Podcasts about parisians

Capital of France

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Best podcasts about parisians

Latest podcast episodes about parisians

History Loves Company
A City Divided: Bloody Week and the War Between the Commune and the Third Republic

History Loves Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 19:42


No sooner had the Paris Commune gotten on its feet did threats of war from the Third Republic start to rear their ugly heads. Resulting in what Parisians called the "Bloody Week," the Commune's National Guardsmen clashed with the Republic's Regular Army in the streets, killing several and wounding more on both sides. Tune in to find out how this all played out, right here on the 'History Loves Company' podcast. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historylovescompany/support

History Loves Company
Lighting the Fuse: The Birth of the Paris Commune

History Loves Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 10:43


With France's disastrous defeat at the end of the Franco-Prussian War, the national government was tasked with creating some semblance of order while trying to keep the ever-growing discord amongst Parisians at bay. Find out just how it all went down in the second installment on the Paris Commune. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historylovescompany/support

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson
Parker pops up at Brugge, PSG lose and Serie A returns

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 55:51


After nearly 2 months apart, the Euro crew of Jimbo, Raphael Honigstein, James Horncastle, Julien Laurens and Alvaro Romeo are back and in full effect. Ligue 1 returns with Lens closing the gap on PSG to 4 points by inflicting a first league defeat of the season on the Parisians. Will Lionel Messi help or hinder PSG when he returns? La Liga is back with unfortunately another racism controversy and with referee Mateu Lahoz adding to his celebrity status. Serie A restarts on Wednesday with Napoli on fire on the pitch and Juventus in trouble off it with their entire board resigning. And Kristof Terreur tells us just how did Scott Parker end up being appointed as the new manager of Club Brugge. Plus Bayern's goalkeeper hunt, Will Still, and life for Lyon after Aulas. Produced by Charlie Jones. RUNNING ORDER:  • PART 1: Moment of the weekend (03.30) • PART 2a: Lens 3-1 PSG (06.30) • PART 2b: Scott Parker to Brugge, with Kristof Terreur (19.00)  • PART 2c: Transfer chit-chat (25.00)  • PART 3: Serie A returns (31.00)  • PART 4: La Liga - Lewandowski (40.00)  SIGN UP TO THE ATHLETIC TODAY FOR £1.99 A MONTH FOR 12 MONTHS • theathletic.com/totally Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Earful Tower: Paris
Paris Bucket List: Things to do in 2023

The Earful Tower: Paris

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 33:40 Very Popular


  IT'S BACK AGAIN!  Today's guest is the reigning champ of The Earful Tower Bucket List, Oliver Gee. That's right, me! I'm joined by the Stockholm Sting aka my wife Lina, who also has her finger firmly on the pulse of things to do in Paris.  We share our top five things that we want to do this year in Paris - and we also share the lists of some prominent Parisians including Australian Ambassador Gillian Bird, France expert Véronique Savoye, the eternal Comte de Saint Germain, baker Molly Wilkinson, and blogger Shannon Pratuch.  Why not write your own list and join us? The full list will be on the website very soon: www.theearfultower.com  Become a Patreon supporter here. 

Ohio Mysteries
Ep. 211 - The French 500

Ohio Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 28:49


Gallipolis, Ohio was born of a scam. In 1790, some 500 Parisians eager to distance themselves from the aftermath of the French Revolution thought they'd bought deeds to land along the Ohio River in America's new Northwest Territory. But when they arrived in the New World, they learned their contracts were worthless. So, what happened to them?  www.ohiomysteries.com feedback@ohiomysteries.com www.patreon.com/ohiomysteries www.twitter.com/mysteriesohio www.facebook.com/ohiomysteries Music: Audionautix- The Great Unknown, and The Great Phospher- Daniel Birch Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Who ARTed
Gustave Eiffel | The Eiffel Tower

