Podcasts about Pastry

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  • 892PODCASTS
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  • May 20, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Pastry

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Latest podcast episodes about Pastry

Papilles
#61 - Cédric Perret - La pâtisserie entre équilibre et liberté

Papilles

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 58:44


Et si ne PAS aimer le sucré et les desserts devenait la force d'un pâtissier. Ça vous semble absurde ? Alors laissez-moi vous présenter Cédric Perret, chef pâtissier du Clair de la Plume à Grignan. Pâtissier mais pas bec sucré, pour savoir si un dessert est délicieux, Cédric a une très bonne méthode : qu'il puisse lui-même terminer son dessert !  Et ça marche puisqu'en 2021 il a obtenu le Trophée Passion Dessert. Du végétal, pas trop de sucre, des saveurs froides, des saveurs chaudes, voici la recette d'un dessert parfait made in Cédric Perret. Parce que oui, s'il y a bien une chose qu'il aime c'est travailler les légumes, les herbes et les produits dans leur intégralité. Qui a dit que le pédoncule des fraises devait être jeté ? Au menu de cet épisode :

Kitchen Confession Podcast
Butter Croissants with Steve Hodge

Kitchen Confession Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 29:51


Renowned pastry chef and master chocolatier, Steve Hodge drops by to fill us in on season two of his show "Project Bakeover". Plus, we hear about his shop Temper Bakery and how the pandemic led to scientifically superior croissants!

Deviate with Rolf Potts
Hitchhiking for pastries: The art of structuring a journey with an obsession

Deviate with Rolf Potts

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 61:32


“"Curiosity is contagious.”  –Sophia Bentaher In this episode of Deviate, Rolf and Sophia talk about structuring journey around specific passions and obsessions, and her own decision to hitchhike Europe in search of pastry recipes (2:00); how your national or ethnic identity affects how you are seen as a traveler (13:00); Sophia's experiences as a woman hitchhiker in places like France, Switzerland and Italy, and how she documented her experiences on a spreadsheet (21:00); how the quest for pastry transformed the journey (38:00); how the travel experience led her to open a pastry business in Marrakesh (49:00); and how processes and stories are sometimes more essential than outcomes (57:30). Sophia Bentaher (@sophiabnthr) is a food traveler and writer, with a French-Moroccan background. Her obsession for food, specifically desserts, led her to drop a 9-5 lifestyle and go explore Europe to learn a traditional cake recipe in each country. Notable Links: The Wet and the Dry, by Laurence Osborne (book) American Chinatown, by Bonnie Tsui (book) Excel (spreadsheet software) Hero's journey (mythology template) Wanderjahre or Compagnons du Devoir (learning journey) Third culture kid (cross-cultural identity) Crostata (Italian tart) Cornes de Gazelle (Moroccan cookie) The Alchemist (novel) The Deviate theme music comes from the title track of Cedar Van Tassel's 2017 album Lumber. Note: We don't host a “comments” section, but we're happy to hear your questions and insights via email, at deviate@rolfpotts.com.

Those Two Girls Catchup
Naked Tackle Talk & Rewarding Pastries

Those Two Girls Catchup

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 24:51


We chat about the insane amount of money Sam Wood received from selling is fitness app The ladies share their experiences with giving "the talk"  Sarah has given herself an incentive for marathon training  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bubble
Friday 5pm – puddle of pastry

The Bubble

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 31:25


Brad has bought a boat, but decides to leave this news until halfway through the podcast, and then claim it's unsinkable. Other stuff happens this week, but really it's not very important compared to the boat thing. Brad has a boat. And he says it's unsinkable.Watch this week's video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmHbjEcp_9wBuy Jonny's book: https://shop1.camra.org.uk/product/a-year-in-beer-a-beer-lovers-guide-to-the-seasons/Brought to you by the team behind the Craft Beer Channel, The Bubble takes an irreverent look at beer from the outside, inviting new people to give us their perspective on the world we're all obsessed with. You're listening to the bubble, the podcast turning beer inside out.SUPPORT US!Pledge on Patreon and get some cool merch & videos: https://www.patreon.com/craftbeerchannelCheck out our awesome sponsor The Malt Miller: https://www.themaltmiller.co.uk/Twitter – @beerchannelFacebook – http://www.facebook.com/thecraftbeerchannelInstagram – @craftbeerchannelRemember to drink responsibly(ish) and not be that guy...Support the show

Papilles
#60 - Mathilda Motte - La passion des Daifuku Mochis

Papilles

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 56:40


Un séjour prolongé d'un an au Japon. La découverte de leur spécialité phare : les Daifuku Mochis. La passion pour ces petites sucreries aux goûts et textures inhabituels pour nos palais français. Voici, très succinctement, le début de l'histoire d'amour entre Mathilda Motte et les mochis. De retour en France, pour continuer à déguster ces merveilles, Mathilda se lance dans leur confection. Très vite, elle publie un premier livre, Mochi Mochis, et un second*, Mochis.* Puis, elle leur ouvre une boutique dédiée, La Maison du Mochi. “Grand bonheur”. Même dans leur signification, les Daifuku Mochis ont un goût très doux et sucré qui résonne parfaitement avec l'expérience de Mathilda. Sucrés ou salés, la grande famille des Mochis comprend de très nombreuses spécialités qui ont toutes un point commun : elles sont  fabriquées avec une pâte de farine de riz gluant. Vous ne connaissez pas encore ? Alors vous devez ABSOLUMENT tester ! En plus, vous n'avez pas d'excuses, La Maison du Mochi vous livre partout en France ! Au menu de cet épisode :

General Njiniyela Podcast Sessions
{Episode 103} - Geegees Pastry

General Njiniyela Podcast Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:20


In this episode we're joined by Nokwazi from Geegees Pastrt in Durban. She tells how she use to skip class in tertiary to go run a business.

Gone By Lunchtime
Chewing the budget pastry

Gone By Lunchtime

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 48:37


Will Grant Robertson pull a cost of living rabbit out of the hat? Toby Manhire, Annabelle Lee-Mather and Ben Thomas talk budget day, the big emissions reduction plan, Te Pāti Māori and an early burst of coalition negotiations. Plus: can Jacinda Ardern forgive Trevor Mallard's trespasses, and what is the speaker playing at? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dirty Linen - A Food Podcast with Dani Valent
Carina La Delfa (Hamptons Bakery/Tommy Collins) - empathy, fun and passionate learning

Dirty Linen - A Food Podcast with Dani Valent

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 31:49


Pastry chef Carina La Delfa runs the kitchen at The Hamptons Bakery and caterer Tommy Collins in Melbourne's Hampton. She is passionate about kitchen culture and the place of women in hospitality. We talk about toxic workplace behaviour and her efforts to turn her own kitchen into a place of empathy, fun and passionate learning.https://www.instagram.com/car_in_a_/Follow Dirty Linen on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/dirtylinenpodcastFollow Dani Valenthttps://www.instagram.com/danivalentFollow Rob Locke (Executive Producer)https://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/Follow Huck (Executive Producer)https://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTShttps://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

Live Greatly
Eden Grinshpan, Top Chef Canada Host | Enjoy the Journey | Food, Travel & TV Insights

