Podcasts about lgbtqi

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Best podcasts about lgbtqi

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Latest podcast episodes about lgbtqi

Becoming Unapologetically Me
Overwhelmed? What To Do with Lucy Power

Becoming Unapologetically Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 35:54


Becoming Unapologetically Me is the podcast for people who know there is more stuck inside them and they want to find a way to release it.In this episode, host Helen Norbury talks to Lucy Power about diversity and inclusion, particularly with reference to neurodivergence and LGBTQ+. Lucy is a qualified and ICF professional certified Coach with a postgraduate qualification in Personal and Business Coaching from the University of Chester. She is also extensively trained and experienced in Transactional Analysis Psychotherapy and integrates this with her coaching practice. Following a complex childhood drenched in overwhelm, Lucy has spent all of her adult life searching for meaning and gathering knowledge about how we operate in our hardest and in our best times. Lucy has studied psychology, philosophy, business administration and leadership, psychotherapy, group psychology, interpersonal neurobiology and complex trauma. She has a Masters in Social Work and has worked with marginalised and traumatised people with complex mental health struggles for years. Lucy, a Global Woman of Choice award winning community builder, is committed to equity and belonging, recognising and working to change social marginalisation, Lucy is a proud member of the LGBTQI+ community. Find Lucy at @iamlucypower and www.the-power.institute.comIn this conversation that covers a wide-range of topics, Lucy and Helen talk about how shame grows in the darkness and prevents us from becoming an unapologetic version of ourselves. The biggest blocker to equity is actually the misconception that “normal” even exists. No-one is easy to group and we are all multi-dimensional beings, differing in our age, race, gender, sexuality, needs, wants, desires and more. Maybe that in itself is where we find the place to belong - we are all worthy, loveable, enough and important and that is a great place to find connection. Key Takeaways“We are born princes and the civilizing process makes us frogs” - Eric BerneShame and apology prevent intimacy and vulnerability and ultimately block you from becoming the unapologetic version of youFitting in by pretending to be like your oppressors gets in the way of true belonging“The greatest burden a child must bear is the unlived life of its parents” - Carl JungSelf awareness and not betraying yourself is the greatest self-care you can offer yourself. Showing honesty and integrity to yourself, and being impeccable with your language towards yourself is crucialDon't forget to subscribe and rate us so we can grow and help more people.Visit www.helenannenorbury.co.uk for more information.Episode SponsorsPaul Culshaw offers group and private one-on-one coaching, enabling you to go from stressful confusion to empowering clarity with a step-by-step organic marketing strategy and plan.Gain the support you need to set up your business online, and start to optimise it to attract leads and sales. Or, take your business further with Nurtured Growth, Paul's one-on-one online marketing program for advanced coaches, therapists and consultants.Paul has over 20 years experience in the digital marketing world, helping small businesses to large corporations, such as Simply Be and JD Williams. Book a free discovery call with Paul today at paulculshaw.comLinkswww.instagram.com/helenannenorbury

The Coming Storm
The Mid-Terms 1. Groomers

The Coming Storm

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 42:26


As America goes out to vote for the first time since the tumultuous aftermath of the 2020 election, Gabriel Gatehouse is back in the deep undergrowth of the US political scene, in a bid to understand where the dark energy underpinning the January 6 assault on the Capitol is going now. Some of the energy from the QAnon conspiracy theory about a satanic cabal of paedophiles is morphing into a grassroots political movement against ‘groomers' – the idea that LGBTQI+ sex educators and trans healthcare advocates are indoctrinating young people into a sexualised culture. The battleground is America's school boards and the prize could be a galvanised Republican base with a new crusade. At a conference in Miami of thinkers shaping the future ideas of the right, Gabriel finds the issue top of the agenda. And across the country, a slate of candidates linked to QAnon is running for office – how will they fare? Producer: Lucy Proctor

Grown and Growing Podcast
Breaking Down the Adolescent Mental Crisis with Dr. Jari Santana-Wynn

Grown and Growing Podcast

Play Episode Play 36 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 66:22


After learning about the child and adolescent mental health crisis in the US, I wanted to talk to a clinical expert to learn more and better equip myself with tools for my own children. The conversation is enlightening and helpful. This conversation with Dr. Jari @doctor.jari  gave me hope.About My Guest:Dr. Jari Santana-Wynn is a child and family therapist, parent coach, international speaker, and certified LGBTQI+ trainer with over 20 years of clinical experience. She earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Miami University (OH) and has worked in community mental health clinics, hospitals, and schools. Her clinical expertise is focused on child and adolescent mental health, trauma informed care, immigrant mental health, and acculturation stress. Dr. Jari's own experiences as an Afro-Latina immigrant child drive her commitment to culturally competent mental health services for minority communities and make her a tenacious advocate for their social, economic, health care, and educational needs.Special Offer for Listeners:For listeners of Grown and Growing, Dr. Jari is offering 50% off of her video series Decolonizing Parenting, a series where Dr. Jari and her sister discuss non-coercive and non-violent parenting strategies that are consistent with the Afro-indigenous child rearing practices of our ancestors.Visit:  https://doctorjari.com/Use the code:  grown&growingGrown and Growing Podcast: Like. Follow. Share. Connect with me:Website: grownandgrowing.buzzsprout.comFacebook: @GrownandgrowingpodcastInstagram: @GrownandgrowingpodcastEmail: grown.growingpodcast@gmail.com

The Juggling Act
The power of pestering and Grace Jennings on the joys of saying no

The Juggling Act

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 26:05


Mel and Jules chat about how to stay strong when facing endless pestering from children, and the scary discrimination that LGBTQI+ couples are still facing in Australia today. Mel also gets to chat with journalist Grace Jennings about her book The Yes Woman, people pleasing and the power of learning how to say no.  Come and share all your thoughts on the episode via our Facebook group facebook.com/groups/thejugglingactpodcast.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

From Sparks to Light - Inspiring Stories for Challenging Times

My conversation on the podcast today is with Jill Salvino, an accomplished commercial director and storyteller and the director of Between the Shades, her debut feature documentary that examines the power of labels and the transcendence of love with a deep dive into the LGBTQI experience. So much of what Jill understands about life resonated with me. The idea of recognizing that our time here is finite, that life is made up of moments, some that are certain to pass us by if we don't take the time to notice.  Of the idea that listening can heal us. Of creating a space for hearing one another's stories with an open heart. That diversity is a gift. “Diversity breeds innovation,” she says. But mostly the message of this conversation is that humans are wonderfully eclectic creatures that desire to be seen and accepted. To love and be loved. To be part of a community. To bring their full and complete selves to the world. As the film reminds us, there is no black and white to the human experience, and the sooner we understand that, the more peaceful our world will be.Jill's film, Between the Shades was screened and was honored at dozens of film festivals and partnered with Passion River Films for distribution. It is licensed in over 300 schools and libraries and available on television as well.Jill has collected over 200 industry awards, including an Emmy, and directed hundreds of commercials and long form content. She has directed four film shorts. Taking it for Granted has screened and won prizes in over a dozen film festivals across the US, including a special screening at NYC's Downtown Film Festival after taking home Best Drama. The Sonnet Project #74 & #153, presented by the New York Shakespeare Exchange, currently touring in the UK and Lies People Tell which premiered in the San Pedro International Film Festival.  It was chosen by the New York Women in Film and Television as one of their Top Short Films of the Year.  Jill is a member of Promax, long-standing chair of the Telly Silver Counsel, and a Gold Member of the New York Women in Film and Television, Judge of The Emmy's as well as a recipient. She lives in Asbury Park, New Jersey with her wife Susan.As our country struggles with the polarization that divides us, Jill's film offers a way out. An opportunity to listen with an open heart to the experiences of those who may live lives that on the surface appear different from ours, but underneath, remind us that people are people, and we all have our own unique stories to tell, if we only take the time to listen.To learn more about Jill, please visit her website.Buy or rent Between the Shades for home viewing on iTunes.  Digitally screening on Google Play, Fandango Now & Amazon Prime or purchase the DVD at Target & Barnes & NobleFollow Jill on Instagram @directorjillTo learn more about Robert Maggio, the composer of our theme music, please check out his website.To learn more about Suzanne, visit her website. To learn more about the inspiration for this podcast, please check out Suzanne's memoir, Estrell...

Over The Influence
S3 Ep81: Robert Mee: The Survivor

Over The Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 57:06


In this episode we chat to the hilarious Robert Mee, who runs the LGBTQI charity Out In The Bay in Lancaster. Trigger Warning: as part of Robert's story he talks about alcohol misuse, drugs misuse, domestic violence, and suicidal thoughts. Robert makes us laugh so much in this episode, which is a true testament to both his character and his outlook - because as you'll hear, he has faced some incredible challenges in his life. As a young man, Robert contracted HIV and was told that he had 6 months to live. His response was to drink - only to be told that his liver was failing him, and that it could kill him more quickly than his AIDS diagnosis. Robert reduced his drinking (or at least he thought he did) but it was through a partner that he was introduced to smoking crack cocaine - this led to him using heroine, and it was after overdosing that he was told that he had 4 hours to live in the Royal Hospital in Liverpool. Robert survived, and went to rehab where he discovered that alcohol was one of the root causes of his problems. Robert now spends his life helping others, and believes that nobody should feel like they're in a situation where they're alone. He's warm, he's kind and he's absolutely hilarious - this episode is a rollercoaster of emotions, and we thank Robert for sharing his story so honestly. If you're affected by anything you hear in this episode, or if you would like further information on services who may be able to help you if you need it, please see the Support Resources section of our website. --- Get In Touch: Of course, you can always get in touch with us (publicly or privately) on our socials - @alcoholfreepod on Instagram, or search for "Over The Influence" on Facebook. We'd love to hear your story - please get in touch with us directly at otihq@overtheinfluence.co.uk or go to our website, www.overtheinfluence.co.uk --- The Premium Podcast: If you love OTI and you'd like to hear behind the curtain, subscribe to the OTI Premium Podcast now! Released every Monday and exclusive to subscribers and OTI Community members, the Premium Pod is Sharon and Ben talking through even more topics surrounding alcohol-free life, from how to not just survive but enjoy AF holidays to alcohol free dating! Subscribe now! Released every Monday, cancel any time - just £5 per month. --- Links: For links to alcohol-related support services, please visit our website. Some further links related to this episode: National AIDS Trust: https://www.nat.org.uk/ Terence Higgins Trust: https://www.tht.org.uk/our-services/living-well-hiv/support-people-living-hiv  --- Disclaimer: All views expressed in this podcast are of the participants themselves, and not necessarily those of Over The Influence (OTI) Ltd. The information, opinions, and recommendations presented in this podcast are for general information only and any reliance on the information provided in this podcast is done at your own risk. We are not medical professionals but normal people giving their own experiences of removing alcohol from their lives, and as such this podcast should not be considered professional advice. If you are dependent on alcohol, or think you may be, we strongly recommend that you seek professional medical advice. --- Helpful Hashtags: We found hashtags and sober social media accounts really helpful in our early days alcohol free, as following them can help to reinforce that you are not alone!  These are some of the hashtags we've followed: #alcoholfree #stopdrinking #healthandwellnessjourney #zeroalcohol #idontdrink #sobercurious #healthydrinking #alcoholfreelife #soberaf #alcoholfreeliving #sobermotivation #podcast #healthpodcast #noalcohol #nobooze #sober #sobercurious #soberlofe #soberliving #sobercommunity #afcommunity #soberwomen #sobermom #sobermomtribe #sobersisters #sobriety #soberuk #soberjourney #sobrietyrocks #overtheinfluence #oti

Nightlife
This Mortal Coil: Trans Rights Activist Georgie Stone

Nightlife

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 20:25


Georgie Stone is the focus of a Netflix documentary called The Georgie Stone Story.

Crossing the Line
Abortion 2.0

Crossing the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 33:41


Movement leaders -- striving to ensure all people have access to abortion since the fall of Roe -- contend that the current and future success of abortion care is the abortion pill. Whether obtaining the pill at clinics, via telemedicine providers, or a self-managed abortion (SMA), access to abortion pills levels out the playing field for millions of people who otherwise might not have access, particularly youth, BIPOC, LGBTQI++, and under-resourced people. In this episode, leaders in the abortion pill space break down how to get them, use them, and why they're critical.Visit CTLpod.com to find out more about the podcast, resources for abortion care, and information on how you can take action.Thank you to Elisa Wells and Imani Wilson-Shabaz from Plan C Pills, Christie Pitney and Dr. Rebecca Gomperts from Aid Access, Kimberly Inez McGuire from Abortion on Our Own Terms and Executive Director of URGE, Dr. Raegan McDonald-Mosley CEO of Power to Decide and Rachel Fey Director of Public Policy. Special thanks to Jex Blackmore, *Diandra, and all the people who shared their stories. *Some names have been changed to protect identities. Go to plancpills.org to learn how to access abortion pills. If you live in a restrictive state go to AidAccess.org. Need help funding your abortion? Check out National Network of Abortion Funds and the Abortion Freedom Fund. Need advice or have questions about a miscarriage or abortion? Go to M+A Hotline. Have legal questions? Go Repro Legal Helpline. Destigmatize self-managed abortion by supporting Abortion on Our Own Terms. Advocate for youth access with URGE. Access trusted abortion care information at AbortionFinder.org and reproductive health information at Bedsider.org. This podcast is brought to you by Population Media Center. Executive Producers are Lisa Caruso and Alex Demyanenko, with Co-Producer Kathleen Bedoya and Associate Producer Dominica Ruelas. This episode was field produced by Charity Tooze. Edited by Bruno Falcon with production services provided by Pidge Productions. Production coordination is by June Neely. Charity Tooze leads impact strategy. The narration is read by Tatiana St. Phard. Original music is composed by Valeri Ortiz.

