Podcasts about Rust Belt

Region in the US affected by industrial decline

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Best podcasts about Rust Belt

Latest podcast episodes about Rust Belt

The BreakPoint Podcast
Losing Our Religion: Blue Laws Decline While Deaths of Despair Do Not

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 5:12


A mortal affliction affects much of America's heartland. Known as “deaths of despair,” both the Rust Belt and Appalachia have seen incredible spikes in rates of addiction, overdoses, violence, and suicide. In addition to the thousands who die each year by various forms of self-harm, thousands more live Gollum-like, trapped by their chemical chains and in loneliness.  It is a complex situation. While we must not diminish anyone's moral agency, the downward paths we are on are paved, lined, and greased by a number of contributing factors. For example, Beth Macy, the author of the book Dope Sick, has documented the lethal partnership of doctors and drug companies, not to mention the co-option of government oversight agencies, which inflicted a plague of highly addictive opioids on some of America's poorest areas of the country.   A new recent study, however, points to an additional complexity, an oft-ignored element of this cultural disease: the decline of religion. According to the study's authors, there is some correlation between the end of so-called “Blue Laws” and the opioid epidemic. In certain parts of the country, Blue Laws have long limited the range of activities allowed on Sundays. Certain businesses were not allowed to be open, and certain things (especially alcohol) could not be sold. Though these laws continue in certain areas, particularly in Europe, they began to disappear in parts of the United States as the 20th century wore on, to the point that now they are few and far between.  Of course, a significant, culture-wide phenomenon like the opioid crisis cannot be reduced to something as simplistic as whether or not people can shop on Sunday. To do that would be to mistake correlation for causation, kind of like saying murders go up with ice cream sales. And this is something the study's authors readily admit.   Rather than claiming that the end of Blue Laws created the opioid crisis, they use the end of Blue Laws as a marker to track the decline in American religiosity. The diminishing connections to faith in communities across the country, especially in those areas where they were once so strong, are among the factors that contributed to our nation's chemical plague. In other words, Blue Laws are a kind of canary in the coal mine, marking when we've crossed a dangerous line.  In light of these diminishing religious commitments, reinstating Blue Laws likely will not lead to a reversal in rates of addictions or other deaths of despair. Even if they were an important part of our cultural life of faith at one time, too much has changed for such an easy fix. However, what these laws represented and what has been lost as they disappear points to the underlying causes, not only of the opioid crisis but of many of our parallel pains as well.  What we need to ask is, in a mix of Friedrich Nietzsche and REM, what is the cost of losing our religion?  As much as we prize our individualism, particularly here in America, human beings aren't just dust motes of consciousness, floating on the air currents of life. We're connected, not just to one another, but to a host of other elements through relationships that give us meaning, identity, direction, and hope. To be healthy, as individuals and as communities, these relationships (upward, inward, outward, and downward) must be strong.  Human beings need a connection to something beyond ourselves, something higher and transcendent in order to find ourselves, to know who and what we are, to be sure of our identity. We need connections with one another, especially the links of family and friendship, in order to be accountable, supported, and complete. And, we need proper connection to the physical world around us, so to be tethered to reality through things like meaningful labor, a place to call home, and some part of the world to call “mine.”  Marx got it wrong. Religion isn't the opiate of the masses, but instead a part of life most needed, irreplaceable by technological convenience or scientific mastery. The loss of religion has been a bad idea wherever it has been tried, and those suffering across Appalachia and the Rust Belt are some of its most obvious victims. By abandoning religion, specifically the Christianity which once provided meaning to these now missing relationships, the essential connection between individuals and communities and a higher purpose has been lost.   As Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn said all the way back in 1983, “Men have forgotten God; that's why all this has happened.” Blue Laws didn't hold off the effects of substance abuse, but the religious impulse that such laws represented were part of a way of seeing life and the world, one in which we weren't just reduced to being cogs or animals or sexual expressions. The Christianity that the world has rejected offers the hope that the world so desperately needs. 

Laporan VOA - Voice of America | Bahasa Indonesia
Upaya Membangkitkan Kembali Kegiatan Ekonomi di Kawasan "Rust Belt" AS - September 22, 2022

Laporan VOA - Voice of America | Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 2:49


Wilayah yang disebut “Rust Belt” di AS memiliki konotasi negatif, karena pernah mengalami masa jaya industri, sebelum akhirnya terpuruk. Berbagai upaya revitalisasi dilakukan, baik di tingkat federal maupun tingkat lokal, guna membangkitkan kembali perekonomian lokal yang tadinya seperti terlupakan.

The Rustbelt Klansman
The Rustbelt Klansman: 9-20-22

The Rustbelt Klansman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 72:47


Conservative News with Commentary

Pop, the Question
Rust Belt Stories (S6-E42, Amanda McMillan Lequieu)

Pop, the Question

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 23:42


The image and stories of working-class people have been central to an understanding of "America" and the "American Dream.” Their stories are omnipresent in popular literature, film, television, music, and everyday life. Host Dr. Melinda Lewis takes a tour with Drexel University sociologist Dr. Amanda McMillan Lequieu to explore a deindustrialized United States of America and its hardest hit communities, where some choose to leave while others remain. Along the way, the two also explore narratives that have helped shape policy and public perception of what it means to come from a place of importance. "Pop, the Question" is a production of Marketing & Media in Pennoni Honors College at Drexel University. Recorded May 27, 2022 through virtual conferencing (Philadelphia, PA, USA). Featured Guest: Amanda McMillan Lequieu, PhD (Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Center for Science, Technology and Society, College of Arts and Sciences, Drexel University) Host and Producer: Melinda Lewis, PhD (Associate Director, Marketing & Media) Dean: Paula Marantz Cohen, PhD (Dean, Pennoni Honors College) Executive Producer: Erica Levi Zelinger (Director, Marketing & Media) Producer: Brian Kantorek (Assistant Director, Marketing & Media) Research and Script: Melinda Lewis, PhD Audio Engineering and Editing: Brian Kantorek Original Theme Music: Brian Kantorek Production Assistance: Noah Levine Social Media Outreach: Jaelynn Vesey Graphic Design: Bhavna Ganesan Logo Design: Michal Anderson Additional Voiceover: Malia Lewis The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Drexel University or Pennoni Honors College. To learn more about Amanda McMillan Lequieu, visit www.amandamcmillanlequieu.com. Additional historical information on Herminie, PA by Jim Miller. To learn more about this and other Pennsylvania towns, visit www.youtube.com/channel/UCbtpYJoRYw7PdJ3M7IyWvYg. Copyright © 2022 Drexel University

The Rustbelt Klansman
The Rustbelt Klansman: 9-15-22

The Rustbelt Klansman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 79:12


Conservative News with Commentary

The Rustbelt Klansman
The Rustbelt Klansman: 9-13-22

The Rustbelt Klansman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 84:04


Conservative News with Commentary

Morning Shift Podcast
New Bill Could Put First Wind Farm in Lake Michigan Off Chicago's Southeast Side

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 19:05


Lake Michigan could be the home of Illinois' first off-shore wind farm. The Rust Belt to Green Belt Act could help fund wind turbines 15 miles off the coast of Chicago's Southeast side. Reset talks to one of the sponsors of the legislation as well as a reporter and community organizer about the details.

China In Focus
Biden in Ohio: Time to Bury the Rust Belt

China In Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 24:54


Biden in Ohio: Time to Bury the Rust Belt Broader Curbs on U.S. Chips Exports to China: Report New WH Clean Energy Adviser's China Ties GOP Raises Concern: Forced Labor Solar Panels Report: iPhone 14 to Use Chips from China Chinese Church Members Appeal for U.n. Help Parade in Poland Celebrates Falun Gong Get Ready for a War to Stop It: Grant Newsham on Possible Taiwan Invasion

Grey Mirror: MIT Media Lab’s Digital Currency Initiative on Technology, Society, and Ethics

In this episode, professor, researcher and author Anthea Roberts joins us to talk about how to view the world and current debates from different lenses. Anthea specializes in public international law, international trade and investment law, global governance and geoeconomics. She is the co-author of ”Six Faces of Globalization: Who Wins, Who Loses And Why It Matters”, selected as one of the best economic books of 2021. In this book Anthea and her co-author identify six main narratives driving debates in the West about the virtues and vices of economic globalization: the old establishment view that globalization benefits everyone (win–win), the pessimistic belief that it threatens us all with pandemics and climate change (lose–lose), along with various rival accounts that focus on specific winners and losers, from China to America's Rust Belt. “Narratives are stories we tell ourselves to make sense of the world... They are also stories we tell others to influence their understanding of the world.” Anthea proposes to cut through the complexity to reveal what splits us apart and the points of concurrence that could bond us back together and move forward. In this chapter you will have a bigger picture of what is going on in the world and will learn how to see it from different lenses. You will also discover the importance of being a system thinker and how to become one. If you want to learn about multiperspectivism or how to view the global stage in a non dogmatic way, reading Six Faces of Globalization is a MUST! SUPPORT US ON PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/rhyslindmark JOIN OUR DISCORD: https://discord.gg/PDAPkhNxrC Who is Anthea Roberts? Anthea is a Professor at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) at the Australian National University (ANU) and a Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School. She is the co-author of Six Faces of Globalization, selected as one of the Best Books of 2021 by The Financial Times and Fortune Magazine. Topics: Welcome Anthea Roberts to The Rhys Show!: (00:00:00) About Six Faces of Globalization: (00:01:56) Curiosity about multiperspectivism: (00:06:04) Using metaphors to synthesize narratives: (00:09:05) About identity & how can it fit in as a perspective: (00:17:20) How effective altruism, techno utopianism & self transformation fit in 6 faces of globalization: (00:21:07) Internal chinese narratives about globalization: (00:26:00) Competition & coopetition of how narratives succeed: (00:34:31) How to be good at system thinking: (00:42:05) Overrated & underrated questions: (00:46:11) Wrap-up: (00:48:20) Mentioned resources: “The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World” book by Charles C. Mann “Images of Organization” Book by Gareth Morgan “Metaphors we believe by” (Blog) by Aaron Z. Lewis Connect with Anthea Roberts: Web: https://www.anthearoberts.com/ Six Faces of Globalization Web: https://www.sixfacesofglobalization.com/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anthea-roberts-a8596b142/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/AntheaERoberts Youtube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLoW2GdYY2EHQVLUNYoI74g/playlists

The Rustbelt Klansman
The Rustbelt Klansman: 9-8-22

The Rustbelt Klansman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 85:26


Conservative News with Commentary

The Rustbelt Klansman
The Rustbelt Klansman: 9-6-22

The Rustbelt Klansman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 93:21


Conservative News with Commentary

Truth Caviar
Tucker Carlson, Selfish Ruling Class, America's Caste System, War on Men, Ship of Fools

Truth Caviar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 81:58


In 2016, a vulgar, ignorant, bombastic Orange Man with a funky hairstyle was elected President of the United States. Why did that happen? In his book, "Ship of Fools: How a Selfish Ruling Class Is Bringing America to the Brink of Revolution," Tucker Carlson ponders and answers that question.Contrary to the nonstop screaming of conspiracies from America's ruling class, Trump didn't win because of fake news or Russia-collusion; he didn't win because he's a racist, sexist, or a homophobe; he didn't win because of the Access Hollywood tape; he didn't win because of his gold jet or helicopter; nor because mouth-breathers in the Rust Belt didn't know what was best for them. Americans elected Donald Trump because they wanted to send a loud and clear message to our selfish ruling class: you have failed us. It's not that they necessarily liked Trump. Although some did. It's that they overlooked many of his negatives because the establishment---from the Clintons to the Bushes to the Obamas to the Pelosis to the McConnells---let them and the country down. And it's not just politicians. It's the technocrats, the deep state bureaucrats, the woke "capitalists"---the Jeff Bezos and Mark Zuckerbergs of the world---and the cultural elites who look down and scoff at them. When a populist is elected, it's a warning to the ruling class that something is wrong. You aren't doing a good job for the people. That's how they should have reacted. Instead, they called American people racists, sexists, fascists, homophobes, clingers, deplorables, irredeemables, rubes, etc. They didn't spend a single second reflecting, taking responsibility, or learning from Trump's election. They doubled down on their neglect and failures. Our elites are fools, unaware that they are in charge of a sinking ship. Ignore the people long enough and something awful will happen. An oligarchy pretending to be a constitutional republic will not endure.We discuss the issues Tucker raises in the book and their implications for America, including the decline of the middle class and the American dream, the loss of manufacturing, the economic stratification of American society, the elite monoculture that's insulated and disconnected from the rest of America, feminism's war on men, and much more. Podcast website: https://www.truthcaviar.comSubstack: https://truthcaviar.substack.comTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/truthcaviarInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/truthcaviarRumble: https://rumble.com/user/TruthCaviarYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFNODTlmM_KykW1G6JTF6swBuy us a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/truthcaviarGoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/f/help-us-make-a-world-a-better-placeVadim's Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/stat4realBrent's Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/bmeastwoodShip of Fools: https://amzn.to/3x1w6BS Support the show

The Zero Hour with RJ Eskow
Prof. Richard Wolff: Can the Rust Belt Be Saved?

