships are interacting with customers in a manner that is negatively impacting customer satisfaction and damaging to the Ford Motor Company brand and Dealer Body reputation." - Ford then cites dealer sales and service contract language that requires dealers to conduct their operations in a manner that reflects favorably on dealers, the company and its products. - In order to prevent people from buying and immediately reselling the pickup truck for a  profit, Ford is "offering support for a No-Sale Provision to be signed by the customer at the time of purchase. Dealers may add this language to existing closing forms or create a new standalone document." Original Source : https://eu.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2022/01/08/ford-letter-warns-f-150-lightning-dealer-sales/9142583002/ 5 MOST TALKED-ABOUT ELECTRIC VEHICLES UNVEILED AT CES 2022 - Chrysler parent company Stellantis unveiled a concept car called Chrysler Airflow at this year's CES, marking the auto giant's (late) entry into the electric vehicle market. - On the production EV side, General Motors unveiled its highly anticipated electric Chevrolet Silverado pickup truck on Wednesday during a virtual keynote given by CEO Mary Barra. - When it comes to driving range, nothing can beat Mercedes' concept reveal at CES this week: a compact luxury sedan called Vision EQXX that can run up to 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) on a single charge - Mercedes' German rival, BMW, wasn't looking to impress us with range or charging time. Its offering at CES this year, BMW iX Flow, boasts an unexpected feature: changing colors. - It still feels strange to associate Sony with electric cars. But that hasn't stop the gaming and electronics giant from showing off its EV progress at CES in recent years. This week, Sony unveiled Vision-S 02, the second iteration of the Vision-S electric vehicle introduced at last year's CES. The Vision-S 01 is currently being tested on public road in Europe. Original Source : https://observer.com/2022/01/electric-vehicles-unveiled-at-ces-2022-roundup/ VOLVO CONFIDENT IT CAN GET ITS ‘UNSUPERVISED' HIGHWAY DRIVING MODE APPROVED IN CALIFORNIA  - Volvo announced a new advanced driver assist system called Ride Pilot system, in which its vehicles drive themselves on certain highways without any human supervision. Ride Pilot will be available as a subscription service to customers in California, the company announced at the 2022 Consumer Electronics Show. - Volvo's forthcoming (and unnamed) electric SUV, which will be announced later this year, will be the first vehicle to feature Ride Pilot. Volvo's Concept Recharge, which was revealed last summer, is meant to preview that SUV, as well as how the new driver assist system will be presented with a fully integrated roof lidar from supplier Luminar. The design of the Concept Recharge will likely be similar to that of the electric XC90 successor due to arrive later this year. - Ride Pilot is what the Society of Automotive Engineers would define as a Level 3 autonomous system, in which the driver's supervision is not required in a highly controlled setting, like on certain mapped highways. But in Level 3 systems, the driver still needs to be ready to take control at a moment's notice Original Source : https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/5/22866190/volvo-ride-pilot-level-3-autonomous-subscription-california TOYOTA PLANS SOLID-STATE BATTERY BY 2025, BUT IT WON'T BE FOR AN EV - Toyota is one of numerous automakers and other companies chasing the holy grail of battery technologies: solid-state batteries. According to remarks from Gill Pratt, Toyota's chief scientist and head of the Toyota Research Institute, we're going to see such a battery from the automaker by 2025. - Pratt told Autoline on Thursday the company will shove the solid-state battery into a hybrid vehicle. Yes, a solid-state battery and internal-combustion engine working together. It may seem counterintuitive, but Pratt said there's sound reasoning for it: Lithium-ion batteries aren't at a price parity with the internal-combustion engine, let alone solid-state batteries. The thinking is to produce the benefits of such a battery, but combine it with hybrid technology to keep the price down on a production vehicle. - Hybrids will provide a perfect test for the technology before the automaker gets in too deep with a solid-state battery powered EV. Original Source : https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/toyota-solid-state-battery-ev/ US: THE 'CHEAP' VOLKSWAGEN ID.4 IS COMING 'IN THE $35,000 RANGE' - Volkswagen closed the year 2021 with almost 17,000 ID.4 sales in the U.S. but the number could be 4 times higher, according to the company's representative. The company has more than 40,000 reservations but is supply constrained, as the cars are imported from Europe. Volkswagen Group of America CEO Scott Keogh said (via Automotive News):  "We could have sold four times that amount. What VW dealers are saying is that this is the most excitement they've had on the shop floor since 1998, when we brought the Beetle back." - In 2022, the car will get an upgrade (including range) while the lineup will be expanded by a new, less expensive version with a smaller battery (probably 62 kWh or so). This new entry-level ID.4 with RWD will start at around $35,000 - "in the $35,000 range." That would be about $5,000 less than in the case of ID.4 Pro (82 kWh, RWD). - The key element of Volkswagen's expansion of the MEB-based electric cars is the Chattanooga, Tennessee plant, which will start production of the ID.4 later this year using battery cells from the new SK Innovation's SK On plant in Georgia. Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/559394/us-cheap-volkswagen-id4-coming/ ELON MUSK SAYS TESLA WILL RAISE PRICE OF 'FSD' TO $12,000 IN US Original Source : https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/07/elon-musk-says-tesla-will-raise-price-of-fsd-to-12000-in-us.html TESLA MODEL Y IS SWEDEN'S BEST-SELLING CAR IN DECEMBER 2021 Original Source : https://www.tesmanian.com/blogs/tesmanian-blog/tesla-model-y-became-the-best-selling-car-in-sweden-in-december-2021 HOW DOES TESLA'S CHINA GROWTH COMPARE TO NIO'S? Original Source : https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/how-does-teslas-china-growth-compare-to-nios TESLA STOCK: SHANGHAI BECOMING EVER MORE IMPORTANT Original Source : https://seekingalpha.com/article/4478566-tesla-tsla-stock-shanghai-becoming-ever-more-important TESLA-CATL PARTNERSHIP STRENGTHENS AS NEW FACILITY SENDS CELLS TO GIGA SHANGHAI Original Source : https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-catl-new-facility-sends-cells-gigafactory-shanghai QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM This question was suggested by Joshua Pritt: “If you live in an apartment or condo or otherwise can't charge at home, how do you charge? Is it a terrible inconvenience or do you have a simple routine to charge during your shopping trips?” Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1334: 08 Jan 2022 | Report: 15 Tesla Semi's Delivered This Month