Conversations
Chris, the lunchbox, and the impossible problems

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 52:36


Chris Pepin-Neff grew up as an identical twin in a small town in Connecticut. When he was four years old, his family suffered a terrible loss. Then Chris grew up to help change history (CW: loss and grief) 

rePROs Fight Back
A Deep-Dive on The Global Anti-Gender Movement

rePROs Fight Back

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 49:11 Transcription Available


The anti-gender and anti-rights movement is a loosely connected set of groups and money, sometimes working in tandem with governments, who are looking to claw back LGBTQI+ rights and abortion rights that have been realized around the world. Bierne Roose-Snyder, Senior Policy Fellow for the Council for Global Equality, sits down to talk with us about how these movements came to be and the danger they pose to human rights and democratic systems. The anti-gender and anti-rights movement simultaneously works on a global and domestic scale. Misinformation and information flooding has contributed greatly to the anti-gender and anti-rights movement, undermining expertise and civil society, and creating a world in which no factual information can be trusted. From a domestic perspective, this can be very closely intertwined with authoritarian and anti-democratic movements. In a move to diminish civil society, the anti-gender movement will often target organizations that promote or support LGBTQI+ rights, sexual and reproductive health and rights, or other human rights—whether through formal complaints or targeted harassment and abuse. For example, in Uganda, the anti-gender government targeted Sexual Minorities Uganda (SMUG), a Kampala-based LGBTQI+ human rights nonprofit. Similarly, Boston Children's Hospital has faced an extreme increase of threats and harassment for providing gender-affirming healthcare. The sexual and reproductive health and rights movement and the LGBTQI+ movement are being out funded by the anti-gender, anti-rights movement at incredible rates. In addition, U.S. religious institutions are not required to report their funding activities. Between 2013 and 2017, LGBTQI movements worldwide received 1.2 billion dollars in funding, while the anti-gender movement received 3.7 billion in funding.  LinksCouncil for Global Equality on TwitterCouncil for Global Equality on FacebookPower Over Rights – Center for Feminist Foreign PolicyRights at Risk – Observatory on the Universality of RightsExporting Disinformation - Mozilla FoundationManufacturing Moral Panic – Global Philanthropy Project  Take ActionFollow the Council for Global Equality on Twitter and Facebook to stay up-to-date on their important work. Early, loud, visible mobilization for solidarity is incredibly powerful against the anti-gender and anti-rights movements. Hope-based messaging—highlighting what we work for and the world we are building—allows for greater reach and momentum. Support the showFollow on Social: Twitter: @rePROsFightBack Instagram: @reprosfbFacebook: rePROs Fight Back Email us: jennie@reprosfightback.comRate and Review on Apple PodcastThanks for listening & keep fighting ...

Who Shot Ya?
Episode 267: 'Bros' with Steve Hernandez

Who Shot Ya?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 58:22 Very Popular


Comedian Steve Hernandez joins us to take a look at Universal's splashy gay rom-com. We talk about where it sits in queer cinema history and whether it delivered on its promises (of both the "rom" and "com" varieties).Then, we get some characters from movies past set up with podcasting narrators of their own.What's GoodAlonso - Retail Christmas seasonSteve - wedding planning, The Chatterbox, Rao's sauce from the jarDrea - Season 3 of Derry GirlsITIDICa). John Waters Returns to Directing to Helm Adaptation of His Novelb). Netflix Will Put Knives Out 2 in 600 Theaters For a Weekc). Velma is “Officially” Gay in the Newest Scooby-Doo MovieStaff PicksDrea - Straight Up (2022)Alonso - Go Fish (1994)Steve - Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat (2018)We are sponsored by OVID.tvVisit OVID.tv and use code MAXFILM for 50% off a year of boundary-pushing international cinema. With:Drea ClarkAlonso DuraldeSteve HernandezProduced by Marissa FlaxbartSr. Producer Laura Swisher

We Knew the Moon
BONUS EPISODE: Neurodiversity & Spirituality

We Knew the Moon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 66:30


What happens when you get three neurodivergent women on the same podcast? Lots of tangents, that's what! Join us for this bonus episode with Sareta Fontaine from Women Who Rebrand Podcast and Amber Collins from The Neurodivergent Awakening Podcast. What percentage of the neurodiverse population are LGBTQI? What are stimming and masking? Is there a connection between being neurodivergent and being spiritual? How are neurodivergent people affected by the moon cycles? Check in and find out! Stay safe and take your meds! Sources: https://thecrossingchurch.com/Events/Detail?EventOccurrenceId=678 https://www.reddit.com/r/neurodiversity/comments/9p3k8m/is_spirituality_ableistneurotypical/ http://neurodiversity.com/religion.html https://astrogarden.proboards.com/thread/1646/neurodivergent-metaphysically-oriented https://www.facebook.com/mindgeographic/ https://neurodiverging.com/creating-safe-spiritual-spaces-for-neurodivergent-folks-with-rev-catharine-clarenbach/ https://www.texthelp.com/resources/blog/12-neurodiversity-strengths-that-come-from-thinking-differently/ https://embrace-autism.com/the-effect-of-moon-phases/ https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1087079209000082 This makes sense as our brain chemistry is different to that of a non autistic person https://www.space.com/amp/full--moon-affects-human-sleep-menstrual-cycle

Damian Barr's Literary Salon
Alan Cumming Book Week Scotland Salon Special! November 2021

Damian Barr's Literary Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 79:05


Relive this very special night of stories and poetry at our special Salon celebrating three of Scotland's most exciting voices: Len Pennie, Courtney Stoddart and Alan Cumming! Len is a champion for Scots and isnae feart! Her poems have been enjoyed by millions online and she appeared with Damian in the BBC documentary In Search of Sir Walter Scott. Courtney is an acclaimed Scottish-Caribbean poet and performer. Her work focuses on racism, imperialism, womanhood and growing up in Scotland. Alan is…Alan and memoir , 'Baggage: Tales from a Fully Packed Life', sees him unpack the lot. It is an honest, poignant and joyful insight into his extraordinary life. He covers career highlights - from winning a Tony and an Olivier to filming with Stanley Kubrick and the Spice Girls. Alan also offers an honest account of the less glamorous, often painful, moments which underpin the values he fights for as a committed social justice and LGBTQI+ activist. And yes, there are Liza Minnelli stories. So settle down and enjoy this honest and joyous recording from late 2021. This Salon raised funds for the Scottish Book Trust - a national charity bringing the benefits of reading and writing to everyone in Scotland since 1998. Find out more about their brilliant work here. Podcast produced and edited by Megan Bay Dorman Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Queerstories
300 Fahad Ali - To My Mother

Queerstories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 9:34


Fahad remembers what it took for his mother to finally meet one of his boyfriends.Fahad Ali is a molecular biologist, science educator, and writer. He is a member of the Palestinian diaspora, a co-founder of the Queer Solidarity Film Festival and the Muslims for Marriage Equality campaign group, and a community advocate and organiser. He performed this piece at Riverside Theatres in Parramatta then again at the Sydney Opera House for All About Women.Queerstories an award-winning LGBTQI+ storytelling project directed by Maeve Marsden, with regular events around Australia. For more information, visit www.queerstories.com.au and follow Queerstories on Facebook.The Queerstories book is published by Hachette Australia, and can be purchased from your favourite independent bookseller or on Booktopia.To support Queerstories, become a patron at www.patreon.com/ladysingsitbetter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Spill
The Other Side Of The Madonna Backlash

The Spill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 20:40


On the show today… The first trailer from Selena Gomez's new documentary, entitled Selena Gomez: My Mind & Me, has been released today. Here's everything you need to know about the documentary and its release day. In sad (and somewhat strange) news, Paris Hilton's dog Diamond Baby has been missing for more than two weeks, but there's now been a new twist in the missing dog's case thanks to an Australian pet physic. So how legit is this? Allow us to investigate. And Madonna has caused some controversy thanks to a TikTok she posted where she seemingly came out as gay. It appears many people are not across her decades-long legacy with the LGBTQIA+ community, so we need to talk through her greatest hits. At the same time, Madonna is being policed for not acting her age on social media, and we have some strong thoughts about that. THE END BITS Subscribe to Mamamia GET IN TOUCH: Join us in our Facebook group to discuss everything pop culture...https://www.facebook.com/groups/2524018781153963/ Feedback? We're listening. Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at thespill@mamamia.com.au WANT MORE? Read all the latest entertainment news on Mamamia... https://mamamia.com.au/entertainment/ Subscribe to The Spill Newsletter... https://mamamia.com.au/newsletter CREDITS Hosts: Laura Brodnik & Clare Stephens Executive Producer: Gia Moylan Audio Producer: Madeline Joannou Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present, and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.Become a Mamamia subscriber: https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Springbrook's Converge Autism Radio

On this episode, Reid Miles from Inside the Asperger's Studio, he sits down with a friend he met through a life coaching group, Evan Atley. Evan is a very interesting kid with an amazingstory of transformation and acceptance.

We Can Be Heroes
Dr Ronx Ikharia

We Can Be Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 47:26


Dr Ronx lives by the motto “you cannot be what you do not see.” They have carved a path in the world they want to see with sheer determination and self-funded their way through Medical School after leaving home as a teenager. They are an Emergency medicine doctor by profession and describe themself as a queer, black, androgynous intersectional feminist. Ronx shares their journey through coming out as trans in the black community and understanding their intersection has allowed them to grow and help others. They are a positive force who uses their own lived experience to provide understanding for the LGBTQI community and beyond. Ronx often uses social media as a place to air their views and commentary on the world around them and when chatting to Glyn, they unpick the role we all play in becoming an ally. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Big Send
The Pod King (Gay Voodoo)

The Big Send

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 92:18


Episode 138 feat. Adam, Smac, Taylor and Toddy. Come send it with the boys, as we discuss, Sailor Steve, Road tripping with kids, Dahmer, Ukraine pigs, 60 days in, Snoring, Crimes of passion, Climate activism, Meat raffles, Roller coaster accidents, Chess cheaters, Suicide by hurricane, Kane Cornes, The happiest man on death row, Drag syndrome, Coolio, and much more... Please forward all complaints to: bigsendbigchat@gmail.com