The Zero Hour with RJ Eskow

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 41:05


BIT-BUY-BIT's podcast
Rust Belt Home Miners with BingBong_BTC and Jon

BIT-BUY-BIT's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 88:33


Rust Belt Home Miners In this episode Jon travels to a rural part of the Rust Belt, USA to interview Pleb Miner BingBong_BTC. BingBong is not only a home miner, but a heat wrangler, harnessing the waste heat created by his machines. Meeting fellow Plebs face to face carries significant importance, especially when a nym is willing to not only sit down and discuss Bitcoin, but to invite you into his home, show you his mining and privacy setups, and treat you like an honored guest. BingBong entered the Bitcoin arena though friends, interested in all things “crypto” , it didn't take long for him to realize there is only one. He obtained sats through the normal KYC channels like Swan, but once again a quick learner, understood the necessity in seeking KYC free options. The Samourai team was an inspiration and building a Ronin dojo was the logical next step. Brother Rabbit and Q & A were of help during his journey. Mining seemed like the logical next step on the Bitcoin journey to enlightenment. First with dreams of mining that sweet corn, he later grew to a greater understanding and took meaning in understanding mining's role in the Bitcoin network. With the aid of guides from the likes of EconoAlchemist and Diverter, BingBong developed the knowledge and confidence necessary to mine. He purchased his first machines from MineFarmBuy and was underway. He and his partner learned the lessons needed to mitigate heat as well as others and were hooked. After ordering more machines they attempted a build inspired by EconoAlchemist he calls the “Hash Hut”. The Hash Hut. The Hash BingBong built in an enclosure comprised of a baker's rack encased in foam board. The bottom of the enclosure is open to take in filtered air into the machines which are placed vertically. The intake and exhaust of the machines is separated by a barrier so as not to recirculate the waste heat. The entirety of the airflow is then directed outside via an attic fan. BingBong can lower the power of his exhaust fan to allow his two 6' take offs at the top of the hut connected to inline fans to direct heat to where it is needed.   Rust belt article - https://ungovernablemisfits.com/a-rust-belt-renaissance-through-permaculture-principles/   Link to win seedsigner - https://twitter.com/jonpdigiacomo/status/1566057650235723776?s=28&t=Qt23QFwHgZUcu17qJLUjzQ     Link to win hoodie - https://twitter.com/MaxBitbuybit/status/1566081427543924738?s=20&t=YzSdksA-O5Dja0ejjvV1jQ     Show guest   twitter - @JonPDiGiacomo   twitter - @bingbong_BTC     twitter - @MaxBitbuybit twitter - @bitbuybitpod Website - https://ungovernablemisfits.com       As always please feel free to reach out and ask me any questions.   Today you can exchange $1 for 5021 Sats (Sale ends soon.)   Thank you Foundation Devices for sponsoring the show.  Use code BITBUYBIT at check out for $10 off your purchase        

The Rustbelt Klansman
The Rustbelt Klansman: 9-1-22

The Rustbelt Klansman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 79:14


Conservative News with Commentary

The Rustbelt Klansman
The Rustbelt Klansman: 8-30-22

The Rustbelt Klansman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 78:51


Conservative News with Commentary

Changing Places
Vacancy: the story of our abandoned neighborhoods

Changing Places

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 31:04 Transcription Available


From Baltimore to Philadelphia, to the Rust Belt and beyond, the United States has a unique crisis on its hands: too much vacant housing with too little demand. From rows of empty, dilapidated housing to abandoned neighborhoods, the story of vacant housing in America is the story of what happens when trends change, people move, populations decline, and the built world people once loved is left to decay.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

American Monetary Association
428: AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History | Casey Michel

American Monetary Association

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 33:01


Jason Hartman invites Casey Michel, author and investigative journalist, to speak about his new book which uncovers how the US has created the greatest money laundering scheme in history. South Dakota has pioneered an entire industry of what they call anonymous trusts. South Dakota has taken this to a magnitude we've never seen by creating perpetual anonymity for these trusts. The information of those in the trust will never be shared with governments, with other jurisdictions, tax authorities, investigators, which is why we've seen both Americans and non Americans flocking to South Dakota. $900 billion is the top line estimate in South Dakota, but it's still a question of how many total assets are actually there, who those assets are connected to and what those assets are actually doing after they pass through all the anonymity that the state of South Dakota freely offers. Casey Michel's book also talks about illicit foreign money purchasing steel mills, factories and manufacturing plants in places like Cleveland, Ohio, the Rust Belt and the Midwest. They're not revitalizing local communities and bringing jobs back, but rather using those assets to hold and hide funds, using them as part of a broader transnational money laundering scheme. And so what ends up happening is that not only do the jobs never come back, the folks who have the remaining jobs are just laid off, the factories begin falling apart and it's clear they are never going to come back. These local communities in places such as West Virginia, Kentucky, Texas and Illinois are seeing their economic crown jewels go to complete rot because of this system of kleptocracy. Towards the end of the broader Cold War period, one could see a sudden surge in the creation of financial secrecy pools and broader economic structuring that incentivized the outflow of illicit suspect wealth from post communist states. These states are linked directly to rising oligarchies and dictatorships that are smothering local populations, looting national treasuries, and making sure bridges, roads, hospitals and schools are never built. And then beyond that, there is no broader free market economy that actually develops in those countries. CaseyMichel.com 0:29 Welcome Casey Michel, writer and investigative journalist, author of AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History 1:10 What is a kleptocracy? 3:03 Kleptocracy is now a transnational phenomenon, closely intertwined with the broader offshoring economy 4:19 The World Summit 6:42 Incentivizing the outflow of suspect wealth from post communist states 8:00 Creating easy access to transnational financial flows 9:47 Private wealth located in global financial secrecy jurisdictions 11:49 The beneficiaries of dynastic wealth have flocked to places within the US 15:21 For every $1 that is given in foreign aid, $3 of untracked, illicit capital leaves those developing countries 16:34 Anti money laundering regulations across a number of industries except the real estate industry 18:27 Billions of illicit foreign money flowing into London real estate 19:14 Broader transnational money laundering scheme in local US communities 21:46 The offshoring world is comparable to a superpower such as the US or China 23:38 The sad state of the media today 25:54 Casey Michel's first book AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History is out now from St. Martin's Press 26:51 Who are the world's biggest money laundering offenders? 28:56 Digital assets, art and money laundering 31:07 Learn more at http://www.caseymichel.com/   Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Learn More: JasonHartman.com Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free course: JasonHartman.com/Deals Free White Paper on The Hartman Comparison Index™: HartmanIndex.com/white-paper Free Report on Pandemic Investing: PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips in Vimeo Free Class: CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: JasonHartman.com/Protect Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: JasonHartman.com/Ron What do Jason's clients say? JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Contact our Investment Counselors at: www.JasonHartman.com Watch, subscribe and comment on Jason's videos on his official YouTube channel: YouTube.com/c/JasonHartmanRealEstate/videos Guided Visualization for Investors: JasonHartman.com/visualization Jason's videos in his other sites: JasonHartman.com/Rumble JasonHartman.com/Bitchute JasonHartman.com/Odysee Jason Hartman's Extra YouTube Channel Jason Hartman's Real Estate News and Technology (RENT) YouTube Channel

Americana - The American Way
Notice of Layoff (Black Monday in the Rust Belt)

Americana - The American Way

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 20:14


This is the thanks my Pap got for saving the world (WWII) and building America. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-morrow/support

Holistic Survival Show - Pandemic Planning
619: AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History | Casey Michel

Holistic Survival Show - Pandemic Planning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 33:49


Jason Hartman invites Casey Michel, author and investigative journalist, to speak about his new book which uncovers how the US has created the greatest money laundering scheme in history. South Dakota has pioneered an entire industry of what they call anonymous trusts. South Dakota has taken this to a magnitude we've never seen by creating perpetual anonymity for these trusts. The information of those in the trust will never be shared with governments, with other jurisdictions, tax authorities, investigators, which is why we've seen both Americans and non Americans flocking to South Dakota. $900 billion is the top line estimate in South Dakota, but it's still a question of how many total assets are actually there, who those assets are connected to and what those assets are actually doing after they pass through all the anonymity that the state of South Dakota freely offers. Casey Michel's book also talks about illicit foreign money purchasing steel mills, factories and manufacturing plants in places like Cleveland, Ohio, the Rust Belt and the Midwest. They're not revitalizing local communities and bringing jobs back, but rather using those assets to hold and hide funds, using them as part of a broader transnational money laundering scheme. And so what ends up happening is that not only do the jobs never come back, the folks who have the remaining jobs are just laid off, the factories begin falling apart and it's clear they are never going to come back. These local communities in places such as West Virginia, Kentucky, Texas and Illinois are seeing their economic crown jewels go to complete rot because of this system of kleptocracy. Towards the end of the broader Cold War period, one could see a sudden surge in the creation of financial secrecy pools and broader economic structuring that incentivized the outflow of illicit suspect wealth from post communist states. These states are linked directly to rising oligarchies and dictatorships that are smothering local populations, looting national treasuries, and making sure bridges, roads, hospitals and schools are never built. And then beyond that, there is no broader free market economy that actually develops in those countries. CaseyMichel.com Key Takeaways: 1:00 Welcome Casey Michel, writer and investigative journalist, author of AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History 1:56 What is a kleptocracy? 3:49 Kleptocracy is now a transnational phenomenon, closely intertwined with the broader offshoring economy 5:05 The World Summit 7:28 Incentivizing the outflow of suspect wealth from post communist states 8:45 Creating easy access to transnational financial flows 10:33 Private wealth located in global financial secrecy jurisdictions 12:35 The beneficiaries of dynastic wealth have flocked to places within the US 16:07 For every $1 that is given in foreign aid, $3 of untracked, illicit capital leaves those developing countries 17:20 Anti money laundering regulations across a number of industries except the real estate industry 19:13 Billions of illicit foreign money flowing into London real estate 20:00 Broader transnational money laundering scheme in local US communities 22:32 The offshoring world is comparable to a superpower such as the US or China 24:24 The sad state of the media today 26:40 Casey Michel's first book AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History is out now from St. Martin's Press 27:37 Who are the world's biggest money laundering offenders? 29:42 Digital assets, art and money laundering 31:53 Learn more at http://www.caseymichel.com/   Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Learn More: JasonHartman.com Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free course: JasonHartman.com/Deals Free White Paper on The Hartman Comparison Index™: HartmanIndex.com/white-paper Free Report on Pandemic Investing: PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips in Vimeo Free Class: CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: JasonHartman.com/Protect Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: JasonHartman.com/Ron What do Jason's clients say? JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Contact our Investment Counselors at: www.JasonHartman.com Watch, subscribe and comment on Jason's videos on his official YouTube channel: YouTube.com/c/JasonHartmanRealEstate/videos Guided Visualization for Investors: JasonHartman.com/visualization Jason's videos in his other sites: JasonHartman.com/Rumble JasonHartman.com/Bitchute JasonHartman.com/Odysee Jason Hartman's Extra YouTube Channel Jason Hartman's Real Estate News and Technology (RENT) YouTube Channel

Comedy Tragedy Marriage

Paul Newman is an aging minor league hockey coach trying to rally his group of misfit players in a dying Rust Belt town in 1977's “Slap Shot.” --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stan-the-movie-man9/message

Big Bets On Campus
MAC Betting Preview

Big Bets On Campus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 57:46 Transcription Available


The pride and joy of inveterate college football gamblers everywhere, the MAC enters yet another season full of intrigue and betting possibilities. Action Network college football experts Michael Calabrese and Mike Ianniello are joined by Stuckey, the creator of the MAC Manifesto himself, to dive deep into this Rust Belt treasure. Are the Ohio Bobcats live to win the conference? Is this the Akron bouceback season? Just how lucky did the NIU Huskies get last season? All of these questions answered and so much more.

JENerational Change
Jordan Chariton: America Is Broken

JENerational Change

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 111:42


Streamed live on Jul 27, 2022.   Jordan Chariton, founder of Status Coup News, joins us to discuss his recent road trip through the Rust Belt to speak with everyday Americans that have been crushed by our broken economic system.   We'll also be speaking with Allison Miller, candidate for FL State Attorney in Pasco County.   Check out our Patreon for more! ☀️ patreon.com/JENerationalChange  ☀️ WEBSITE: jenerationalchange.com ☀️ TWITTER & INSTAGRAM: @JENFL23

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Larry Summers On Inflation And Mistakes