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 18:55


Show #1334 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Saturday 8th January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon ProducerPRABHAT VAZE VOLVO CARS RECORDS FULL-YEAR SALES GROWTH, SALES OF ELECTRIFIED CARS GREW MORE THAN 60% - Volvo Cars global sales grew by 5.6 per cent per cent to 698,693 cars in the full year 2021. - Sales of Recharge models grew by 63.9 per cent in 2021, compared with 2020. Recharge cars made up 27 per cent of the company's total sales volume in 2021. - Almost 40 per cent of all new Volvo cars sold in December were Recharge models, whereof fully electric cars made up 7.4 per cent. In Europe, the share of Recharge cars was almost 60 per cent, while in the US it was close to 30 per cent of overall sales volumes. Original Source : https://www.media.volvocars.com/global/en-gb/media/pressreleases/293359/volvo-cars-records-full-year-sales-growth-sales-of-electrified-cars-grew-more-than-60 VOLKSWAGEN GROUP IS NUMBER ONE FOR BATTERY ELECTRIC CAR SALES IN THE UK - With over 37,000 battery electric car sales (equal to a 19.5 percent share of the segment in 2021), the Volkswagen Group in the UK not only further developed its market leadership in car sales, but also became the clear market leader in the growing zero emission battery electric vehicle segment in 2021 - The year 2021 saw battery electric vehicles breakthrough to become mainstream in the UK car market with overall BEV sales up 76.3 percent on 2020 to a total of 190,727 units, equivalent to 11.6 percent of all cars registered (source: SMMT). - With multi-award winning cars, from the Volkswagen ID.3 and World Car of the Year ID.4; plus the outstanding Audi e-tron GT and Audi Q4 e-tron joining the existing Audi e-tron line up; and the ŠKODA Enyaq iV entering the market, Volkswagen Group UK outperformed the car market with an increase in battery electric registrations of over 100 percent to 33,239 in 2021. Meanwhile Porsche Cars GB registered 4,039 Taycan models leading total Volkswagen Group BEV registrations in the UK to more than double to 37,278 cars in 2021 compared with the year before. Original Source : https://www.volkswagengroup.co.uk/en-gb/releases/12 GERMANY MARKS 48,436 NEW EV REGISTRATIONS IN DECEMBER - With 48,436 new electric cars, the German Federal Motor Transport Authority (KBA) recorded a new record for new registrations in December. With a share of 21.3 per cent, this segment reached another record high. - Looking at the new registrations from January to December of this year, the picture is as follows: A total of 355,961 electric cars were newly registered – an increase of 83.3 per cent (share of around 13.6 per cent) compared to the previous year (194,163 new registrations, share of around 6.7 per cent). The increase in plug-in hybrids, on the other hand, was somewhat smaller. From January to December 2021, the KBA recorded a total of 325,449 new PHEV registrations Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/01/06/germany-marks-48436-new-ev-registrations-in-december/ WALMART AND FEDEX ORDERING THOUSANDS OF ELECTRIC DELIVERY VANS FROM GM'S BRIGHTDROP - Walmart struck a deal with General Motors-backed BrightDrop to reserve 5,000 of the company's electric delivery vans, the companies announced today. The retail giant says it will integrate the EVs into its fleet in the coming years. - BrightDrop, which is GM's dedicated electric delivery spinoff, will sell to Walmart both of its vehicles: the EV600 and the EV410. The EV600, which went into production last fall, has 600 cubic feet of cargo space, can travel up to 250 miles on a full battery, and has a gross vehicle weight of less than 10,000 pounds. The smaller EV410 features 400 cubic feet of cargo space and can cover 250 miles on a single charge. Original Source : https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/5/22867087/walmart-brightdrop-electric-delivery-van-gm-fedex RIVIAN ROLLS OUT FIRST OTA UPDATE TO CUSTOMERS - Rivian is still new on the market, and their R1 line of cars only started deliveries last November. This means owners did not have the chance to experience an OTA update up until now. You see their excitement when they finally got one and we must say we are impressed this came in sooner than expected. It is not a big update by any means, but one meant to iron out some bugs here and there, just to make things smoother onboard the R1T and R1S. - The update procedure was documented by the user “Iwantatesla” in Rivian Forums, who also mentioned everything seems “much snappier” after the update. - the update covers things from Bluetooth connectivity to the improved Navigation app. Various user interface refinements were also on the menu, with smoother transitions between apps as well as improvements to the infotainment system's performance. Original Source : https://www.autoevolution.com/news/rivian-rolls-out-first-ota-update-to-customers-looks-like-the-kids-were-forgotten-178543.html FIRST 15 TESLA SEMI UNITS TO BE DELIVERED TO PEPSICO BY END OF JANUARY: REPORT -Recent reports from the electric vehicle community have suggested that PepsiCo may end up taking delivery of its first 15 Tesla Semis as early as this month. - The EV maker has reportedly started installing several Megachargers at PepsiCo's Modesto, California facility. Images shared with EV publication Drive Tesla indicated that the Semi's Megachargers are connected to a Megapack battery. The power output of the Megachargers was reported to be a whopping 1.5 MW as well - Perhaps the most exciting factor about the Semi's reported deliveries this month, however, would be the vehicle's batteries. Expectations are high that the Semi would be using Tesla's new 4680 battery cells, which were unveiled on Battery Day. Tesla has been showing some encouraging signs with its 4680 ramp Original Source : https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-semi-first-customer-deliveries-date-pepsico CHARGENET RAISES $6 MILLION TO PUT EV CHARGERS IN FAST FOOD PARKING LOTS - Electric vehicle charging startup ChargeNet raised a $6.2 million seed round from local investors including the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator, as it looks to expand its network of charging hubs at fast food restaurants across California. - The funding will aid San Diego-based ChargeNet's strategy of deploying solar-powered EV charging stations at fast food restaurant parking lots, starting with six charging ports at a Taco Bell in South San Francisco later this month. The company plans to add similar locations in and around Los Angeles as part of its goal of expanding to more than 80 fast food restaurants by the end of the year, ChargeNet CEO Tosh Dutt told dot.LA. Original Source : https://dot.la/chargenet-ev-chargers-parking-lots-2656247335.html WATCH TESLAS AND AUDIS AND OTHER CARS SMACK INTO FAKE KIDS Original Source : https://jalopnik.com/watch-teslas-and-audis-and-other-cars-smack-into-fake-k-1848316218 TESLA'S CAMERAS-ONLY AUTONOMOUS SYSTEM STIRS CONTROVERSY Original Source : https://techxplore.com/news/2022-01-tesla-cameras-only-autonomous-controversy.html MODELING STUDY SUGGESTS 1.8M EXCESS DEATHS ATTRIBUTABLE TO URBAN AIR POLLUTION IN 2019 Original Source : https://www.greencarcongress.com/2022/01/20220107-lancet.html QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM This question was suggested by Joshua Pritt: “If you live in an apartment or condo or otherwise can't charge at home, how do you charge? Is it a terrible inconvenience or do you have a simple routine to charge during your shopping trips?” Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM

FAZ Digitec
Sony, Ford und Mobileye: Die Technik-Wetten aus Las Vegas

FAZ Digitec

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 41:04


Wird Sony tatsächlich ein eigenes Elektroauto auf den Markt bringen? Warum interessieren sich inzwischen mehr Menschen für die Produkte von Mobileye rund um das autonome Fahren als für die Chips des Mutterkonzerns Intel? Welche Inspirationen bringt die Consumer Electronics Show, die CES in Las Vegas, für die Pandemiebekämpfung? Unser Amerika-Korrespondent Roland Lindner war einige Tage in Nevada, um in den Hotels und dem Kongresszentrum von Las Vegas einen eigenen Eindruck von den neuesten Technik-Trends zu bekommen. Im Digitec-Podcast berichtet er von seinen Erlebnissen – und darüber, warum man auch traditionelle Autohersteller wie Ford oder General Motors nicht völlig übersehen sollte. Zudem: Was ist eigentlich aus der Autoshow in Detroit geworden, die früher der CES auf dem Fuße folgte?