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 8:08


The Eiffel Tower was by far the largest structure built for the 1889 World's Fair in Paris. Eiffel was an entrepreneur and he had two engineers working with him to plan the iron tower, but not everyone was on board with the design. Audiences today may be surprised to hear that many Parisians thought the design was an eyesore and a blight on their beautiful city. The architect Stephen Sauvestre was commissioned to work on the design to make it less ugly. He drafted arches, glass-walled halls on every level, stonework around the base, and other ornamental details throughout the structure. Ultimately they stripped it down to a more utilitarian structure but they kept his idea of arches at the base. The form of the tower is largely determined by the engineers' calculations to cut down on wind resistance. The primary resistance came from writers and artists who criticized the tower throughout its construction. I think my favorite description came from Francois Coppee who called it “this mast of iron gymnasium apparatus, incomplete, confused and deformed.” Of course, this criticism faded as the world's fair began and the tower was a huge hit. Over 2 million visitors came to marvel at it. While it did prove successful, the Eiffel tower was not intended to be a permanent fixture in the city. It was built to wow visitors in the fair and then to be torn down later. Eiffel only had a permit to have the structure stand for 20 years.  The idea that the tower would be temporary provided an interesting opportunity for another sort of creative visionary. A truly remarkable con artist named Victor Lustig sold the tower for scrap… two times. While truly awful, his plan was quite clever. He posed as an official with the French government, but instead of claiming a high-status post, he pretend to be a mid-level, government official. He met with heads of various scrap iron companies telling them that because of the sensitive nature of such a high-profile project he was trying to meet with people discretely to get bids for the roughly 7,300 tons of iron used to build the tower. He then met privately with the least successful of the bidders and tried to appear empathetic. He told the guy, look I know you are up and coming, it's hard to compete with these bigger companies, I feel for you. I'm just a mid-level government employee, I'm struggling too. Maybe we can help each other out. He actually got the guy to bribe him for the contract for all the scrap iron which did a few things. It made him seem a little more credible to the guy he was conning, but more importantly for Lustig, it made his mark less likely to report the crime as doing so would be not only embarrassing but also implicate him for bribery. Lustig got the money and then fled to Austria where he watched the papers to see if there were any reports of his crime. He was correct that the businessman would be too embarrassed to report the crime. In the ultimate show of hubris, Lustig returned to Paris and attempted to repeat the same scam. The second time around he was not so successful and ended up fleeing the country yet again. He went on to carry out numerous other audacious crimes before he was arrested and sent to the notorious Alcatraz prison in the United States. Arts Madness Tournament links: Check out the Brackets Tell me which artist you think will win this year's tournament Give a shoutout to your favorite teacher (I'll send a $50 Amazon gift card to the teacher who gets the most shoutouts on this form by Feb 27) Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Join Us in France Travel Podcast
Rookie Mistakes Visitors Make in France, Episode 421

Join Us in France Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 52:21 Very Popular


There are several rookie mistakes visitors make in France, especially if they are visiting for the first time. Annie Sargent asked the Join Us in France Group in Facebook what mistakes they made and they came up with 32 fantastic observations that you need to know about so you don't make the same mistakes!   Table of Contents for 'Rookie Mistakes Visitors Make in France' with links to the text transcript   [00:00:00] Intro [00:00:31] Today on the podcast [00:01:14] No news this week [00:01:45] Podcast supporters [00:03:06] Annie and Elyse [00:03:17] 32 Rookie Mistakes [00:03:43] 1. Don't Overschedule your day [00:05:55] 2. Self-cleaning toilets [00:07:10] 3. Good Manners [00:09:56] 4. Comfortable shoes [00:10:47] 5. Buy it if you want it [00:11:23] 6. Eat at French standard time [00:13:51] 7 Avoid the crowds [00:15:24] 8. Andouillette is not a small American andouille sausage [00:16:16] 9. Don't expect busy Parisians to stop and chat [00:17:12] 10. Don't presume the waiter will bring you the bill as soon as you're done eating [00:18:31] 11. Bonjour or Bonsoir after 6PM [00:19:29] 12. Don't get angry if there are transportation problems [00:20:44] 13. Do not say “Tu” to a stranger if that person is not clearly under 10 [00:23:47] 14. Visit Paris first [00:25:50] 16. It's a mistake not to try the daily special at restaurants [00:27:19] 17. Understand how trains work [00:28:00] 18. Not understanding French restaurant etiquette [00:28:31] 19. It's a mistake to take a hideous. Package tour rather than organize your own trip [00:30:46] 20. Have a travel pack in your bag [00:31:35] 21. Beware of cyclists and electric scooters [00:33:59] 22. Being worried that you are going to look like a tourist [00:35:56] 23. Don't over pack. [00:37:08] 24. Ice for your drinks [00:38:10] 25 Keep your train tickets [00:39:29] 26 Get the waiter's attention [00:40:44] 27. Trusting the GPS too much [00:43:07] 28. Don't worry about finding cash [00:45:12] 29. Understanding how tipping woks in Francew [00:45:49] 30. Use Apple Pay or Google Pay [00:47:19] 31. Don't talk so loud [00:48:18] 32 Don't underestimate people's kindness [00:50:12] Copyright   More episodes for first-time visitors #rookiemistake, #rookiefrance, #visitors, #touristlife, #parisjetaime, #paristips, #parisknowhow, #joinusinfrance Support the Show Tip Your Guides Extras Patreon Audio Tours Merchandise If you enjoyed this episode, you should also listen to related episode(s): A Cornucopia of Bizarre French Foods, Episode 193 Tipping and 10 Things You Didn't Know About France, Episode 91