Live Greatly

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 25:25


From London to India, Eden Grinshpan shares her journey of discovering her passion for cooking and all the people and experiences that inspired her along the way. TOP CHEF CANADA's host will share some of her experiences that got her to where she is today including insights into navigating the high stress of cooking competitions and appearing front and center on television. Eden also shares some of her favorite recipes and snippets from her first cookbook EATING OUT LOUD. Key Takeaways from This Episode How Eden found her passion and love for food. How Eden got into the media and TV industry Eden's advice to her younger self. A behind the scenes look into the contestants of Top Chef Canada Tips for navigating stress The importance of travel  Recipe ideas Disclaimer: All information and views shared on the Live Greatly podcast are purely the opinions of the authors, and are not intended to provide medical advice or treatment recommendations. The contents of this podcast are intended for informational and educational purposes only. Always seek the guidance of your physician or other qualified health professionals when you have any questions regarding your specific health, changes to diet and exercise, or any medical conditions. About Eden Grinshpan  EDEN GRINSHPAN IS THE HOST OF TOP CHEF CANADA and THE AUTHOR OF EATING OUT LOUD: BOLD MIDDLE EASTERN FLAVORS FOR ALL DAY EVERY DAY. A graduate of Le Cordon Bleu in London, Eden has a “Grande Diplome” in Pastry and Cuisine. After graduating, she took her love of culinary and travelled to India, Israel, and Southeast Asia to learn the culture and cuisines of the countries she explored. While in India, Eden volunteered with an orphanage called Ramanas Garden, where she re-opened a café to raise money and awareness for the orphanage. After returning to NYC, Eden completed a management program at The Institute of Culinary Education. Soon after, Eden met Samantha Schutz, and together they created Eden Eats, a Cooking Channel show that explored the global culinary food scene. A year later, Eden launched Log On & Eat with Eden Grinshpan on Cooking Channel, where she travelled the country in search of the most adventurous, well-known food bloggers and social media influencers. In May 2018, Eden partnered with Chloe Founder Samantha Wasser to open DEZ, a Middle Eastern fast-casual restaurant in NYC that featured a menu inspired by Eden's Israeli heritage and travels. Eden released her first cookbook, EATING OUT LOUD with Clarkson Potter, on September 1, 2020. Eden lives in Brooklyn with her husband, Ido, her 4-year-old daughter, Ayv and her newborn, Romi. GET A COPY OF EDEN'S COOKBOOK, EATING OUT LOUD HERE: https://www.edeneats.com/book/ Connect with Eden Grinshpan Website: EDEN EATS Instagram: edeneats Facebook: EdenEats Twitter: EdenEats Youtube: Eden Grinshpan Nivron Kristel Bauer, the Founder of Live Greatly, is on a mission to help people thrive personally and professionally. Kristel is a corporate wellness expert, Integrative Medicine Fellow, Top Keynote Speaker, TEDx speaker & contributing writer for Entrepreneur. Follow Kristel Bauer on: Instagram: @livegreatly_co LinkedIn: Kristel Bauer Twitter: @livegreatly_co Facebook: @livegreatly.co Youtube: Live Greatly, Kristel Bauer To Book Kristel as a speaker for your next event, click here. To Watch Kristel Bauer's TEDx talk of Redefining Work/Life Balance in a COVID-19 World Click here.

Real Success with Nate Kaeding
Episode 38: Jamie Powers

Real Success with Nate Kaeding

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 35:00


Former NFL athlete and Iowa entrepreneur Nate Kaeding talks with Jamie Powers, owner and executive pastry chef of Deluxe Cakes and Pastries in Iowa City. Jamie talks about how she got her start in the restaurant industry, the struggle of being an early morning pastry chef and surprising challenges that came along with starting a bakery. Presented by MidWestOne Bank.

Papilles
#59 - Camille Saint M'Leux - Le cuisinier qui aimait les desserts

Papilles

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 36:15


Avoir les bases dans chaque discipline, de l'entrée au dessert. Voici pourquoi, en plus de sa formation de cuisine, Camille Saint M'Leux a suivi, il y a quelques années, une formation en pâtisserie. Aujourd'hui Chef Cuisinier (et pâtissier) de la Villa9Trois à Montreuil, il utilise donc son double savoir faire et tire le meilleur de chaque discipline. Un joli travail des textures pâtissières appliqué en cuisine, et l'instantané et le digeste cuisinier dans ses desserts. Le résultat ? Vos papilles qui explosent à tous les plats. Quête du iodé et sarrasin, voici ses deux fils conducteurs préférés qui rythmeront votre dégustation. L'objectif ultime de Camille ? Vous faire aimer même les ingrédients dont vous êtes les moins fans. Parce que oui, vous les aimez, vous ne les avez juste jamais assez bien goûtés. Cette règle, il l'applique aussi dans sa cuisine. Fasciné par la complexité, il s'évertue toujours à trouver la recette qui lui fera aimer les produits qui lui résistent encore. Au menu de cet épisode :

Pastry Arts Podcast
Dee Frances: Lessons in Baking Science from a Cookbook Author, Obsessive Baker & Blogger

Pastry Arts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 38:44


Dee Frances is the voice and creator behind the baking blog One Sarcastic Baker, where she shares sweet baking recipes and different information about baking and baking science. Working in retail bakeries and years of exploring and learning has given Dee the experience and knowledge to dive deep into the world of baking science and write her new book, Baking Science (April, 2022, Page Street Publishing), where she talks about the importance of science in the baking process and how we can use it to better our craft. In this episode we discuss: How Dee became obsessed with baking What motivated her to start a baking blog The dirty details of food blogging The role of eggs in baking A unique method for stabilizing whipped cream When to use butter vs. oil in baking The importance of acid in baking Why freezing is a type of baking Dee's tip for pre-heating an oven in record time And much more! Episode Sponsored by ASR Group Experts trust Domino and C&H Sugar brands because each powerful grain of their cane sugar delivers an impact. Proving that baking is all about what you put into it. Visit thebakingexperts.com for more insights.

Sucio_Talk
Riley Redfern Ep 77 "Michelin Mami"

Sucio_Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 96:49


Sucio Talk Podcast Presents Riley Redfern. Riley Redfern Was AND Still IS A Badass Pastry Chef. I Say Was Because These Days She Dedicates Her Time To Her New Tech Job At GigPro. GigPro Is An App That Makes It Easier For Hospitality Industry Workers To Find Freelance Jobs With No Commitment, A Transparent Pay Structure, And The Flexibility To Work On Your Terms. And I Say IS Because Before This New Chapter, Before The Great Plague, She Was The Pastry Chef Of Then 3 Michelin Starred Restaurant Coi In San Francisco. She Details Being Unsure Of Her Adult Future As A Teenager, And How Taking A Job At A Local Bakery Sparked Her Interest In Pursuing A Career In Food Ultimately Changing Her Life. I First Met Chef Riley At A Joint Dinner We Both Worked For Our Respective Restaurants. She Was Fierce In Her Element And Im Not Gonna Lie She Scared The Fuck Outta Me. Her Serious Demeanor Was Captivating And Inspired Her Cooks To Follow Suit. When I Told Her This, She Was Like What?? Me?? I Had Only Crossed Paths A Few Times During That Evening And She Left Such An Impact On Me Ive Always Wanted To Have Her On Sucio Talk. Riley Is One Of The Most Honest Woman I Know, Showcasing Her Fight With Mental Health And Being Transparent About Her Struggles. She Also Details Some New Projects Shes Involved With But You'll Have To Listen To Get The Scoop.Hint.......It Rhymes With "Lonely Mans"Ladies & Gentleman Please Enjoy Episode 77"Michelin Mami"#Sucio_Talk Also Available On@SpreakerPodcast@GooglePodcast@ApplePodcast@AudiblePodcasts@youtubeSUBSCRIBE.REACH OUT.REPOST.SHARE.SUCIOTALK@GMAIL.COMWRITE IN KITCHEN STORIES TO BE FEATURED ON THE SHOW.SHOW SOME LOVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA.LET PEOPLE KNOW ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE FOOD PODCAST.#sucio_talk #suciotalk #suciotalks #david_sucio #davidguilloty  #chefdavidguilloty #boricua #puertorico #100x35 #420 #badassesingeneral #spreakerpodcasts #foodie #chefs #chef #cook #cooks #cooking #cuisine #history #travel #entrepreneur #food #love #brownchefsPEACE!

Tis the Podcast
If You Like Pastry And You're In Europe, You Should Try The Galwickian Yule Cake. (One Royal Holiday)

Tis the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 75:04


Happy Monday, Christmas fanatics! And Happy May! Can you believe we're in month five of the year already? We are officially over Halfway to Halloween, which means we're over Halfway to our beloved 'Ber Months! On top of which, we're just under two months from the Halfway point to Christmas - Leon Day! This year is flying, so make sure to enjoy every second of it because we'll be on that official downward slope before you know it!    This week, the elves travel back to the land of Hallmark Christmas movies to cover the 2020 original, "One Royal Holiday" - one of many that feature a fictional European kingdom that, for some reason or another, features a royal family that sounds British! As longtime listeners of the show will know, Julia, Thom, and Anthony all have a love/hate relationship with Hallmark films. How does this one fare with our hosts? Is it a massive win or a swing and a miss? You'll just have to tune in to find out! Just make sure to let us know what you think of this film as well, and whether or not you agree or disagree with our takes, on any of our social media pages, all of which you can access at https://linktr.ee/TisThePodcast.com !   In addition, we'd like your help with preparing for our upcoming 5 year (!!!!!) anniversary episode/Christmas in July Spectacular! How, you may ask? Well, much has been said about our list and our rankings over the years - and how low or high some movies are rated, or how harsh or lenient we were with certain specials. Well, now is your chance to weigh in! Because to celebrate our 5 years, we will be hosting "The Oscars" of Christmas movies, dishing out awards such as "Best Movie", "Best Score", "Best Lead Actor", etc. And guess who wants to choose the winners? All of you!   So, if you have a few minutes during your day today, please allow your voice to be heard and cast your votes for your perceived winners of each category at the following link:     https://forms.gle/4mPRDHSfERhRHTEP9 .    You'll notice that there are a lot of nominees in each category, so there will be two rounds of voting. This initial round will be open until Mid May. After which, you'll get a chance to vote again on all the same categories that have less nominees, which will be narrowed down and chosen based on this round of voting. Then, on July 25th, you'll find out who's won in our joint Christmas in July/Anniversary episode!     In addition, if you have any favorite memories of Tis the Podcast from over the five years, or want to share your thoughts on the show, we'd love you to share those with us via a voice memo/recording so we can play it in the anniversary episode as well! Just make sure to include your name in the recording (Which you can do using the voice memo app on your phone!) and email it to us at elves@tisthepodcast.com. In the meantime, settle in and enjoy this fun episode that's full of Christmas warmth and feels! As always, thanks for your love and support, y'all!