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2 The Leadership Code: Alain Hunkins

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 26:42


You may be someone who has, at some time or another, been led by a leader who leads like it's 1955. For that matter, you may be a leader who finds themselves living out the bad habits inherited from previous generations of leaders and wondering how to take ownership and transform. How can we Crack The Leadership Code, to build ourselves and those we serve into Strong Leaders?  Let's find out together. Our guest is Alain Hunkins. Alain believes that he has literally cracked the code on what it takes to lead, not just in 2021, but also far beyond. Alain Hunkins is a faculty member of Duke Corporate Education. Alain's writing has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Inc., Chief Executive, Chief Learning Officer, and Business Insider. He's a leadership speaker and coach who has worked with Walmart, Pfizer, Citigroup, General Electric, State Farm Insurance, IBM, General Motors, and Microsoft. Alain is the bestselling author of, Cracking the Leadership Code: Three Secrets to Building Strong Leaders. Website: https://www.alainhunkins.com Social Media https://www.facebook.com/hunkins. https://twitter.com/AlainHunkins. https://www.linkedin.com/in/alainhunkins Part 1) 3 Secret to Building and Becoming a Strong Leader Why Giving Power Away, Makes You Powerful The Seduction of Power Recognizing the Difference Between Compliance and Commitment Becoming a Facilitator and Chief  Supporting Super Heroes, or Super Teams The Secret Leadership Formula of S.U.&L Why People over Numbers Gets Better Numbers . . . Curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch? Take a look at DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1333: 07 Jan 2022 | VW ID Buzz Retro Microbus Unveiling

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 26:03


Show #1333 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Friday 7th January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon ProducerPRABHAT VAZE VW POISED TO UNVEIL RETRO-MICROBUS EV IN MARCH - Volkswagen Group plans to unveil the ID Buzz, an electric iteration of its iconic hippie-era microbus, on March 9. CEO Herbert Diess announced the date Thursday in a Twitter post that sketched out the contours of the new design, which draws on the lines of the original model. - VW's original microbus -- the colorful, bread loaf-shaped van that was a regular sight in the 1960s at music festivals including Woodstock -- has a dedicated fan following. Original Source : https://europe.autonews.com/cars-concepts/vw-poised-unveil-retro-microbus-ev-march VOLKSWAGEN TO PREMIERE RETRO ID BUZZ EV ON 9 MARCH - The model is planned for UK sale during the latter half of 2022 and will become Volkswagen's fourth dedicated electric model, following the ID 3, ID 4 and newly unveiled ID 5. - It will also be the first ID model to be offered both as a passenger vehicle and a commercial vehicle, with production planned to take place at VW's commercial vehicle plant in Hannover, Germany from early this year. - Based on Volkswagen's MEB electric vehicle platform, the new MPV will be offered in both standard- and long-wheelbase guises - The production ID Buzz adopts a squarer shape than the earlier concept in a move that, Volkswagen officials have told Autocar, is aimed at providing it with maximum interior space. - As with the Microbus, the production version of the ID Buzz adopts two conventional front-hinged doors at the front as well as two parallel sliding doors at the rear. Original Source : https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/electric-cars/volkswagen-premiere-retro-id-buzz-ev-9-march US: TOYOTA SOLD OVER 52,000 PLUG-IN CARS IN 2021 - In 2021, Toyota offered two plug-in hybrids: the Toyota Prius Prime and Toyota RAV4 Prime, while Lexus launched the all-new Lexus NX 450h+ in December (18 units). The total Toyota brand volume was:  Q4: 10,376 (up 76%) at 2.5% share 2021: 52,749 (up 195%) at 2.6% share - The Toyota RAV4 Prime noted a relatively strong Q4 with 7,741 units and a total of 27,703 units in 2021. - The aging Toyota Prius Prime (the 2nd model evolution after the original Prius PHEV) noted 2,635 units in Q4 (down 29% year-over-year). However, the year 2021 was the second-best year for the plug-in hybrid Prius. Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/558967/us-toyota-plugin-sales-2021/ - The incentive has a limit of 200,000 units per manufacturer, which was reached in 2018 by Tesla and shortly thereafter by General Motors. Reaching the limit triggers the phase out of the incentive, over the following six quarters. Tesla lost its eligibility for the federal tax credit with the end of 2019, while GM lost it on April 1, 2020. - Recently, Lexus started sales of the plug-in hybrid Lexus NX 450h+ (18 units in December), which, as far as we know, adds to the Toyota counter, marginally increasing the total. - It means that those who are waiting for the launch of the Toyota bZ4X in mid-2022 will be only shortly supported by the full incentive. - That should make the Subaru Solterra noticeably more attractive, as it's basically the same car, but eligible for the incentive. Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/558975/toyota-federal-tax-credits-190000/ VIETNAM CAR MAKER VINFAST TO BUILD US BATTERY FACTORY AS IT GOES ALL-ELECTRIC - Vietnam's VinFast plans to build electric vehicle battery cells and packs in a new U.S. manufacturing complex, its global chief executive told Reuters, as the company pledged to transform itself into an all-electric automaker by the end of this year. - VinFast, part of Vingroup JSC, the largest conglomerate in the country, became the country's first full-fledged domestic car maker when gasoline-powered models built under its own badge hit the streets in 2019. - The company, which began selling electric vehicles (EVs) in Vietnam at the end of 2021, said in a statement on Thursday it planned to become what it said would be the first car company to cease making gasoline-powered cars and transition to all-electric vehicle production from late 2022. - VinFast will initially assemble battery packs with cells sourced from its supplier at its U.S. complex before starting its own production there. - The company is looking to initially produce 100,000 battery packs per year, with $174 million in investment, and then upgrade capacity to one million. - The company said that on Thursday it was seeking to establish an EV plant in Germany. Original Source : https://e.vnexpress.net/news/business/vietnam-car-maker-vinfast-to-build-us-battery-factory-as-it-goes-all-electric-4413250.html GM UNVEILS NEW SELF-DRIVING CADILLAC CONCEPT VEHICLE - General Motors unveiled a new personal self-driving electric concept car from GM's luxury brand Cadillac on Wednesday during the CES technology show. - GM CEO Mary Barra, during a keynote address, also revealed that GM and its majority-owned subsidiary Cruise plan to offer a personal autonomous electric vehicle to consumers as soon as mid-decade. - GM's time frame for personal autonomous vehicles may seem aggressive given setbacks in the development of self-driving vehicles in recent years. Cruise was initially supposed to commercialize an autonomous ride-hailing fleet in San Francisco in 2019 but indefinitely delayed those plans to conduct further testing and acquire needed permits. Original Source : https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/05/gm-ceo-mary-barra-unveils-new-self-driving-cadillac-concept-vehicle.html RESIDENTIAL PARKING OPTIONS AND ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY WILL IMPACT ELECTRIC VEHICLE ADOPTION - Access to charging infrastructure is one of the biggest barriers to plug-in vehicle adoption. In an online survey conducted in May of 2020, respondents provided information on their household parking options, existing electrical access, and potential electrical access. - Parking for single-family detached housing (SFH Detached) was most often a driveway/carport, followed by a personal garage or on-street parking. Most of those with a personal garage had electrical access or potential electrical access, while less than half of those with driveways/carports had electrical access. - SFH Attached housing had a smaller share of electrical access for their parking in personal garages and driveways/carports. Apartment residents had the least access, with each of the three apartment categories having less than 25% access or potential access to electricity. Original Source : https://www.energy.gov/eere/vehicles/articles/fotw-1219-january-3-2022-residential-parking-options-and-access-electricity JAPAN'S HONDA TO BUILD BATTERY EV PLANT IN CHINA Original Source : https://www.argusmedia.com/en/news/2289110-japans-honda-to-build-battery-ev-plant-in-china MAGNA SHOWS HOW HEAVY-DUTY PICKUPS CAN GO ALL-ELECTRIC WITHOUT LOWER TOWING, PAYLOAD Original Source : https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1134659_magna-heavy-duty-pickups-all-electric-without-lower-towing-payload ‘RIGHT TIME' TO END ELECTRIC VEHICLE GRANTS, SAYS POD POINT CEO ERIK FAIRBAIRN Original Source : https://www.standard.co.uk/business/end-electric-vehicle-grants-podpoint-ceo-erik-fairbairn-b975240.html INNER MONGOLIA LAUNCHES FIRST 5G UNMANNED NEW ENERGY MINING VEHICLE PROJECT IN ORDOS Original Source : https://pandaily.com/inner-mongolia-launches-first-5g-unmanned-new-energy-mining-vehicle-project-in-ordos TOP GOOGLE MAPS RIVAL ANNOUNCES NEW-GEN FEATURE FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES Original Source : https://www.autoevolution.com/news/top-google-maps-rival-announces-new-gen-feature-for-electric-vehicles-178408.html EV CHARGING COMPANIES PUSH FASTER AT-HOME CHARGES, V2G AND CONNECTIVITY AT CES Original Source : https://techcrunch.com/2022/01/06/ev-charging-companies-push-faster-at-home-charges-v2g-and-connectivity-at-ces/ NIU BQI ELECTRIC BIKE PRICE AND SPECS REVEALED AHEAD OF US/EU LAUNCH Original Source : https://electrek.co/2022/01/06/tech-specs-and-pricing-revealed-for-nius-innovative-new-electric-bike-ahead-of-us-eu-launch/ RIVIAN STOCK CRASHES FOLLOWING AMAZON'S DEAL WITH STELLANTIS   Original Source : https://finance.yahoo.com/news/rivian-stock-crashes-following-amazon-152335011.html HOW E-MOBILITY IS DRIVING A FOUNDATIONAL SHIFT IN TRANSPORTATION Original Source : https://www.intelligenttransport.com/transport-articles/130674/e-mobility-driving-foundational-shift-in-transportation/ QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM This question was suggested by Joshua Pritt: “If you live in an apartment or condo or otherwise can't charge at home, how do you charge? Is it a terrible inconvenience or do you have a simple routine to charge during your shopping trips?” Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM

ALBERTO PADILLA
Lo mismo que con cualquier otra industria, el uso de la tecnología también abarata, al tiempo que mejora, los servicios de salud. Entrevista con #IsoldeArzt @isolde_arzt de @baxter_intl.

ALBERTO PADILLA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 58:31


-Acciones tecnológicas sufren a la espera de alzas de interés. -Año nuevo y los problemas de la cadena de suministros. -General Motors deja de ser la #1 en Estados Unidos. -Influyente banco cree que Bitcoin podría alcanzar US$100,000. -OPEP y aliados aumentarán la oferta de petróleo…si pueden.

The Paul W. Smith Show
Chris Renwick ~ The Paul W. Smith Show

The Paul W. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 8:31


January 6, 2022 ~ The WJR Senior News Analyst says General Motors introduced its new 2024 EV Silverado at the Consumer Electronics Show and he tells Paul on a full charge it has a range of 400 miles.

WSJ Tech News Briefing
EVs Take Center Stage at CES Tech Show

WSJ Tech News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 14:34


General Motors, Chrysler and electronics giant Sony unveiled their visions for the future of electric cars at the tech conference CES. WSJ reporter Mike Colias joins host Zoe Thomas to discuss the designs, why more tech companies are eying the auto industry and what it means for the broader EV market. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Founders
Charles de Gaulle

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 34:54


What I learned from reading Charles de Gaulle by Julian Jackson. Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 232 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

The Guy Gordon Show
Deborah Wahl ~ The Guy Gordon Show

The Guy Gordon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 9:37


January 5, 2022 ~ Deborah Wahl, Chief Marketing Officer for General Motors, talks with Guy Gordon about everything CEO Mary Barra announced as the keynote speaker of CES, including the all-electric Silverado pickup.

WSJ Minute Briefing
North Korea Fires Test Missile

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:03


Also, General Motors expected to unveil an electric version of its Chevy Silverado pickup. Plus, AT&T and Verizon's 5G rollout delay could avert serious air travel disruptions. J.R. Whalen reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketplace Morning Report
What are the top issues facing the economic world in 2022?

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 8:07


The omnipresent pandemic and the tense staring contest between the U.S. and China are just a couple of the things to watch as the global economy churns ahead into 2022. We spoke to Ian Bremmer, founder of the Eurasia Group, about its “Top Risks” report for the new year. For the first time in 90 years, General Motors has lost its spot at the top of the U.S. car sales mountain.

Marketplace All-in-One
What are the top issues facing the economic world in 2022?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 8:07


The omnipresent pandemic and the tense staring contest between the U.S. and China are just a couple of the things to watch as the global economy churns ahead into 2022. We spoke to Ian Bremmer, founder of the Eurasia Group, about its “Top Risks” report for the new year. For the first time in 90 years, General Motors has lost its spot at the top of the U.S. car sales mountain.

The Data Chief
#41 - GM's Iwao Fusillo on Recruiting Top Talent and Building a Successful Data Literacy Strategy

The Data Chief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 51:23


For years, businesses have prioritized academic background and domain expertise when searching for top talent, matching current skills to job reqs with little regard for candidate aptitude. But according to Iwao Fusillo, Chief Data and Analytics Officer at General Motors, this is an outdated strategy. Iwao has led and developed data and analytics teams across multiple verticals, including finance and sports. In his experience, the secret to building successful and diverse teams is assessing passion, too. Fusillo, a data and analytics veteran with prior stops in the NFL and American Express, now leads GM's program for enterprise-wide analytics and data science. In this episode of the Data Chief, Iwao joins Cindi to discuss how data and analytics are fueling the future of General Motors, advice for structuring and scaling data teams, and how GM's newly founded data and analytics academy is fostering data literacy across the organization.Key TakeawaysPresentation is key: As data and analytics professionals, one of the most important skills you can develop is how to speak the language of the business. This means presenting data stories in a business-friendly way so that non-technical stakeholders start to build trust in data programs, not fear or confusion.The best talent is both skilled and passionate: If you're only evaluating candidates based on a bulleted list of current skills and past experience, you're very likely missing out on great talent. Don't discount a desire to learn and passion for your product or industry.AI requires a hands-on approach: While AI and machine learning offer many opportunities for improved business operations, they can pose great risk if left unsupervised. Responsible use of these technologies means paying attention to data quality and acting quickly when biases are identified.Key Quotes“It's such a unique time to be in the automotive industry because automotive and tech are coming together. As I sit here today, as GM's Chief Data and Analytics Officer, I really do feel that data and analytics are fueling GM's future, our all-electric, zero-emissions future, and being responsible for a program of enterprise-wide analytics, top-tier data science capabilities in an industry that I've got such passion about is big for me.” “As analytics mature over the next decade, as A.I. continues to mature over the next couple of decades, Chief Data Officers, Chief Analytics Officers will in fact be tapped more for CEO positions and independent board positions. Many more functions will be led by data-savvy, senior executives.”“Passion, when it comes to data, [data] literacy is really important. That's why we put the GM analytics academy course out there, to not only build the literacy itself but just the passion in having a core competency around analyzing and presenting data in a compelling way to make decisions.”“I am seeing a rapid uptake here at General Motors in data and analytics being a part of that strategic story, data, and analytics, being a part of every person in every function and how they think about it and how, how they think about advancing their function.”“There's domain expertise, and I think having great math and science skills are important, but they're not a full package. You don't have to have math and science, or you have to have transferable skills, yes. I would say, I would take the passionate person who I could drop into a textile mill in the middle of the Midwest somewhere. And that person will figure it out. I'd rather have that than the person with the exact academic background.”“Some of the attributes we teach in the analytics academy are speaking in the vernacular of the business. How do we talk about data concepts from descriptive analytics to predictive analytics? How do we talk about those concepts in a business-friendly way?” Bio:Iwao Fusillo joined General Motors as Chief Data and Analytics Officer in January 2021. Reporting to the Head of Innovation & Growth for GM, Iwao is responsible for driving GM's program for enterprise-wide analytics and data science capabilities. He leads the end-to-end data lifecycle and establishes business processes for best-in-class data strategy, architecture, governance and democratization. Acting as GM's data evangelist, he ensures that GM's 1,300+ data analytic professionals use a value-based approach to defining workstream priorities and serves as a trusted business advisor to senior management and various stakeholders to identify strategic analytics opportunities with transformative value creation potential. --The Data Chief is presented by our friends at ThoughtSpot. Searching through your company's data for insights doesn't have to be complicated. With ThoughtSpot, anyone in your organization can easily answer their own data questions, find the facts, and make better, faster decisions. Learn more at thoughtspot.com. 