Entr'Nous
#36 Sexo: Où sont les hommes ? - Partie 2

Entr'Nous

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 39:57


Envoyez-nous vos commentaires en audio (message vocal) : https://www.vodio.fr/repondeur/311/Ou, envoyez-nous un email à info@love-health-center.org ou caparledecul@gmail.comCette épisode est la suite de l'épisode précédent, #35.En micro-trottoir nous vous avions demandé quelles étaient d'après vous les raisons du fait qu'il y a moins d'hommes que de femmes qui semblent s'intéresser aux connaissances sexo. Pourquoi y a-t-il moins d'hommes que de femmes qui s'inscrivent aux activités du LHC? En bref, où sont les hommes ?Surfant sur les réflexions du premier épisode, on vous propose d'aller un peu plus loin.Comment pourrions-nous inviter les hommes à se mettre en mouvement ? Comment faire en sorte que les hommes s'informent plus ? Quels conseils les hommes nous ont-ils partagé lors du micro-trottoir ? Y a-t-il des moments plus propices pour s'engager activement vers une sexualité plus épanouie ?  On vous propose quelques pistes de réflexions. Contribuez également, faites-nous part de vos opinions, expériences, conseils par email ou via notre boite à message vocal.Une cocréaton entre Olivier (du podcast "Entr'Nous") et Xavier (du podcast "Ça Parle de Cul") Deux épisodes collaboratifs, épisodes #35 et #36 du podcast Entr'Nous et épisodes #7 et #8 du podcast Ça Parle de Cul.Entr'Nous est un podcast vivant où l'on parle avec authenticité de sexe, et où l'on vous invite à explorer votre relation à votre sexualité. Parlons de sexualité avec simplicité, audace et authenticité. Au micro, pour animer, Olivier Mageren cofondateur de l'asbl Love Health Center.Ça Parle de Cul est un podcast qui parle de la sexualité des hommes avec humour, mais sans tabous. Chaque mois, Xavier invite quelqu'un pour parler ensemble autour d'un sujet qui concerne les hommes et leurs pratiques et rapport à la sexualité.   Et vous?Le micro trottoir est passé, mais notre micro est toujours ouvert pour recevoir votre témoignage. L'aventure à votre rencontre se poursuit. Qu'auriez-vous envie de nous partager à ce sujet ? Voici une liste de questions pour t'inspirer:Et si vous n'êtes pas un homme, que vous soyez femme, LGBTQI+, accepteriez-vous de diffuser la réflexion, et si vous le souhaitez aussi, faites-nous part de vos idées.Toi en tant que mec, comment t'investis-tu dans les domaines liés à ta sexualité? Comment t'informes-tu à propos de la sexualité?Comment développes-tu tes connaissances et bien-être en sexualité?Comment penses-tu qu'il faudrait parler aux mecs?Comment le LHC pourrait susciter l'intérêt des hommes? Quelle activité te parlerait vraiment, à laquelle tu participerais à coup sûr?Quelle thématique sexo t'intéresse?Dites-nous ce que vous aimeriez voir comme aide, accompagnement, activités, service...? Comment te mettrais-tu en mouvement? Quel serait le moyen pour toi?Envoyez-nous vos commentaires en audio (message vocal) via l'outil ci-dessous :https://www.vodio.fr/repondeur/311/ Ou, envoyez-nous un email à info@love-health-center.org ou caparledecul@gmail.comAbonnez-vous à nos 2 chaînes de podcast pour vous informer chaque mois. Au plaisir de vous écouter.Séquençage du podcast : 00:22 Introduction01:08 Donner des idées, des pistes02:14 Un accueil favorable dans la rue04:21 Anonyme homme 1 : chercher à apprendre et au plus tôt !04:49 Anonyme homme 2 : un préservatif sur une banane c'est insuffisant05:13 Anonyme homme 3 : les jeunes en ont besoin!05:21 Anonyme homme 4 : l'enseignement insuffisant06:00 Anonyme homme 5 : la femme-objet06:33 Anonyme homme 6 : le futur fait peur07:03 Commencer tôt l'éducation sexuelle des jeunes08:13 Le rôle des médias sociaux09:22 Proposition aux animateurs / animatrices EVRAS10:23 Le rôle des potes10:40 Anonyme homme 7 : découvrir le sexe par le porno et les discussions entre amis10:58 Anonyme homme 8 : j'aurai plus tendance à me confier à des amis, des gens que je connais11:28 Où est-ce qu'il y a encore de l'espace pour pouvoir créer des contenus éducatifs ?12:29 Une augmentation de ce type de contenus spécialisés suffit-elle ?13:02 Garder la curiosité et décomplexer le dialogue14:06 La sexualité qui évolue avec l'âge et les étapes de la vie, exemple avec la périnatalité18:09 L'homme aussi peut s'adresser aux professionnels : anticiper et ne pas attendre un problème21:43 Question pausée à une femme : si ton mec te pose des questions, comment réagis-tu ?22:17 Qu'est-ce les hommes aimeraient avoir comme sujets proposés ?22:56 Anonyme homme 10 : l'histoire de l'orgasme, l'importance de l'orgasme et la vue sur la sexualité masculine23:17 Anonyme homme 11 : envie de m'amuser23:23 Anonyme homme 12 : généraliser tous ces contenus sur les réseaux sociaux et que les hommes prennent la parole23:42 Anonyme homme 13 : un homme gay serait beaucoup plus enclin à participer23:56 Anonyme homme 14 : on a tous des kiffs différents24:14 Anonyme homme 15 : la taille qui compte ? Non c'est bouger (humour : cours de danse?)24:28 Et à quoi pense Olivier en tant que sexologue27:13 L'avis de Xavier et : on peut comprendre que certains sujet pourraient moins intéresser les hommes... À tord ou à raison ?29:37 Soyez curieux, osez !30:42 Le tantra32:07 La conclusion d'Olivier34:57 La conclusion de Xavier35:22 On a toujours de nouvelles choses à découvrir35:57 Choisir de vivre sa relation, pas la subir36:12 Et à l'international ?36:39 Un croisement où l'on rencontre l'autre37:42 Donner davantage de place à notre intériorité dans le couple38:35 Clôture du podcast

WDR ZeitZeichen
Bruno Balz, Hit-Schreiber (Geburtstag, 06.10.1902)

WDR ZeitZeichen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 14:46


Der erfolgreichste Liedtexter während der NS-Zeit war schwul: Bruno Balz hat über 1000 Lieder geschrieben, darunter Evergreens wie "Kann den Liebe Sünde sein" - in der Nazizeit war sein Leben wegen seiner Homosexualität dennoch bedroht. Retten konnte sich Bruno Balz vielleicht nur, weil seine genialen Lieder für die Nazis unentbehrlich waren... Autorin: Christiane Kopka Von Christiane Kopka.

rePROs Fight Back
Becca Andrews on Her New Book No Choice: The Destruction of Roe v. Wade and the Fight to Protect a Fundamental American Right

rePROs Fight Back

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 43:23 Transcription Available


What was access to abortion like before Roe v. Wade, and what will access to abortion look like after its overturning? Becca Andrews, reporter at Reckon News, talks to us about her new book No Choice: The Destruction of Roe v. Wade and the Fight to Protect a Fundamental American Right, including what communities will be hardest hit by the Supreme Court's decision, as well as the inspiring, groundbreaking work that leaders, activists, and providers are doing around the country to ensure that patients are able to access essential abortion care. The history of reproductive coercion has been and continues to be rampant in the United States, disproportionately targeted towards people of color and non-cisgendered folks. This unjust thread, foundational to the beginnings of the U.S., continues to weave through access to reproductive healthcare and modern medicine in general. The Janes, the Clergy Consultative Service on Abortion, and the Society for Humane Abortion were collectives that supported, counseled on, referred to, and facilitated access to abortion care before the Supreme Court's 1973 implementation of Roe. However, Roe's legal protections were not around long before they started to be chipped away at; Roe had not even been in place for 50 years before its repeal. Throughout Roe's standing, many white women's reproductive health and rights advocacy did not extend to include all who have a right to care. This was made expressly evident through the application of (and lack of fight against) the Hyde amendment, which systematically prevents those receiving Medicaid coverage from accessing an abortion. In addition, the multi-layered barriers—such as a lack of access to childcare and transportation, inability to take time off of work, and lack of access to funds for the procedure and associated costs—coalesced overtime to make an unnavigable labyrinth to accessing care that was particularly felt by those with low-incomes, people of color, young people, LGBTQI+ folks, and immigrant communities.  LinksNo Choice: The Destruction of Roe v. Wade and the Fight to Protect a Fundamental American RightBecca Andrews at Reckon NewsBecca Andrews on Twitter Take Action Items Support Becca by purchasing her book, No Choice: The Destruction of Roe v. Wade and the Fight to Protect a Fundamental American Right! Follow Becca on Twitter and Reckon News on Twitter and Facebook.Support the show

Queerstories
299 Gloria Demillo - Dear Elyan

Queerstories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 9:48


Gloria pens a letter to their baby nephew and in doing so ponders what it means to be their Tita, or Tito, or simply Gloria.Gloria Demillo (they/them) is a poet, researcher and multidisciplinary creative. Their most notable contributions include the Harana Poetry Tour for the Art Gallery of New South Wales; published works with the Australian Poetry Journal, Peril Magazine, Cordite Poetry Review, Red Room Poetry; and performances at the Biennale of Sydney, the National Young Writers Festival, Wollongong Writers Festival, Australian Poetry Slam, and the Bankstown Poetry Slam Olympics. They performed this story at Riverside Theatres in Parramatta.Queerstories an award-winning LGBTQI+ storytelling project directed by Maeve Marsden, with regular events around Australia. For more information, visit www.queerstories.com.au and follow Queerstories on Facebook.The Queerstories book is published by Hachette Australia, and can be purchased from your favourite independent bookseller or on Booktopia.To support Queerstories, become a patron at www.patreon.com/ladysingsitbetter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nuus
Daniel Lazarus is nuwe Mnr. Gay Namibië

Nuus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 0:37


Daniel Lazarus is as die nuwe Mnr. Gay Namibië in Windhoek gekroon. Die eerste naaswenner is Oeloff Henning en Charlie McNab is in die derde plek. Tien deelnemers het om die kroon meegeding en Lazarus sal tussen 9 en 16 Oktober aan Mnr. Gay Wêreld in Kaapstad, Suid-Afrika, deelneem. Mnr. Gay Namibië is 'n woordvoerder vir die LGBTQI+-gemeenskap wees, beide plaaslik en in die buiteland, en sal as 'n sigbare rolmodel vir die gay gemeenskap dien. Lazarus sê aan Kosmos 94.1 Nuus hy sal betrokke raak by gemeenskapsaktiwiteite met die doel om 'n inklusiewe menseregte-agenda in Namibië te bevorder.

Hey Gurl! with Bill Janisse
The Investment GURL

Hey Gurl! with Bill Janisse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 57:51


For over 30 years, Kathryn Swain has been advising hedge funds, family offices, CEOs, professional sports franchise owners, as well as royal and presidential families, in her roles as professional trader, portfolio manager and Investment Advisor Representative (IAR).At age 21, Kathryn began her career at Merrill Lynch in Baltimore while working full-time and finishing her undergraduate degree by night. At 25, she moved to San Francisco, taking on the role of lead trader of a two-billion-dollar equity and option trading desk for Charles Schwab & Company. After stints in management, operations, and finally as a featured professional speaker, Kathryn became head of marketing at her first RIA, Osborne Partners Capital Management.After transitioning, she became frustrated in her search for a Wall Street firm that would not only treat her with respect and dignity as a trans woman but would also share her same passion for socially responsible investing and LGBTQIA+ advocacy. She resolved to create that firm herself and LGBTQi was born.Loved recording this episode with you Kathryn, welcome to the Hey Gurl family and thank you for sharing your talents and time with us today. Follow Kathryn: https://lgbtqinvest.comhttps://kathrynswain.comKathryn Instagram: @kathrynswain Kathryn & Company: @power98.5radioLGBTQinvest: @lgbtqinvestBill Janisse Instagram: @billjanisseBill FB: @billjanisse Hey Gurl! Instagram: @heygurl.podcastHey Gurl! FB: @heygurlpodcast Hey Gurl! Tik Tok: @heygurlpodcastHey Gurl! Website: www.heygurlpodcast.com Hey Gurl! YouTube: Here