FoodCrush
15 years of French fare with Chef Andrew Schneider of Le Reve Patisserie & Cafe

FoodCrush

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 68:24


Biting into a crisp, buttery croissant is an experience that has the potential to incite a sigh of gustatory satisfaction. But it takes skill and perseverance to create a well executed pastry that keeps customers coming back time and time again.Among the places in Milwaukee which have done so is Le Reve Patisserie & Cafe, which has been gleaned accolades for its French bistro fare and well executed pastries for 15 years. This week, we're sitting down with Chef Andrew Schneider, who founded the restaurant alongside Therese Hittman in 2008, to chat about the past, the present and the future of the beloved French eatery. Along the way, we glean insights into Schneider's journey from aspiring firefighter to chef, the inspiration behind the cafe and the launch of Le Reve's new events space and cooking school, Troquet.

The Big Red Couch RPG Podcast
Episode One Hundred And Seventy Three – Pastry-Fu: Crouching Cruller, Hidden Donut

The Big Red Couch RPG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 68:31


Donuts & Crullers – Ben starts to make a game about a TV Genre he hates, and ends up inventing a card mechanic for cooking competitions. 24/7 Coffee & Questions – Craig tries to come up with an explanation for the “high-level adventurer running a tavern” trope, and ends up with a mystery hiding in […]

Papilles
#58 - Delphine Bodier - Se reconvertir en pâtisserie

Papilles

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 62:37


Il y a 5 ans, Delphine Bodier a décidé de changer de vie et de se dédier à la pâtisserie. Un CAP en poche et plusieurs expériences dans des grandes maisons plus tard, elle ouvre, au début de l'année 2022 , Pampa, sa propre boutique, à Villeréal. Après tout juste deux mois d'activité, Delphine déborde d'idées qu'elle a hâte de reproduire en pâtisseries. Si sa reconversion n'a pas toujours eu des allures de contes de fées, aujourd'hui, Delphine Bodier explique que “la pâtisserie a donné du sens à [sa] vie”. Ce dont elle est le plus fière dans cette aventure ? Avoir réussi toute seule (et bien entourée) à aller au bout de son projet — ou plutôt de son rêve. Au menu de cet épisode :

Witchfix Podcast
Episode 311 - 'Potions and Pastries' by Bailey Cates

Witchfix Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 17:50


This episode (311) takes a look at ‘Potions and Pastries' the next book in the Bailey Cates ‘Magical Bakery Mystery' series.All opinions my own, and subjective as they come.Pre-Order ‘The Thirteenth Girl' now!https://www.amazon.co.uk/Thirteenth-Girl-absolutely-unputdownable-psychological-ebook/dp/B09MHHNQMF/ref=sr_1_12?crid=1Z2QA7FIWM2FB&keywords=the+thirteenth+girl&qid=1643280508&sprefix=the+thirteenth+girl%2Caps%2C70&sr=8-12Amazon Link for my first novel, ‘Stranded' below:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stranded-Escape-most-twisty-thriller-ebook/dp/B091BNQDQW/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=stranded+sarah+goodwin&qid=1624625721&sr=8-1Music by Jahzzar – ‘The Last Ones' and/or ‘Bloom'(Under Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International Licence - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...)Photograph by Michael Penny.New podcast episodes every Tuesday and Thursday. Videos on the Witchfix youtube channel, crafts, unboxings, magical herbs and more.Amazon Wishlist - https://www.amazon.co.uk/hz/wishlist/ls/NO4CUXFXJMUW?ref_=wl_shareVote for your favourite book to be reviewed, and add new ones on the podcast's goodreads List - https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...Buy Waywood by Sarah Goodwin on Amazonhttps://www.amazon.com/Waywood-Sarah-...Buy Dead to Rites by Sarah Goodwin on Amazonhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/Dead-Rites-H...Follow on Twitter @WitchfixEmail witchfixpodcast@gmail.com

Roux Fitness
Ep 115: Do you ever wonder how pastry chefs stay healthy and fit surrounded by sugar?

Roux Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 43:32


This week Bradley sat down with Stacked Client Greer Gilchrist. Greer says Stacked Coaching teaches you how to "feed yourself in a way that takes care of you." Finding the balance between cooking for work and cooking for self has been tricky for a chef with two restaurants, but Greer is finding her way. Check out this week's podcast to learn how Greer navigates her nutrition in her bakeries, restaurants, and uses food to fuel her day! You can find Greer on Instagram @greergilchrist or at her bakeries @theharbingercafe and @harkencafe (PS these pages will make you drool) ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ While you're there make sure to subscribe and give us a review.

JB & Jules - Triple M Bundaberg 93.1
JB & Jules Pod: JB is a Sugar Baby & Jules has Joined a Mysterious Club

JB & Jules - Triple M Bundaberg 93.1

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 17:50


"me give you $5000 to be Sugar Baby" is the text message JB received. Now he thinks he will be able to quit work. Meanwhile Jules has joined a club focussed around a french Pastry. In other news, local members are now getting inventive in their attempts to get votes. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Line
Presenting Dyed Green, An Exploration of Irish Food & Culture

The Line

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 49:18


On today's episode of theLINE, I have the pleasure of presenting an episode of Dyed Green, a podcast about food and culture in Ireland. Hosted by my brother, Max Sussman, and his wife, Kate McCabe, each episode features dynamic conversations with chefs, farmers, scholars, and more - exploring Ireland's rich culinary history, its dynamic creative culture, and challenging outdated stereotypes. In this episode I got the chance to join Max in interviewing Jess Murphy. Jess is a celebrated chef, restaurant owner, writer, and activist. Originally from New Zealand, she moved to Ireland and opened the Michelin Green Star Kai restaurant in Galway's West End. We talk to her about why we should all think about today's Irish food on the same level as other internationally acclaimed cuisines. If you enjoy this conversation, make sure to subscribe to Dyed Green to get the episodes as they launch! (Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS).theLINE and Dyed Green are Powered by Simplecast. 

On Air With Ryan Seacrest
The Pastries

On Air With Ryan Seacrest

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 47:12


The Morning Hack…3 sleep tips we've all heard...but are actually myths!! Can you really get cavities from kissing?! A Hometown Hustler out of South Gate! She lost a lot of work during the pandemic...so she focused on her first love...BAKING! Tanya wants to be on the Netflix show “Is it Cake?”…host Mikey Day from SNL is on! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Euromaxx
Kaiserschmarrn – An imperial dish

Euromaxx

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 4:29


The popular Austrian dish Kaiserschmarrn has a sweet taste and a funny origin story dating back to Imperial times. According to its many fans, it can be eaten either as a main dish or as a dessert.