Les Bookworms
PALing around Paris

Les Bookworms

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 27:50


On this episode of Les Bookworms Pod, we chat about two books that have been in our PAL (pile à lire aka TBR) for awhile. Each is written by women who love the City of Lights! Both books are relatively short and provide unique perspectives of Paris. The collection of short stories « There's Only One Paris » snakes around each arrondissement and gives glimpses into the different lives of Parisians, activities and landmarks each district has to offer. « L'Origine » offers a personal perspective of an artistic journey and deep dive into the history behind the painting L'origine which can be found in the Musée d'Orsay. Come pal around Paris with us! You can find a fuller episode description and other book reviews on our blog: https://lesbookwormspod.wordpress.com For our current reads and dose of French living, check out our Instagram: @lesbookwormspod

The Rest Is History
268. Brazil: The Last Emperor

The Rest Is History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 50:38


As promised during the Portugal mini-series, Tom and Dominic are returning to Brazil to discuss its history post-independence. This episode will focus upon the Brazilian Empire, in particular the Emperor Pedro II. How did this boy who acceded to the throne at six years old, come to receive a French state funeral in front of 300,000 Parisians in the pouring rain?Join The Rest Is History Club (www.restishistorypod.com) for ad-free listening to the full archive, weekly bonus episodes, live streamed shows and access to an exclusive chatroom community.Twitter: @TheRestHistory @holland_tom @dcsandbrook Email: restishistorypod@gmail.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Bald and the Beautiful with Trixie Mattel and Katya Zamo
An American Turkey in Paris with Trixie and Katya

The Bald and the Beautiful with Trixie Mattel and Katya Zamo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 45:19


As the sun fades and day turns to dusk in Paris, the beautiful Champs-Élysées becomes a twinkling thoroughfare filled with the comings and goings of sharply-dressed Parisians, bustling to and fro beneath the majestic Arc de Triomphe. In a small, nameless cafe, Trixie and her family open a fourth bottle of Châteauneuf-du-Pape as they laugh and smile over a table filled with escargots de bourgogne, couilles de mouton, and tarte tatin. As the warmth and fellowship from this intimate Thanksgiving gathering travels through the cafe doors to the chilly street outside, the scene cuts to America: the barren hills of Hollywood bake under the Southern Californian sun; a house sits alone against a hillside littered with the detritus from citrus trees and forsaken souls. Inside, the critically-acclaimed HBO miniseries Chernobyl is on the television while a Stouffer's Meat Lovers Lasagna bakes in the chef-caliber Miele oven. A Mexican Coca-Cola sits alone on the coffee table as its consumer, Katya, scrolls aimlessly through videos of Turkey-Fryer fires on Tik Tok set to pop music refrains from Dua Lipa. Never in the history of the world has there been such a stark dichotomy of holiday celebrations than between Paris and Los Angeles. Alas, such is this post-modern life. From everyone here at BALD, LLC, we wish you filthy troglodytes the happiest of Thanksgivings. For a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D & 5 FREE AG1 travel packs with your first purchase, visit https://www.AthleticGreens.com/TBATB New to Etsy? Use code MERRY10 at checkout for 10% off your first purchase at https://www.etsy.com! Maximum value of $50. Offer ends Dec. 31, 2022. Sign up for Firstleaf Wine Club today and you'll get your first 6 bottles for $39.95 plus free shipping! Go to https://www.TryFirstleaf.com/BALD As you start your holiday shopping, visit https://www.rakuten.com or download the Rakuten app to earn cash back when you shop at thousands of stores. You can start saving today! Follow Trixie: @TrixieMattel Follow Katya: @Katya_Zamo To watch the podcast on YouTube: http://bit.ly/TrixieKatyaYT Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: http://bit.ly/baldandthebeautifulpodcast If you want to support the show, and get all the episodes ad-free go to https://thebaldandthebeautiful.supercast.com/ If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be amazing! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: http://bit.ly/baldandthebeautifulpodcast To check out the Trixie and Katya Live Tour, go to: https://trixieandkatya.com To pre-order your copy of our new book, "Working Girls", go to: workinggirlsbook.com To check out the Trixie Motel in Palm Springs, CA: https://www.trixiemotel.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans
Bavarian Podcast Works S5E19: Reacting to Bayern Munich drawing PSG in the Champions League Ro16 + Werder Bremen preview