Les interviews d'Inter
Frank Marotte : "En 2035, 100% des véhicules Toyota seront zéro émission"

Les interviews d'Inter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 8:00


durée : 00:08:00 - L'invité de 6h20 - Aux États-Unis, Toyota vient de devancer General Motors comme premier constructeur du pays. Et en France ? Franck Marotte, PDG de Toyota France est l'invité du 6h20 - invités : Frank Marotte - Frank Marotte : PDG de Toyota France

Business daily
Record 4.5 million Americans quit their jobs in 'Great Resignation'

Business daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 3:16


A record-breaking 4.5 million American workers quit their jobs in November 2021 as the trend coined "The Great Resignation" drags on. Economists say it signals a sign of confidence in the labour market, but could also reflect ongoing fears about the pandemic. Also in the show: Toyota dethrones General Motors as America's best-selling carmaker for the first time in 90 years, and Blackberry users bid farewell to the iconic phones. 

WSJ Minute Briefing
New Covid-19 Infections Hit One Million in the U.S.

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 2:55


Plus: Job openings are on track for a new record high. Toyota overtakes General Motors as top-selling car company. Former New York Governor Andrew Cuomo won't face sexual-harassment charge. Trenae Nuri reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Customers Who Click
Give your customers what they want and watch your sales grow

Customers Who Click

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 36:29


“The number one driver of growth is always sales. And the number one way of getting more sales is to drive the customer behaviours that equate to sales.” In episode 92 of the Customers Who Click podcast, I had a great chat with Howard Tiersky about how ecommerce businesses need to adapt and innovate to provide more value for the customer and grow. Who doesn't remember Blockbusters? It's all that we have left today - a memory, because as we know Blockbusters failed to take advantage of the digital transformation and… Well. You know who rules the streaming world today *cough* Netflix *cough* . Blockbusters, and many other long-established businesses ceased to exist in the recent years for one simple reason: they failed to serve their customers' needs. The good news is, these are extreme examples, but I also know that many of today's DTC brands struggle to provide more value for their customers and as a result, watch them leave one by one in favour of competitors who offer better customer experience. How can you change that? If you feel like you're forever a step behind your competitors, and can't seem to really understand what drives your customers, this episode is for you. Howard is a speaker, author and digital marketing consultant who helps the world's largest brands navigate digital transformation — to re-invent their customer journeys to earn the love of today's "Digital Customers." In the 20 years of his professional career, Howard has worked with many Fortune 1000 companies, including General Motors, General Electric, NBC, Universal, Avis or Airbus. You can connect with him on LinkedIn, Twitter or head over to https://www.from.digital/.

Founders
Warren Buffett's Shareholder Letters— All of them!

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 34:36


What I learned from reading Berkshire Hathaway Letters to Shareholders by Warren Buffett.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 231 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Squawk on the Street
Bulls Win Big in 2021, The S&P 500 Tops the Major Indices, Omicron Effect on Travel, EV Stocks Outlook for 2022, and Sen. Sanders vs. Buffett.

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 43:53


On the final trading day of 2021, Scott Wapner, Leslie Picker and Mike Santoli explored what has been a bullish year for the stock markets despite volatility and the pandemic: The S&P 500 up 27%, outperforming the Nasdaq and the Dow. The anchors looked at this year's biggest market drivers and the action surrounding "meme stocks" such as GameStop and AMC. Then there's the effect of the COVID-19 omicron variant on travel, with airlines canceling more than 1,300 flights on Thursday and the CDC warning against cruise ship travel despite vaccination status. Also in focus: The 2022 outlook for EV stocks after a year that saw Tesla join the $1 trillion market cap club and Rivian surpass General Motors and Ford to become the second-most valuable automaker in the U.S., the year's biggest market losers - Peloton's big slump continues thanks to a Wall Street downgrade, plus: Sen. Bernie Sanders tweet-slams Warren Buffett for not intervening in a Berkshire Hathaway-owned company's labor strike.

RecTech: the Recruiting Technology Podcast
TriNet and Paradox in the News

RecTech: the Recruiting Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 4:31


TriNet, a leading provider of human resources solutions for small and medium-size businesses(SMBs), today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Zenefits.  Details of the stock and cash transaction were not disclosed. Zenefits is a leading cloud HR platform which provides innovative and intuitive HR, benefits, payroll and employee engagement software purpose-built for small and medium-size businesses.  Through the acquisition of Zenefits, TriNet diversifies its product offering to include an Administrative Services Organization (ASO), enabling TriNet to dynamically service SMBs throughout their lifecycle.  Upon deal close, Zenefits will become a wholly owned subsidiary of TriNet and Francisco Partners will become a TriNet stockholder. TriNet is also expected to become a preferred supplier of PEO and HRIS services to Francisco Partners portfolio companies across the country after closing. The acquisition is expected to close in the coming months, subject to customary closing conditions, including the receipt of regulatory approvals. https://hrtechfeed.com/trinet-to-acquire-zenefits/ Company Now Valued at $1.5 Billion Paradox, the conversational recruiting platform built to give every recruiter, hiring manager, and talent professional an assistant to get work done, today announced a $200M Series C investment. The round was led by Stripes, Sapphire, and Thoma Bravo, and included participation from Workday Ventures, Indeed, Willoughby Capital, Twilio Ventures, Blue Cloud Ventures, Geodesic, Principia Growth, DLA Piper Venture Fund and current investor Brighton Park Capital.  Paradox's vision is embodied by Olivia — the conversational AI assistant helping companies like Unilever, Nestle, McDonald's, CVS Health, and General Motors automate tasks like candidate screening, interview scheduling, onboarding, and more through smart, simple, mobile-first experiences. In just five years, Olivia has helped 500+ global clients save millions of hours of manual work — freeing their teams up to spend time with people, not software.  https://hrtechfeed.com/paradox-raises-200m-series-c/

Founders
Unstoppable: Siggi Wilzig's Astonishing Journey from Auschwitz Survivor and Penniless Immigrant to Wall Street Legend

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 31:25


What I learned from reading Unstoppable: Siggi Wilzig's Astonishing Journey from Auschwitz Survivor and Penniless Immigrant to Wall Street Legend by Joshua M. Greene.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 231 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Whitestone Podcast
About Ross Perot