Opinions and Beer
Cocoa Berry Pastry Sour - Chicken Killer and Serious Gamer Reaction

Opinions and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 58:19


Cocoa Berry Pastry Sour - Chicken Killer and Serious Gamer Reaction

None Taken
E 148 THE PEN & THE PASTRY: French Elections, Ethiopian Peace Talks, and South African Flooding

None Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 119:25


Shingles and a moving story. Student loan forgiveness. Is free speech overrated? Ethiopia and Tigray consider peace. What are human rights under autocracy? Homeless like Hitler? Tuckers Testical Tanning Tutorial. Hundreds dead, thousands homeless, and highways turned into rivers as South Africa faces apocalyptic flooding, while the media remains silent. What to expect from Finland, Sweden, and Ukraine as Putin's war approaches the third month of atrocity. Bits from Matt Braunger, Liza Treyger, Nate Craig, and Joe Kilgallon. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/None_Taken /support

Travel Today with Peter Greenberg
Discussing pastries, The Yankees, hip hop, and more in The Bronx

Travel Today with Peter Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 38:13


This week's Eye on Travel Podcast with Peter Greenberg covers pastries, The Yankees, hip hop, and more in The Bronx with Borough President Vanessa L. Gibson, Owner of Madonia Bakery Peter Madonia, Interim Head of Exhibitions at the New York Botanical Garden Joanna Groarke, and Executive Director at Universal Hip Hop Museum Rocky Bucano. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Eye on Travel with Peter Greenberg
Discussing pastries, The Yankees, hip hop, and more in The Bronx

Eye on Travel with Peter Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 38:13


This week's Eye on Travel Podcast with Peter Greenberg covers pastries, The Yankees, hip hop, and more in The Bronx with Borough President Vanessa L. Gibson, Owner of Madonia Bakery Peter Madonia, Interim Head of Exhibitions at the New York Botanical Garden Joanna Groarke, and Executive Director at Universal Hip Hop Museum Rocky Bucano. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dirty Linen - A Food Podcast with Dani Valent
The Producers: Deniz Karaca (Cuvee Chocolate) - the world of chocolate

Dirty Linen - A Food Podcast with Dani Valent

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 41:40


Pastry chef, chocolatier and chocolate maker Deniz Karaca is so embedded in the world of chocolate that he sees it as part of him: it's his identity and passion, it's who he is. But chocolate has also pushed Deniz to question, explore and change, as he's transitioned from creative patissier to craft producer. Cuvee Chocolate, his bean-to-bar operation on the outskirts of Melbourne, has ethics at its foundation and unique flavour and texture as its goal.https://cuveechocolate.com.auFollow The Producers on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/producerspodcast/Host Anthony Huckstephttps://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/Host Dani Valent https://www.instagram.com/danivalentExecutive Producer Rob Lockehttps://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTShttps://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep
The Producers: Deniz Karaca (Cuvee Chocolate) - the world of chocolate

Deep in the Weeds - A Food Podcast with Anthony Huckstep

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 41:40


Pastry chef, chocolatier and chocolate maker Deniz Karaca is so embedded in the world of chocolate that he sees it as part of him: it's his identity and passion, it's who he is. But chocolate has also pushed Deniz to question, explore and change, as he's transitioned from creative patissier to craft producer. Cuvee Chocolate, his bean-to-bar operation on the outskirts of Melbourne, has ethics at its foundation and unique flavour and texture as its goal.https://cuveechocolate.com.auFollow The Producers on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/producerspodcast/Host Anthony Huckstephttps://www.instagram.com/huckstergram/Host Dani Valent https://www.instagram.com/danivalentExecutive Producer Rob Lockehttps://www.instagram.com/foodwinedine/LISTEN TO OUR OTHER FOOD PODCASTShttps://linktr.ee/DeepintheWeedsNetwork

Topic Lords
130. Gilding The Lemur

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 72:49


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * Tyriq * https://twitter.com/FourbitFriday * https://frror.bandcamp.com/ * Stevie * https://www.hryx.net Topics: * Watching TAS videos and wondering how much of what is happening is necessary vs flourish * If Jeff Bezos wanted to recreate Jurassic Park * Chocolate-dipped fruit has such an enormous gulf between perceived effort and actual effort that as a gift giver or potluck attendee you are all but obligated to take advantage * Strong Men, Riding Horses by Gwendolyn Brooks * https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?contentId=28113 * The creators of Earthworm Jim: Where are they now? Microtopics: * Tunic. * Finding collectible pages of a game's manual inside the game. * Games in fake languages. * Playing imported games in emulation and trying to figure out how to play even though you don't speak the language. * Curveballs. * A monthly in-person cozy casual game development meetup. * Discovering what people mean by "within" when people say "inquire within." * What happened to all of the art. * What a whale bone smells like after you clean it. * Whether it's grosser to drink bone marrow or eat oysters. * The most charming of all the crabs. * TAS runs. * The various kinds of tools that might assist you in creating a tool-assisted speed run. * Human-Mediated Speed Runs, or HMSRs. * Proving the ideal speed run. * Some kind of sequence that is based on a timer. * When the TAS run does a little dance and you're trying to figure out whether that's important to the run or if they're just killing time. * The game became Snake. * Whether coffee cures or causes cancer. * Like listening in a mirror. * The vapors. * Trillionaires not being as rich as they used to be. * A big big island full of organisms that are just waiting to be coated in gold. * Painting your entire body and dying somehow. * Lemur-friendly paints. * People who've eaten breakfast and then died. * Dipping some shit in some crap. * Watching Food Network to discover the Science of Chocolate. * An attractive morsel. * Pastries with fruit fillings. * A solid cube of a mass of dessert-object. * Taking advice from someone who hasn't even been on several hundred podcasts. * Frantically putting the Topic Lords banner back on your wall when you see Jim approaching. * Releasing Topic Lords episodes. * Shuffling off of this mortal topic. * Making a movie to promote your new chocolate bar. * A type of chocolate that tries to be solid. * Spaghetti-Os as a back formation of Spaghetti-O-ification, which is what happens when pasta passes through a black hole's event horizon. * Using Hawking radiation to retrieve lost Spaghetti-Os from within black holes. * The movie playing the sound of somebody peeing to let you know that now's when you get up to use the bathroom. * A crowd of people doing foley work for a restaurant scene in Murder She Wrote. * Picking somebody for Animatronic Angela Lansbury to murder and then picking somebody for her to pin it on when she solves the crime. * The fine line between true and false. * The fine line between foot and floor. * Desert-eyed, rentless strong men pasted to stars already. * A source of praise for the patriarchy. * Addled by landlords. * Whether being pasted to the stars is good. * The elbow of the topics. * Earthworm Jim. * A muscular goofball earthworm. * Whether you can say "groovy" and still be angry. * A strict no-sequels policy. * Not the thing you're here to talk about. * George "The Fat Man" Sanger. * Wall-E but a Roomba but also one of those 90s wireless phone cradles. * Games you can play for free on the web. * All the good times we had at Blockbuster Video renting movies from Blockbuster Video. * How public libraries still exist and offer more movies than your local Blockbuster Video had and they're free and you keep them for a month rather than two days but nobody gives a shit because libraries don't have branding or advertising. * A perfect solution to a problem that everybody wants solved urgently. * Weirdly buff creatures that should not be buff. * Music band with animal companion solves mystery. * The Dog & The Stoner & The Band & The Ghost. * Queen Slug-for-a-Butt.

Euromaxx
Glowing Algae Tarts

Euromaxx

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 4:19


Algae are rich in protein, available worldwide and easy to grow. A pastry chef in Munich got the idea to create glowing blue algae tarts. Not only do they taste yummy, they're good for the global climate.

Best of News Talk 590 WVLK AM
Sylvia Lovely & Martine Holzman

Best of News Talk 590 WVLK AM

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 15:10


Jack is talking bakes and cakes with Sylvia Lovely and Martine Holzman from Martine's Pastries.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mess Hall Podcast
215 Breakfast Pastries with King Fabbs

Mess Hall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 30:25


Welcome to the Mess Hall Podcast, part of the Alberta Podcast Network, Locally grown. Community supported. Avery, Lena and King Fabbs try an array of breakfast pastries: French toast sticks, Eggo Poptarts, chocolate hazelnut pancake sandwiches, and Toaster Strudel.  Our bonus item is Tim Horton's apple fritter ice cream.    You can find King Fabbs here: Website: kingfabbs.com Instagram: king_fabbs Facebook: @kingfabbs Twitter: @KingFabbs TikTok: @kingfabbs Sound Could: King Fabbs YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCVBalDF-4dWcBrOe8_EM6KA Spotify: King Fabbs  Band Camp: kingfabbs.bandcamp.com Follow us and send a message at: Twitter @themesshallpod Facebook @messhallpodcas Instrgram @messhallpod  email: messhallpodcast@gmail.com  We want to tell you about ATB's podcast - The Future Of. Join Todd Hirsch, ATB's Vice President and Chief Economist, as he connects with special guests who offer unique and useful perspectives about the future. Explore how our economy and communities can not only brace for change, but embrace the opportunity it creates. From the future of women in business to the changing nature of work itself, The Future Of helps us understand what's coming, and what we need to do today to get the tomorrow we want. Featuring two episodes each month, plus bonus episodes, The Future Of includes interviews with top community and business leaders from Alberta and around the world.  Subscribe to The Future Of in the Apple Store, Google Play, Spotify and everywhere podcasts are found, and connect to ask your questions about the future by emailing thefutureof@atb.com. This episode is brought to you by Park Power, your friendly, local utilities provider in Alberta. Offering Internet, Electricity, and Natural Gas with low rates, awesome service, and profit-sharing with local charities. Winter is coming and energy usage for all Albertans will be increasing, so now is a great time for listeners to look at their utility bills and ensure they are on the best plan. Albertans have a choice who they pay their utility bills to. Park Power is happy to provide free no-obligations comparisons. If you decide to switch providers, it's easy. And you can feel good knowing you are supporting a local business, and helping to give back to our communities with your utilities bills. Learn more at parkpower.ca