Bavarian Football Works: For Bayern Munich fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 38:00


So the Champions league draw is over, which is the reason why we delayed recording this podcast until Monday so we could talk about who Bayern Munich will play in the Round of 16. It turned out to be Paris Saint-German, a team we've faced a number of times in the last few years. Boasting an attack with the likes of Leo Messi, Neymar, and Mbappe, the Parisians have a formidable XI that can beat any team on their day. Meanwhile there is also the game against Werder Bremen on Tuesday, which is worth discussing because we need to talk about how Julian Nagelsmann will fare with the World Cup looming. So lots to talk about in a quick pod. In this episode, INNN and Schnitzel discuss: How we feel about drawing PSG yet again. How the World Cup could affect the tie — in terms of both fatigue and mentality. Is this the must-watch game of the Round of 16? Will former Bayern youngster Renato Sanches play in the tie? PSG's attack vs Bayern's defense — how they stack up. The playbook to stop Leo Messi. Joshua Kimmich vs Marco Verratti and the midfield battle. What about the rest of the Bundesliga — how will RB Leipzig, Borussia Dortmund, and Eintracht Frankfurt fare? Moving onto the Werder Bremen preview — how does Bremen stack up? Why Bremen are like the Fulham of the Bundesliga (Schnitzel explains). Nagelsmann's options to replace Phonzie, and the overall fullback conundrum. INNN laments the downfall of the Muller Mafia. Be sure to stay tuned to Bavarian Podcast Works for all of your up to date coverage on Bayern Munich and Germany. Follow us on Twitter @BavarianFBWorks, @TheBarrelBlog, @tommyadams71, @bfwinnn, and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Daily Good
Episode 663: UK Universities divest from fossil fuels, a delightful autumnal poem, a restaurant chain offers to train UK prisoners, Rick Steves tours you around the Orsay Museum in Paris, Ella Fitzgerald swings “April in Paris”, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 18:29


Good News: 100 universities in the UK have pledged to divest themselves from their investments in oil and gas, Link HERE. The Good Word: A wonderful and evocative poem about autumn. Good To Know: A brilliant bit of trivia about how much Parisians love their baguettes! Good News: The UK-based restaurant chain, Wagamama, is part […]

Piano Rhapsody
20.2: Autumn Leaves (Albéniz)

Piano Rhapsody

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 13:52


The autumn soundscape is all about falling leaves and gentle gusts of wind. This piece was a precursor to the Impressionist movement that was on the verge of exploding into popularity. We discuss three-handed pianists, marching bands, and how to influence Parisians. Twitter: @PianoRhapsody Email: pianorhapsodypodcast@gmail.com Find PianoRhapsody on SoundCloud for this recording and more!

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K460: About Paris - 貓咪旅館大爆滿與肉品販賣機