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 85:05


He’s in the news again this week — after persuading Joe Manchin that the climate and healthcare bill he’s pushing isn’t inflationary. Larry Summers has had a storied career, as the chief economist of the World Bank, the treasury secretary under Clinton, and the director of the National Economic Council under Obama. He also was the president of Harvard University from 2001 to 2006 and remains there as the Charles W. Eliot University Professor. You can listen to the episode right away in the audio player above (or on the right side of the player, click “Listen On” to add the Dishcast feed to your favorite podcast app). For two clips of our convo — on how the US government spent way too little during the Great Recession and way too much during the pandemic, and how we can help the working class cope — pop over to our YouTube page.The episode has a lot of thematic overlap with our recent discussion with David Goodhart, author of Head, Hand, Heart: Why Intelligence Is Over-Rewarded, Manual Workers Matter, and Caregivers Deserve More Respect. Here’s a new transcript. And below is a clip from that episode on how our economy overvalues white-collar brain power:Back to inflation talk, here’s a dissent:I’ve been reading your blog for a little over a year now, and listening to Dishcast, which is great. I’ve noticed a few things, however, that I would like you to perhaps respond to, or at least consider. First, what you refer to as “wokeness” on the left is, I agree, an obnoxious problem that has been exacerbated by social media. But I think your recent guest Francis Fukuyama has it mostly correct in his new book, Liberalism and Its Discontents, when he identifies illiberal trends on the political left as being more of an annoyance, or at the very least, far less of a threat to the republic than illiberal trends on the right. Second, I completely disagree with this rather lazy salvo from you: “Biden’s legacy — an abandonment of his mandate for moderation, soaring inflation, an imminent recession, yet another new war, and woker-than-woke extremism — has only deepened it.” It simply is not the case that Biden has not, especially when forced to, hewed towards moderation. Yes, he is attempting to respond to a leftward shift in the Democratic Party by trying to govern more from the left, but this is simply a reflection of political reality. In addition, much of his agenda has been batted down, but more on that in a moment. Next, inflation and an imminent recession have a lot more to do with what the Fed has done over the last four decades — and definitely since the financial crisis of 2008 — than with Joe Biden. On this theme of a highly financialized economy nearing the end of the neoliberal era, I recommend Rana Foroohar on Ezra Klein’s latest podcast, where she talks about the popping of the “Everything Bubble.” Asset-value inflation, deindustrialization, a perverse focus on shareholder value rather than investing in Main Street or even R&D, and an utter lack of policy solutions, have caused this. In addition, as Foroohar herself says, the changes we need to make in our economy are going to be, in the short-to-medium term, inflationary. This means policymakers have to start making policy that actually helps both people and infrastructure, which means spending money. Unfortunately, the garden has gone untended for so long that we’re teetering on the brink of becoming a really shitty country if we don’t take more aggressive action. In addition, with regard to an upcoming recession, Noah Smith wrote on his Substack recently that Keynesian economics would suggest that a quick recession now in order to stomp out inflation would be better in the long run than milquetoast attempts to curb it by raising interest rates too slowly. The idea is that recessions — especially fast and somewhat shallow ones — can be weathered, but inflation that goes on for too long leaves lasting scars on the economy. (Smith identifies the Volker recessions as probably permanently damaging the Rust Belt.) Personally, what I worry about more on the left is not “woke-ism,” but the trendy socialist/ironic/weird outlets like Jacobin or Chapo Trap House, which seem to be doing their damndest to convince younger, more impressionable and less educated people that the whole country is fucked; it’s designed to be fucked because capitalism is fucked; and only its imminent collapse will allow for problems to be solved through revolution/redistribution. Believe me, that sentiment is becoming a real problem, and the people who buy into it are every bit as ideologically rigid, illiberal, and closed to inquiry as those on the rabid right.Next up, listeners sound off on last week’s episode with Fraser Nelson, the British journalist who sized up the prime minister race. The first comment comes from “a long-time libertarian in Massachusetts”:I’ve been reading the Dish for about a year and finally subscribed thanks to your fascinating interview with Fraser Nelson. I was particularly glad to be alerted to Kemi Badenoch.It’s taken awhile to pull the trigger on subscribing to the Dish because of your Trump bashing, since you sound more like Hillary Clinton than William Buckley. I’m perfectly fine with bashing Trump, but I prefer to see it paired with an acknowledgment of the forces that created him, i.e. the abandonment of the middle class by the two major parties, particularly the Democrats. I do think half the country would lose its mind if Trump runs again, so in that sense I sympathize with your sentiments. But the larger context is essential.Some episodes our listener might appreciate — ones sympathetic to the concerns of middle-class Trump voters — include Michael Anton, Mickey Kaus, Ann Coulter and David French. More on the Fraser Nelson pod:Thank you for an outstanding episode. Nelson has almost persuaded me to take out a Spectator subscription! I thought he summed up eloquently and fairly the state of the Conservative Party, Johnson, Sunak and Truss, and the challenges that lie ahead.Like many Brexiteers — and Nelson half-acknowledges this — the Tories have not grappled with the realities of Brexit. The most obvious lacuna in your discussion was the economy. You cannot leave the EU and not increase the size of the state. You have to have more customs arrangements (as we have recently seen at Dover), more vets, more checks and so on, ad nauseam. It’s all very well for conservatives to argue for a smaller state, but they haven’t defined what that will look like and how the services people use now (education, transport, local government, the legal system etc) will be improved, i.e. funded to a better extent than now. Underfunding is obvious and no amount of arguing “we can do it more efficiently” will cut it — the Tories have had 12 years to fix this.Moreover, picking fights with the EU has meant less investment, reduced business confidence and increased uncertainty — except of course in Northern Ireland, which has access to the single market and where business is booming. Listen to NFU President Minette Batters talk about the issues surrounding Truss’s free trade deals with Australia and New Zealand, or fishermen now dealing with the consequences of Brexit. They were once fans. Not so much now.James Carville once said, “It’s the economy, stupid.” Promising tax cuts now when much of the Western world is likely to enter a recession is ridiculously irresponsible, but hey ho, it’s a political campaign and reality will bite once we have a new prime minister, whoever she is.Also, I look forward to hearing Marina Hyde on the Dishcast!This next listener takes issue with some of my phrasing:I enjoyed the Nelson episode overall! But I have to take issue with a rare faux pas from you, where you said that Rishi Sunak is “himself obviously a globalist, just by his very career and nature.” I can’t really understand how you came to this conclusion. Is anyone who worked overseas for some time a “globalist”? Are you a “globalist” because your moved to America? What about Sunak’s “nature” makes him so?Back in 2016, Sunak supported Brexit, which was seen as the losing bet, despite much pressure from David Cameron. And he has set out very clearly in his leadership campaign that he thinks, for example, we need to be tougher on border control. Neither of these things strike me as globalist, nor a return to the Cameron era.On the other hand, I agree with your characterisation of Truss — who voted Remain before undergoing a miraculous and instantaneous change of heart the day after her side lost — as a “dime-store Thatcher.”Speaking of border control, here’s David Goodhart — also from a British perspective — on why elites favor open borders:One more listener on Fraser pod:As a Spectator subscriber (and Glasgow Uni man), I very much enjoyed Fraser Nelson. Mishearing (I think) at around the 37 minute mark when he seemed to refer to Boris getting a first at Oxford, I was reminded of this fine b****y exchange with David Cameron in the Sunday Times back in the day:Surely Boris has been the man Cameron had to beat, ever since they were at school together. 'This is one of the great myths of politics', says the PM [Cameron]. 'These things grow up and it's so long ago no one challenges them, but I don't think we really knew each other at school, he was a couple of years ahead of me. He was very clever.'Then Cameron explodes into a beaming grin. 'But', he says exultantly. 'Boris didn't get a First! I only discovered that on the Panorama programme the other night... I didn't know that'. He is suddenly lit up, almost punching the air with joy.And in that outburst of public-schoolboy competitiveness — Cameron, of course, did get a First — he reveals everything we've always thought about him.Also, when Boris was described as believing the untrue things he said at the time he said them, I’m reminded of George Costanza’s credo that “it’s not a lie if you believe it!” (which, for a fairly left liberal Tory, you’d perhaps take over a Trump analogy).Lastly, a listener looks to a potential guest:If you wish to continue to mine the vein of the global power landscape, its recent evolution this century, and its implications: Condoleezza Rice. She has an interesting perspective from one whose expertise is Russia and is a past practitioner of American statecraft with Russia and China.Thanks, as always, for the suggestion. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

Garage Heroes In Training
GHIT 0358:  Rally Wrap Up:  The 2022 Rust Belt Ramble

Garage Heroes In Training

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 37:53


GHIT 0358:  Rally Wrap Up:  The 2022 Rust Belt Ramble Rally Master Jeff Stobbs returns to report in live from the awards ceremony of this year's Rust Belt Ramble Rally between Detroit, Buffalo, Cleveland, The year there was a ceremony for dearly departed car makes of the past.  We cover highlights of the trip as well as many of the entries.  We are then joined by Finn, from The Car Farm channel on YouTube.  They entered the rally in their Buick Grand National.  Why is a Buick Grand National on a Lemons Rally.  Listen to find out. One of the highlights from this event is the introduction of the Lemons Rally grill badges.  The badges actually began at the last rally, but we didn't do a good job of interviewing so its new to us.  Lol.  Vicki also gets a few tips on what to do for her first upcoming rally this fall. A link to the episode is: https://tinyurl.com/RustBeltRamble2022 If you would like to help grow our sport and this podcast: Awesome choice #1:  Subscribe to our podcast on the podcast provider of your choice and every episode will show up.  Even Better:  If you could give our podcast a (5-star?) rating Mostest Bestest:  if you would leave a podcast review We really appreciate it. We hope you enjoy this episode! PS  Are you are looking to stream or save your integrated telemetry/racing data with video? Candelaria Racing Products Sentinel System may be the perfect solution for you.  We are in the midst of installing the system in two of our cars.  If this sounds like something that may help you and your team, please use our discount code "GHIT". This will give 10% discount code to all our listeners during the checkout process. PS2  If you are looking to add an Apex Pro to your driving telemetry system, do not forget to use our discount code for all Apex Pro systems.  Please enter the code “ghitlikesapex!”. You will receive a free Windshield Suction Cup Mount for the system, a savings of $40. Vicki, Jennifer, Ben, Alan, Jeremy, and Bill Hosts and Drivers for the Garage Heroes In Training team   The Car Farm can be found on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCarFarm 

The Hatchards Podcast
Tess Gunty

The Hatchards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 36:27


The latest installment of the Hatchards Podcast is a global affair, recorded variously in Los Angeles, Paris, and North London and featuring our guest Tess Gunty, author of the phenomenal debut novel, The Rabbit Hutch.Set over three sweltering July days in the fictional town of Vacca Vale in the American rust belt, the novel revolves around the residents of ‘The Rabbit Hutch', a dilapidated housing complex that is home to a motley mix of the Midwest's forgotten and forlorn: damaged teens struggling to deal with the legacy of foster home abuse; an elderly couple besieged by falling rodents; a lonely online obituary editor; and Blandine Watkins, the heroine of the story and its unforgettable central character, upon whom a shocking act of violence is both the beginning and the culmination of this novel.We spoke to Tess about the inspiration for the spellbinding Blandine; the influence of the German mystic, Hildegard of Bingen; the plight of real-life midwestern towns abandoned by the political class; and her own background in the Vacca Vale-esque South Bend, Indiana. Ryan also squeezed in the obligatory film reference in the form of a question about Harmony Korine.

The Josh Boone Show
#23: John Heers – Sacrifice, Spirituality & Old World Wisdom

The Josh Boone Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 139:03


John Heers is the Co-Founder and Director of the First Things Foundation, and the host of the podcast, Why Are We Talking About Rabbits?  The First Things Foundation is a non-profit organization that takes young people from the “new world” of the West to the “old world” of developing countries where they immerse, learn the language, and connect with local entrepreneurs and helps empower them to spur organic, ground-up development in their communities. They have active projects in Guatemala, Sierra Leone, the Georgia Republic, Ethiopia, and Appalachia near and dear to me here in the Rust Belt of the United States. John has a Master's Degree in History from Columbia University. Previous to First Things Foundation, John worked overseas serving the Peace Corps as a water resource manager in Mali, oversaw emergency relief in the Georgian Republic, and taught history for 9 years in South Bronx and Harlem in New York City and Haiti.  In our conversation we dive into:The global response to COVIDMetaphysics, spirituality, and secularismWealth inequalityCorruption in the non-profit worldPsychedelics and simulation theoryNihilism, and spiritual versus the material worldLoneliness and the opioid epidemicCommunity, and extreme povertyDemocracy and revolutionThe declining health of western cultureHow technology may make or break our future Connect with John:Website: First-Things.orgInstagram: @firstthingsfoundationPodcast: Why Are We Talking About Rabbits? Music by Kirby Johnston – check out his band Aldaraia on Spotify

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Daily Signal Podcast: Former Trump Adviser Warns Against Ravages of Globalism

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022


In the wake of globalization, the industrial base of the country has been hollowed out. Booming towns throughout the Rust Belt began to hemorrhage residents as jobs dried up and were shipped overseas. Americans are beginning to seriously question whether the decision to send manufacturing overseas was worth it. Paige Willey, a former adviser to […]

Daily Signal News
Former Trump Adviser Warns Against Ravages of Globalism

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 23:49


In the wake of globalization, the industrial base of the country has been hollowed out. Booming towns throughout the Rust Belt began to hemorrhage residents as jobs dried up and were shipped overseas.Americans are beginning to seriously question whether the decision to send manufacturing overseas was worth it.Paige Willey, a former adviser to then-President Donald Trump and host of the “This Is Your Country” podcast, joins the show to discuss how globalism has ravaged America, and what can be done to counter it.We also cover these stories:The Labor Department reports inflation rose to a whopping annual rate of 9.1% in June, the highest rate in nearly 41 years.An Austin, Texas, newspaper releases portions of school surveillance footage showing law enforcement officers retreating from gunfire in the hallways of an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, during a May mass shooting.Louisiana state District Judge Donald Johnson temporary enjoins a state law banning most abortions in the state pending a lawsuit challenging the legislation.Citing safety concerns for staff and customers, Starbucks announces it plans to close 16 of its coffee shops across the country. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pinstripe Alley: for New York Yankees fans
Pinstripe Alley Podcast Ep. 161: Ups & Downs in the Rust Belt

Pinstripe Alley: for New York Yankees fans

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 46:40


It was a bit of an odd week for the Yankees, who sandwiched two days of clobbering -- 19 runs in a doubleheader on Saturday in Cleveland, and a 16-0 win last night in Pittsburgh -- between some very quiet performances at the plate. This has been a bit of a recurring trend for the lineup since mid-June, though they've remained at the top of the MLB standings with a 59-23 record as of the start of play on Thursday. Andrew and Kunj talk all things Yankees, from those past couple series to the mini-resurgence from Aaron Hicks and and all the lows of Joey Gallo (sigh) and the recently-slumping Jameson Taillon. There's also plenty of discussion on Aaron Judge, homers allowed by the rotation, concerns about Aroldis Chapman's return, Ron Marinaccio's injury, and the regular B-Ref leaderboard update + Yankee/Manfred of the Week. You might be surprised about Kunj's pick! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Jet Setter Show
140: AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History | Casey Michel

Jet Setter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 33:22


Jason Hartman invites Casey Michel, author and investigative journalist, to speak about his new book which uncovers how the US has created the greatest money laundering scheme in history. South Dakota has pioneered an entire industry of what they call anonymous trusts. South Dakota has taken this to a magnitude we've never seen by creating perpetual anonymity for these trusts. The information of those in the trust will never be shared with governments, with other jurisdictions, tax authorities, investigators, which is why we've seen both Americans and non Americans flocking to South Dakota. $900 billion is the top line estimate in South Dakota, but it's still a question of how many total assets are actually there, who those assets are connected to and what those assets are actually doing after they pass through all the anonymity that the state of South Dakota freely offers. Casey Michel's book also talks about illicit foreign money purchasing steel mills, factories and manufacturing plants in places like Cleveland, Ohio, the Rust Belt and the Midwest. They're not revitalizing local communities and bringing jobs back, but rather using those assets to hold and hide funds, using them as part of a broader transnational money laundering scheme. And so what ends up happening is that not only do the jobs never come back, the folks who have the remaining jobs are just laid off, the factories begin falling apart and it's clear they are never going to come back. These local communities in places such as West Virginia, Kentucky, Texas and Illinois are seeing their economic crown jewels go to complete rot because of this system of kleptocracy. Towards the end of the broader Cold War period, one could see a sudden surge in the creation of financial secrecy pools and broader economic structuring that incentivized the outflow of illicit suspect wealth from post communist states. These states are linked directly to rising oligarchies and dictatorships that are smothering local populations, looting national treasuries, and making sure bridges, roads, hospitals and schools are never built. And then beyond that, there is no broader free market economy that actually develops in those countries. http://www.caseymichel.com/ Watch the video HERE. Key Takeaways: 0:49 Welcome Casey Michel, writer and investigative journalist, author of AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History 1:28 What is a kleptocracy? 3:21 Kleptocracy is now a transnational phenomenon, closely intertwined with the broader offshoring economy 4:37 The World Summit 7:00 Incentivizing the outflow of suspect wealth from post communist states 8:17 Creating easy access to transnational financial flows 10:07 Private wealth located in global financial secrecy jurisdictions 12:07 The beneficiaries of dynastic wealth have flocked to places within the US 15:39 For every $1 that is given in foreign aid, $3 of untracked, illicit capital leaves those developing countries 16:52 Anti money laundering regulations across a number of industries except the real estate industry 18:45 Billions of illicit foreign money flowing into London real estate 19:32 Broader transnational money laundering scheme in local US communities 22:04 The offshoring world is comparable to a superpower such as the US or China 23:58 The sad state of the media today 26:12 Casey Michel's first book AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History is out now from St. Martin's Press 27:09 Who are the world's biggest money laundering offenders? 29:14 Digital assets, art and money laundering 31:25 Learn more at http://www.caseymichel.com/   Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Learn More: JasonHartman.com Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free course: JasonHartman.com/Deals Free White Paper on The Hartman Comparison Index™: HartmanIndex.com/white-paper Free Report on Pandemic Investing: PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips in Vimeo Free Class: CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: JasonHartman.com/Protect Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: JasonHartman.com/Ron What do Jason's clients say? JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Contact our Investment Counselors at: www.JasonHartman.com Watch, subscribe and comment on Jason's videos on his official YouTube channel: YouTube.com/c/JasonHartmanRealEstate/videos Guided Visualization for Investors: JasonHartman.com/visualization Jason's videos in his other sites: JasonHartman.com/Rumble JasonHartman.com/Bitchute JasonHartman.com/Odysee Jason Hartman's Extra YouTube Channel Jason Hartman's Real Estate News and Technology (RENT) YouTube Channel