From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy Podcast
A Conversation with Daniela Galarza

From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022


You're listening to From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy, a food and culture podcast. I'm Alicia Kennedy, a food writer based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Every week on Wednesdays, I'll be talking to different people in food and culture about their lives, careers, and how it all fits together and where food comes in. Today, I'm talking to Daniela Galarza, the writer behind The Washington Post's Eat Voraciously newsletter, which goes out Monday through Thursdays offering suggestions for what to cook for dinner. We discussed how she went from pastry kitchens to food media, writing recipes for a broad audience with plenty of substitutions, and walking around Walmarts to see what kind of ingredients are available everywhere.Alicia: Hi, Daniela. Thank you so much for being here. Daniela: Hi, Alicia. Thanks for having me.Alicia: Can you tell me about where you grew up and what you ate?Daniela: I grew up in the suburbs of Chicago, a few different suburbs. And my mom immigrated to the U.S. in her early adulthood, and my dad from Iran. And my dad moved from Puerto Rico to the mainland in—when he was 9 or 10 years old. And they met in Chicago and realized they had—I guess, they both loved to cook. Or they both loved food. And so growing up, I ate a lot of both of those cuisines, and also a lot of things that they kind of made up together. And then, when I started going to school, I started—my brother and I, who’s younger than me, started complaining that we weren't eating enough American food. I loved the Puerto Rican food and the Iranian food that I was eating. It's interesting that I, as a kid, just wanted macaroni and cheese and, from a box. And, I don't know, hot dogs, and—What else? Oh, and baked pastas. I wanted all of this Italian American food, which was so foreign to my parents. And they did their best to try to figure out what we would eat. That manifested in really interesting mas- ups. My dad's take on spaghetti and meatballs was spaghetti, really, really overdone spaghetti in, I think, a canned tomato sauce, and then a fried pork chop on top. And it would get cut up for me. Yeah, there were a lot of translations into American food that I ate.Alicia: Wow. Well, and you've had such a long and varied career in food. So I wanted to start at the beginning. Why food? And how did you start your professional career?Daniela: I don't know how I always knew I wanted to work in the food, in food, somehow doing something with food. I think I always gravitated towards the kitchen. It wasn't always a happy place in my home. I just loved eating. Something I get from my mom that I'm more aware of now is a pretty sensitive sense of taste. And I think that that contributed to my enjoyment of eating different foods and different cuisines, whether I was cooking them myself or eating somebody else's at a restaurant or at their home. And that enjoyment—I remember my parents. My dad was a bus driver for the Chicago Transit Authority. And my mom did many, many different jobs when I was growing up. And it was very clear that both of them worked to work, to pay the bills. And I came away from that experience never wanting to work a 9 to 5 and never wanting to work to just pay my bills. I wanted to figure out how I could work, how I could do something I loved and make a living out of it. And initially that was me wanting to go to culinary school. And I had a lot of notions of like, ‘Oh, I'll open a restaurant.’ Or ‘Oh, I'll be like a TV chef like Julia Child,’ whoever I watched on PBS growing up. And my mom had these very strong feelings about like, ‘Oh, you want to be, want to cook for people?’ And in some cultures that—there's a stigma. There's a class attached to that kind of service industry work. And I remember being so puzzled by that when I would hear that from family members just not understanding it at all.Until I went into working in restaurants and saw how restaurant people are treated, saw how you were treated if you worked in the back of house at a restaurant in general and the assumptions that are made about you. And then, I understood her words a lot more. But I still had a lot of fun doing it.Alicia: [Laughs.] Well, so you started out in kitchens, right?Daniela: Yeah. Oh, I didn't answer the second part of your question. Yeah. I started out working in restaurant kitchens. My first job was working at a local bakery, selling the bread. And then my second job was at Williams-Sonoma as a food demonstrator in the local mall. And when I went to college, I worked in local restaurants to help pay for books and lodging. And that's when I started getting into pastry. I found some local pastry chefs that took me under their wing, and I got really excited about it and was a pastry assistant for a really long time. And then, after I finished college, I studied food history in college and found a number of really great professor-mentors while I was there who encouraged me to stay on the scholarly food path. They thought I would become like them, and I would teach food history or food anthropology. And then, I would write books about my research. Just that whole time, I was just like, ‘No, I'm gonna go become a pastry chef. I'm going to get this degree; I'm going to cross off my list. And then somehow, I'm gonna figure out how I'm going to pay these student loans back by working in restaurant kitchens.’And so after I graduated, I went to the French Culinary Institute in New York City. And I had to work full-time while I was doing that. A way I found a job in New York was I just read. I started reading all of William Grimes’ restaurant reviews and looking for the ones that mentioned pastry chefs. And I cold-called all of those restaurants and just said, ‘I'm moving to your city. I need a job in a restaurant kitchen. This is my experience. Are you hiring?’ And most of these places hung up on me until one of them didn't. And I mean, I don't know if they still do trails, but I did a two-day trail where I worked for free for two days. And they observed my work and hired me. God, I had a job. I could move to New York, and I could go to culinary school. And I finally thought I had found my place—It's like, ‘I graduated college. And I found what I was, what I've always wanted to do. And I did it.’I worked in pastry kitchens in New York, and went to France and studied a little bit more in France. And then got offered a job doing product development in Los Angeles. And I never wanted to leave New York. This was a really good opportunity. And it was also an opportunity for me to finally have health care benefits, which I hadn't had before. As you know, they're very rare in the restaurant. I went into that, and then the recession hit and this company basically went under. And a friend of mine at the time said, ‘Have you thought about writing about food?’ And I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, it had been years since I thought about writing about food.’ I hadn’t thought about writing about food since I was in college. Yeah, they told me about an internship at Eater LA that was open, and I went and applied for it. And that's how I started writing about restaurants and food. That was really long.Alicia: No, I love it. Because it gives me a better sense of—I knew you did all these things. But I didn't know how you know the chronology of everything you've done. And so now, it all comes together.You've stayed really invested and interested in pastry. What keeps you so excited about dessert?Daniela: When I was in pastry school, I didn't have a clear sense of what the North American public thinks of as pastry and how it fits into their daily lives and how essential it is. And then when I went to work in restaurant kitchens, they—that's where my first sense of pastry as a business came out. At the time, I was told by a number of restaurant people that the average restaurant sales for rest—in restaurants in New York City was about 30 percent, which was considered high nationally. So 30 percent of people that walk in the door of a restaurant were ordering dessert. And I just thought, ‘Oh, my God, that's horrible! It's so low.’And it's about, if I'm devoting my whole life to this—but I also knew it from a practical standpoint, where it just so happened that the first restaurant I worked at the dessert sales were 90 percent. And that was because it was mostly a tasting menu. And the restaurant was known for its desserts as this sort of spectacle, and it was something that the chef really promoted. And so, I had this really early skewed introduction to how many desserts people would order at a restaurant. And then progressively in my career I realized, ‘Well, people are, just don't order dessert. They're always on a diet. They’re always making excuses. They’re too full.’ And I was the person at the end of the night. All the line cooks are cleaning up. It's 10, 11 p.m. The kitchen closes, but pastry stays open because people are having their after-dinner drinks. And then, they're gonna order dessert, or you hope they're gonna order dessert. And so, you have all your mise en place. You have all of your beautiful little cakes and the souffle ingredients and all of the things you have ready to go. And then they don't order dessert, and you have to throw it all away. And I was crushed. I was constantly crushed when people didn't order dessert. And then, you're walk home at 1 or 2 in the morning, walk 50 blocks home and would just be bummed out the whole time. And after that experience, few years of experiencing that, it just underlined for me the labor that goes into pastry, I feel is so much, can be so much greater than the labor that goes into savory food. And I want to value that. I find it exciting just because it's—Pastry is so many things, has so many different ingredients and involves so much chemistry. There's so many different components. And I feel it intersects with a lot of different arts, like architecture and the fine arts, and creates emotion for a lot of people in ways that savory doesn't always. And so, I appreciate it from that perspective, too. But I always think about the person at the end of the night that's waiting to see if you're going to order a slice of cake or a custard. I want to order it from them. Make sure they feel appreciated.Alicia: I love that. You mentioned that you got that job at Eater LA after working in kitchens, working in product development. How did you transition? Because studying food history in college, of course, you have this bank of knowledge. And then, you have this wealth of experience of real restaurant labor. And you have this real knowledge, culinary knowledge. And so, how did that all translate when you ended up at Eater?Daniela: It was a rough transition. I hope nobody goes back and reads my archives, I hope. I just want them to disappear forever. I mean, I was a terrible writer initially. But I was fortunate in that some of the people that I worked with—and Eater at the time was very small and scrappy. There was so much competition. There was always this feeling we have a chip on our shoulder ’cause we're just a blog. And so, we've got to really prove ourselves. And I don't know, I really glommed on to that. I don't know, I've also been sort of scrappy in my life and just had to make things work. And I think that I identified with that. I identified with ‘work long hours and do everything and don't get paid any money,’ because that was my entire youth and early adulthood. How to do it. I don't think anyone should have to do that. But that side of things, that's how I started reporting. I remember, we were always trying to be first on everything. I was just really good at talking my way into restaurants and asking if I could talk to people and asking a lot of questions and being curious. And I don't know, all of that, fortunately, came pretty naturally to me, because I didn't study journalism. But the parts of writing that didn't, and sometimes still don't come naturally to me, are just the practice of putting sentences together and building a story. I think I'm always gonna be learning that. I'm still learning that. I still feel like I struggle with it sometimes. But so, it was this progression from Eater LA. And then eventually, LA Weekly called and said, ‘We could pay you!’ Because I was working for free at Eater, and I said, ‘Wow, ok, yes, please pay me.’ And LA Magazine called and said, ‘Yes, we're hiring,’ and they paid a little bit better. And then, Eater came back to me after they got bought by Vox Media and said, ‘Well, we have more money.’ Because I basically said, ‘I'm not going back unless you can pay me a living wage.’ So they did, and I moved. That's when I moved back to New York from L.A., was to do that.I mean, while I was sort of cobbling together this new, going from restaurant industry to journalism, I was working many small part-time jobs. I was working in marketing. I was working in consumer product PR, which was just a very bizarre space and weird time in my life. And I was working as a private chef. And so, I was doing a lot of different things at the same time. Oh, I was also doing farmers’ markets on the weekends; I was selling products for people that made pestos and tapenades and cheeses and things like that. So yeah, I was working many jobs all the time. [Laughs.]Alicia: Right. That's such a hustle, my God. Well, and then you've been at Serious Eats and now at the Washington Post. And it seems you're doing a bit more recipe work right? In the last few years?Daniela: This is the first full-time job I've had where I'm doing recipe development, and I'm so appreciative of it because I feel it ties all of my interests and skill set together. It was something I was looking for, was why I left Eater. Eater at the time didn't publish recipes. And they were really adamant about that. And I had pitched a number of avenues and ways for us to get into that space. They were shut down. And at the same time, I started getting contacted by other editors at other publications. And I was really curious about what it would be like to work for other New York publications. And so, I went freelance for a year and that was frightening. And also, I learned a lot—learned so much more, interestingly, about editing during my time freelance writing for other editors than I did at Eater. And then the Washington Post posted a job for a newsletter writer, and I really didn't think the world needed another newsletter. [Laughter.] I still kind of don't think the world needs another newsletter. It's shocking to me that people subscribe to my newsletter. Joe Yonan, the editor there, sent me an email and said, ‘You really should apply for this.’ And on the last day when the application was due, I remember I went for a walk around the block with my dog. And I thought like, ‘If I wrote a newsletter, what would it be like?’ And I wrote this application email and I got the job after a long interview process. Alicia: Yeah. [Laughs.]Well, how do you balance that now? Because you really are focused on the newsletter, but the newsletter is really intense the way you do it. It's Monday to Thursday. It's recipes. But it's also a ton of variations on those recipes for people who have different needs or different allergies. And then also, you're giving the context for the recipes as well, whether it's from a cookbook or it's from your own understanding. And that seems so much work.How are you kind of balancing all of that now? And how has it been to have to be really kind of relentlessly creative in putting out this newsletter all the time?Daniela: Yeah, that's a good question. It is a lot of work. And I tried to think about it as, manage the—I guess when I feel burned out on the writing part, I go into the kitchen. It's using different parts of my brain. Just a weird way to say it. Sometimes I need to sit down and type my thoughts out. And sometimes I need to go into a kitchen away from a screen and put my hands in something. And that balance is really, I think, really helpful for me and really good for me, because I come up with ideas while I'm cooking. And then vice versa. Some people, I think, still think that I'm developing four recipes a week. No, that would be insane. I'm not doing that. I'm only developing one new recipe a week. And I develop those recipes throughout the month. And then I hand in a batch of recipes at the beginning of the month. And they go through an edit process and a testing process. And then, they get shot. They're styled and shot by a great team, shot by photographer Rey Lopez. And I just love his photos. And I'm so grateful that I get to work with this team of people who really help me remember that I have to keep this thing going. They're all these people who are depending on me to keep this thing going. Otherwise, I so admire people like you that have your own motivation. If I didn't know there were people waiting for my work in order to do their work. I don't think I would do anything. I think I would stay in bed all day. And it's this fear of letting people down that keeps me—Yeah, I do. really enjoy my work. And I'm really grateful I get to do it.Alicia: How do you keep that fresh and provide so many substitutions too? Where did that idea come from? And how do you kind of conceptually think about that? How do you figure out where in the recipe, there's room for variation and play?Daniela: I think that is something that came up organically as I was writing the newsletters. And it was initially inspired or prompted by the fact that the newsletter started kind of in the early days of the pandemic, or less than a year into the pandemic. And so, people were still really concerned about going to the market more than once a week, or more than once a month in some cases. And there was a lot more caution, and there was still an availability issue. The Washington Post also reaches an international audience. And so, when it was springtime for, let's say Washington, D.C., it was not springtime in Perth, Australia. I had information coming at me from many different places, many different sides. I knew initially, from the very beginning of the newsletter, I wanted to offer as many meatless options as I could, because it's just a way I'm trying to eat myself. And so selfishly, I was wanting to challenge myself to think more broadly about the way I eat and how I can, let's say, satisfy my cravings for certain things and maintaining a level of nutrition, but not always default to meat as the center of the plate. So, I started doing that, building off of what I learned. I lived in a vegetarian co-op in college for two or three years. And I learned so much from that crew of people. Shout out to the Triphammer Co-Op. I actually don't think it exists anymore. But it was a great, incredible group of people that were very committed to being vegetarian and vegan, and challenged my thinking as a person who grew up eating meat. That was my first introduction to taking a vegetarian diet, a vegan diet very seriously. And I learned so much from them. I learned all of the building blocks of what I know about vegetarian cuisine from them. And when I started writing this newsletter, I was thinking a lot about that. And I was thinking about how much I wished I could still talk to those people, and then just decided—it just sort of started to flow. Or it was like, ‘Alright, if I made this. If I got this recipe in my inbox, and I thought, ‘Ok, this sounds good, maybe I'll make it. But I'm looking in my pantry. And I don't have, I don't know, let's say all-purpose flour. I'm out of all-purpose flour, or I'm out of onions, or whatever. What would I do?’And I think that most people who cook, who are very confident in the kitchen, and most people I happen to talk to like this the way we're talking? I think we know these things intrinsically. I think we know, ‘Ok, if I don't have lemon juice, I can use white wine vinegar. I can make it. I can make things work with these very obvious substitutions.’ But I also have a lot of friends who don't know how to cook at all. And I think about them in the kitchen. I think about them holding their knife, or I think about like, ‘Oh, if they saw this recipe, they would just assume they couldn't make it because they don't have rice in their pantry right now.’ And I'm just like, ‘Actually, maybe I can outline this in a way that's sort of easy to parse, and hopefully not too obvious for all the people that know how to cook, but also gives people ideas if there have an allergy to something, or they find cilantro doesn't taste good to that. What are the ways I can offer them ideas around that?’ And that has turned into this signature of the newsletter. I get dozens of emails every day from people who are like, ‘Thank you so much for putting that in there.’ I didn't consciously start doing it. It just started to happen. And I'm glad it's resonating with people. Alicia: Yeah, it's so interesting to find—when you are so obsessed with food, and you have kind of done all the trial and error over time. I mean, for me, I've learned how to cook through trial and error. You've learned how to cook in an actual formal setting. But for it to come really naturally, and that you think about these things is so obvious. It is a really delicate balance in recipe writing to speak to the people for whom it isn't a natural thing to substitute—I made a Sohla recipe from Bon Appetit, an eggplant adobo, and it had pork in it. And I was like, ‘Alright, well, I'll just—I'll substitute that with minced mushrooms. And I'll just add more oil, so that there's fat there.’ But other people wouldn't think of that because they'll just be like, ‘Oh, it has pork in it. If I don't want to eat meat, I'm just not going to make this.’And so that's why I think that your newsletter is so important, because it really does show people that thought process. And I think once people start to learn that, what can be substituted or what can be replaced and where there's room for adaptation, then their regular cooking is just going to get better because they're going to start thinking that way, too. Basically you're lending people your brain [laughs], which is a really great—the way you do it is so cool. And I love it because it makes it so clear and so simple. And I do think the Washington Post, maybe, it probably becomes more natural to you guys to be a little more open to meatless food, because Joe is the guy writing the bean cookbook and the plant-based cookbook and everything. [Laughs.] So is it kind of understood at the Post that you guys do these kinds of adaptations, or what is the conversation like if you can give any insight into how you guys talk about eating less meat or or giving those options?Daniela: I mean, definitely think you should talk to Joe about it at some point. There really aren't conversations like that. Joe’s certainly never going to come out and say, ‘We can't publish this recipe because it uses this ingredient. And this ingredient is problematic, because whatever.’ He's just not that kind of person. He's a very open-minded person. And he's also just not naturally a judgmental person. I mean, he's definitely the best boss I've ever had. I'm not just saying that. It's one of two reasons why I'm still at the Washington Post, I can say that. And I so appreciate his openness.It's more than when we talk about recipes, when we talk about what we're going to be making, he's so enthusiastic about his dishes. And it comes across in his writing, of course. And I think that rubs off on all of us in general. I think that approaching something from a place of enthusiasm, rather than limitation is a real—just so encouraging. It feels more encouraging to me.Alicia: So I wanted to ask, you've lived in a few cities. How has that shaped your perspective on food and writing about food? Because yeah, you grew up in Chicago. You moved to New York. You lived in L.A.. Do your parents now, are in Arizona?Daniela: Yeah. They're in Tucson. And I've been living with them in Tucson for the—almost the entirety of the pandemic, or almost two years now. And I will say, the assumptions that I want to say that maybe rural America makes of the coastal cities are entirely correct. And I say yes, just from having lived in those cities and been in those bubbles, and essentially still operating in those bubbles. And then living in Tucson, which is a much smaller city. I mean, it's landlocked, and it's also—It's west coast, but it's Southwest. And it has its own brand of politics. And I think it is a fascinating place to live, if all—if you've only ever lived in very, very large cities, because it really outlines for me the ways in which I'm biased, and the way I can make assumptions about anything. I mean, the way it plays out in the newsletter is when I'm developing recipes, I do actually go to Walmart and look and see what ingredients are available there on a regular basis because Walmart is the biggest supplier of food in the country. And it is still where most people are shopping. And if an ingredient can't be found there, it's—there's a good chance that the person reading the newsletter might not make that recipe. And I want to make sure things are available to people. Big guiding light from the beginning of the newsletter, and when I first—the newsletter concept was not my idea. That was Liz Seymour's idea. She’s a managing editor at the Post, assistant managing editor at the Post. But the way I conceived of executing her idea of this daily news, daily recipe newsletter was that if it was under the brand Voraciously, what does eating voraciously mean? And what it means to me is this really open-minded sense of what you're eating. I didn't want to just make whatever, 30-minute pasta dinners every night, obviously. I eat a variety of foods, and I eat from a variety of cultures, and I want it to represent all of that too. So it's a balance between understanding that not everyone lives in big cities. And I do hear from people who live in really small towns, and I constantly ask them, like, ‘What's it like?’ I want to know more. There's someone that emailed me who lives in a really remote place in Wyoming in a mountain town and can only go to a store once a month. And they just describe it as so peaceful. And honestly, that just sounds amazing. Sounds amazing to me.Alicia: I love that you go to Walmart, because, while obviously I'm like, ‘Walmart sucks, is evil.’ But at the same time, I understand that.The Walmart de Santurce is always packed, and they have a surprising variety that I think maybe if you never go to a Walmart you don't know that they have it. I found Brooklyn Delhi Curry Ketchup. I found Woodstock Farms pickles. They have a non-dairy section. Whenever I have to go for something random like a bike pump or a tube, I go and I look at all the food. And it is really interesting to see that it's actually not at all what people would assume. They also have local foods that they'll sell too. They adapt to what the culture is where they are, which it's not a black-and-white thing where they're forcing Kraft foods upon people or something like that. It's a lot more nuanced than that, which is super interesting. I think someone should write about how Walmart does food buying.Daniela: I agree. And yeah, I want to reiterate, I go and look at what Walmart sells. I don't actually shop at Walmart. Alicia: It’s ok if you do. [Laughs.]Daniela: But it's because I have a wide variety of places I can shop where I live. Tucson is not such a small city that there aren’t dozens and dozens of markets. But I respect the fact that a lot of people shop there, because they do have really great prices. I mean, really, it's a really affordable place to buy food, particularly if you're feeding a large family. If I was feeding a large family, I would definitely go there and buy an extra large bag of chips. Because, man, that's a good deal. Alicia: No, no, no. I mean, the food costs are insane right now. Everyone's doing Reels and TikToks about how much less food they can buy right now. Gas is super expensive. These are the things you have to think about when you are a recipe writer, is really, what are people actually going to have? And what are they going to have access to, and what's going to be affordable. I'm going to do a pantry series for the newsletter too. I'm thinking about that. But also, just by nature of living in a small city on an island have limited options. I don't have maitake mushrooms, as much as I would love to eat a maitake a lot. I can't get them. I can’t always even get organic tofu. I have to get just non-GMO tofu. And these are such little things, but they're things that I really took for granted all the time. And I think a lot of people take for granted all the time, is it—when you're living in New York or something is that you can go to a glorified, one of those glorified, gentrified bodegas and get Miyoko's vegan butter. I have to make a very special trip if I want to do that. There's so many things I have to consider when making decisions that I never used to think about. It makes things way more interesting if you do that, if you think about, like, ‘How can I break something down to its absolute essentials, and still make it really, really good?’ I think that’s where we're, where you get to change people's thinking about what it means to cook at home, and how delicious and how accessible that can be.Daniela: Exactly. I want to go back slightly to something, that point of something we were talking about earlier, which is that this idea of giving people these other options and substitution suggestions opens the door for them to learn about how they want to cook and learn about—I mean, obviously learn about these options. It was also, for me, kind of a rejection of this notion that I think food media has had for a really long time that you must make the recipe exactly as written, or it might work, won't work. I think there was a lot of steering people away from trying things a different way, because then they're gonna come back to the publication and say, ‘This recipe didn't work.’ I think that there is a lot of almost satirical cases of this, where people are writing in and being like, ‘I made this meatloaf, except I didn't use any meat, and it didn't work, you know?’ And it's like, ‘Ok, well, obviously, it wouldn't work.’ But there are ways that you can make substitutions. And I think that it's also giving people permission to trust their instincts a little bit. I guess I don't make any recipe exactly as written, usually. And maybe that's because I'm more confident in the kitchen. But I can also see my friends who aren't as competent in the kitchen looking at a recipe and say, ‘Well, it’s telling me to add a whole tablespoon of salt. Maybe I don't like it that salty. I'm not going to add a whole tablespoon right now.’ I can see them making their own judgment calls. And I want to give them permission to do that. Because I think that's when you feel empowered in the kitchen, you feel more confident. And that's when you open the door to sort of a more exciting cooking life, I think.Alicia: Of course, yeah. And so I wanted to ask you, how do you define abundance?Daniela: You, helpfully, sent these questions in advance. And I've been thinking about this for a while now. And I think just coming at—I mean, I still feel we're in a pandemic. And I have felt very closed off from my friends and family, some other family that I'm not living with. And I felt disconnected from the social environment. And so, I think of abundance as eating with other people. Really sharing a meal with people and relishing the experience of talking to them, whether it's about the food or something else, that makes me think of just a table, a table full of food, but also full of people. I miss people. Alicia: Well, for you is cooking a political act? Daniela: Well, I think yeah, I think any kind of consumption in a capitalist society is political, can be political. But I also think that sometimes when I'm cooking—and this is again, before the pandemic, when I was cooking for people—I was cooking out of love. I was cooking because I wanted to make ‘em happy. So maybe I wasn't always conscious of the decisions I was making in terms of where I was buying my food or what I was buying or what I was cooking, or whetherIt was cooking on gas or electric, whether I was cooking in a stainless steel pot or aluminum. All of these potential decisions were fading into the background. But in general, it is a political act. Alicia: Yeah. Well, thank you so much for coming on today. Daniela: Thanks so much for having me.Alicia: Thanks so much to everyone for listening to this week's edition of From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy. Read more at www.aliciakennedy.news. Or follow me on Instagram, @aliciadkennedy, or on Twitter at @aliciakennedy. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.aliciakennedy.news/subscribe