Body Liberation for All
Not _______ Enough. Finding Confidence in Being You

Body Liberation for All

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 51:09


Yael R Rosenstock Gonzalez (she/her) is a sex educator, sex coach, researcher, author, speaker, curriculum developer, and workshop facilitator. As a queer, polyamorous, white-presenting Nuyorican Jew, Yael has always been interested in understanding the multi-level experiences of individuals. This led her to found Kaleidoscope Vibrations, LLC, a company dedicated to supporting and creating spaces for individuals to explore and find community in their identities. Through her company, she facilitates workshops, develops curriculum, offers Identity Exploration Coaching, and publishes narratives often left out of mainstream publishing.This episode we explore:Honoring boundaries in community spaces and navigating POC spaces as a white presenting personFinding belonging and claiming identity as a multi-ethnic personDiversity in the Jewish diaspora Promoting inclusive representations of human experience in publishing Episode ResourcesDecolonizing Wellness: A QTBIPOC-Centered Guide to Escape the Diet Trap, Heal Your Self-Image, and Achieve Body LiberationBali Retreat March 19-25 2023https://kvibrations.com/https://www.sexpositiveyou.com/https://www.instagram.com/yaelthesexgeek/https://www.tiktok.com/@yaelthesexgeekHello and welcome to another episode of Body Liberation for All. I'm your host, Dalia Kinsey, holistic registered dietitian, and the author of Decolonizing Wellness.My work is centered on amplifying the health and happiness of LGBTQI+ and BIPOC people. And that is also what we do here at Body Liberation for All. I wanna remind you, I am hosting the Decolonizing Wellness Eco-Luxury QTBIPOC retreat in Bali in March. So if you are a person who loves the plan way in advance, like I do. This is when you want to book. This is a great time to give yourself plenty of room to break the trip into payments and to get all of your ducks in a row. If you aren't going to be able to join us, but you know someone who this retreat could be life changing for, please make sure you share it. Substack makes sharing so easy on their platform. So if you visit daliakinsey.substack.com to listen to this episode you'll see it's just a click of a button. Today's guest, the Yael Rosenstock has so much knowledge in different areas that we cover a lot of territory in this conversation. There was still so much more that we could have dug into that hopefully at a later date we'll get to revisit. Today we explore a little bit of the lived experience of being a white presenting person who lives shoulder to shoulder with POC within the family, but out in the world is not having the same experience as the family members that have a darker complexion. Since we already know race is not actually real from a scientific perspective, it's totally a social construct, your skin color itself will to a large extent determine how much lived experience you have as a person of color or as a white person, regardless of what the socialization inside of your house is like because so much of the POC experience, if you're living in a colonized country, if you're living in a country that has its roots in white supremacy, so much of the experience is informed by the anti-Blackness or the anti-POCness that you're going to encounter out in the world.That does not in any way invalidate the cultural uniqueness of people who are in these very blended families and happen to have pale skin or white skin. So it's interesting to me to hear directly from somebody having this experience. It's an interesting concept to look at on an individual level. What does the fact that race is fictional and totally social have? How does that all play out - when you know you are culturally different from the white folks who do not have POC blood relatives that they live with and are close with but at the same time you know that you're not experiencing the same level of marginalization. What is that like? I rarely bother to claim my Latinx heritage. Because the anti-blackness that I have encountered in a lot of Spanish-speaking circles here in the US is so intense it doesn't make any logical sense for me to keep trying to be somewhere that I don't feel welcome.Some of these themes that Yael shares, the feeling of not enoughness when you are more than one thing or when you've only been presented with a narrow definition of what it means to hold a particular identity, is so relatable. I know not just to us, it's so relatable to so many people, because the ways that we define certain identities are so narrow it naturally leaves out a large number of people. The work that Yael is doing to promote the authentic representation of a wide variety of human experience at her publishing company feels like such a natural extension of this lived experience that she has of knowing how difficult it can be to really claim and embody our identities when we haven't seen anything similar reflected back to us. I love this. Entire conversation. I know you will too. Let's jump right into it. Body Liberation for All ThemeYeah. They might try to put you in a box, tell them that you don't accept when the world is tripping out tell them that you love yourself. Hey, Hey, smile on them live your life just like you like it is.It's your party negativity is not invited. For my queer folks, for my trans, people of color, let your voice be heard. Look in the mirror and say that it's time to put me first. You born to win. Head up high with confidence.  This show is for everyone. So, I thank you for tuning in. Let's go.Dalia: I definitely wanted to cover the concept of white passing fragility. But then I want to definitely talk about your other projects and just what you're doing with intersectionality.Yael: Okay. I do want to warn that there's a very good chance that that will not. Some people will really like that idea of the white passing fragility, but others won't because right. The author of that book has become super famous and super rich off of a book around racism as a white woman. And just giving you a fair warning that this may or may not be taken so well.Dalia: And then that's so interesting too, because it seems like people should be compensated for good work or things that they do with good intentions.Dalia: But so often people who are in social justice are on the struggle bus financially, but, and that almost seems to be the expectation. Like you have to be a martyr to break down systems of oppression. But then I also am conflicted because it seems like all the time, white people continue to profit off of pain from people of color and especially Black people in this country. Even when you look at who makes money off of depictions of just Black suffering in general, whether it's another movie about slavery, even if it's a "fun" spin on it, like the Django or something, which I refuse to watch, I just don't understand how we're not seeing how problematic that is, but at least hers originally started out with intentions that seemed more educational.Dalia: Like I think it's a little more sketch to create a film or a piece of entertainment that centered on Black pain. And then all the money goes to somebody who's not Black. I mean, not at all, but the majority, most of it, right. It seems less sketchy, but it is sketchy nonetheless.Dalia: And I've been having a lot of feelings around these white savior complexes that are popping out these days. And people not understanding that, hey, maybe people want to be the hero of their own damn story and guess what, maybe they are ready are.Yael: But you're in the wayDalia: I know. Right? Or like you just exhausting people showing up to the March and explaining to everybody how, you know, you're being white the right way. I don't know if you've seen that play out in real life where people try constantly schooling other white people on how to be more. Down, I guess is the expression, but it doesn't really translate, but it's so rare that people confront people like that because their competition or the people that you have to compare them to you sometimes are so problematic that by comparison, they seem amazing.Yael: Yeah, I like this better.Dalia: So it's like, should I even say anything?Dalia: So I don't know.Yael: Considering that most of my spaces are POC and or Latin. I don't have that many white saviors.Dalia: Smart. Okay. Is that by design or is that coincidental?Yael: Well, I think at first it's coincidental, right? Just like growing up in a mixed neighborhood with a mixed family.Yael: It just is what happened. I was in a school with folks of different groups. And so that just continued. And then when I did reach middle school and there were white people who were just white, not Latin, like, I mean, there were a couple in elementary, but not many. And. I just felt really uncomfortable in the space.Yael: And that was like my assigned group. Cause I wasn't dark enough to be in the Latin group, I think. And also like the Latin group was like ghetto fab. Like I also wore my hair back slicked back. I also had the lip liner, and I had the big hoop earrings as well,Dalia: But like it wasn't enough.Yael: It was a, it was a browner Latin group. And so I felt like I shouldn't be part of it. Like I was friends with them, but I shouldn't be part of it because I didn't look the same. And so I just like ended up, even though I was friends with all the other groups, I ended up in the white girl group and I was just like, this is uncomfortable. Like, I don't agree with the things they say.Yael: I like rebelled a bit and basically got kicked out. And so I think after that, I was just like, I'm going to try and choose. So I don't think I've ever been like, I'm unwilling to be friends with white people because that doesn't seem nice either. But the same reason that folks have affinity groups, right?Yael: The same reason we hang out with queer people as queer people, the same reason you hang out with Latin people if you're Latin or Black and Black is because you don't want to have to explain certain things. And I'm tired. And so I don't go into all white spaces cause I get nervous about why are they all white?Yael: Like what's the intention behind this group. Is there an ulterior motive and I, yeah, I just like, I don't want to have to explain things that I end up becoming that white person, the white savior being like, that's not how. I joined a book club once. And they were talking about how, like, it didn't make sense that this person was referencing their dreams.Yael: Like it's not like a real thing. And I was like, this person is Mexican. And I don't know that much about Mexicans, but in like Caribbean culture dreams can be really important.Dalia: Oh wait. They were saying like a literal dream, not goals that they were struggling with finding meaning in their dream and they thought that was weird?Yael: Yeah. He was writing a memoir and he was referencing how he thought his dream was related to the, like what was happening in his life and that he had seen a Wolf or something. Right. He has indigenous culture roots, right as a Mexican-American. But they were just like, no, that's like, he's just making that up from the memoir.Dalia: But no, because that's extremely common.Yael: Yeah. Like they couldn't fathom it.Dalia: That is fascinating. So this is so interesting, can you share your marginalized identities? Because I think the experience of being white presenting is interesting in that you may be exposed to things that I might never hear, because I didn't even know that, I didn't even notice that white people weren't doing that all the time too.Dalia: Because at work at the moment I'm working in a majority Black office. And people are constantly talking about, you know, oh, I saw this, I wonder if it's a sign and we all have different religious backgrounds too. Somebody even started wearing a hair net because they're afraid somebody might get some of their hair that was shedding and put roots on them. None of us thought that was weird. We were all like, oh, if you feel it's necessary, you do that. You make sure you're not,Yael: You save yourself. It may or may not be real. It may or may not be. I'm always like, I rather be careful then sorry.Dalia: Exactly. Absolutely. Nobody said anything when I came into the room to sage it because I thought that we had some bad mojo in there.Dalia: People said, make sure you get my desk.. Someone came in with holy water. Like we had a very problematic coworker , and we were like, get all the stuff we're clapping in the corners.Yael: I was friends with one of the custodians where I used to work and she's an older woman. She was like the age of maybe like between mother and grandmother.Yael: And she brought me a bracelet because she was. You're very joyful and you're pretty. And I just think that someone's going to send you a curse. made me a bracelet to protect me from maldiciones. She just didn't want me to get hurt.Dalia: And you immediately put it on. You're like, okay, thanks.Yael: I mean, first off, like I appreciate that you're caring about me and no, I don't think it's weird.Yael: I've worn, evil eyes before, you know, like, to me, I think that the bigger thing for us is like whether or not we participate or whether or not we're like, yes, this is real when I talk about ghost stories, I share all the ghost stories. I know. Was I there? No. Was it real? I don't know. Cause I wasn't there, but it could be .Dalia: It's so dismissive to be like, oh, that's so dumb. What? Who says that -only people who are very sheltered and are under the impression that their way is the only way.Yael: This was a group about social justice. The people are lovely and the ones who hosted, I actually adore. They are fantastic.Yael: And they weren't the ones who were having this question, but I remember one person in particular, she was just totally dismissive. And I was just like, I don't understand. And I didn't show up for a couple of years, but then I came back and I was like, okay, my role is going to be giving the perspective of not these people in the case that this comes up again, because they keep reading books by people of color. And like, I don't have the same perspective. Like I said, I'm not Mexican. I don't know what they do. But I have a feeling that this is like something that's shared, like it's a native American thing.Yael: It's a Latin thing. It's a Black thing. Like I just feel, you know, Asian cultures, everyone, actually.Dalia: I know this is whats so bizarre.Yael: There are definitely white people who also have that as a practice and Jews, a lot of us who do pass it are white or pass as white, like that's also part of our culture.Dalia: And that's another thing. So this is one of my big questions. So, you identify as Latin X?Yael: Yes, I'm LatinaDalia: You're Latina and you're Jewish. And so does that mean your mother is your Jewish parent.Yael: That is actually, so...Dalia: does that matter or is that like out of date or…Yael: No, that is an excellent question. My parents tried to enroll me in what's called Yeshiva because they didn't like the local public school.Yael: And so they wanted to put me in a Jewish school and I got rejected because my mother is Catholic and my father is Jewish. And as you like are insinuating, like the religion follows the mother. Now that school accepts muts like me of my form. They no longer discriminate against us, but because my parents couldn't put me in the Jewish school.Yael: I went to an Episcopalian school.Dalia: Oh, wow, you were all over the place.Yael: Yeah. So I got a good Christian education .Dalia: Oh, and how did your dad manage,, was he a little heartbroken? Like, Ooh, not what I had in mind.Yael: Well, it was a small school. There wasn't a religion class, but like every morning we started with prayers and every Wednesday we had mass and I just, I didn't know they wanted me to be Jewish. I thought they were saying, here are our religions. You go to Sunday Jewish school. You go to day school with Christians. Figure out your path. And so I very confidently figured out my path. I was like, I am Jewish. And like, I am now very knowledgeable about Christian stuff. But actually they did want me to be Jewish and they had warned the school that that was what they wanted.Dalia: I was under the impression, and this may not be accurate. Is that like a modern Jewish person may be a little more secular and maybe they know some of the traditions and then maybe they go to synagogue for special events or, but still feel that strong cultural identity.Dalia: And then don't really feel, I feel like they should be dropped into that white American bucket with everybody else because they're separate as an ethnic group. Whereas other white ethnic groups (in America) gave up their separateness for the most part.Yael: Interesting. So I haven't done much study into the question, but I have a friend who sent me, who sends me lots of articles, Catherine.Yael: And she sent me an article about whether or not Jews are white and my coworker, Asia Gray, who does our anti-racism curriculum and what have you. One of the books was, how antisemitism was the original racism. And so that's part of the way that she