Sea Control
Sea Control 354 - Sub Shipyards for Northern Ohio with CAPT Edward Bartlett

Sea Control

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 35:12


The Bartlett Maritime Corporation intends to build a brand-new naval repair depot and submarine construction support facility, alongside potential repair shipyards in Lordstown and Lorain, Ohio. The ambitious project would build and use Oceangoing Transit Carriers to transport new submarine sub-modules and, eventually, complete submarines through the St. Lawrence Seaway. Host Matthew Hipple discusses the Lordstown-Lorain project w/ its entrepreneurial architect, CAPT Edward Bartlett. Relying on Ohio's industrial revenue bond program and the Navy's facility lease-purchase program, this public-private partnership would mobilize Unions, governments, school, and businesses across Northern Ohio. The financial mechanisms employed would eventually transfer ownership to the Navy of vital new industrial facilities and support craft deep w/in the Rust Belt, where skilled industrial labor is plentiful.

The Chris & Sandy Show
The Chris & Sandy Show With Country Artist Justin Fabus

The Chris & Sandy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 46:30


We had a great conversation with Justin Fabus on The Chris & Sandy Show. We talked about so many things from family, music, sacrifices, he told some great stories to a whole lot more! The story on how 1 tweet got him on stage at PPG Paints Arena during the Pittsburgh stop of New Kids On The Block's Mixtape Tour was amazing! As you watch, you'll see how and why he turned a NKOTB song into a country song!Since introducing himself in 2016, that Rust Belt work ethic has propelled him to unbelievable heights. He launched three successive projects on the iTunes Country Albums Chart with Remedy hitting #49, Shelter From The Storm reaching #25 and his latest, The Aftermath, reaching #2. The Aftermath also reached #11 on the iTunes Overall Top Albums Chart. During 2019, Donnie Wahlberg even recruited Justin to take the stage at PPG Paints Arena during the Pittsburgh stop of New Kids On The Block's Mixtape Tour. Along the way, he also shared bills with Garry Allan, Randy Houser, and Craig Campbell in addition to packing headline shows. In the face of the Global Pandemic, he remained prolific throughout 2020. His Shelter From The Storm EP peaked in the Top 25 of the iTunes Top Country Albums Chart propelled by fan favorites such as “Somebody Like You,” which he co-wrote with GRAMMY® Award-winning legend Richard Marx.However, he only picked up the pace in 2021 with The Aftermath EP, threading together elements of country, rock, pop, and soul. Its lead single “Run” with Chapel Hart helped propel the EP to #2 on the iTunes Top Country Albums Chart.Next up, the new single "Dead in The Water" will be released July 8th.

Caixin Global Podcasts
China Stories: Coal, Once a Boon, Turns Chinese Rustbelt City Into a Bust

Caixin Global Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 22:29


As the golden years of mining fade, the resource-depleted city of Hegang is struggling to survive. Read the article by Cheng Siwei and Zhang Yukun: https://www.caixinglobal.com/2022-05-10/in-depth-coal-once-a-boon-turns-chinese-rustbelt-city-into-a-bust-101883185.html Narrated by Cliff Larsen.

Rust Belt Running
Episode 145 - Team Rust Belt Running

Rust Belt Running

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 58:04


This week, the boys discuss Andrew's lit weekend. Champagne, race spectating and pacing, and friends. The Women's 6k Championship in Canton was worthy of much discussion, as we welcomed the American Women's Marathon Record Holder Keira D'Amato to the streets. The surprise of Aliphine Tuliamuk took everyone by surprise as well. Our advice - Drink mimosas when you spectate races.... then go run miles at a different race (not actually recommended). The real excitement in this episode is the launching of Team Rust Belt Running. Adam and Andrew have worked tirelessly to launch their own run coaching business. Aimed at bringing individuals success in their running journeys, the boys talk about what it took to get to this point and how they can help you in your journey. Check out RustBeltRunning.com to learn more or apply! Enjoy your miles!

Sweet'N Up with Jeff Spencer
Episode #94 with Zamir Gotta

Sweet'N Up with Jeff Spencer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 62:58


Iazamir "Zamir" Gotta is a producer, TV Personality, Independent Filmmaker, and Peacemaker. He is best known as the traveling companion of the late American chef Anthony Bourdain in his Travel Channel TV show Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations, when they traveled to Uzbekistan, Russia and Romania and later in the U.S. Rust Belt, Ukraine, and Kansas City. Gotta also accompanied Bourdain in Batumi, during Bourdain's subsequent series, Parts Unknown on CNN.

China Stories
[Caixin Global] Coal, once a boon, turns Chinese rustbelt city into a bust

China Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 22:07


As the golden years of mining fade, the resource-depleted city of Hegang is struggling to survive.Read the article by Cheng Siwei and Zhang Yukun: https://www.caixinglobal.com/2022-05-10/in-depth-coal-once-a-boon-turns-chinese-rustbelt-city-into-a-bust-101883185.htmlNarrated by Cliff Larsen.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Broken Boxes Podcast
On The Other Side Of Time: Conversation with Evan Starling-Davis

Broken Boxes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022


In this episode we hear from New York-based narrative artist, producer, and curator Evan Starling-Davis who excavates the everyday stories pushed beneath the margins of our society. Navigating his lens as a Black and queer digital-age griot, Evan's work breaches the hard facts, personal truths, and surreal realities we bury ourselves in. His artistic practice is situated within art immersion, mindfulness pedagogy, and experiential technology, and is heavily guided by the Black Speculative Arts Movement (Afrosurrealism and Afrofuturism specifically). Evan Starling-Davis is in conversation with artist Cannupa Hanska Luger who is a recurring host with Broken Boxes and who often accesses speculative fiction in his practice from the perspective of an Indigenous person of the Great Plains of North America. This episode was recorded at Colgate University in Hamilton New York as a part of a recent artist residency. Special thanks to Nick West, Curator of Picker Art Gallery for the introductions to Evan Starling-Davis and for organizing a studio on campus to record this conversation. Artist Bio: Evan Starling-Davis is a New York-based narrative artist, producer, and curator, excavating the everyday stories pushed beneath the margins of our society. Navigating his lens as a Black and queer digital-age griot, Evan's work breaches the hard facts, personal truths, and surreal realities we bury ourselves in. A doctoral candidate of Literacy Education at Syracuse University with a focus in extended reality (XR) technology, Starling-Davis researches and facilitates arts-based literacy and social justice projects and interventions for Black communities in the US. His artistic practice is situated within art immersion, mindfulness pedagogy, and experiential technology, and is heavily guided by the Black Speculative Arts Movement (Afrosurrealism and Afrofuturism specifically). To create new pathways for Black imagination and media literacy to flourish, Evan combines motivational design, multimedia arts, and immersive technology in striking new ways. Exploring immersive technologies as tools of healing (such as virtual, augmented, and mixed-reality) his most recent project, Hidden Fragments Breathing, models the radical potential immersive art exposure has to transform literacy in Black communities across the Rust Belt. As a curator with meticulous attention-to-detail, Starling-Davis has managed public humanities projects and community-based art experiences from conception to completion. His interdisciplinary projects have been featured in art galleries, museums, and theaters internationally. More recently, he has been selected as a 2020-2021 Humanities NY Public Humanities Fellow, a 2019-2020 Louise B. and Bernard G. Palitz Art Scholar, and a 2018-2019 Syracuse University McKean Scholar. Music Featured: Saffron by MF DOOM from Metal Fingers Presents: Special Herbs Vol. 1 & 2

Play with Pain: Chet Waterhouse

The hilarious Jackie Kashian and I dissect our Rust Belt adolescence and then tackle some comedy And of course, the Kilmartin Connection Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1844: American Kleptocracy: Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History - Casey Michel, Wholesaling Workshop In Jacksonville

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 44:14


Jason Hartman invites Casey Michel, author and investigative journalist, to speak about his new book which uncovers how the US has created the greatest money laundering scheme in history. But before that, join Jason at the Wholesaling Mentoring program in Jacksonville, Florida! South Dakota has pioneered an entire industry of what they call anonymous trusts. South Dakota has taken this to a magnitude we've never seen by creating perpetual anonymity for these trusts. The information of those in the trust will never be shared with governments, with other jurisdictions, tax authorities, investigators, which is why we've seen both Americans and non Americans flocking to South Dakota. $900 billion is the top line estimate in South Dakota, but it's still a question of how many total assets are actually there, who those assets are connected to and what those assets are actually doing after they pass through all the anonymity that the state of South Dakota freely offers. Casey Michel's book also talks about illicit foreign money purchasing steel mills, factories and manufacturing plants in places like Cleveland, Ohio, the Rust Belt and the Midwest. They're not revitalizing local communities and bringing jobs back, but rather using those assets to hold and hide funds, using them as part of a broader transnational money laundering scheme. And so what ends up happening is that not only do the jobs never come back, the folks who have the remaining jobs are just laid off, the factories begin falling apart and it's clear they are never going to come back. These local communities in places such as West Virginia, Kentucky, Texas and Illinois are seeing their economic crown jewels go to complete rot because of this system of kleptocracy. Towards the end of the broader Cold War period, one could see a sudden surge in the creation of financial secrecy pools and broader economic structuring that incentivized the outflow of illicit suspect wealth from post communist states. These states are linked directly to rising oligarchies and dictatorships that are smothering local populations, looting national treasuries, and making sure bridges, roads, hospitals and schools are never built. And then beyond that, there is no broader free market economy that actually develops in those countries. http://www.caseymichel.com/ Key Takeaways: Jason's editorial 1:03 Introducing American Kleptocracy 3:32 Kleptocracy and Nancy, the worlds best investor 5:01 Join Jason at the Wholesaling Mentoring program. Go to JasonHartman.com/Wholesale 6:06 Winners of the $50 Amazon gift card weekly raffle have 30 days to claim your prize. JasonHartman.com/Ask Casey Michel Interview 6:30 Welcome Casey Michel, writer and investigative journalist, author of AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History 7:11 What is a kleptocracy? 8:41 Kleptocracy is now a transnational phenomenon, closely intertwined with the broader offshoring economy 9:47 The World Summit 12:10 Incentivizing the outflow of suspect wealth from post communist states 15:15 Private wealth located in global financial secrecy jurisdictions 17:17 The beneficiaries of dynastic wealth have flocked to places within the US 20:32 For every $1 that is given in foreign aid, $3 of untracked, illicit capital leaves those developing countries 21:35 Anti-money laundering regulations across a number of industries except the real estate industry 22:08 Billions of illicit foreign money flowing into London real estate 22:06 25:19 The offshoring world is comparable to a superpower such as the US or China, The sad state of the media today 29:27 Casey Michel's first book AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY is out now from St. Martin's Press, Who are the world's biggest money laundering offenders? 34:40 Learn more at http://www.caseymichel.com/ Tweetables: "Power corrupts; and absolute power corrupts absolutely" - Lord Acton   Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN https://twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI https://www.instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/   Learn More: https://www.jasonhartman.com/   Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free course: JasonHartman.com/Deals   Free White Paper on The Hartman Comparison Index™: https://www.hartmanindex.com/white-paper   Free Report on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172 Free Class: CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect Special Offer from Ron LeGrand:  https://JasonHartman.com/Ron What do Jason's clients say?  http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Contact our Investment Counselors at: www.JasonHartman.com Watch, subscribe and comment on Jason's videos on his official YouTube channel: YouTube.com/c/JasonHartmanRealEstate/videos Guided Visualization for Investors: JasonHartman.com/visualization Jason's videos in his other sites: JasonHartman.com/Rumble JasonHartman.com/Bitchute JasonHartman.com/Odysee   Jason Hartman Extra: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0qQ…   Real Estate News and Technology: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPSy…

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 34 – Not Even Covid Could Change Her Mindset with Lisa Thee