Whitestone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 14:11


Have you heard of Ross Perot, the billionaire Presidential candidate well before Donald Trump? Well, Perot was one of the most unique Americans ever. And Perot's life and approaches have many lessons for us to consider, with the result that many view him as one of the best leaders ever. Join Kevin as he reports some of the most unusual, seemingly craziest things you've ever heard about a leader doing business in America. // Download this episode's Application & Action questions and PDF transcript at whitestone.org.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1322: 2022 Will Be The Year Of Mainstream EVs | 27 Dec 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 29:45


Show #1322 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Monday 27th December. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. UNVEILING OF THE ELECTRIC SILVERADO PICKUP WILL BE ONLINE - Each year, hundreds of companies, including the world's top automakers, travel to Las Vegas for the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) to show off their latest products. But the pandemic resulted in the cancellation of last year's in-person events. - One of the most anticipated events was that automaker General Motors was to reveal its new fully electric Silverado pickup for the first time. But those plans have now been scrapped due to lingering covid concerns. - GM Chief Executive Mary Barra had been scheduled to give a keynote speech at the annual conference on Jan. 5, where the electric Silverado pickup truck was to be revealed for the first time. The press conference and keynote will now be presented remotely, - The electric Silverado will go into production late next year at GM's Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant. The fully-electric truck will have a range of more than 400 miles on a full charge, according to GM. Original Source : https://www.futurecar.com/5088/General-Motors-Cancels-its-In-Person-CES-Events-and-Unveiling-of-the-Electric-Silverado-Pickup-Due-to-Covid-Concerns VCS SAY 2022 IS THE YEAR THE ELECTRIC CAR GOES MAINSTREAM - Venture capitalists watching the electric-car business say that 2022 is when the rubber meets the road. - adoption in the US is lagging, EVs could account for about one-third of light-vehicle sales here by 2030, the industry expert IHS Markit predicted in August. - Whether automakers have electric-vehicle success next year could dictate the trajectory of EV penetration in the US moving forward. Here are three things that VCs say you can expect next year. - It's a golden moment for EVs, said Greg Reichow, partner at Eclipse Ventures in Palo Alto, California. - Customers and investors are awaiting the first deliveries of the electric Ford F-150 Lightning pickup, which has nearly 200,000 reservations. Deliveries of the GMC Hummer pickup will continue well into the new year. And reports say the Cadillac Lyriq SUV should reach customers in early 2022. - "Initially, we had large statements about big investments, and there were questions in the market about how serious are people going to take this," said Gabe Cunningham, principal at Fontinalis Partners in Detroit. "It became apparent that those big investments were backed by executives and that they were truly serious about diving into electric vehicles." - Car companies now have to seek out ways to make these far-reaching promises happen. They need to secure the lithium and other rare-earth materials necessary for millions of electric-vehicle batteries. - Despite the mix of electric products expected from both legacy automakers and startups next year, some of the nascent companies could realize they've met their match with their more established competitors — and the reality of an industry with massive overhead costs — said Alexei Andreev, managing director AutoTech Ventures in Menlo Park, California. - The industry has already seen a reckoning as it relates to EV startups. Companies like Faraday Future, Nikola Motors, and Lordstown have experienced troubles, not unlike Tesla did in its early days. Original Source : https://www.businessinsider.com/vcs-2022-electric-car-predictions-ford-lightning-rivian-hummer-2021-12 THE ELECTRIC DELIVERY VAN THAT SAVED CHRISTMAS - Whatever side of the great EV debate you fall on, the benefits of electrified transport to short-haul, multi-drop carriers making 100-plus deliveries per day must be considerable. Zero noise (technically, drivers should turn off their engines when delivering to you, but few do), lower pollution and, from a driver's point of view, ease of operation, with no clutch pedal or gearshift to contend with 1000 times a day. And that's before you factor in the cost of diesel at an all-time high. - Amazon announced it was buying 1800 electric vans from Mercedes-Benz to supplement its European delivery fleet, and in the UK, DPD has just bought 100 new e-vans, taking its electric fleet to 600 vehicles in total. - We've chosen the e-Dispatch from the mid-size van class because of its competitive pricing (starting from £28,250 after the government's £6000 plug-in grant), a one-tonne payload and a class-topping 205-mile WLTP range. - we're unlikely to cover more than 30 miles today making the 80 deliveries we've loaded; even with 100-plus drops, that's unlikely to rise much above 50 miles. And while some drivers will cover up to 70 miles in a day with deliveries further afield, none would be compromised by this van's range on a full charge. - The Citroën e-Dispatch starts at £28,250 for the short-wheelbase XS Enterprise model with a smaller, 50kWh battery, which trades 350mm in load length and some standard equipment, compared with our top-flight medium-wheelbase test van with its 75kWh battery, costing £45,701 after the grant. Original Source : https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/features/electric-delivery-van-saved-christmas CHINA SEES THRIVING NEV MARKET IN 2021: REPORT - The total amount of financing in NEV-related sectors has exceeded 80 billion yuan (about 12.6 billion U.S. dollars) this year, and the number of newly-established NEV-related firms was 2.4 times that in 2020, according to the report released by database query platform Tianyancha.com. - Battery-changing services are becoming a new growth point in the NEV market, with 39,000 new related companies this year, the report said. Original Source : http://www.china.org.cn/china/Off_the_Wire/2021-12/25/content_77952384.htm INSIDE AUSTRALIA'S GROWING PIRATE ELECTRIC CAR MARKET - Australia's slow uptake of electric vehicles has led to the spread of a cottage industry in parallel imports, with small businesses springing up to bring in low-cost second-hand cars from Japan. - Ben Lippa, a self-described rev head, founded his import business J-Spec just over 22 years ago to import highly modified “drift” cars to Australia, but today finds many of his customers are electric cars such as the Nissan Leaf, which is no longer imported to Australia by its maker. - In Yackandandah in north-east Victoria, Russell Klose, who once imported cars and parts from a business in Albury-Wodonga, has come out of retirement with his son Cam and friend Matt Grogan for the same reason. - They have formed Kilowatt Cars, and are now waiting on a licence to begin to sell low-priced second-hand electric cars also sourced from Japan. Original Source : https://www.smh.com.au/business/entrepreneurship/inside-australia-s-growing-pirate-electric-car-market-20211224-p59k0y.html IS NOW A GOOD TIME TO BUY A USED ELECTRIC CAR?   Original Source : https://www.carsguide.com.au/car-news/is-now-a-good-time-to-buy-a-used-electric-car-tesla-model-3-nissan-leaf-hyundai-ioniq-used IN-CAR PAYMENTS FOR MERCEDES EQS Original Source : https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211108005472/en/Daimler-Mobility-and-Visa-Form-Global-Technology-Partnership-to-Integrate-Digital-Commerce-Into-the-Car-Seamlessly-and-Conveniently LOOKS LIKE NIO MAY EXPAND TO THE US, NEW JOB LISTINGS FOUND Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/557133/nio-posts-job-openings-us/ WULING HONGGUANG MINIEV TOPS CHINA'S NOV. VEHICLE REGISTRATIONS LIST Original Source : https://autonews.gasgoo.com/china_news/70019417.html PLANS IN ENGLAND FOR CAR CHARGERS IN ALL COMMERCIAL CAR PARKS QUIETLY ROLLED BACK Original Source : https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/dec/27/plans-in-england-for-car-chargers-in-all-commercial-car-parks-quietly-rolled-back NEW YORK CITY TO INVEST $420M IN ELECTRIC VEHICLES AND INFRASTRUCTURE Original Source : https://www.offgridenergyindependence.com/articles/25570/new-york-city-to-invest-420m-in-electric-vehicles-and-infrastructure US INSTALLING WORKPLACE CHARGERS AT AN IMPRESSIVE PACE   Original Source : https://chargedevs.com/newswire/us-installing-workplace-chargers-at-an-impressive-pace/ REMEMBERING GM'S EV1, THE LOST PIONEER OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES' RISE Original Source : https://eu.freep.com/story/money/cars/mark-phelan/2021/12/25/gm-ev-1-electric-vehicles/9003729002/ QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Returns in 2022.  Email me a suggestion for a possible question and I might pick yours!  hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Founders
The Outsiders: Eight Unconventional CEOs and Their Radically Rational Blueprint for Success