talks about oppression and like structural oppressions and what have you.Yael: And she starts that story there and it's like Jews became white if you are white, but there are Black Jews. There are like plenty of Middle Eastern Jews that have more color there are Russian Jews, the Sephardic Jews, the Mizrahi in general. So there are plenty of Jews of color and then they're like me Ashkenazi, which are of German roots, right. German and certain parts of Russia, roots and Poland and all that kind of stuff. And so, yeah. Yes, it is a different, I agree. It's different ethnic group. Like you can trace us back when I did that blood test, I literally come out 49% Ashkenazi. I'm from Germany, even though I can, I can trace my roots on a family tree that's physical to the 15 hundreds. It says I'm Ashkenazi. Wasn't mentioned Germany because the Jewish blood is what it picks up. And so, yes, I agree. Like there's like this ethnic thing there and that's why you can be a secular person of a religion.Yael: I mean, there are plenty of secular Christians, right. That celebrate Christmas and what have you. But there's like this certain level of like the foods that you eat and the mannerisms that you have and like certain cultural values. I don't identify it as a secular Jew I identify as reform, which is like a less observant Jew.Dalia: Now, how did you feel your queer identity meshes with Judaism? It's rumored to be an easier mesh. Is that true? Are Christians just being jealous?Yael: I think it is an easier, easier. I mean, I know plenty of Christians that are queer, but my synagogue, I don't remember how old I was, but she bat mitzvah'd me so young enough for that had a lesbian rabbai.Yael: And she got married at our synagogue and we were just a regular reform synagogue. Right. We weren't like, ah, where the most social justice progressive synogauge, we were just a reform synagogue. And we did lose some of the older parishioners and I imagine some other age ones, when she joined as the rabbi, but for the most part, everyone was like, love who you love.Yael: Right? Like that's not an issue. And she was a woman rabbi and my next rabbi was also a woman, right? So like that's super common. It's even starting very slowly in the Orthodox community, which is one of the more observant sects of Judaism to have women rabbis. And so overall I think that shift is, is more common in our space .Dalia: The idea of there being Jewish people of color is interesting to me, because it seems like in the states, people are under the impression that that's not a thing. Can you tell us about the work that you're doing for representation, and as far as intersectionality goes as a very fair skin person of color.Yael: Sure so I think the most thing that the thing that directly relates is that I'm part of the diverse bodies project. The idea is a nude photo interview series, intended to increase representation of who gets seen and photograph naked and how you want to be represented.Yael: So it's not that you had to do a sexy shot or you had to do a serious shot that people get to bring their personalities in through the photographs and show who they are. And that was really important to us and something that we did because it's been taken us forever. But the mini books that we've already released is the Jews flying the rainbow flag mini books.Yael: And so it's got five different Jews and we had plenty of Jews participate but featured five different Jews ranging from like early twenties to, I think, sixties and out of the five of them. Two of them are Black. One of the Black Jews is also Latin, so she's Afro Dominican. And the point of that was to be like folks exist, you know, and it's so common for you to be like, this is what a Jew looks like when.Yael: Yeah, sure a lot of us do look like me. There are Black Jews. There are Latin Jews, there are Asian Jews, there are all the types. And so that was really important to us that we highlight that these are two queer Black Jewish women and they get as much space in this little book as anyone else.Yael: I will say part of my work and that's what we got into the white white passing fragility talk is that I don't identify as a person of color. And who knows, maybe I'll change that at some point. I choose not to identify that way. Cause it feels appropriative. And to be like, just because I have another language or just because my family may have a bunch of people of color and it doesn't mean that I'm existing as a person of color.Yael: And so when I walked through the street, people see me as white and that's just true. But I do enter, and I was asked this question recently, so why do I enter people of color spaces? And it's cause I'm, I'm feel safer there. I feel more connected there. I don't feel blegh there. And so if people are willing to have me, which they generally are, most people of color spaces are open to white presenting Latin folk. Then I just asked permission and I join.Dalia: That's interesting and I knew that, and I forgot that when I said that, because I know I'm very used to- anybody who says they're a person of color. I was just like, okay, like, it's the response? Because especially, you know, Black American, no, actually.Dalia: Latin people even more than Black Americans come in all kinds of shades and colors, and you can't look at somebody and have any clue what even their parents look like. And that a lot of times really informs their experience as far as how they were treated growing up, because it is funny to me how depending on who you're sitting beside, people may perceive your color differently, which just goes to show how arbitrary our understanding of race is..Dalia: Like number one, we know it's not a real biological thing, but like you said, it's the experience that creates the cultural differences. It's the lived experience that matters. So if, when you are out in the world, people treat you as though you are white well then you are having the white experience.Dalia: And that is really the key difference. But I have biracial friends who, if they were with their brown parent, they get treated differently and are even perceived differently versus with the other parent, which I just think is fascinating.Yael: Well, my parents are both white. My dad is white Ashkenazi and my mother is a white presenting Latina.Yael: My uncle, my abuela they would have been identified as POC, but not my mother. And so when I'm with my mother, it was the same thing. People don't realize she speaks Spanish. She's been spoken about by people who were like checking her out.Dalia: Well, it's just interesting to me. And I don't know if this happens everywhere or if it's some of our American brainwashing, but like all the time people act as though Spanish is. Secret language. And I'm like, what is wrong with you? It is so, so common. And the people who speak it look so many different ways and you don't have to only speak English, your heart language, or your first language.Dalia: Like, that's another thing I'm like, you do realize that maybe she can speak Spanish as a second language or not all latin people look the same. I really don't understand the disconnect with that because I've been spoken about in Spanish to my frigging face so many times, and I do speak Spanish. And usually, I mean, unless they're saying something really rude, usually people are trying to guess whether or not the person I'm with is my husband or my what's the male form of mistress.Dalia: I bet there isn't one, right? Oh,Yael: LoverDalia: Yeah, it just goes to show like, if there isn't a word that connotes, not a legitimate partner, because you're not married to them that's some more sexist shenanigans, but yeah, it's just interesting to me that people make that assumption so often. So what has your experience been like trying to stay connected to your Latin roots when so often people are very narrow about what they consider to be Latin?Yael: So it's funny because all of our countries have folks, all the Latin countries have folks that look like me. And like most of the countries have folks that look like you, right? It's not, we're not anomalies in these spaces.Yael: And so I actually, I was convinced I needed to prove myself. Like my mother, I felt counted as real Latina because she was raised in Puerto Rico. Her first language is Spanish. Like that seems to me like check that counts. But me I'm half Ashkenazi. I look, the way that I do my Spanish for awhile was pretty crappy.Yael: And so I, I felt the need to prove myself. All my friends were Latina and I was like, I must be more Latina. I must speak this fluently. And I must eat the food. And I am an incredible salsa dancer at this point. So, but that was all me. Right. And perhaps white people and perhaps Black people who weren't Latin.Yael: Right. And that, if I said I was. The response was always like, oh really? Unless I turned around and then they're like, I see it in your butt now I know that you're Latin because of your butt, like, literally the number of times people have been like, I believe you because of your shape. Otherwise I wouldn't have counted you.Yael: Whereas on the flip side with Latin folks, there's really not much surprise. They don't assume I'm Latina. But if I start speaking Spanish or they see me dancing or whatever, like they ask me, where are you from? They don't ask me, are you at the end of the ask me? Oh, okay. Yeah. Right. Assume that I am. And they're right, because for them, it's not so surprising to see someone who looks like me, but I think, and it's when you think of immigration, you're going to assume that more white Latins are going to migrate because of mean.Yael: Whereas you have browner and Blacker people migrating because of need. And so if you're hanging out with folks from your same social class, which will end up being also your same racial categorization, because those are very linked to whether or not we all want to admit it in the Americas as well.Yael: And all the Americas. So like, I think that that's part of it, right? You're used to hanging out with other brown people. And so even though your country has plenty people who look like me, you never associated with associated with them. Either. They were from a different region or they were from a different social class.Yael: And so they went to different schools and they had different access. And so I think that's more it, but like Latin people never not include me.Dalia: Oh, that's interesting. So it was really more just internal.Yael: Yeah. I was like in TV, none of the Latinas looked like me. All of my friends were darker than me.Yael: And so I was like, I need to be darker. And my abuela ? When I went to go visit her, she was like, no sunscreen. We need to get you more dark.Dalia: That is so interesting to me because that I've seen more often the opposite experience. So first I think when I turn on Univision, everybody's white and the housekeeper looks like she has some indigenous ancestry.Dalia: She doesn't get to say anything, except like, let me get that for you.Yael: They're white almost. They're like what I call exotic white. Like they have, what's considered what I consider the stereotypical, Latin of means look, which is like, they have very heavily European race roots, but they were at some point mixed with other races.Yael: And so they have like olive tone skin, dark hair, like certain whatever. And I don't have. It's like, I'm actually just white passing.Dalia: Yeah. Oh yeah. That makes sense. That distinction. Yeah. I can see that for sure. Like a Sophia Vergara type of, yeah.Dalia: But at the same time I'm sure when she is home, she would be called white, but it's just, when you weave and you come here, then you you've turned into some exotic white.Yael: Yes. And that like that to me is like an interesting thing too. Like if in your own country you are white and then you come here and you're like, I'm a person of color.Yael: What changed? And it's true. Our racial dynamics are very different in each country, but it's interesting to me that, like, I mean, you don't necessarily, people don't identify necessarily as white or Black or what have you. That's not part of, most of the country's ways of self. They just don't do that. And then some countries that like became illegal like you don't put that stuff on the birth certificates, like you just don't name race. But in my head, I'm like you can recognize hopefully that people look different in your country and that you're having different experiences based on that. So when you come to this country, why do you claim this identity?Yael: Or if your family came to this country, why do you claim this identity when you were still white passing?Dalia: Well, yeah, that is really interesting. And what is funny to me, especially for Dominicans, just because I hear this from them more than anybody else, that your race, it feels like it did change during the flight because your treatment was completely different.Dalia: And maybe back home, you were part of the dominant group culturally and power structure wise. And this is the first time people are treating you as though you're an other. And so maybe your identity will shift them because race really is a social construct. So you can make a flight and your race changes.Yael: Yes, totally agree. But also those are Afro Dominican, right? Then being put into a category that is on the lower end of, or possibly the lowest end of our racial categories in the U S. And so they're going from being the norm to going to being the most marginalized population in the country. Whereas if you are a light skinned or white passing Latina you were going from being the highest, probably social class in your country to be not too far down. You might feel like you're all of a sudden, like super oppressed, because you're not used to any form of oppressio nDalia: that see, that really says a lot. And it is the author, speaking of white passing fragility, the writer of white fragility says, you know, like 97% feels like a horrible loss or injustice when you're used to a hundred percent.Yael: Oh, wow. Nice quote.Dalia: And I say that, and I'm like, she probably said some other numbers, but don't look it up. Trust me. I love the idea of that perspective of asking for permission to go into these other spaces because you feel comfortable, but then also not internalizing the rejection. If somebody says, I really, I don't think it's a fit.Dalia: How did you get to that point? And how do you suggest other people who are white presenting, but feel more comfortable in browner spaces? How should they reconcile that?Yael: So I think there's like tying back with like that white savior thing that like, I need to be here.Yael: Don't get me wrong, communities are important. And again, like a lot of my community is POC and that is important to me. And also I recognize that not every space is for me. If you were going to have a men's group, I don't belong in it. When I was helping facilitate a peer sex education group, I was like, we need a leader for the abstinence and virginity group, because I am neither abstinent nor identify as a virgin, but I am a super sexual human being.Yael: And so I don't belong in this space. It does not make the space safe. This is a group led by and for folks with a certain experience. And so when you recognize that that's the point, right? Like women's groups, you don't want men. And normally we don't question that we're not like, oh, how exclusionary what's exclusionary is if you don't allow all women.Yael: All women belong in women's groups, whether they're CIS or trans. But you don't allow men because it's a woman's space. And the point is to create a space that feels safe for that population. So they can be heard, feel seen and not have to explain things that they would have to explain to someone who doesn't understand.Yael: And so to me, that is what often POC spaces are. And there's so much I can understand because I'm surrounded by POC and because my family has POC and there's so much I can't understand because I will never live it.Yael: And so if the space would be safer without my presence, then why would I want to put myself in a spot that will cause others harm when then the intension is for them to have a good space.Yael: Not every space is like that, right? Like if you go to school, if you go somewhere most spaces, unless you're like at historically Black university, right? Like you're going to be surrounded by white folks and like, no, one's questioning that. And so why shouldn't you get to be surrounded by the people you want to be surrounded with for this time period that is yours. It's your time, it's your space. And so I think for me, it's just like thinking about what is your intentions about entering it? Are you trying to contribute in a way that is helpful and wholesome and caring and supportive. Great. Is it wanted? Yes. Enter. Is it not. Go somewhere else. You can still hang out with those same people just not in that particular space that was designated at this time for this purpose.Dalia: And when you say it that way, not at this time and not this space, because I feel like a lot of people who seek out those spaces, that isn't how most of their day is, you know, it's just a little refuge and it