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 69:28


Lisa Thee is a consultant to some of the world's most innovative healthcare and global technology companies including Microsoft and UCSF's Center for Digital Healthcare Innovation. She is the co-Founder of Minor Guard, an Artificial Intelligence software company focused on making people safer online and in real life. A staunch advocate for the protection of children Lisa is unstoppable in her efforts in protecting children, and in fact families, from online bullies and criminals.   You will get to hear this week about this incredible and unstoppable woman. We will get to share many of her experiences including how she has been forced to deal with the effects of Covid-19 and how she continues to move forward today. She will even tell us about how her registered emotional support dog helps her continue to do the work she began many years ago. You can't help but be inspired and motivated by what Lisa does and how she lives her life. About the Guest:   Lisa Thee is a Top 50 Global Thought Leader for AI, Privacy, and Safety with demonstrated experience in delivering revenue and solving complex business technology, governance, privacy and risk challenges at scale.   Ms. Thee is a consultant to some of the world's most innovative healthcare, and global technology companies including Microsoft and UCSF's Center for Digital Healthcare Innovation to accelerate FDA approval for AI use in clinical settings. She is the CEO and Co-Founder of Minor Guard, an Artificial Intelligence software company focused on making people safer online and in real life.  She is a keynote speaker including her TEDx talk “Bringing Light to Dark Places Online: Disrupting Human Trafficking Using AI.” She hosts the Navigating Forward Podcast. She has been named to the 2021 Top Health and Safety, Privacy, and AI Thought Leaders and Influencers and Women in Business you should follow by Thinkers 360. She was recently named to the 2022 “Top 100 Brilliant Women in AI Ethics” global list.   https://lisathee.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisathee/     About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:22 Hi, and welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. We're glad you're here, wherever you are. And we hope that you will enjoy us this week, we have a kind of a really interesting person, kind of she absolutely is an interesting person and some good stories to tell. And I'm sure we're going to have a lot of fun in our discussions. Today we'll talk about AI, we're going to talk about a lot of things related to health care and disabilities and other things. So I'd like you all to meet Lisa v. And I assume you want me to refer to you that way.   Lisa Thee  01:54 Yes, that's great. Hi, everyone. My name is Lisa Thi and I am the data for good practice sector lead at launch Consulting Group.   Michael Hingson  02:04 And so why don't you tell us a little bit about kind of you younger and bring us up to date and how you got where you are today.   Lisa Thee  02:14 Yeah, I grew up in the Midwest. And kind of what people might consider the dress, the Rust Belt these days of Detroit, and studied engineering in school, and came out west to California after graduation and worked in the tech industry for 18 years before I retired as a director at Intel, and their hybrid cloud group and went off to do my own company for as AI software startup, called minor guard and have been working in the entrepreneurship innovation space, in consulting, Keynote, speaking and advising for the past few years now.   Michael Hingson  02:53 So what did you exactly do it Intel?   Lisa Thee  02:56 Oh, goodness, and also one of those awesome places where you get to try a lot of things. So in the decade that I worked there, I worked in different groups, from supply chain planning, to marketing to it to business development, and ultimately leading their AI solution group working on new applications for AI to improve things in society.   Michael Hingson  03:18 So Intel being very much a chip manufacturer and so on. How does AI get into that in terms of why why did they do that?   Lisa Thee  03:29 Yeah. So when you have a chip manufacturing company, the way that you increase your available market is to increase increased consumption of compute. So that could be through cloud providers that could be through personal computers, it can be through gaming, lots of different applications. So one of the ways that AI really benefits Intel as a company is by increasing utilization and solving bigger and hear your problems. So whether you're buying compute space in Google, or Amazon, or Microsoft, all of those, all those roads lead back to Intel, because they're providing the chips for the cloud infrastructure.   Michael Hingson  04:07 So at some point, maybe we'll find a significant amount of AI on chips. And of course, you've got people like Ray Kurzweil who talk about the singularity, and discuss the time when, well, what we're calling AI or computer intelligence, and human intelligence, Mary and M become all part of the same brain.   Lisa Thee  04:28 Absolutely. And in fact, it was hard to wear enabled AI solutions that launched me from being a corporate citizen, to an entrepreneur in my 40s when the iPhone 10 launched, I got a call from a colleague of mine from Apple, and he shared with me that he was no longer under NDA. And he thought we could do a lot in terms of prevention of child abuse online by identifying issues on the chip itself on the phone before they got saved to the cloud. And so that's what launched our company minor guard where we go Because on improving online safety for kids, online and in real life together by leveraging AI and nudity detection, to make sure that they weren't making 30 site decisions that were ruining the rest of their lives.   Michael Hingson  05:15 So I'd love to learn more about that. What? What did you all create? And what how does it work? And what does it do?   Lisa Thee  05:22 Yeah, so today, our technology inspired some of the changes that Apple made and iOS, when we started our journey, it took 130 unique decisions to block your child from taking a nudey kitty photo, that is illegal content and technically a felony. Today, it only takes a single choice, if you have a family iOS account, and you identify your child is using that device. So we help them to see the opportunity to really focus on safety in a way that was frictionless and allowed kids to be kids and make mistakes, but hopefully not the kinds of mistakes that will follow them for decades to come.   Michael Hingson  06:04 How does AI enter into that? I mean, if you would think I can just push a button and my child won't be able to access the site anymore. Where do they I get into that?   Lisa Thee  06:15 Yeah, so most apps today are end to end encrypted. So there's not a lot of visibility on the device, once you're in App if you're on a tic tac, or you're on a Snapchat or any of those popular social apps. And so we knew we needed to do it at a device level. Because once it was in the app and software, there was no way to make sure what what was happening. So when Apple you got to the generation with the iPhone 10. And beyond, they had an AI accelerator chip in the phone that allowed for facial recognition to unlock the phone. And by having that AI accelerator on the device that opened up the window to be able to do some detection on the device before you saved, saved it to the cloud. To make sure that before it got into an encrypted vault, you can make sure that a child isn't doing something that's illegal, and will possibly honeypot them for perpetrators.   Michael Hingson  07:08 So what does so let's say somebody takes a kiddie porn picture. What does ai do?   Lisa Thee  07:17 It identifies that the device is registered to a child through iOS, and identifies that image is explicit, and it blocks that image from ever being saved to the device. And secondly, to check what somebody sends them, it's going to prevent your child from taking their own content, because we learned through the process of working through this challenge with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children who is the nationwide clearinghouse for all reports of child sexual abuse material online. For tech companies, the public and law enforcement, that 40% of these images are actually taken by children themselves. They're often groomed or influenced by others to make a bad choice. And they don't really realize the stakes that they're entering when they move from being a regular kid to being somebody that has now created and distributed Child Sexual Abuse material, which is a felony.   Michael Hingson  08:15 And we're making any kind of progress on going the other way, which is people sending pictures to a child.   Lisa Thee  08:22 Yes, I think safety, that is harder. It is. So in my day job, I work with some of the leading thought leaders at the big tech companies in this space. I think there's a very large desire to make sure that the policy groups and the legal teams that are setting the terms of service to align with all the regulations internationally, have better tools were the operators that are trying to moderate that content, to be able to identify it and get it off of platforms. It is definitely a threat to every business owner to be hosting illegal content. I don't think anybody wants it there. It's an industry wide challenge. But unfortunately, criminals don't usually play by the rules, they intentionally find the places where they can break them. And so that's where I think AI comes in as a great complement to the humans, where AI can do what it does particularly well with just pattern recognition, tactical reordering of things to make it easier to process extremely large volumes of data. And make sure that the right things are in front of the moderators at the right time to get the most egregious acts off of the internet as fast as possible.   Michael Hingson  09:30 So they're they're always pictures and things like that. But what about bullying and those sorts of things where it's perhaps a lot more textual and so on, does aI have yet any real influence on dealing with that kind of situation bullying and such?   Lisa Thee  09:46 Absolutely as as much advancement as we saw on the video and photo side of AI. In the last 10 years, there's a whole new renaissance around natural language processing speeds typically around being able to use AI to detect things in context. So one of the companies that I advice for that I'm really passionate about is spectrum labs, because they are taking over 40 international languages and being able to apply models that are uniquely trained to identify 40 Different abuse types. So whether that be cyber bullying, whether that be Daxing, whether that be human trafficking, they can pick up the signals in the noise, and help moderators to take action on accounts that are problematic and creating harm across the platforms. So I'm really excited about their tech because I've been under the hood of most of these solutions. And I do know that they're able to do things in multi language that are unprecedented. And so that's why I chose to back behind them. I also have some experience working at a business to consumer products called bark technologies. And bark is really focused on parents being able to moderate their own children's communications on social media applications, I know that when mine get old enough, I will definitely be using their product. Because there is a big difference between somebody saying, I just tripped in front of that girl, I like I want to kill myself, and my life is meaningless. I want to kill myself, and having AI help bring the right alert at the right time can change the trajectory of a person's life. And I've seen that many times over. Because it's really connection and humans that help to intervene when things get dark. It's not going to be technology, but sometimes you don't know until you get an alert that they need special attention.   Michael Hingson  11:44 Course Gaia, somebody trips in front of a girl that he really likes, what we need to do is to send a message saying you got to call this guy he's really embarrassed.   Lisa Thee  11:55 Yeah, that one is recoverable. But when you are mentioning things like time, and your conflict that we know that they're significantly more likely to take action on that feeling, because they've been researching how to do it. And so you know, I am, I am definitely somebody who learned a lot of mistakes the hard way through hard knocks. And I'm grateful that I grew up in a generation where you could make a lot of mistakes, and it wasn't in the public domain for the rest of your lives. But unfortunately, for this generation, that's just not the case. And so they do a lot more typing than talking. And so when you can use technology to that, and especially AI to make sure that you can give them as much privacy as humanly possible. Well, getting the signal from the noise of something is really going from an affordable mistake to a life altering one. I'm really passionate about that. So I think Burke on the consumer side spectrum on the business side are really the leading folks that I see that can really help with this problem.   Michael Hingson  12:53 I think you bring up a really interesting issue, which is, as you said, there's a lot more typing than talking today, and I go back generations before you. And I remember growing up, I'm sure I was an oddity, but I wasn't really bullied, we didn't have internet at all, in the time that I was growing up. And I don't I don't think that we had nearly as much bullying as is appeared later. Or at least if we did, it wasn't talked about very much. And there was no social media. But But you are right people type today a whole lot more. How do we get people back to interacting with each other? I read an article, I think last year in the New York Times about the art of conversation has has died or is is not much in existence anymore. And that was all at that time discussing how politicians were treating things, but still, it also involved how they were treating and how other people started treating each other and not conversing, not talking and not sharing ideas and trying to find commonality. How do we deal with that?   Lisa Thee  14:11 It's a really good question. I wish I I wish I knew the full answer, there's a few things that come to mind. The first is that empathy is a very slow dobro skill that requires a lot of face to face communication. And in a lot of cases, this generation just isn't having as much opportunity to see the impact of their words, and how they can affect other people. So I think it allows them under the veil of anonymity online to speak to people in ways they wouldn't in real life. And I think that extends to adults as well. So I think a lot of it is really seeing the impact of your words and connecting back with that humanity piece. And the second piece I wanted to mention was really around the areas of cyber bullying and what does that like versus maybe what some of us who are in older generations experienced bullying is not new. No I do think that the 24 by seven never able to get away from it is. So you may 20 years ago, when I was graduating from college, you, you may have had a bad experience. And people may have been really mean to you when you're at school, for example, but you could come back to your apartment and just be separated from it, and have a little bit of a break and a respite and to be around people that were maybe more positive in your life, maybe that's your family, and maybe it's your friends. But you could you could get a break from it. Today's generations, they are scared to go to sleep, because they want to know what's being said about them at two in the morning. And I can relate in a small way. I mean, when I made a mistake, when I make a mistake at work, for example. I know I'm looking for that email from my manager or my client saying that it's okay. And we'll be alright. And this is how we're going to fix it. And when I have, I don't have that reassurance or that connection that it's going to be okay, and people are bombarding me with messages about what a problem this is. Now, I certainly feel anxious, I don't think there's any solution for that human condition. So I actually have a lot of empathy for growing up these days, they don't have a lot of room to make mistakes and, and grow from them. And realistically, I don't think humans are much different than computers, they learn much more from their mistakes on their successes. And that's how we advance AI is all the failures. And I think that's how humans learn as well.   Michael Hingson  16:34 Well, I think that's right. It's not just you learn from your failures in ai, ai, you learn from your challenges, your failures, as you said, much more than your successes in real life, just because the mistakes and the frustrations stay with your consciousness longer. Oh, I did that really? Well. Great. And then you move on, oh, my gosh, I screwed up. What? What is that going to do to me, and it's not anything new to have those kinds of feelings. But we do have today, such a much easier advice environment, on the parts of so many of us to ignore dealing with it, like you said, you wait for that email, and somebody doesn't take the time to say it to you to send you the email because they're off now doing other things. Whereas in the past, things were done much more face to face.   Lisa Thee  17:28 Yeah, you have much more real time feedback. And yet, you didn't have an eyes on culture, like work ended at a certain time. And I think there's been a lot of studies post pandemic that as we've shifted to a more virtual work environment, people aren't really having a hard time guarding their time at both ends of the day. Now in a way that wasn't as big of a problem when we had commutes. And when we had a lot more face time.   Michael Hingson  17:52 I have heard many times the joke about people, kids in the back of of cars, parents are driving in two kids sitting next to each other. And they're texting back and forth rather than talking. And I've actually seen that I've been in vehicles where they do that. And to me, it's just hard to fathom. Why don't you just talk to each other?   Lisa Thee  18:15 Privacy? They don't want the adults to hear it. Right? Yeah, that's true. Yeah. When you, when you put yourselves in the shoes of a digital native, they just they've had so much more access to information than we did so much younger, they have a lot more complexities to manage through in terms of social structures and growing up, and everything's public. So I can understand wanting to keep something between a couple of people because it's not so easy to do anywhere else in their lives.   Michael Hingson  18:47 Right. The other side of it is that I think to some degree in the past, when a family was in a car, and people were sort of forced to talk to each other, it did help invoke a better and higher level of trust than just keeping things private. Oh, I don't want them to know, because I can't trust them. So we've we've lost some of that trust that we used to have, it seems to me, I may be misinterpreting. But that's kind of what it seems.   Lisa Thee  19:16 Yeah. For me, what I've observed is we're making trust a problem for families and consumers and individuals versus looking at it at a societal and platform level. And I'm really hopeful as we come out of 2022 that we start to get more regulation around was expected from platforms to keep kids and families safer. I don't think this should be a consumer problem. I think this is a legacy of, you know, the growth of social and mobile and cloud that we've seen over the last 20 years. When we looked at regulating this industry 20 years ago. We just couldn't have envisioned the law So we live today. And you know, going into this whole Metaverse of web app three dot O generation, I think we have a lot more people online, we have a lot more opportunities for harm, as they're interacting with each other as building community has gotten so much easier. And it's time for us to be thinking through policies like we do with cybersecurity. On the digital safety side, that's where I'd like to see trust grow by having a level playing field for all the innovative startups all the way through to the large, multinational corporations. What we all agree is just off limits. I think today, there's just too much gray zone,   Michael Hingson  20:39 it seems to me that a lot of that is going to have to be done within the industry, because the politicians are so divided. They won't agree or do anything with it you had for four years, one party in power, who was just from their political stance against regulation doesn't matter what it is. And now we have a different party in power. But still, the people who don't want regulation or who say they don't want regulation, that's part of the interesting thing. It seems to be part of the time, what we're seeing are people just oppose each other just to oppose each other, rather than dealing with doing the right thing.   