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 33:47


What I learned from reading The Outsiders: Eight Unconventional CEOs and Their Radically Rational Blueprint for Success by William Thorndike.Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 230 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

The Maverick Paradox Podcast
Secrets of Great Leaders

The Maverick Paradox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 52:07


This is an episode for The Maverick Paradox @ KLDR. Judith Germain hosts this radio show, and her guest today is Alain Hunkins and they are discussing the secrets of great leaders. He explains that most leadership models are now outdated and leaders need to understand that their people need an engaging experience. We live in a world of increased speed and transparency which is why we are shifting towards authentic, human leaders. He reminds us that great leaders give insight not information. Alain Hunkins helps high achieving people become high achieving leaders. Over his twenty-year career, Alain has worked with over 2,000 groups of leaders in 25 countries. Clients include Wal-Mart, Pfizer, Citigroup, General Electric, State Farm Insurance, IBM, General Motors, and Microsoft. In addition to being a leadership speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach, Alain is the author of CRACKING THE LEADERSHIP CODE: Three Secrets to Building Strong Leaders (Wiley, March 2020), which was endorsed by leadership luminaries Jim Kouzes, Barry Posner, and Marshall Goldsmith. They have an interesting conversation where Alain shares her leadership hacks and surprises Judith with questions on Maverick Leadership that she has been pondering. If you wish to listen to The Maverick Paradox @KLDR as the episodes are broadcasted then visit KLDR Online. Judith's websites:  The Maverick Paradox Magazine - themaverickparadox.com Company Website - maverickparadox.co.uk Judith's LinkedIn profile is here, her Twitter profile (MaverickMastery) is here, Facebook here and Instagram here. 

Rising Above
Be The Best You: Interview With Anthony Sarigianopoulos

Rising Above

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 69:09


In this episode I sit down and talk with Anthony Sarigianopoulos. He shares some of the ups and downs of working for General Motors as well as his fitness journey and what led him and his brother Joe into starting "Two Brothers One Mic" podcast. His passion is to help people create a better version of themselves to ultimately become THE BEST YOU!! Social Media: Instagram: dave_hess28 Facebook: Rising Above Podcast YouTube: Rising Above Podcast Twitter: @ RisingAbovePod Email: risingabovewithdavidhess@gmail.com Check out Two Brothers One Mic on Facebook and look for them on your favorite podcast streaming service. Listener Support: https://anchor.fm/risingabove --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/risingabove/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/risingabove/support

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene
1973: Jim Taylor

Cars Yeah with Mark Greene

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 47:28


Jim Taylor is the CEO of Electric Last Mile Solutions, ELMS, where they are transforming commercial fleets to drive the e-mobility business of today and tomorrow. Jim also held various leadership positions at General Motors from 1995 to 2010, including CEO of Hummer and President of Cadillac.  

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1317: UK EV Grant Cut Could Be Lowering Prices | 22 Dec 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 23:23