certainly isn't that they don't want to have a fully integrated intersectional life.Dalia: Like you said, it's a break from having to explain certain things. And what's interesting is when sometimes you try and make things more and more broad. There's just more potential for issues because I have seen more on reality TV than in real life. Yes. White presenting, Latin people using certain racial slurs saying it's okay for them because they're down or whatever. And I'm like, yeah, but you're not of the group that gets to use that word and they just kept on defending it. I'm just like, okay, we're just, you're canceled. We're moving on. So there are, there can be issues where people who you would expect to not be problematic come in and are.Dalia: And so maybe some people have been burned. A few times, and now they're just, they're exhausted and they don't want to put the energy into fielding out who is safe and who is not safe.Yael: And there's nothing wrong with that. Like it's not necessarily personal, it could be personal if you're one of those people, but even the question, right?Yael: Like I wanted to advertise a job position and so I seek to advertise them first in places of color and queer spaces. And so I contacted several different groups. Oh. And then, sorry, I remember there was a posting for a DEI position at a Jewish organization. And so I started to contact the admin of different POC, Jewish groups, like a Black Jewish group, or what have you.Yael: And I said, listen, I filled out their form to enter, but I was like, I don't actually want to enter. I'm wondering if you can share this link. So folks can see the job. I am a white presenting, a Latino Jew. I ended up getting messaged even by the Black group. And they're like, oh, you can join. I was like, Black is not part of my identity.Yael: Like we, because of the Caribbean, we have those roots as well. But like I don't claim that.Dalia: It's funny. I do feel like Black people in my experience. That's why I was so I've been surprised when people have told me, they were bullied. Black kids in school who are other POC is it's always surprising to me because the town that I was raised in and the part of the south that I'm from, people still were in that space of, if you we're different enough to maybe not be able to get into a whites only area, or if the clain would have targeted you too, cause clan is not down. They're very antisemitic, they're anti everything. But then you were welcome. Like if you wanted to sit at that table, you were always welcome. Just anybody who is being othered the policy was come on in. If you have nowhere else to go, we'll take you.Yael: That's lovely. I definitely know that that's not always true. And again, it's okay. I mean, the bullying is not okay. Deciding who's in your space is, but yeah, exactly. So like I was welcomed and obviously everyone's Jewish because it's a Jewish group.Yael: And so it's, it was specifically a space built for Jews, Black Jews and some Jews of color to have a reprieve from the white Jews. White Jews often mean, well, right? Like we fill up social justice spaces, like hardcores. I've spoken to people about this, that like insofar as percentage of folks who are involved in social justice by group, I imagine that our group is one of the most heavily social justice oriented.Yael: Cause we're so small and people are like you're everywhere, but it doesn't mean that we're doing it well or that we're doing it right. And so it can be exhausting to have white Jews around because we are those white saviory types.Yael: And yeah. So I was, I was surprised and I was like, well, okay. Like I will post it myself then afterwards. And she had, she had posted already and she had written my name and giving me credit. And like I said, this person wanted to let us all know about this job.Dalia: That's very cool. It's nice to find community, but it's also very nice to know that when you're trying to create a safe space around certain parts of our identity, that there are people who understand and support, because I'm sure it's hard for some people to hold that space.Dalia: And to not feel guilty about saying no sometimes. So it's nice to know that even if not everybody understands, some people totally understand and they're not gonna lose any sleep over it. They're just going to move on to the next Facebook group and they'll be fine. And maybe you'll run into each other in another space.Dalia: That's centered around an identity that you have in common.Yael: Yeah. Exactly. And so I think that's just like, it's kinda like building resilience and you might actually be in another POC group together, but not necessarily that one.Yael: And make everybody safe because I would hate to go into a space where I was told, Hey, women are welcome. Like this happens a lot. Well, not now that everybody's at home groups are really growing and there's like a group for everything. But previously it just felt like, like in the nineties, everything that was gay or LGBTQ was CIS male dominated.Dalia: Tell us about your company and what made you want to form a publishing company and what your vision is for that company?Yael: Sure. So my company's name is Kaleidoscope Vibrations, LLC . And for anyone who's an owner, kaleidoscope is it's like this toy that had all these like gems on the bottom and you'd move your hands in opposite directions around this tuby thing. And you'd look inside and it would be create new, pretty color combinations.Yael: And so the idea is that every vibration or event in your life creates a new beautiful you, and that our identities are always forming and they're always developing. And the reason I created this company was because I was this like Jew that wasn't Jewish enough. I was this Latina that I didn't think that I looked enough or counted enough.Yael: I was queer, but not queer enough. You know, like there are all these ways and this, I, I didn't feel like I should count. And that's, that's different, right? Like that's different than choosing whether or not you belong in a space as to whether or not you feel like you matter enough to be in a space or if you, you belong.Yael: And so I created this company to help people find confidence in their identities and find their communities. So maybe. You don't belong to blank community, but you do belong to another one and then you can find the people that you need so you have a supportive, loving environment that understands you.Yael: And so I do workshops, I do identity coaching, curriculum development like inclusivity in the workspace across different identities and what have you. But we also have a publishing sect, and that's the purpose is to uplift different narratives that aren't necessarily heard. And so the first book was mine, which is An Intro Guide to a Sex Positive You.Yael: Sex is not necessarily something you think of and you're like, oh, this is not inclusive, but it really is. And so my book, I know I had someone read it, who was like, I've been looking for a book that validated my experiences as a queer person while reading it that wasn't heteronormative, right. That wasn't geared towards straight people.Yael: And it's not that my book has hetero exclusive. You can be whatever matched you with. I just don't assume what you're going to match. And so I don't add genders into my conversations in the book and that like that in and of itself, apparently at the time was somewhat revolutionary for some folks. And the next book was Luna, Luna Si, Luna.Yael: Yes. Maybe it's that Luna? Yes. Luna Si. And it is a book about two little sisters who are Latino it's in English and in Spanish. And the younger sister has autism. And she is 40% verbal. And so we often see representations of savants, right? So, and they tend to be white males. And so you have these kids who have really incredible abilities to count numbers or to memorize things, or what have you.Yael: And they often do have very good verbal capacities. They have awkward social cues because they have trouble reading it, but that's like the extent to how they represent autism. Whereas in this case, like you see how she, how she is able to communicate the form that her language takes. And you do learn about like the kinds of things that she can do.Yael: You learn about stems. So like ticks that people do to keep themselves calm and well. And that was the intention, right? link that autism comes in all colors, all ethnicities, that there are varying levels of how much people can communicate and what, you know, how much need or help they might require.Yael: And yeah, and it just, that's, it it's a story about sisters and how they love each other and how they communicate and also one of them has autism. And so that intention of bringing those to the surface and yeah, we're working on a bunch of other different possibilities as well. Another one's about anxiety.Yael: So another bilingual book, but a little girl's anxiety and what that's looked like for her.Dalia: That's really helpful. I think that more and more children are experiencing anxiety earlier. So that's definitely needed. And it is interesting how ableism racism, xenophobia, how it all plays together and how you really don't see representation of people living with a diagnosis that aren't white it's. I mean, it's almost always going to be white to the extent that when you meet someone with something as common as down syndrome, who's Asian, you're like, wow. Like, oh, I didn't know. Obviously we can all get whatever we can be born, any kind of way, human diversity, it's just what we choose to feature. That makes it seem like we aren't as diverse as we are.Yael: But then it's also the like racism that exists within the publishing space. And so even when you do have some books that are more representative in that, like the pictures have kids of all different colors, it doesn't necessarily that the author is a person of color.Yael: And so with my company, you have to have either the identities that you are discussing or someone in your like close family, someone in your close life, and you have lived this with them, right. That you are experiencing this with them. So like the author of the book autism, t he person with autism, didn't write this.Yael: She doesn't write. But her sister wrote it. And so she has lived with her sister, her, the younger one's entire life, the one who has autism so entire life. And so that was like the perspective that we were able to take. And so it's very important to me that the people who are writing the stories also have lived experience.Yael: And it's not just about like, oh yeah, we need to mix A and B and with number 3 so that we can count in this diversity world where like, you're supposed to do this. Now it's about like, this is my story, and I want you to hear it.Dalia: And the way that people tell their own story is so different from how it's told by an observer.Dalia: And people can feel that difference. Sometimes it's so subtle, but you definitely, some things just they're very difficult to fake and so right now, a lot of companies. In all sectors, not just publishing people are faking the funk right now, and it's not pretty. So it falls flat. It's all kind of, oh, this just came to me.Dalia: Did you see that woman who has been saying that? She's...Yael: who said that she was Black from the Bronx in the Bronx and is a white Jew from Kansas.Dalia: Yes, she got the hoop earrings, she got the tan and she was like, I'm ready to rock. I do not understand how this has happened more than once in such a widely publicized way in my lifetime.Yael: So I actually, let's, let's break that down a bit. So first off, she's a, she is a white Jew, right? My friend is also a white Jew. Neither of them actually presents white. Like, if you look at them, that's not the identity you're going to give them because they were darker skin tones. Right. And so it's also interesting how whiteness works that like, because they are Jewish, they are given.Yael: Right. It just, that is also so interesting. But I remember someone commented, like how did no one realize like Afro Latinas don't come that light? And I was like, hold up a second way lighter than that woman. Right. There are people who identify as Black. That is their identity. Who are way lighter than this faker.Yael: And so my thing was, you should not fake who you are, but the fact that people believed her makes total sense to me.Dalia: But it seemed like to me, what was the most damning is how. Some of her clothing choices and accessory choices, maybe they speak to her, they were so sterotypical. It just seemed a little performative.Yael: She faked three different identities.Dalia: Oh, I didn't see that part.Yael: Afro Latina was her latest identity. The one before that was Black American, the one before that was north African. Okay. She moved across the globe.Yael: No one tracked this?! Like at one point she was north African and now she's Black and now she's Afro Latina from the Bronx specifically.Dalia: That's interesting too, that extra, that, that was so important for her to feature that what trips me out about it. And I think what really troubles a lot of people about it is to know that.Dalia: Race is not real to the extent that whatever you say could literally change your experience. You just have to keep saying it and buy some hoops and you can be another person. Like, it just, she went overboard with the, just so stereotypical, but you're right. It easily could have been true going off of skin color alone.Dalia: And some people do still dress that way, even though it's not the nineties anymore.Yael: But I love my hoops in the nineties.Dalia: I did too, you know, but they're like more modern with the embellishment. It has that like handcrafted feel. I don't know what happened with the hoops. It went out for me with letting my eyebrows finally try and grow back in, but I did use to be so, so into that. But at one point I also had a Jheri curl.Dalia: So I really shouldn't talk about anybody else's since its style, I've made many mistakes over the years. I really appreciate you sharing your perspective and coming on. Where can people find you? Sure.Yael: So my main thing is that I'm @yaelthesexgeek I'm a sexologist, sex coach, a sex educator.Yael: @yaelthesexgeek on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. My website is sexpositiveyou.com, so pretty easy. And then my company is kvibrations.com. And so you can find most of my things through there.Dalia: Awesome. You are doing so many different things. We didn't even touch on the sex positivity, maybe that's for another day.Dalia: Are you thinking of revisiting that book now that you know, we're kind of all in a different place as a country and as queer people? Or are there things you'd like to add? Are you going to revise that addition or write something new?Yael: Yeah. So the book is only two years old, but things change and shift so much, right? Like now there is so much more language outside of queer spaces around pronouns, but I think even in 2018, like the idea of talking about pronouns outside of queer spaces was still foreign for most, so. Yes, there are definitely, I've looked back and I'm like, oh, overall, I'm like, this is a good book.Yael: Just so you know, like people love my book and I go back, I'm like, oh, this was, this was better than you thought it was. Yes, there are, of course things I want to change, but I I'm looking into doing a teen workbook version of it. Because I wrote it for my 14 year old self, but I don't think parents of 14 year olds would be thrilled to have their kids read this book..Yael: And I think it's more of like a 16 and up kind of book. And I want to be able to reach people when they're younger because sexual trauma and boundary making and self pleasure and all of that is important before you are 18 or 16. And I also started, but I'm not going to have time right now, the nerds guide.Yael: So this is the intro guide and the nerds guide goes into the socio historical and psychological backgrounds. And so when you talk about things, Gender. I want to be able to talk about that are six sexes and genders are present in the Talmud in ancient Jewish text, rich and written 1500 years ago. I want to talk about the hijra in India, and that they have like that as a third gender that's established that how different native American communities have two spirit or don't have two spirit identities.Yael: And like, what does that mean and how do they conceptualize it? And just like, recognizing that there's so much more beyond what we talk about.Dalia: Yeah, that sounds really fascinating.Yael: Yeah. But that's going to take awhile. It's going to take research and I'm doing a PhD right now.Dalia: The list just keeps going.Yael: And that's on the back burner, that's like maybe if someone gives me a book deal, I'll work on that.Dalia: I love it. Oh, excellent. Thank you so much for coming on.Yael: Thank you for having me.Yael: I always, I really enjoy talking with you and Dalia.Dalia: Same here. Same here. You'll have to come back when you finish your nerd book or I'm sure, actually you're doing many things. I'm sure it'll be before then. Sounds good. Get full access to Body Liberation for All at daliakinsey.substack.com/subscribe