Lisa Thee  21:20 Yeah, for me, what I can say about this is I don't usually get the call until it got pretty bad. And trust me, the things that I get involved in, these are not tweener situations, right when the victim is six, or under which by the way, 56% of victims of child sexual abuse material are whose privacy is more important, the adult that's trying to consume that for entertainment value, or the crime scene victim who's having their images consumed for the pleasure of adults, I think the privacy in the regulation needs to fall a lot more on protecting our legacy and our next generations and protecting people's rights. And if people really understood the level of severity of what's being searched for and how an invasive the technology has to do it, it's very lightweight, just like a spam filter, I think there would be a lot less opposed to regulations. I think I wish that we could get better at helping people understand that if you really want privacy fully, you need to make sure that you turn off all of your spam filters to right like we're willing to make trade offs for privacy to not get attacked by criminals. Why would children not deserve the right to be able to use very labor? Wait hash matching technology that is not invasive? It's not going through your emails, personally, it's looking for picture matches for reported crimes, things like that. without even opening your stuff. I think if people really understood what we were talking about at that level, there would be a lot less gerrymandering happening in politics.   Michael Hingson  22:56 How do we deal with that? How do we make that happen? How do we get people to understand? And I guess that's really getting back to the whole issue of we're so polarized today. How do we break this logjam?   Lisa Thee  23:09 I would love to say that I have an answer. In 2021, I did a TED talk on the topic and started a petition to try to get some of the Department of Justice recommendations into the regulatory bodies for communication Decency Act 230 revisions, they, they did interviews with industry leaders and advocates for victims and the NGOs that do best in breed and came up with some very comprehensive and very rational guardrails that we could be adhering to. And I really hope that as Europe and the US are looking at some of these new bills, we don't get pulled to the to either side of all the things we disagree about, but we've had something we can all come together on. Unfortunately, I don't think that that helps people get reelected by being agreeable. So we'd love to see more pressure from people writing to their local representatives that they expect movement on this. And if you want to learn more about the bill that the petition and support that it's on my website, Lisa v.com/ted. Talk.   Michael Hingson  24:27 th, Lisa v th e,   Lisa Thee  24:30 right. Yes. And I I've been working with my California representatives to try to get some legislation brought forward because this is far overdue. We're gambling with things that are just the stakes are too high for kids.   Michael Hingson  24:47 Is the industry moving toward doing more to truly and not only intellectually but emotionally regulating itself on this It doesn't have to be left to the politics to do it and the politicians to do it.   Lisa Thee  25:04 I think that anytime you need to clean up technical debt and be looking for criminals abusing your systems, there has to be some kind of incentive or policy in place to make sure that you get the appropriate amount of funding. I have never met anybody that works in the industry, whether it be at Google or Microsoft, or all the other places that doesn't do this work, because they care. There's a lot easier ways to make a paycheck with a data science background, trust me. But unfortunately, a lot of times the boards in the C suite executives don't fully understand what it takes to do this, right. And it's grossly underfunded. So I think regulation will be the place where it allows them to make better trade offs for shareholders and better trade offs for their leadership to understand why the investment is absolutely mandated. And I think the other challenge you get into so you get a lot of hero complexes here and you get people that will just work themselves to the absolute core like to the bone. And it's because how do you ever measure someone else's suffering against your own? I gave myself PTSD, in 2017, from working every night, every weekend, on morphine drips in the hospital after injuries, because I had a really hard time turning it off, when you know, what's really going on. And I think that's why regulation really matters. We need to make this everyone's priority, that actually gets done. And I think we wouldn't see privacy and cybersecurity come to the forefront for a long time until regulation GDPR allowed people to make those investments, I think we're gonna have to see something similar in the digital safety front to help companies come along. I don't think there's a lack of talented smart people that can innovate and do what needs to be done. But there needs to be an impetus to act. And that's going to come from regulatory bodies.   Michael Hingson  27:08 We live in an era where it's not new, but people say, Well, we've got to do what we do. And we're all about just getting money for the shareholders. And personally, I understand why people say that. But companies were also originally formed many times from an entrepreneurial standpoint, to do something good. But we lose that along the way. And we get to the point of well, we're just all about making money for our stockholders.   Lisa Thee  27:39 I think this one is a little bit trickier. I think there's a lot of unintended consequences going on. When you build a platform to connect the world and have all these visions and wonderful ways it can happen, you're probably not thinking about the creepy guy in Estonia, that's going to start targeting sixth grade girls and Columbus, Ohio. When the nefarious actors typically are, innovate faster than these companies can keep up with. In terms of the ways they're misapplying their technology. So I think a lot of it's going to always be a balance of pushing a ball. I do think that the same way that privacy has really gotten much more regulated, I think we're gonna see online safety going that direction as well. And looking forward to that day, I don't anticipate by the time that Gen Z is parenting, that they're going to have the same struggles that I do with a nine year old and a 10 year old in the world. And I look forward to that, because they've grown up with this stuff. And they know how people use it. And they're not naive. I think right now we have a huge education gap, with our lawmakers, with our citizens, on really the ways that people are taking advantage of access to young people.   Michael Hingson  28:59 The kinds of things you're saying, to me, it seems, are things I've heard before. So what I'm saying is, I don't think they're necessarily new. So I think there's a little bit more to it, then people are just totally uneducated or uneducated. We're also not seeing the will to change and you're right with the Gen Z environment. hopefully over time, the these kids growing up, will recognize that we've got to change the world. But I hope that it happens before then because it's not like the concepts are new. It's more that we're not yet emotionally accepting it as such a reality in all of our lives unless we're specifically hit by it with a with a specific or concrete example for our child.   Lisa Thee  29:53 I have to have some tough talks with friends and family at least a couple of times a year and it's usually the somebody comes to me because something's happening in their family with one of their kids on safety. And I tell them what I know and what they can do. And then oftentimes, they don't want to do that, because it's a lot of work and who the heck has extra time for anything right now, or they don't want to make their child feel like their privacy is being invaded or a whole host of reasons. And then I get a call six to nine months later with law enforcement involved when people are missing when you know, things have gotten really off the rails. And I got to the place where I had to tell people look, I am happy to help you. If you are willing to take multiple hours to get things set up properly. And if you're not willing to commit that in the next 48 hours, I can't help you. Because I can't sit here and just wait to watch the train wreck. And I think that that's where the policy piece comes in where platforms have to design in safety by design. And parents don't need to be investing hours and hours and hours to set things up properly. Because frankly, I have an engineering degree, I founded an AI startup, I consult for some of the biggest thought leaders in this area. I don't know how to set their crap up. I don't I don't think this should be a consumer problem.   Michael Hingson  31:16 Oh, I hear you. And that's what I'm getting at. It's not like this information is new. And it's not like these people don't have the the industry doesn't have access to the information, and probably has heard it. But they under strict   Lisa Thee  31:32 chair, they don't lose market share. If they don't do it. That's the problem. We vote with our feet.   Michael Hingson  31:37 Yeah, that's that's the problem, we're still back to. It doesn't matter how important it is to do. From a reality standpoint, emotionally and intellectually. We're not there yet.   Lisa Thee  31:50 I mean, I tried to hold myself to a different standard, because I do have more access to information. And frankly, nothing the Facebook whistleblower service is new to me, but it to her being, you know, testifying to Congress before it kicked my Facebook habit, again, for like the fourth or fifth time. It's hard to stay away from some of these platforms, because they are a way for us to connect. They are a way for us to educate ourselves. They're fun. And I think if adults have a hard time staying away from things that aren't necessarily good for them, I think we have no right to expect the next generation to do better.   Michael Hingson  32:28 Not until they get older and hopefully become wiser.   Lisa Thee  32:31 I mean, your brain doesn't develop to anticipate long term impacts of your decisions fully until you're 24 years old. What are we expecting out of 1415 year olds? It's nonsense.   Michael Hingson  32:42 Yeah, much less six year olds?   Lisa Thee  32:44 Absolutely. No question. The age of my first phone, globally is estimated to be 10 years old these days. first smartphone,   Michael Hingson  32:52 I like actually, I got my first iPhone in 2009. It was the iPhone three, three, 3g. And so we've been using them ever since. And they're a wonderful tool. That's also part of it is that we've got to recognize it's a tool. But we also need to develop in our own minds much less in a regulatory way. What it really means to be able to positively use the tool and cut out some of the negative stuff. And it is just so easy to do that today to have all the negative stuff. It's so frustrating.   Lisa Thee  33:28 It is I think we'll continue to improve and innovate. I think there's too much more awareness of what really can happen. I think that some some of the places where I'm seeing a lot of innovation in terms of regulation and safety by design are coming out of places like Australia, huge superfan of the Safety Commissioner over there. Julie and Julie came from the tech industry and kind of knows where some of the popples are, and is starting to bring regulation that really can bring us forward in terms of hate speech in terms of cyber bullying in terms of protecting children. So I I feel like we will get there. I just wish we have gotten there already. I'm impatient at this point. I've been working in this field since 2015. And I'm ready to see some real movement   Michael Hingson  34:21 Yeah, it's it's got to be very frustrating for you because you're very close to it and you have children of your own and all you can do is do your best to bring them up and teach them how to make the right decisions and hopefully they'll do that but it is easy to to make a mistake and there's such a fine line today.   Lisa Thee  34:38 And it's not the parents negligence, it's we're not You're not set up to win. And even if you keep your kid off of it, they go to school and totally on unsupervised and have older siblings that you know it. We need. We need help. We need help.   Michael Hingson  35:03 Personally, I'm gonna start to worry when I get an email from someone that says that your dog just complained on Facebook that you weren't giving him enough bones, then I'm gonna worry.   Lisa Thee  35:14 There you go. I think AI to translate animal language would be a very interesting application, I only has to say about me,   Michael Hingson  35:25 it would be a whale out but not too many negative things. I think that there's a lot more positivity going on than we think. But they're very strategic. Some of these dogs are very intelligent. We had we had a dog. She was a breeder for Guide Dogs for the Blind. One day she was on the bed chewing on a bone but the bone kept slipping. Do you know what do you know what a doughnut is? I'm not sure I do. It's a it's a rubber doughnut. Very tough. It's really hard to to chew up. And in fact, I think they come with a warranty that if your dog happens to do it, which is very rare. They'll replace it for free. But it's it looks like a doughnut. Well, anyway, so our dog Fantasia was chewing on this bone and kept slipping away. She just deliberately left the bone on the bed, jumped down, went and grabbed a doughnut brought it back up on the bed. But she then picked up the bone, put the bone in the hole of the go nuts, so she could chew it and it wouldn't slide around. tool users tool users all the way   Lisa Thee  36:30 up. Absolutely. I also love their attunement. I feel like my dog knows the emotions and feelings of everybody in the family and knows who needs to snuggle and who needs a lick and who needs cuddle. At all times. They're they're really wonderful complements to our lives.   Michael Hingson  36:46 My fourth guide dog was named Linnaeus, she was a yellow lab. We were at a party and I, I took the harness off because everyone knew Lynnie. And so we let Lynnae wander around and visit people. And our pastor was there. She came up and she said, You know, it's interesting, Lynnae clearly is empathic and intuitive. She goes to the first person who's the most in pain, and then she'll visit the rest of the crowd. And you know, she said I don't mean physical pain. And when we started observing Lynnie that was absolutely true. And because Sheree had seen her at several parties, and so new Lynnie well, but it's absolutely true. They do have a lot of empathy and they know what's going on. You know, I've talked about that with me and the World Trade Center. The decisions that I made on September 11 came in large part because of what I saw Roselle doing and not doing. Because I've been working with dogs so long, Roselle there was a colleague who started shouting, there was fire and smoke above us. And there were millions of pieces of paper falling outside the window, and I could hear the stuff falling by the window, but I didn't know what it was at the time. But you know, David said millions of pieces of burning paper, I believed him. But with all of that Roselle is just sitting next to me wagging your tail going woke me up. i What are we doing here? And so that told me that whatever was going on wasn't such an imminent issue for her that she was even the slightest bit nervous.   Lisa Thee  38:22 Interesting, and then forgive my lack of awareness. How did you proceed out of that building with her guidance   Michael Hingson  38:30 downstairs. I mean, that was the only way to go. I was the Mid Atlantic region Sales Manager for Quantum. So I ran that office, and I spent a lot of time learning about emergency preparedness, what to do in emergencies and so on. And part of that actually led to why we're calling the podcast unstoppable mindset, because what I actually develop that day was a mindset. Well, not that day, but before that day of what to do if there's an emergency. And I really got to the point of knowing that whatever happened, if there were ever an emergency, I was as prepared as I could be, to deal with it. Now, of course, there are things that could have happened, that would have changed all of that, like the building just collapsed, and in which case, we wouldn't be here. But it was truly all about developing a mindset. And I think that gets back to what you're talking about here. We've got to change our mindset. And that's what what I did on the days before in the months before September 11th was develop that mindset. So I always observe what my guide dogs are doing anyway. And so it was a natural part of things to go oh Roselle is not acting nervous at all. So I believed everything that David said about what he was seeing paper falling burning paper falling fire above us and so on. But whatever was happening was in such an imminent issue, that we had to panic and just run out of the office, which wouldn't have done any good anyway.   Lisa Thee  39:58 Wow. Wow. Yeah, and I think that's exactly a great lead in to some of the things that I learned about in digital safety for the other folks that are maybe listening to this and a little bit nervous about what their kids are doing online, after hearing me, and that is, you know, teach your kids to do emergency drills, we teach them for tornadoes, we teach them for fires, we teach them for all sorts of natural disasters, that oftentimes will never happen in their lifetime. But coming across something on the internet, that's inappropriate, or makes you uncomfortable, is probably going to happen to 99.99% of kids, before they turn 18. And so I think one of the tricks that I've learned through being in the industry is really, you know, teaching your kids what to do when they do have that moment. So it's the stop, walk and talk method. And I'm sure my kids are sick of hearing it from me, but it's when you see something that makes you feel uncomfortable, you need to stop what you're doing, walk away from your computer, and come talk to a trusted adult, and know that I'm not going to freak out, I am here to support you. And that secrets can't live in the dark.   Michael Hingson  41:10 That is, of course, the other part of it, which is that you have to react appropriately and help even stronger, encourage and emphasize and enhance the trust, which is what you're really implying. And it's important that kids understand that parents really mostly do want to have that trusting relationship, there are some who give up those responsibilities, which is unfortunate. But that's not generally what happens.   Lisa Thee  41:41 And that's why I don't say talk to a parent, maybe it's talk to a trusted adult, maybe it's his uncle, maybe it's a teacher, maybe it's my market research was the majority of times that kids come in contact with the adult world online. It has come into being pushed towards them. And it's not something they're actively seeking out. And shame is a huge deterrent from getting help. And kids are not equipped to be able to handle the coordinated behavior and malicious adults is just not a fair fight. So I, I tried to remind that myself and them that I have the mindset that I'm here to be a resource for you and not to make this about my shame triggers not to freak out and overreact. I'm teaching you how to be in the world. And the world sometimes can be a little messy. And I know that criminals are looking for easy targets. They're looking for the people that don't have somebody that has their back. Yeah. And I don't ever want to put my kids in the position of not having somebody behind them.   Michael Hingson  42:48 Did you have any of these kinds of experiences growing up bullying or those sorts of things?   