Binouze USA
Episode 193 Les Pastry Stouts

Binouze USA

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 53:36


On aborde un style en plein essor cette semaine, à savoir les stouts pâtissiers. Plus toutes nos rubriques habituelles. Intro et outro: Big Patate par Ruff N Ready  Binouze USA fait partie du label Podcut. Retrouvez tous les podcasts du label sur www.podcut.studio. Vous pouvez aussi aider le label en allant sur www.patreon.com/podcut.   

Dave & Jenn in the Morning
Dave Visits Pastry Princess 04/08/2022

Dave & Jenn in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 3:41


Dave Visits Pastry Princess 04/08/2022

SideDish
A Traffic Haiku & Smokin Pastry?

SideDish

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 49:03


Brady, Annie and Eric are without a guest this week so what else could they possibly talk about -- traffic, restaurants, and missing stop signs.  The trio bids a sad farewell to a few businesses (Smokin Bowls and Kirklands) and laments the temporary closure of Boston Avenue (bridge repair).  Welcome to Renaissance Liquors and a hardy welcome back to the Cinco de Mayo celebration (back after two years!).MentionsScrumptiousRenaissance LiquorsWibby BrewingSmokin Bowls - Closure AnnouncementKirklandsThanks to Andy Eppler for "Nothing but the Rain" as our IntroSend Off MusicThanks to David Cutter Music for "Float Away"

Young Sheldoncast
S2E5 - A Research Study and Czechoslovakian Wedding Pastries

Young Sheldoncast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 27:41


Sorry it's gross, but he sucks, okay? You are allowed to watch the terrible trailer for this episode here (WARNING: WATCH THE TRAILER IN INCOGNITO MODE OR YOUTUBE WILL JUDGE YOU)

Playing Favourites
Playing Favourites | Ep. #38 | Baked Goods (With Maria!)

Playing Favourites

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 61:35


Luke and Harry are once again joined by a guest - Maria! Maria is a graduate of the Cullinary Institute of America, having studied Baking and Pastry. She now works as a bakery manager at her workplace, and has been baking for 10 years. And oh my god does she know her stuff, holy crap. Have a listen, we're talking all things baking. Be sure to tweet @PlayFavourites on Twitter or email playingfavouritespodcast@gmail.com with suggestions for what should be discussed next episode! USEFUL LINKS The Cullinary Institute of America Baking ratios Biscuit KitKat Buttercream America's favourite baked goods Cruller Apple fritter donut Funfetti cake Angel food cake Carrot cake batter Savoury pies Aquafaba Meringue Salt dough All-edge brownie pan Brownie slicer pan Greggs sausage roll Brookie Bakewell tart Cherry bakewell Maria's lemon blueberry basil entremet Apple crumble MARIA Instagram LUKE / GINGERFORK Twitter Twitch YouTube HARRY / FLAMINGYETI Twitter Twitch YouTube

Joni and Friends Radio
Pleasures Tell the Truth

Joni and Friends Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 4:00


Your desires and pleasures reveal what your heart truly treasures. Is your heart gripped by selfish pursuits? Or do you consider everything to be nothing compared to knowing Jesus? Recognize the grip sin has on your heart, and seek the pleasure of your Savior above all!

Pastry Arts Podcast
Luis Amado: From Churros Cart to Chocolate Academy

Pastry Arts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 34:35


Chef Amado began his foray into the culinary world at the age of 16, selling churros in the streets of Guadalajara, Mexico. As a young man he made the move to the U.S. to pursue an education in culinary arts. In 1992 he graduated from Grand Rapids Community College, and not long after, traveled to Belgium where he worked to develop his knowledge of classical European pastry and chocolate. He returned to U.S. in 1994 and worked in a variety of positions at private country clubs and fine dining restaurants throughout California, Indiana and Michigan. Since 2016 he has been directing the Baking and Pastry Arts Program at Lake Michigan College, where he develops curriculum, teaches classes and coaches students for national and international competitions. He owns the Luis Amado Chocolate Academy in Stevensville, Michigan, where he offers personalized and small group chocolate classes to students from around the globe. His work has been featured in numerous magazines including The ACF National Culinary Review, Revista Dulcypass and So Good Magazine. Chef Amado is very passionate about competitions and has captured more than 22 gold medals and 6 best-of-shows awards from competitions including the 1996 Culinary Olympics in Berlin, The 2000 National Dessert Competition, numerous ACF-approved Culinary Arts Salons, The Great Lakes Regional 1999-2003, and most recently the 2017 AUI Chocolate Cup in Washington, D.C. In this episode we discuss: Luis's entré into the world of food as the owner of a churro cart How a customer helped him enroll in culinary school in the U.S. Luis's passion for culinary competitions How the student became a teacher His style and process for developing new chocolates His tips on working with chocolate Advice for future chocolatiers Why he decided to open the Luis Amado Chocolate Academy And much, much more!

Crispy Coated Robots
CRISPY COATED ROBOTS #110 - The Best in 'Sub-puppetry' and the Top 5 Breakfast Pastries

Crispy Coated Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 85:40


Episode 110:  “…Like a sugary lava.”   Jim, Joseph, and George contemplate the best non-Jim Henson created puppets, and also the Top 5 in Breakfast Pastries.·        Which movie preview terrified the trio as young boys to the degree that they gave up any and all dreams of being professional ventriloquists?  ·        How did Joseph know that his choice of pastry doomed the relationship between him and a former girlfriend?·        What does George say about Texas pastries that's sure to light a fire in Waco?·        What is the significance of freckles on marionettes?·        Which podcast host gives an impromptu English lesson on Yoda Speak?·        Which is Joseph's favorite Romper Room episode and why?·        What gallows humor comment stops the show in its tracks as the guys can't stop laughing?

Recipe of the Day
Puff Pastry Tart with Apple, Prosciutto and Parm

Recipe of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 5:39


Today's recipe is Puff Pastry Tart with Apple, Prosciutto and Parm.Here are the links to some of the items I talked about in this episode: #adJill Silverman Hough wine pairing cookbooks:100 Perfect Pairings: Main Dishes To Enjoy With Wines You Love100 Perfect Pairings: Small Plates To Serve With Wines You LoveBaking sheetParchment PaperPizza CutterHere's the Recipe Of The Day page with all of our recipe links.If you want to make sure that you always find out what today's recipe is, do one or all of the following:Subscribe to the Podcast,Text the word Dinner to 1-833-413-1352,Join the ROTD Facebook Group here  (this is a brand new group! You'll be a founding member!),Subscribe to get emails here.Have a great day! -Christine xo

Kevin McCullough Radio
20220318 - Now's A Perfect Time To See NYC & Go Grab Some Pastry's For St. Joseph's Day

Kevin McCullough Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2022 47:52


20220318 - Now's A Perfect Time To See NYC & Go Grab Some Pastry's For St. Joseph's Day by Kevin McCullough Radio

AboutBeverages.com - Podcast
Give It A Shot - The Bruery Pour Me S'More Imperial Pastry Stout

AboutBeverages.com - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022


For a few years now, one of our favorite breweries has been The Bruery. Located in Southern California and cleverly named by incorporating the founder Patrick Rue's last name, they are always churning out delicious beers of all styles. On a recent trip to California to pick up some pre ordered items Andrew also grabbed the beer we are featuring this week. For this episode we will be trying the Pour Me S'More. It is an imperial pastry stout with graham crackers, cacao nibs and natural vanilla flavor. What did we think? What do you think? Let us know in the comments below or join us live on Thursday nights to give us your feedback while we are live streaming on Twitch. If you have any ideas for future episodes of "Give It A Shot" or just have a question, you can always send us an email to AboutBeverages@gmail.com.

Two Chocolate Cakes
Pastry Wrapped Olives

Two Chocolate Cakes

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 9:22


The Bullocks were one of many families that became my family, but the first family where I was well and truly wanted.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/twochocolatecakes/support

@theAlynettework
All Things 805 03/13/22

@theAlynettework

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 52:05


A delicious discussion with Diana Salzer founder of Salzer's Pies and Pastries. Teams sports with the Commissioner of AYSO Fillmore, Arnold Munoz. New Music from Jack Brown aka WildChild "Manifestin" --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alynettework/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alynettework/support

Have Such A Good Day
Insta Happiness, Screwball Comedies, Pastry Duel… to the Death!

Have Such A Good Day

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 52:22


Sarah gets a new tech thang and Heather heeds the wild scream of a fox. Thank you to our Patrons! Please consider directly supporting us at Patreon for ad-free episodes, access to our Discord server, and all around good vibes as you help us keep the lights on.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/hsgd. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.