Spiritual Misfits Podcast
Dr. David Gushee on Christian humanism after evangelicalism

Spiritual Misfits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 57:26


The Reverend Dr David Gushee is one of the world's leading Christian ethicists as well as a pastor, author and advocate. He's the author of a range of important books, notably including ‘Changing our Mind', a landmark argument for LGBTQI+ inclusion in the church first published in 2014. More recently his book ‘After Evangelicalism' has provided an invaluable guide for many pilgrims trying to find their way out of the maze of American evangelical culture without necessarily knowing where to go from there. David's books have been so helpful for me, so I can't even tell you how excited I was to have this conversation with him. We explored a range of important and interesting questions together, like:How do you extract yourself from evangelicalism while retaining your Christianity? What might Christian humanism look like for post-evangelicals? What does it mean to have theology informed by the holocaust?What does responsible, meaningful engagement with scripture look like coming out of spaces that have weaponised it in various ways?David's thoughts on all of these questions are well worth your time. He's warm, intelligent, and gives me hope for the future. I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did. 

#ThatsNotWright Podcast
EP151b_[Low Hanging Fruit] Wogboy Forever, The Little Mermaid and Gonzo

#ThatsNotWright Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 87:22


Panelists: Dim, Andy, Jon Talking Points: Nick Giannopoulos Wogopoly The Little Mermaid The Ringer Downfalls of public figures Trans Muppets https://linktr.ee/trainspotterspodcast Don't forget to hit the URL in the profile to get to our links. Make sure to like, share and follow and if you've listened to over 2 hours over 3 episodes you should keep our doors open and buy us a coffee! #thelittlemermaid #gonzo #muppets #LGBTQI #trans #theringer #woke #rogerebert #johnnyknoxville #wogboyforever #sooshimango #wogboy #melbourne #social #trainspotterspodcast #spotify #trainspotting #podcast #itunespodcast #soundcloud #melbourne #australia #anchorfm

24 Mattino - Le interviste
Timori sui diritti civili

24 Mattino - Le interviste

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022


In apertura di terza parte, l'analisi dell'attualità e della politica italiana ed internazionale con il nostro Paolo Mieli. La vittoria alle elezioni politiche di un partito conservatore come Fratelli d'Italia, ha fatto scattare l'allarme di chi, da anni, combatte per estendere i diritti civili nel nostro paese. Comunità LGBTQI+, femministe, ora temono per le unioni civili, per la possibilità di avere accesso all'aborto in una struttura pubblica. L'Italia vivrà davvero anni di oscurantismo sui diritti? Ne parliamo prima con Lavinia Mennuni, neo senatrice Fratelli d'Italia, è stata tra le promotrici della Marcia della vita e ha difeso le posizioni di Pro Vita e Famiglia contro l'aborto, la "teoria gender" e le adozioni da parte di coppie omosessuali e poi con Antonella Veltri, presidente di D.i.Re Donne in rete contro la violenza.

The Fake Ass Book Club
Episode 73: "Banned Books and Crack"

The Fake Ass Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 65:29


The F.A.B. Podcast presents the banned books episode! As you may know, the ladies love books..especially ones that have been banned! This week, Moni & Kat give a little history on "banned books week" and its significance. They also dive into some of the most banned books of all time, including the ones they have and want to review on the show. The ladies also discuss the current uptick in book banning in the US and it's significance. Get ready for an opinionated conversation about some of the most censored books in history...some audio bloopers, and the reason Moni's kids thought she smoked crack before!! Cheers!! Enjoy the show! ** Trigger Warning: Adult Content & Language, use of N-word etc. Please be advised this show is for adults 18 and up and the open minded.PSA:** When we refer to "white people" we are speaking about those who are socially accepted as "white" and are actively or passively upholding/defending/ and or benifiting from systems of oppression. This Quote from show sums it up : "Oppression restricts access to knowledge about the world around you" -Kat Dedication To our listeners always, to Librarians & storyteller for fighting for book access, and to the Iranian Woman (Mahsa Amini ) who died in custody of the morality police for a dress code infraction & national daughters day!! (Honorable mention to sex workers out there!) Also, pimps are the worst! ***"Mahsa Amini was 22. She was visiting Tehran from her hometown of Kurdistan. She was detained by the morality police, allegedly for violating the hijab rule, which became compulsory following the 1979 revolution. She was arrested on September 13. Three days later, she died. The police says that she had a sudden heart attack while in detention, but activists and others have said that she was tortured or beaten in the head, and that's why she died." Full article in the link below. https://www.npr.org/2022/09/23/1124836810/anti-government-protests-grow-in-iran-after-a-woman-died-in-police-custody Show Notes: Info About Banned Books Week :https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/books/2022/06/29/banned-books-explained/7772046001/ https://bannedbooksweek.org/george-m-johnson-headlines-action-packed-tuesday-for-banned-books-week/ Phil Donahue clip featuring Uncle Luke: https://youtu.be/iViMrXn5IIs Great replacement theory not new concept, shows up in The Great Gadsby: https://www.geneticsandsociety.org/article/great-replacement-theory-was-never-fringe, https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2022/05/23/how-replacement-theory-moved-from-the-fringes-to-the-mainstream Christiane Amanpour: https://www.businessinsider.com/christiane-amanpour-refused-to-wear-head-scarf-for-irans-president-2022-9 About Malala Yousafzai: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malala_Yousafzai UK Teen hacks GTA 6: https://techcrunch.com/2022/09/26/london-police-arrest-uber-rockstar/ The Luniz "I Got 5 on It" featuring E-40 https://youtu.be/CiZ3XtGtmQs FAB Episode 21: X-Men unlimited https://share.fireside.fm/episode/wOJOKrZS+Ghrpo3bI "Parable of the Sower" Octavia Butler Check out the Libby app for downloadable books from the public library!! Support libraries!! *Stranger than Fiction: * They're really banning books out here! That's soooo strange! https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2022/09/02/oklahoma-teacher-banned-books-hb-1775/7970325001/ *Please email thefabpodcast@gmail.com with your book suggestions and "Stranger Than Fiction" stories so we can share them on the show!! Reach out and let us how we are doing!! *You can find us online by clicking our Link tree https://linktr.ee/Fabpod Please don't forget to follow, rate, review, and SHARE our podcast! Be on the look out, Patreon coming soon!!

The Natural Healing Podcast
54: Discover Emotional Freedom with LaDonna Silva, LMFT

The Natural Healing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 64:03


This conversation will give you hope and open your heart! Over the last three decades since being propelled to heal from personal trauma, LaDonna Silva has been committed to using the art of therapy to help herself and others find ways to rediscover their inner power, find meaning in their experiences and discover emotional freedom. In this beautiful conversation, you'll learn about the journey that led LaDonna from trauma and pain to the freedom and growth that continues to support her to serve people from all walks of life, including the LGBTQI+ community to lead more conscious and empowered lives. You'll be inspired by LaDonna's awareness, her open heart and her ability to transform the deepest grief and suffering into lessons for greater growth, awareness and expansion. Visit acenterfornaturalhealing.com/emotionalfreedom to preview this episode and get all the resources mentioned throughout our conversation. In this episode, you'll learn: How LaDonna's personal journey working through her deepest wounds helped her become a fearless, open-hearted healer and therapist who empowers others to do the same What it takes to find emotional freedom despite hurtful experiences How to deal with difficult emotions, including anger and grief Why self-care is essential to live a life of less pain, burden and sorrow The Microcosmic & Macrocosmic Orbit Meditations are available at a special price for a limited time at acenterfornaturalhealing.com/shop. Join the the VIP waitlist for the From Surviving to Thriving online experience at joinfstt.com. Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.setarehmoafi/ https://www.instagram.com/salvadorcefalu/ https://www.instagram.com/acenterfornaturalhealing/ Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/setareh.moafi https://www.facebook.com/salvador.cefalu.9 https://www.facebook.com/acenterfornaturalhealing

Beyond the Couch with Dr. Christine Jehu
93. Are your eyes set on where you're actually going?

Beyond the Couch with Dr. Christine Jehu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 20:08


Your process may be taking you in a different direction than where your eyes are set. Not a bad thing! It's an indication that it's time for some realignment!Become a Beyond the Couch INSIDER - all the pod goodness & exclusive content to your inbox once a week. No spam, all greatness. Sign up hereLet's Connect on Instagram! @therealdrjehuReady to start therapy? → Grab your FREE Quick Start Guide to Finding a Therapist!Crisis Resources: Call 988 for Suicide & Crisis LifelineTrevor Project for LGBTQI+ 1-866-488-7386Text START to 678-678

Queerstories
298 Laura Hart - The Dog, The Rockstar and the Beach

Queerstories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 13:00


A sleepy beachside town is the unlikely setting for Laura's wildly unlikely, memorable meetcute.Laura Hart is a drag king, comedian & improviser who has been performing for yonks. They are the founder and host of popular drag show The Kings & Drag King Bingo, and have toured around Australia and internationally. They perform and teach at Improv Theatre Sydney, and in 2022 they won an Honour Award for Arts and Culture.Queerstories an award-winning LGBTQI+ storytelling project directed by Maeve Marsden, with regular events around Australia. For more information, visit www.queerstories.com.au and follow Queerstories on Facebook.The Queerstories book is published by Hachette Australia, and can be purchased from your favourite independent bookseller or on Booktopia.To support Queerstories, become a patron at www.patreon.com/ladysingsitbetter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Healing Narratives of Suicide Loss
Rebuilding A Marriage

The Healing Narratives of Suicide Loss

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 36:13


Kellie lost her son, Chris, to suicide 2 years ago. Kellie had adopted Chris when he was 3 years old and at 22 years of age, he took his own life after struggles with addiction. Kellie's story has many layers and her honesty and bravery come forward in her words. Hear how: Kellie and her husband had very different grief reactions. the couple divided but then came back together again by establishing new boundaries. they created a platform for helping others which gave them both hope for the future. Kellie felt that her family foundations were “falling apart” and had to be rebuilt. Kellie is continuing her bonds with Chris by publishing a book, Mount Hope, which she calls a “love letter for the LGBTQI community.” Kellie felt she was ripped apart and had to hit the depths in order to rebuild who she was. Kellie won $75,000 not long after Chris died and how that impacted her journey. faith was a vital part of her healing. Mount Hope is available on Amazon and is a book about faith, sexuality and in the final chapter, Chris shows readers that suicide is not a sin in the religious context.   Please listen with care and know there are people out there that can help and support you.  Within the UK:  Samaritans - Free on 116 123  Suicide&Co - Free on 0800 054 8400 Mon-Friday 9aam-9pm  Within the US:  Suicide Hotline: Free on 1-800-273-8255 or text 742741  Anywhere else in the World: Suicide Grief Support Contact me here: DrSue@suicidegriefsupport.com and we will see what is available in your country. Or find me on Facebook - Suicide Grief Support Or Instagram - Suicide Grief Support    Links you need from this episode:   https://www.facebook.com/kellie.woolf https://www.instagram.com/kelliewoolf/ https://twitter.com/KellieKWoolf https://kelliewoolf.com Mount Hope eBook : Woolf, Kellie: Amazon.co.uk: Kindle Store

Spiritual Misfits Podcast
A 'belonging of misfits' (poems and stories live at Hamilton Baptist Church)

Spiritual Misfits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 41:48


A couple weeks ago there was a very special convergence of communities at Hamilton Baptist Church. I know many of you have listened to the episodes with Andrew Dodd and Scott Higgins sharing their stories and the story of Hamilton. If you haven't listened yet add those to your up next. Anyway, Andrew invited me to come along to Hamilton and share some thoughts and poems. And Mitch Forbes and some of the New City Baps crew came along, as well as a few others from Meeting Ground church. So we ended up with a very special mix of people in the room, and honestly it was so lovely to meet a number of podcast listeners in person and to celebrate being a bit of a rag-tag group on the fringes of faith. Which can be a pretty fun place if you make it a party. Before the morning Andrew Dodd asked me if we could make this a ‘live' podcast episode. So that's what you're about to hear. Andrew's the host for this one. And there's a bit of variety. First, a conversation with Mitch Forbes. Then we hear from one of our listeners, Alison. Shout-out to you Alison. And then the bulk of the episode is a mix of Andrew interviewing me and me sharing some poems around evolving faith and LGBTQI+ inclusion.  This was a lot of fun and I hope you get the sense that you're in the room with us experiencing the energy of it. On that note, if you would be interested in hosting or collaborating on some sort of spiritual misfits meet-up or live gathering, hit us up. Who knows what could happen? 

BitchStory
BitchStory Lesson 32 - Chingonas! Celebrating Hispanic Heritage with some Badass Latinas!

BitchStory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 62:59


So, disclaimer: neither of us are Hispanic/Latina. We aren't claiming to be experts, and we are open to conversations to educate us. This podcast aims to bring the unsung heroes onto the stage. Our stage is still small, so please share this podcast with friends who would enjoy it. We would love your topic suggestions, or for you to let us know if we missed an important name or detail. This episode lists a whole bunch of Latina badasses who need to be known! We are busy bitches, just like you guys. Sometimes, even though we do research for each episode, we are struck with a question or thought while we are recording. We're just keepin it real and organic. During this episode we were trying to think of a celebratory term to say at the end of each woman's segment...like CHEERS! Lisa suggested Chingona, and it couldn't be more perfect: "Throughout Latin America and in many Latinx communities in the United States, the word chingona has always had negative connotations attached to it. The word has historically been used to describe women who are “too aggressive,” while the masculine version of the word “chingon” is used as a way to compliment men. In recent years, Latinas like Duarte have made efforts to reclaim the word and used it as a way to empower themselves, similarly to how the LGBTQI community has taken back the word “queer.” Y'ALL! that is exactly what we are trying to do with "Bitch"! Chingona is the perfect word! https://medium.com/@CoachellaUninc/chingona-definition-reclaiming-what-it-means-to-be-a-fearless-latina-ce904efa4be2 and, an apology: And, as far as why Hispanic Heritage Month is 9/15-10/15 - census.gov says: “About National Hispanic Heritage Month It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402. “The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua." Speculating during the show, we incorrectly associated it with Dia De Los Muertos, which isn't until November 1-2. We really should have done better with this fact. Forgive us, and happy independence. (We wish Puerto Rico could celebrate this way) My brain (Kelly's) is struggling a little because of long covid, and meds to deal with the other health issue fuckery. So I fuck up my words and struggle to recall things, a lot. Sorry. Be gentle with me, I'm Perimenopausal too. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bitchstory/support

SBS World News Radio
Why some politicians need armoured cars and bullet-proof vests

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 3:02


Political violence has been on the rise in Brazil, with candidates for the upcoming elections and their supporters facing a wave of threats and attacks this year. Incumbent President Jair Bolsonaro was almost killed in a stabbing during the 2018 campaign.But the candidates most targeted by political violence and threats tend to be Black women and LGBTQI people, especially trans women.