Lisa Thee  42:53 Nope. Um, my drought of this came mostly from my travels in my 20s as a global IT manager and until I hit 36 countries before the age of 30. Seeing in the business hotels, I was often mistaken for a flight attendant. So people acted really comfortable in their own environment. And I saw a lot of the business travelers taking advantage of human trafficking victims, it was very blatant. And it was something that really cemented in me that when I was in a position where I could have the authority to do something about this crime that I would, and that came later in my 30s. But it was my it was the fuel and AI engine, so to speak, to say, what's the point of being a woman with any kind of power in the world, if you're not advocating for marginalized women and children, I, there's, that's the only reason to keep doing what I do every day.   Michael Hingson  43:53 I think I said earlier was fortunate and not having any real bullying or anything like that. Now I faced discrimination as a blind person. I've had a number of examples of people who discriminated or treated me inappropriately because of being blind. And I think the first example of that was when a high school superintendent in our district decided that my guide dog wouldn't be allowed to ride on the school bus because there was a rule in the district that said, no live animals allowed on the bus, which was well, which it was contrary, contrary to state law, also at the time, and he was a bully. And so he was really trying to just make his position, the only one that mattered to them and disregarded everything else. And it actually took getting the governor of California involved to fix it. But the Governor did. As I tell people I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall when the superintendent was summoned to say perminova over it. But the next week I was back on the bus.   Lisa Thee  45:05 I love that. It's awesome. It is so nice to see people that are abusing positions of power and authority to have some kind of accountability. I'm glad you didn't just advocate for yourself, you advocate for everyone that comes after you, right?   Michael Hingson  45:20 Sure. The The interesting thing about it is we first took it to the school board. And the board voted, even though we pointed out the state law, we pointed out case law my father did that demonstrated that the penal code in California took precedence over a rule in the school district, the board voted three to two to support the superintendent. That's how cowed several of the people were, or just took the position. Well, the superintendents, the boss, and we got to go along with what he says. And that's why it eventually went to the governor. But it was my first lesson in the fact that because I happen to not be able to see, I would be treated differently than than other people.   Lisa Thee  46:02 Wow, that's really powerful.   Michael Hingson  46:07 But it happens. And, you know,   Lisa Thee  46:09 I'm glad that you have a family that supports you, not everybody has the luxury of a functional family, to advocate for them. And that's why I do what I do. I'm not really worried about this happening to my kids to be honest, I they have a lot of advantages. But there's a lot of kids in foster care, there's a lot of kids that are maybe from families that maybe the LGBT community or other reasons are not under the protections that are. And I want to make sure that we we rise as a society for our most vulnerable, not only the privileged,   Michael Hingson  46:48 well, and you are taking the steps that you need to take with your children so that they grow up aware they grew up, hopefully wiser for it. And they grew up trusting their mom,   Lisa Thee  47:02 we'll see the jury's out time will tell the talks about Stranger Danger online and drives him nuts. Who knows?   Michael Hingson  47:13 That's right. I mean, you know, who knows what will happen, but all you can do is your best. And ultimately, you've got to live with that, that you can only do your best. And, and so you just kind of move forward as best you can. I'd like to read because you brought it up, you've experienced COVID, and so on, and which brings up the whole issue of, of disabilities, which is, of course another whole subject about people and how they treat people and so on. So I'd love to learn a little bit more about kind of, if you will, what happened to you and where you feel you fit now on the spectrum of people with disabilities and what where you feel society isn't all   Lisa Thee  47:52 that great question. So I was early to being exposed to COVID. I got sick in June of 2020. Well, before testing was readily available. And we knew what the possible long term effects of this disease were. My husband got it at the same time, unfortunately. And thank goodness my kids didn't. So very interesting all living in the same environment. But the adults were susceptible and the children weren't. I didn't have a lot of the classic symptoms they were looking for at the time, I never had a fever from COVID. I had pretty mild symptoms, according to the classifications, but unfortunately, it awoke at something in my immune system, that it's still having a hard time turning off. So since having COVID, and being diagnosed with long COVID with neurologic mild neurological impairment, I've lost half my hearing in my left ear, I have the hearing of a 60 something in my 40s I have a lot of Gi challenges that take a lot of medication to keep under control. And I get a lot of brain fog and insomnia because sleep apnea, so I have to be treated for that. And now I'm in the process of physical therapy and occupational therapy to recover some of my processing time and my brain when I'm trying to use my executive functioning skills. So as somebody that was labeled gifted before I started kindergarten, it is really, really hard to manage through the world. At the bottom 2% of the population, it's very foreign from what I've known before now, and I get lost picking my kids up from school. I sometimes am in a room and I don't know why I'm there. It is really hard for me to learn new things. Fortunately, I have a lot of things I learned before I got sick, but I still have a lot of access to. But new things are really, really tough for me, logistics names, things that I would just do without ever thinking about it. And I'm on disability from work right now I'm on a reduced schedule, I have been for a year and a half. I don't want to be put out to pasture I want to be part of the world. But unfortunately, that's as much as my body can handle at this point in time.   Michael Hingson  50:33 I have a friend who has brain cancer, and she's had it for several years, and she has gone through several brain surgeries and has had to work totally from home and not able to an infant back home is right now across country from where she works and so on. So it's it's a challenge. But the fact is that sometimes things occur, and she's, she's going through it pretty well. And she is able to, to move forward, although sometimes there are setbacks, and then those occur, but but she's really, she's really learned to be as strong as she can be at addressing it. So for you, what are they what are you doing, or what what can be done to kind of help some of the issues of the brain fog or the mental activities and so on?   Lisa Thee  51:26 No, I'm the results of my full diagnosis are only about a week old. So I'm sitting with a lot of acceptance right now, that's a big part of the game is just accepting that this is medical, it's not something I will be able to will myself thought of, or practice crossword puzzles and be done with. So I think part of it is reducing my stress around expecting more for myself and what I'm capable of today. I think secondarily is learning to how to have boundaries with friends, family and employers, what is possible for me, my doctor has been a really great partner in all these believing me and helping me get the right resources, make sure that I can, you know, keep my hours down, because I function very well, when I'm not fatigued, I just get fatigued much quicker than most people do post post injury. And I think also, you know, we've seen the impacts of the pandemic, disproportionately pushing women out of the workplace, or back to the 1980s levels of representation. So I feel really grateful that I have an entrepreneurial background to fall back on. I don't think I could keep up in a full corporate environment today. And I'm really grateful for advocates that I have within Funch consulting, that allow me to work and do what I do particularly well, in the times that I can do it so that I can still be part of society and make those accommodations. I'm really grateful for that. But I must admit, it's so really painful. When people clearly are expecting me to do things that I'm just not capable of, because I don't look disabled examples. So Girl Scout cookies for the last five years, totally not a big deal. I couldn't reconcile the number of boxes and what we ordered this year, I just simply couldn't do it. Or, you know, my kid forgot to I drop my kid off late to school this week. And they're like, Okay, you just need to go here into the attendance person and write this email and do this and do that. And I had to be like, I'm sorry, I have brain damage. I am not going to have the wherewithal to do that. On top of everything else I'm doing today, like, Can this be enough? You're seeing me right now seeing that my kid is here with me? Can you make an exception? And I found that unless I'm more vulnerable and actually say I have a disability, can you please? People are really kind of condescending, to be honest. And so I'm still tinkering with it. I haven't really come up with the way to protect my dignity and get the accommodations I need. Do you have any suggestions? Because honestly, I'm a little newer to this.   Michael Hingson  54:24 What did the attendance person do with a fine with that?   Lisa Thee  54:27 They argued with me three times until I said I have brain damage and then they stopped.   Michael Hingson  54:33 Yeah. The The problem is we haven't taught each other how to be inclusive and we haven't taught ourselves to address difference. So you're right people expect you just because you look quote normal and have quotation to be normal, even though in fact you might not be dyslexic. He is a perfect example of that kind of thing where it's an invisible disability, but it affects many people. And people have learned ways to address the issue, and sometimes hide the issue. But they've, they've learned to be able to be successful. And I think the biggest thing is, is what you're saying and doing right now you accept it, you accept the fact that there is this, this change in your life, which classifies you as a person with a disability. And there's nothing wrong with that. If you can address some of the issues medically or, or in some way, and your physical and occupational therapists and others can help you address some of that. And it may be creating new neural paths and of some sort, or it may just be that some things won't totally go back the way they were. But if you accept that, and figure out how to deal with it, that's the best that you can do.   Lisa Thee  56:04 Yeah, I think I'm early in that journey. But I know that that's where I need to go next. And it's funny, I've technically been on disability, because I've worked part time instead of full time for almost a year and a half. But it wasn't until I got that final doctor's diagnosis, that I able to accept that that it's real. And even though I'm living with it, like they didn't say anything in that report that I couldn't tell you what's happening all the time, seeing it validated in writing, with specific tests that they don't know anything about me, and they can detect, it really helped me come to at least say, Okay, I don't need to blame myself anymore for this. And I don't need to hide all the places that are hard for me. And maybe this is as good as I'll be. Or maybe I'll improve over time with new learning new ways. Like you mentioned with dyslexic people. I mean, how CEOs are dyslexic Creative Learning. Well,   Michael Hingson  57:06 that's exactly right. You know, Malcolm Gladwell wrote the book, David and Goliath, and he talks in there about CEOs who are dyslexic, they didn't say anything, but they learned to deal with it. And the fact is, I still take the position that there is not one person on this earth who doesn't have a disability. For most people. It's you depend on light. And I sometimes say that facetiously. But it is absolutely true. You don't have access to electric lights, or candles, or whatever power goes out, and you're not in a room with a window, you're most likely in a world of hurt. We've developed accommodations for that, because we've invented the electric lights, they, yes, Thomas Edison and others invented the electric light. And, and we have done a number of things to allow light to be around whenever we want it. It doesn't change the fact that in reality, physically speaking, most of us still have that same disability.   Lisa Thee  58:12 I mean, at the end of the day, 2021 was tough, I was getting scanned for brain tumors, I was getting many, many medical tests, I probably didn't go two weeks without some kind of doctor's appointment the entire calendar year. And I still had to deliver a TED talk that I get selected for before I got disabled. And when it's really hard for you to learn new things, it's really hard to memorize, even if you wrote the speech. And I mean, until the week I was on that stage, I really wasn't sure, really until the morning of if I was going to stand up there like a deer in headlights and not be able to deliver it because they don't allow any visual aids in the TED family.   Michael Hingson  58:58 And he's they're smart. They're smart. Who needs visual aids? That's what I say,   Lisa Thee  59:03 You know what, you know, who needs them? People with neurological damage?   Michael Hingson  59:07 Yeah, no, I understand. Yeah.   Lisa Thee  59:11 You know, I don't think many people that would follow me on social media on LinkedIn or such would envision that I have a disability. And so I just encourage everyone to be generous with their kindness for people you never really know what people are managing through. Most of 2021 Even though I was named a top 50, global thought leader in AI, privacy and health and safety and they did a TED talk. I was in bed by two o'clock because I couldn't physically hold my head up. Yeah. So   Michael Hingson  59:47 and, and the reality is we we don't need to and shouldn't pity ourselves. Sometimes. Yeah, you have to have a little pity. But ultimately, what we have to recognize is We are who we are, with whatever gifts we have, sometimes those gifts change, but we we have the gifts that we have. And what we need to do is to maximize our ability to use them. And sometimes that also helps us grow and improve our ability to use gifts. But it is ultimately a mindset. And it is a mindset that we need to adopt to basically get ourselves to recognize that we can probably be better than we think we are.   Lisa Thee  1:00:31 And that's actually what's inspired me now to write my book, the 90 day career cleanse, how to go from burnout to sustainability, sustainable living, because I had to learn a new way, it wasn't an option. And I see a lot of people suffering right now with feeling like they can't keep up. And they can't keep doing this. And I want to give some lived experience and some hope and some frameworks to people to be able to make that transition more gracefully. Because it's a lonely road when you're in the middle of it.   Michael Hingson  1:01:01 Well, how is your puppy dog helped you in terms of dealing with all the things that have happened to you.   Lisa Thee  1:01:09 Um, I think one of the strongest ways he helps me as accountability. He doesn't care how I feeling he expects a walk every day. And that gets me out in the sunshine and helps me see the tops of the trees and the blue skies of California and be reminded at how little anything I'm doing matters in the scheme of the world and not to be so hard on myself or others. I think the other ways that he helps is, you know, the, the cuddles and snuggles and the attunement. I mean, you can't be in your head and not be present in the moment when the warm cuddly puppy in your lap, that you're heading, it just brings you back into your body. And I find so much of what needs to happen to get through the stressors of life and mental health, whether that be mental health or medical, or, you know, just the the wear and tear of adulting is getting out of your brain and into your body. And I think that's where animals really help.   Michael Hingson  1:02:11 We have been talking for some time about writing a book, of course, I wrote thunder dog, which has been a number one New York Times bestseller, and it's actually called Thunder dog the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. And if you out there who are listening to this have read it hope you will. Alamo says that it would be really great Elmo being my guide dog. It'd be great if you buy books, because we need to get money for kibbles. So you know, just keep that in mind.   Lisa Thee  1:02:38 More of those donut toys, right?   Michael Hingson  1:02:40 And go nuts. Yeah, well, he's got a couple of he plays with them. But, but the thing about it is that in there, of course, I talked about being in the World Trade Center. And we talked earlier about the mindset that I developed, that kept me from being afraid or allowed me or helped me use the fear, if you will, that I had to help me focus. But I've never taught people how to do that. So we're actually writing a new book, The working title right now is a guide dogs Guide to Being brave, awesome. And we're going to we're talking with people about fear and the things that that they have accomplished and overcoming fears and so on. And of course, we're emphasizing a lot with animals. So if you don't mind, we're going to probably see if we can draft you to be interviewed for the book.   Lisa Thee  1:03:26 Oh, it will be an absolute honor. Thank you.   Michael Hingson  1:03:30 And, you know, we're really excited about it. Because there's so many things that and we've talked about it here that we talked about in our lives, that are creating so much fear, we've got to be able to move beyond the fear. Because if we allow fear to just overtake us, then we are no longer in a good position to make decisions and think the way we ought to about how to deal with whatever problems we're facing.   Lisa Thee  1:03:57 I can't say that I bring my dog most places because I do still have a lot of triggers for my PTSD. I was in a school when they went into lockdown for an active shooter in 2016. And I came out okay, but we didn't know that for those three hours, we were hiding in the dark under a desk, wondering if I would ever see my family again. And then going into Child Safety Online. I I know what can go wrong and a level of detail that most people will never ever have to deal with. And so I get a lot of judgment a lot of times when I bring my dog because he's he isn't an emotional support animal. He has been registered as one but a lot of people think that's a joke and not a real thing. And, you know, I just hope that people can remain a little bit more open that not not everything on the surface is all the story and he really does help me and I'm sure there's other people that maybe take advantage of that system and you know, have fun do all sorts of crazy animals are traveling with or whatnot, but I just, I just encourage people to judge less than accept more.   Michael Hingson  1:05:09 Well, the the issue with emotional support animals in part is even ones that are registered are not necessarily trained to deal with the public and so on. And of course, a service dog or assistance dog is an animal that's been trained to provide a service. And so one of the things I'm immediately thinking of is that you ought to explore the scene, what else you could do or how someone could help you even better train him to help you with PTSD, because that is recognized as a service.   Lisa Thee  1:05:43 Oh, that's wonderful. I'll, I'll talk to you after this. Learn a bit more. I would not put myself it's an amazing drug dog trainer that is not in my skill set of things that I can   Michael Hingson  1:05:54 use. Okay. That's okay. Well, listen, we've been doing this a while. So we should we should end I think, unless you've got something else you want to talk about?   Lisa Thee  1:06:03 No, this was, this was wonderful. Thank you, Michael. How can how can people   Michael Hingson  1:06:07 reach out to