Show #1317 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Wednesday 22nd December. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. TESLA ANNOUNCES FREE HOLIDAY SUPERCHARGING - Tesla is making its Supercharging free for the holidays -- with some caveats. The move, which is intended to curb long wait times at the automaker's charging stations during this busy season, is limited to off-peak hours in select locations. - A map on Tesla's consumer website confirms that between Thursday, Dec. 23 and Sunday, Dec. 26, owners motoring along select travel routes in the US can receive free charging at specific stations between the hours of 7 p.m. and 10 a.m. (local time zone). - The majority of stations covered under this incentive are concentrated on the West Coast, primarily in California, where over 30 locations are free, as well as Arizona (10 locations) and Nevada (7 locations). Original Source : https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/tesla-supercharger-free-holidays/ TESLA'S BIG HOLIDAY UPDATE ADDS TIKTOK AND SONIC - It includes useful driving features like automatic access to a car's blind spot cameras, as well as fun additions like new games built into Tesla Arcade, TikTok support, and a feature that lets the electric cars “dance to a choreographed light show.” The update's version number is 2021.44.25, and should be rolling out over the coming days. - The most useful inclusion in the update could be its blind spot camera feature which automatically shows a live camera view of the car's blind spot whenever a driver activates a turn signal. Tesla CEO Elon Musk indicated the feature was in development in July 2020, but now it's here to (hopefully) make maneuvers like changing highway lanes a little bit safer. - Other practical improvements include an easier way to add multiple waypoints to a journey, and simplified controls for accessing a car's primary controls. It's also now possible to drag and drop your most frequently used apps to customize the car's menu bar, and the heaters in the front seats can now regulate temperature based on how hot it is in the car generally. - TikTok videos can now be watched directly from the car's touchscreen via Tesla Theater, and Tesla Arcade has been updated with new games like the original Sonic the Hedgehog Original Source : https://www.theverge.com/2021/12/21/22847952/tesla-christmas-update-2021-sonic-the-hedgehog-sudoku-blind-spot-cameras FORD F-150 LIGHTNING OFFERS V2V CHARGING - The all-electric 2022 F-150 Lightning has the ability to “share” its range with other EVs, Ford has revealed. - The available vehicle-to-vehicle charging feature enables owners to charge a friend's vehicle during an outage or top off an EV battery for a neighbor. - The F-150 Lightning makes vehicle-to-vehicle charging possible thanks to its onboard generator and high-capacity battery systems, as well as the Ford-exclusive Pro Power Onboard 240-volt outlet. - when plugged to a F-150 Lightning with the optional 9.6 kW Pro Power Onboard, the Ford Mobile Power Cord charger can deliver Level-2 charging estimated to add an average range of 20 miles (32 km) per charging hour on a Mustang Mach-E Extended Range RWD. - Once connected to the 240-volt Pro Power Onboard outlet, customers can use the Mobile Power Cord to charge EVs that use the SAE J1772 charge port. Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/555880/ford-f150-lightning-v2v-charging/ VAUXHALL CORSA-E AND MOKKA-E GET £3K PRICE CUT AFTER GRANT CHANGES - Vauxhall has responded to last week's surprise reduction in the UK's Plug-in Car Grant (PiCG) incentive scheme by lowering the price of its electric cars. - Effective from today, the battery-powered Corsa-e and Mokka-e will have their list prices reduced by £3,000. It means the former now starts from £25,805 on-the-road including the grant, with the latter down to £29,365 including the grant. - Vauxhall's decision to reduce the price of its two electric cars means that even the expensive trim levels, namely the Corsa-e Elite and Mokka-e Ultimate, all fall under the £32,000 cap on the grant, so are eligible for the £1,500 discount. Original Source : https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/vauxhall/corsa/356939/vauxhall-corsa-e-and-mokka-e-get-ps3k-price-cut-after-grant-changes AUDI MAIN PLANT TO ONLY MAKE ELECTRIC CARS FROM 2028 - In Germany, Audi's main plant in Ingolstadt will only produce electric cars from 2028. - These plans are quite ambitious seeing as the Ingolstadt plant hasn't produced a single electric model to date. Within just three years, half of all vehicles built in Ingolstadt should be fully electric, and “from 2028, only electric cars will then roll off the production line in Ingolstadt,” an Audi spokesperson told Der Spiegel. - The first model to be produced in Ingolstadt will be the Q6 e-tron. The Audi spokesperson said the first pre-production units are already being built and series production is planned for 2023. The Q6 e-tron is based on the new PPE electric platform, on which Porsche will also introduce the electric Macan successor in parallel. Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2021/12/20/audis-main-plant-to-only-make-electric-cars-from-2028/ DUCATI REVEALS NEW MOTOE ELECTRIC RACER AT MISANO - Ducati has used a private test session at the Misano World Circuit Marco Simoncelli to debut their all-new MotoE racer. - The company will take over the MotoE series as the official machine supplier in 2023, with Michele Pirro given the shakedown duties of a machine that looks ready to race, even at this early stage. - Laced with carbon fiber, and the usual Ducati fodder of Ohlins suspension, Marchesini wheels, and Brembo brakes, the V21L also sports a double-sided swingarm, differentiating it from something like the single-sided Panigale V4 R used in WorldSBK. Original Source : https://www.cyclenews.com/2021/12/article/ducati-reveals-new-motoe-electric-racer-at-misano/ THIRTEEN NEW ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY PLANTS PLANNED IN THE U.S. WITHIN FIVE YEARS - In addition to electric vehicle battery plants that are already in operation in the United States, 13 additional plants have been announced and are expected to be operational within the next 5 years. Of the 13 plants that are planned, eight are joint ventures between automakers and battery manufacturers. Many of these new plants will be located in the Southeast or Midwest.  | Manufacturer | Location | Expected Opening | General Motors & LG Chem | Lordstown, OH | 2022 | SK Innovation | Northeast of Atlanta, GA | 2022 | General Motors & LG Energy Solution | Spring Hill, TN | 2023 | SK Innovation | Northeast of Atlanta, GA | 2023 | Stellantis & LG Energy Solution | TBD | 2024 | Ford | Northeast of Memphis, TN | 2025 | Ford & SK Innovation | Central KY | 2025 | Stellantis & Samsung SDI | TBD | 2025 | Toyota | Southeast of Greensboro, NC | 2025 | Ford & SK Innovation | Central KY | 2026 | General Motors & LG Energy Solution | To be determined (TBD) | TBD | General Motors & LG Energy Solution | TBD | TBD | Volkswagen | Chattanooga, TN | TBD Original Source : https://www.energy.gov/eere/vehicles/articles/fotw-1217-december-20-2021-thirteen-new-electric-vehicle-battery-plants-are POLESTAR 3 ELECTRIC SUV: LOOK MA, NO HANDS (OR ACCIDENTS) Polestar 3 will go into production in late 2022 or early 2023 and the SUVs will be equipped to use an advanced lidar system from Luminar, a tech company making waves with its efforts to build the "uncrashable" car. - The long-range lidar system offers Level 3 hands-free driving on designated stretches of highway. The driver can take their hands off the wheel, feet off the pedals, and can also divert their eyes and attention elsewhere such as answering emails or watching a movie. Luminar developed its own hardware and software and created the Iris sensing platform for significantly less cost. - Its lidar can read the landscape from 1,148-1,640 feet away, depending on the size of the object, which is much further than the human eye can see or headlights can illuminate. That is a real strength because it gives the vehicle more time to react. - Luminar will provide lidar sensors to Volvo starting in late 2022. They will be used in the Volvo XC90 replacement, which could be called the Embla. The new 2022 flagship electric SUV will be on the next generation of Volvo's Scalable Product Architecture or SPA2, designed to handle the advanced driving capability. - Polestar CEO Thomas Ingenlath said he will wait until 2025 to make the more advanced Level 3 hands-free system available in the Polestar 3. When the time comes, it will be activated via an over-the-air software update. Original Source : https://www.motortrend.com/news/polestar-3-electric-suv-lidar-level-3 MACK TRUCKS' 1ST ALL-ELECTRIC VEHICLE ENTERS SERIAL PRODUCTION Original Source : https://www.lehighvalleylive.com/allentown/2021/12/mack-trucks-new-electric-vehicle-enters-serial-production-at-lehigh-county-plant.html UK'S PIVOT POWER BRINGS ONLINE 5MWH FLOW BATTERY AT 'WORLD'S LARGEST HYBRID PROJECT' Original Source : https://www.energy-storage.news/uks-pivot-power-brings-online-5mwh-flow-battery-at-worlds-largest-hybrid-project/ BYD DELIVERS 1000TH PURE-ELECTRIC TANG SUV IN NORWAY Original Source : https://www.automotiveworld.com/news-releases/byd-delivers-1000th-pure-electric-tang-suv-in-norway SEC OFFICIALLY ANNOUNCES $125M SETTLEMENT WITH NIKOLA OVER MILTON FRAUD CASE Original Source : https://www.teslarati.com/sec-announces-125m-settlement-nikola-motor-trevor-milton-fraud/ CHECK THE BATTERY TECH OF THE AUDI RS Q E-TRON DAKAR RALLY CAR Original Source : https://www.quattrodaily.com/check-the-battery-tech-of-the-audi-rs-q-e-tron-dakar-rally-car/ QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Returns in 2022.  Email me a suggestion for a possible question and I might pick yours!  hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Founders
My personal blueprint – The Autobiography of Ed Thorp

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 33:02


What I learned from rereading A Man for All Markets: From Las Vegas to Wall Street, How I Beat the Dealer and the Market by Ed Thorp. Subscribe to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 230 full length episodes.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get access to every full episode. 

Capital Gains Tax Solutions Podcast
Becoming a Mindful Millionaire with Leisa Peterson

Capital Gains Tax Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 33:23


Leisa Peterson is on a mission to help 1 million people elevate their financial consciousness by helping them realize their true value in the world and beyond. She's had the great fortune to witness 1000s of money breakthroughs while writing her book, The Mindful Millionaire. Her specialty is helping business owners overcome a cycle of scarcity, uncertainty, and economic volatility. They can heal themselves or their sense of self-worth and rebuild amazing confidence so they can build holistic wealth and ultimately semi-retire, which is pretty cool. a time where you can have flexibility and freedom to call your own shots and make a bigger impact.Prior to starting WealthClinic®, LLC, she worked with some of the largest financial and business services companies in the world including Wells Fargo, State Farm Insurance, UNUM Life Insurance, New York Life, Federal Express, Pitney Bowes, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors.In‌ ‌our‌ ‌conversation,‌ ‌we‌ ‌discussed:‌The Secret to becoming a mindful millionaire.Understanding yourself is a scarcity mindset or an abundance mindset.What's the cheapest way to solve a problem?Trust yourself and trust the decisions that you're making.Connect with Leisa Peterson:https://capitalgainstaxsolutions.com/becoming-a-mindful-millionaire-with-leisa-peterson/Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!Here's How »Join the Capital Gains Tax Solutions Community today:capitalgainstaxsolutions.comCapital Gains Tax Solutions FacebookCapital Gains Tax Solutions Twitter

Stuff You Missed in History Class
The Flint Sit-down Strike

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 51:25


Flint, Michigan was at the heart of auto manufacturing for General Motors in 1936. And while the strike was largely centered around Flint, it also involved workers at GM factories all over the U.S. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com