Dennis Prager podcasts
No Diesel Trucks

Dennis Prager podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 75:55 Very Popular


California plans to ban diesel trucks by 2040. All vehicles — cars and trucks — will have to be electric… The Los Angeles school district thinks that criticism of junk food is racist… The same Los Angeles school district promotes a “queer” calendar. Each month has a LGBTQI+ theme.  The tabloids are having a field day with rock star Adam Levine's marital travails. Men must learn to control their nature. This is often easier said than done — even when your married to a beautiful model.  The United States and Western Europe are in the process of committing energy suicide. Meanwhile, China powers up on coal. Not surprisingly, California is leading the nation over the cliff.Thanks for listening to the Daily Dennis Prager Podcast. To hear the entire three hours of my radio show as a podcast, commercial-free every single day, become a member of Pragertopia. You'll also get access to 15 years' worth of archives, as well as daily show prep. Subscribe today at Pragertopia dot com.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

W2M Network
TV Party Tonight: The Orville - New Horizons (season 3)

W2M Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 118:51


Jesse Starcher, David Wright and Mark Radulich present their The Orville New Horizons Season 3 Review! The third season of the comedy-drama science fiction television series The Orville, also known as The Orville: New Horizons, premiered on June 2, 2022. It streams on Hulu in the United States and on Disney+ internationally (seasons 1&2 only). Filming began in October 2019 but was halted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and production ultimately completed in August 2021. This season is the show's first on Hulu, after airing its previous two seasons on Fox, as well as the first to premiere since The Walt Disney Company's March 2019 acquisition of 20th Century Fox. Mark Radulich and his wacky podcast on all the things: https://linktr.ee/markkind76 also snapchat: markkind76 FB Messenger: Mark Radulich LCSW Tiktok: @markradulich twitter: @MarkRadulich

Live Well and Thrive
S1, E7: Supporting Social Justice

Live Well and Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 21:02


Welcome to “Live Well and Thrive,” a podcast recognizing the hard work, dedication, and diversity of our team at Kaiser Permanente Northern California. In this episode, we have three amazing guests and how their multicultural Business Resource Groups are a valuable resource for their members in dealing with the social challenges facing us today. Guests: - Belinda Luu, Strategic Leader of Data Management and Governance Senior Counsel, serves as the strategic advisor on the Northern California Kaiser Permanente Asian American and Pacific Islanders Association board - Gloria Wilson, an ethics and compliance leader and past President of the Kaiser Permanente African American Professional Association - Theophilus Little, Facilities Service Director and the co-chair of KP Pride, a business resource group supporting the LGBTQI+ communities "I've heard some of my Black BRG (Business Resource Group) members say when there are incidents of racism, I cannot deal with this. Why is this happening? When does it end? I don't have the answers," says Gloria Wilson, an ethics and compliance leader and past president of the Kaiser Permanente African American Professional Association. "So the best thing I can do is listen, let people know they are heard." Get involved with one of our Business Resource Groups: https://sp-cloud.kp.org/sites/BRGHub Learn more about "MindfulHub"- a volunteer collective which shares mindfulness activities throughout KP: https://sp-cloud.kp.org/sites/MindfulHub Share your thoughts, ask a question, or suggest a podcast topic, in writing or in a short audio clip. Send it to LiveWell&Thrive@kp.org. You never know, we may use your comment or audio snippet in an upcoming episode.

Dipsaus
Teaser Dance of Dipsaus HotD S01E05 recap: We Light The Way #DragonsYall

Dipsaus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 20:09


Luister naar de hele aflevering via PODIMO What is the Seven Hells is going on?!? Aflevering 05 “We Light The Way” geeft ons Thirst Traps (Harwin shippers verenigt u!), we krijgen te zien dat Mushroom's verhalen meer waarheid bevatten dan verwacht. Afgewezen geliefden, vindictive royalty's, en een uncosumated marriage betekent chaos in Westeros. We were clutching our pearls… behalve Mariam dan…! Anousha Nzume, Mariam El Maslouhi en Ebissé Wakjira duiken samen met Manju Reijmer in Alicent's breuk met Rhaenyra, een openhartig gesprek over LGBTQI+ representation (lack thereof!!!) en seksualiteit in de Velaryon familie en dat intense huwelijksfeest dat ons op het puntje van onze stoel deed zitten...De "Game of Thrones-universum is uitgebreid met de prequel-serie "House of the Dragon". In Dance of Dipsaus gaan we de hele series wekelijks ontleden. "House of the Dragon" draait om de Targaryan-dynastie, ongeveer 200 jaar vóór de gebeurtenissen van "Game of Thrones". Het is gebaseerd op delen van de roman "Fire & Blood" van George R.R. Martin uit 2018. We verwachten dat de show zijn voorganger en zijn eigen naam waarmaakt - met vuur, bloed en draken in overvloed.Abonneer je VIA @PODIMO_NL! #DragonsYall #DemDragons #DanceofDipsausZie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Beyond the Couch with Dr. Christine Jehu
92. LEADERSHIP is about example & invitation

Beyond the Couch with Dr. Christine Jehu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 19:43


Exciting shifts ahead for Beyond the Couch!! Sharing thoughts on that and digging into LEADERSHIP today. Leadership as a high performer!"leadership is about example and invitation"Become a Beyond the Couch INSIDER - all the pod goodness & exclusive content to your inbox once a week. No spam, all greatness. Sign up hereLet's Connect on Instagram! @therealdrjehuReady to start therapy? → Grab your FREE Quick Start Guide to Finding a Therapist!Crisis Resources: Call 988 for Suicide & Crisis LifelineTrevor Project for LGBTQI+ 1-866-488-7386Text START to 678-678

Queerstories
297 Eda Gunaydin - Cultural Ambassador

Queerstories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 10:47


Eda's always considered herself a cultural ambassador for being gay, but a night out during Mardi Gras isn't quite the promotional tour she'd hoped for.Eda Gunaydin is a Turkish-Australian writer and researcher interested in class, race and diaspora. You can find her essays and creative non-fiction in Meanjin, The Sydney Review of Books and The Lifted Brow. She has been shortlisted for a Queensland Literary Award and the Scribe Non-Fiction Prize. She is currently Contributing Editor at the Sydney Review of Books, and her debut essay collection Root and Branch was published in May 2022. It's brilliant and I've been recommending it to everyone I speak to, you should buy it. But first listen to this story, recorded at Riverside Theatres in Paramatta in 2022.Queerstories an award-winning LGBTQI+ storytelling project directed by Maeve Marsden, with regular events around Australia. For more information, visit www.queerstories.com.au and follow Queerstories on Facebook.The Queerstories book is published by Hachette Australia, and can be purchased from your favourite independent bookseller or on Booktopia.To support Queerstories, become a patron at www.patreon.com/ladysingsitbetter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

ZÜNDFUNK - Generator
"Autistic Pride": Was Autismus mit der LGBTQI-Bewegung gemeinsam hat

ZÜNDFUNK - Generator

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 51:26


Dieser Zündfunk Generator ist anders. Autorin Nicole Ficociello bringt Zündfunk-Moderatorin Ann-Kathrin Mittelstrass etwas mit. Ein Ding, das etwas über unsere Gesellschaft erzählt und hinter dem eine Geschichte steckt, die man auf den ersten Blick so vielleicht nicht vermuten würde. In dieser Folge ist es ein Kalender mit Fotos, die Orte in München während des ersten Corona-Lockdowns zeigen. Statt Menschenmengen auf dem Marienplatz sieht man leere Straßen und Plätze an die sich nur ein paar Tauben verirrt haben. Wem dieser Kalender gehört, warum er für diese Person wichtig ist und was das mit uns als Gesellschaft zu tun hat, zeigt diese Sendung.

Beyond the Couch with Dr. Christine Jehu
91. Foundation Check In

Beyond the Couch with Dr. Christine Jehu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 21:43


It's a great day for a personal check in. How's your foundation? Where are you aligned or misaligned? Sharing where I'm at in this season and how I'm approaching some realignment!Become a Beyond the Couch INSIDER - all the pod goodness & exclusive content to your inbox once a week. No spam, all greatness. Sign up hereLet's Connect on Instagram! @therealdrjehuReady to start therapy? → Grab your FREE Quick Start Guide to Finding a Therapist!Crisis Resources: Call 988 for Suicide & Crisis LifelineTrevor Project for LGBTQI+ 1-866-488-7386Text START to 678-678

RITH Weekly Sermons
09.11.22 | Encouragement for Young Families in a Culture of Wolves | Glenn Hubbart

RITH Weekly Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 46:38


Raising children these days is like raising tender lambs in a culture of wolves--COVID-19 lockdowns, vaccine and mask mandates, inflation, wokeness, gender confusion, school boards encouraging gender fluidity, and a demonic wave of LGBTQI+ rights that is sweeping our nation. In order to successfully raise children, Christian parents must be regularly filled with the Holy Spirit. Listen as Pastor Glenn Hubbart explains how this divine power includes power to do the right thing as parents, courage to stand up to woke culture, wisdom to avoid satan's schemes against your marriage and family (2 Cor. 2:11), and most all, love.

The Laura Flanders Show
A.M. Homes: “The Unfolding” of American Democracy

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 29:15


(Full Episode Notes are at Patreon.com/theLFShow)  Salman Rushdie praised A.M. Homes' latest novel, The Unfolding as, “A terrific black comedy, written almost entirely in pitch-perfect dialogue, that feels terrifyingly close to the unfunny truth.” In this episode, A.M. and Laura discuss political fiction, women writers and the unraveling of American democracy. Homes is an American writer best known for her novel The End of Alice, about a convicted child molester and murderer and Music for Torching, about the run-up to a school shooting. The Unfolding, written in the decade before the January 6th Insurrection, is similarly anticipatory. It follows a Republican donor plotting a mob assault on Washington. It was published this September 6th. Also included, a clip of a solidarity reading at the New York Public Library in support of Rushdie. And a commentary from Laura on the reality journalism of the late Barbara Ehrenreich.  Music featured in the middle of the podcast:  “Miracle” by Ultra Naté from her new album “Ultra” courtesy of Peace Biscuit.Guest, A.M. Homes: Author of over 30 books including The Unfolding; recipient of the 2013 Women's Prize for Fiction; contributing editor to Vanity Fair and BOMB Magazine, and appears regularly in several publications including, The New York Times, Harpers, Art Forum and The New Yorker.  She also writes for film and television including writing the adaptation for Showtime of her first novel JACK.  She teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Princeton University.*Books by A.M. Homes:“The Unfolding” , Find More About the Book Here“This Book Will Save Your Life”, Find More About the Book Here(*Bookshop is an online bookstore with a mission to financially support local, independent bookstores. The LF Show is an affiliate of bookshop.org and will receive a small commission if you click through and make a purchase.) It's our members that have kept this show available to hundreds of thousands of listeners and viewers like you, but it takes a lot of funds to keep the show flowing nationally. We do not take corporate or government underwriting, we rely on you.  Go to Patreon.com/theLFShow and join our team, by becoming a patron partner or for more ways to donate go to LauraFlanders.org/donate

Queerstories
296 Adrian Mouhajer - BUB; Beating Up Bilal

Queerstories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 7:33


Adrian recalls a formative encounter with a boy at school, and reflects on how their memories of fighting intersects with their experiences of gender.Adrian Mouhajer is a non-binary lesbian Lebanese writer, fighter, and all-around class clown that never really grew out of it. They specialise in over-sharing and giving good hugs which surprisingly comes in handy when they fight because they prefer grappling over striking. They currently work at ACON as a Program Coordinator of Safety, Inclusion, and Justice, and they continuously overshare in a bid to promote having conversations regarding subjects normally viewed as too much for a Maccas drive-thru.Queerstories an award-winning LGBTQI+ storytelling project directed by Maeve Marsden, with regular events around Australia. For more information, visit www.queerstories.com.au and follow Queerstories on Facebook.The Queerstories book is published by Hachette Australia, and can be purchased from your favourite independent bookseller or on Booktopia.To support Queerstories, become a patron at www.patreon.com/ladysingsitbetter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.