The History Voyager Podcast The Spanish Flu
Dr. Brad Sommer and the Rust Belt

The History Voyager Podcast The Spanish Flu

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 138:15


In a wide-ranging talk Dr. Sommer and I talk about the Rust Belt of America and other problems.  

Avon Lake Matters
Avon Lake Matters - Interview with Zoe Apisdorf, Director of Residential Experience at Rust Belt Riders

Avon Lake Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 28:33


Zoe Apisdorf, Director of Residential Experience at Rust Belt Riders, talks about their partnership with the City of Avon Lake in offering residents a drop-off compost service. Upcoming events happening in Avon Lake: Sunday, May 15, 4:00 PM: Avon Lake High School Spring Choir Concert / Fundraiser Sunday, May 15, 10:00 PM: Star Party at Walker Road Park Monday, May 16, 7:00 PM: Collective Committee Meeting Thursday, May 19, 6:30 PM: Avon Lake Citizen of the Year & Project of the Year Award Ceremony Saturday, May 21, 9:00 AM: Avon Lake Clean-Up Day Saturday, May 21, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM: Shred Day at Ellen Trivanovich Aquatic Center Parking Lot Saturday, May 21, 9:00 AM-5:00 PM: Avon Lake Public Library Outdoor Tent Book Sale Sunday, May 22, 10:00 AM: Avon Lake Sports Hall of Fame 30th Annual Memorial Golf Outing Monday, May 23, 7:00 PM: City Council Meeting Thursday, May 26, 6:00 PM-8:30 PM: Vendor Game Night at Klingshirn Winery Monday, May 30, 10:00 AM: Memorial Day Parade and Ceremony. All Blue Star and Gold Star Mothers, veterans groups, and Avon Lake organizations interested in participating should contact Jacqui Hoffman, Program Manager at (440) 930-4130 Ext. 1033 or by emailing AvonLakeMemorialDay@AvonLake.org. For more information on future events/meetings, please visit www.AvonLake.org

Marketplace Morning Report
TurboTax parent company to settle over deceptive advertising claims

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 8:58


The company behind TurboTax has agreed to pay restitution to millions of customers who used its tax preparation software. This is to settle allegations that Intuit used deceptive marketing tactics to charge people who should have been able to file their taxes for free. Marketplace's Nova Safo has the latest details. Also, Diane Swonk, chief economist at the tax and advisory firm Grant Thornton, walks us through the state of the labor market and the implications of the Fed’s half point rate hike yesterday. Plus, what happens when a country’s central bank does not use higher interest rates to rein in inflation? We have an example from Turkey, where consumer prices are up nearly 70% in a year. And, hear how Allentown, Pennsylvania, at the heart of the Rust Belt has started attracting new manufacturing businesses.

Marketplace All-in-One
TurboTax parent company to settle over deceptive advertising claims

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 8:58


The company behind TurboTax has agreed to pay restitution to millions of customers who used its tax preparation software. This is to settle allegations that Intuit used deceptive marketing tactics to charge people who should have been able to file their taxes for free. Marketplace's Nova Safo has the latest details. Also, Diane Swonk, chief economist at the tax and advisory firm Grant Thornton, walks us through the state of the labor market and the implications of the Fed’s half point rate hike yesterday. Plus, what happens when a country’s central bank does not use higher interest rates to rein in inflation? We have an example from Turkey, where consumer prices are up nearly 70% in a year. And, hear how Allentown, Pennsylvania, at the heart of the Rust Belt has started attracting new manufacturing businesses.

Know Your Enemy
The Right Kind of Worker (w/ Gabriel Winant)

Know Your Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 91:29


Since Donald Trump was elected president — partially on the strength of white working class support in the Rust Belt — we've heard that the GOP is a working class party; that liberals sold out American labor to globalized capital; and that American workers are too socially and culturally conservative to remain within the increasingly progressive Democratic tent. According to the populist right, the culture war is itself a class war, waged on behalf of real workers against a secular, libertine professional elite who control the commanding heights of the economy, government, and media. What's wrong with this story? Labor historian and essayist Gabriel Winant joins Matt and Sam to answer that question. Using Gabe's award-winning book The Next Shift: The Fall of Industry and the Rise of Health Care in Rust Belt America as a guide, we tell a different story about working class formation in this country, about the forces that led to the decline of America's industrial base, and about the prospects for renewing labor's power relative to capital. Along the way, we take on figures of the newly labor-curious right — Oren Cass, Sohrab Ahmari, and others — explaining how their vision is based on ideologically motivated elisions that seek to resolve rather than energize class conflict.  It's a hot one, folks! Further Reading:Gabriel Winant, "We Live in a Society," n+1, Dec 12, 2020— "Professional-Managerial Chasm," n+1, Oct 10, 2019— "Coronavirus and Chronopolitics" n+1, Spring 2020.— "Strike Wave," New Left Review, Nov 25, 2021.Sohrab Ahmari, "How America Kneecapped Its Unions," Compact, Mar 31, 2022.Julius Krein, "The Real Class War," American Affairs, Nov 20, 2019.Alexander Riley, "Labor Betrayed by the Progressive Left," Chronicles, Mar 2022. Landon R.Y. Storrs, The Second Red Scare and the Unmaking of the New Deal Left, Princeton U Press, 2012.Melinda Cooper, Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism Zone Books, 2017.Alice Kessler-Harris, In Pursuit of Equity: Women, Men, and the Quest for Economic Citizenship in 20th-Century America, 2001. Oxford U Press. 2001.

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals
How Union Organizing Fights the Boss w/ union organizer Daisy Pitkin (G&R 157)

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 56:10


We're in the midst of a new era of momentum and militancy around labor organizing. We're seeing headline grabbing organizing campaigns at Starbucks and Amazon shifting the political landscape. But beyond Starbucks and Amazon, union organizing has been spreading to sectors across the country. In our latest episode, we talk with labor organizer and writer Daisy Pitkin about her new book "On the Line: A Story of Class, Solidarity, and Two Women's Epic Fight to Build a Union." We talk about her work organizing a series of factory laundromats in Phoenix, AZ in the early 2000s. Pitkin worked with immigrant women working in the terrible conditions to organize a union. Most notably, she worked with a woman named Alma, who Pitkin describes as "the gutsiest worker leader I've ever met." This was all done despite a vicious corporate backlash in the reddest of red states. Currently, Pitkin is organizing Starbucks workers in the Rust Belt. We discuss the Starbucks campaign and the future of labor organizing. Daisy Pitkin has spent more than twenty years as a community and union organizer, working first in support of garment workers around the world, and then for U.S. labor unions organizing industrial laundry workers. She is the author of On the Line: A Story of Class, Solidarity, and Two Women's Epic Fight to Build a Union, out now via Algonquin Books. ------------------------------------------------------- Outro song- "Put it in the ground" by Marion Wade Links// On the Line: A Story of Class, Solidarity, and Two Women's Epic Fight to Build a Union (https://bit.ly/3MuMTT9) The Gospel of Organizing (https://bit.ly/3rSKGJe) Follow Green and Red// https://linktr.ee/greenandredpodcast Check out our new website: https://greenandredpodcast.org/ Join our Discord Party: https://discord.gg/Cfq8P4Hf Donate to Green and Red Podcast// Become a recurring donor at https://www.patreon.com/greenredpodcast Or make a one time donation here: https://bit.ly/DonateGandR This is a Green and Red Podcast (@PodcastGreenRed) production. Produced by Bob (@bobbuzzanco) and Scott (@sparki1969). “Green and Red Blues" by Moody. Editing by Isaac.

Heroic Investing Show
260: AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History with Casey Michel

Heroic Investing Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 33:22


Jason Hartman invites Casey Michel, author and investigative journalist, to speak about his new book which uncovers how the US has created the greatest money laundering scheme in history. South Dakota has pioneered an entire industry of what they call anonymous trusts. South Dakota has taken this to a magnitude we've never seen by creating perpetual anonymity for these trusts. The information of those in the trust will never be shared with governments, with other jurisdictions, tax authorities, investigators, which is why we've seen both Americans and non Americans flocking to South Dakota. $900 billion is the top line estimate in South Dakota, but it's still a question of how many total assets are actually there, who those assets are connected to and what those assets are actually doing after they pass through all the anonymity that the state of South Dakota freely offers. Casey Michel's book also talks about illicit foreign money purchasing steel mills, factories and manufacturing plants in places like Cleveland, Ohio, the Rust Belt and the Midwest. They're not revitalizing local communities and bringing jobs back, but rather using those assets to hold and hide funds, using them as part of a broader transnational money laundering scheme. And so what ends up happening is that not only do the jobs never come back, the folks who have the remaining jobs are just laid off, the factories begin falling apart and it's clear they are never going to come back. These local communities in places such as West Virginia, Kentucky, Texas and Illinois are seeing their economic crown jewels go to complete rot because of this system of kleptocracy. Towards the end of the broader Cold War period, one could see a sudden surge in the creation of financial secrecy pools and broader economic structuring that incentivized the outflow of illicit suspect wealth from post communist states. These states are linked directly to rising oligarchies and dictatorships that are smothering local populations, looting national treasuries, and making sure bridges, roads, hospitals and schools are never built. And then beyond that, there is no broader free market economy that actually develops in those countries. http://www.caseymichel.com/ Watch the video HERE. Key Takeaways: 0:50 Welcome Casey Michel, writer and investigative journalist, author of AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History 1:30 What is a kleptocracy? 3:23 Kleptocracy is now a transnational phenomenon, closely intertwined with the broader offshoring economy 4:39 The World Summit 7:02 Incentivizing the outflow of suspect wealth from post communist states 8:19 Creating easy access to transnational financial flows 10:07 Private wealth located in global financial secrecy jurisdictions 12:09 The beneficiaries of dynastic wealth have flocked to places within the US 15:41 For every $1 that is given in foreign aid, $3 of untracked, illicit capital leaves those developing countries 16:54 Anti money laundering regulations across a number of industries except the real estate industry 18:47 Billions of illicit foreign money flowing into London real estate 19:34 Broader transnational money laundering scheme in local US communities 22:06 The offshoring world is comparable to a superpower such as the US or China 23:58 The sad state of the media today 26:14 Casey Michel's first book AMERICAN KLEPTOCRACY: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History is out now from St. Martin's Press 27:11 Who are the world's biggest money laundering offenders? 29:16 Digital assets, art and money laundering 31:27 Learn more at http://www.caseymichel.com/   Free Class:  Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else http://JasonHartman.com/Fund Free Report on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172 Free Class: CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect Special Offer from Ron LeGrand:  https://JasonHartman.com/Ron What do Jason's clients say?  http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Contact our Investment Counselors at: www.JasonHartman.com Watch, subscribe and comment on Jason's videos on his official YouTube channel: YouTube.com/c/JasonHartmanRealEstate/videos Free white paper on the Hartman Comparison Index™ Guided Visualization for Investors: JasonHartman.com/visualization Jason's videos in his other sites: JasonHartman.com/Rumble JasonHartman.com/Bitchute JasonHartman.com/Odysee