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 3:27


歡迎留言告訴我們你對這一集的想法: https://open.firstory.me/user/cl81kivnk00dn01wffhwxdg2s/comments 每日英語跟讀 Ep.K460: About Paris - The Parisian cat hotel that's feline fairly full Much as they enjoyed their cats'company during two years of coronavirus lockdown, Parisians have enthusiastically taken up travel again if the reservation register at one Paris cat hotel is anything to go by. 如果巴黎一家貓旅館的預定登記本上有可供判斷的事情的話,那就是巴黎人又熱情擁抱旅行了,雖然冠狀病毒疫情封鎖的兩年期間,他們喜愛貓咪的陪伴。 At the Arbre a Chats (Cats' Tree) hotel, prospective guests need to reserve well ahead, as all its 24 “contemporary and comfortable” cubicles are fully booked — although cats who know one another can double up and share a room. 在貓之樹旅館,想入住的賓客都老早預定,因為旅館所有24間「現代且舒服」的小房間都預定一空,雖然相熟的貓咪可以睡在一起,共享一間房。 “Unlike last year, this year we were fully booked for August from the end of February,” hotel owner Veronica Colson said. 「和去年不一樣的是,今年我們從2月底開始,8月份的預定就已經滿了」,旅館老闆薇蘿妮卡.柯爾森說。 With cats snoozing on couches, sitting high up in the tree-shaped wooden climbing structure in the center, or observing street life from a ledge by the window, the hotel is in full swing as cat owners rediscover the pleasure of travel. 貓咪有的在沙發上打盹,有的坐在中間的樹木形狀的木頭攀爬結構的高處,有的在窗邊的壁架上觀察街頭生活,因為貓主人們重新發現了旅遊的樂趣,這間旅館的生意正如火如荼。 Next Article Paris gets sausages and steaks 24/7 from vending machine 巴黎販賣機全天候販售香腸和牛排 With their beloved baguette already available 24 hours a day, it seems only logical that Parisians can now get the Bayonne ham and Basque pate that goes so well with the bread from the first meat vending machine installed in the French capital. 巴黎人鍾愛的棍子麵包一天24小時都有供應,而現在,和棍子麵包非常搭的巴約納火腿和Basque pate,可在巴黎首台肉品販賣機買得到,似乎也滿合理的。 In a city filled with small shops where long lunches remain a crucial part of the French "art de vivre," the gleaming red machine set up on the lively Rue de Charonne in eastern Paris seems a bit incongruous. 在一個小商店林立、午餐慢慢吃仍是法式「生活藝術」重要環節的城市,這台光鮮亮麗的紅色機器現身巴黎東區生氣勃勃的夏洪尼路,看起來有點不搭軋。 The area has at least two dozen butcher's shops and no shortage of meat, but that didn't deter the owners of one of those shops from investing 40,000 euros($45,000)to set up their project, selling vacuum-packed meat from the refrigerated machine. 這個區域至少有24家肉鋪,沒有肉品短缺的問題,但其中一家店的老闆並未因此卻步,仍投入4萬歐元(約4萬5000美元)擬定計畫,從這台有冷藏功能的機器販售真空包裝肉品。 From their machine, which takes cash or credit cards, customers can also get a large choice of traditional delicatessen including duck confit and beef carpaccio. There are also faux-filet steaks on display, priced at 34 euros per kilogram. 他們的機器收現金也收信用卡,顧客也能買到許多傳統熟食,包括油封鴨和義式生牛肉,還有沙朗牛排,每公斤要價34歐元。Source article: https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1547057 ; https://news.ltn.com.tw/news/world/paper/971715 Powered by Firstory Hosting

Return Ticket
S2 01 | Paris by baguette

Return Ticket

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 30:00


Can it be true that 94 per cent of Parisians live less than five minutes from a bakery? In a country where eating lunch at your desk is illegal, and people-watching at the local boulangerie is a philosophy, what can the rise and fall of bread tell us about Paris and its inhabitants? 

Le French Rugby Podcast
Brennan The Younger

Le French Rugby Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 43:35 Very Popular


There's transfer rumours galore on the show this week... are Toulon taking Elton Jantjies, is Dan Biggar off to Brive, who's the latest All Black heading to Toulouse, could Joe Marchant quit Quins for Stade Francais and what on earth has been going on behind the scenes with the Parisians this week?Plus, we chat to Josh Brennan after his run of starts for Toulouse at the beginning of the season about keeping some giants out of the side, gunning for France selection, whether Ireland might come calling, the possibility of facing his brother this weekend and much more. All that and we pick our MEATER Moment of the Week...Use the code FRENCHPOD20 at checkout for 20% off any full price item at Meater.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Daily Good
Episode 646: Parisians to swim in the Seine, a great Wodehouse quote, Australia works to kick its coal habit, Phil Rosenthal visits Mississippi, Thelonious Monk swings in his own idiosyncratic way, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 20:16


Good News: The Mayor of Paris has committed 1 Billion Euros to help clean up the Seine River in Paris and make it swimmable again! Link HERE. The Good Word: A great quote from PG Wodehouse! Good To Know: A delightful historic fact about Eleanor Roosevelt and Amelia Earhart! Good News: Australia has taken some […]

Spotlight on France
Podcast: pregnant in parliament, opera in Paris' streets, Wallace fountains

Spotlight on France

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 27:29


As the French National Assembly gets younger and more female, some lawmakers say it's time MPs on maternity leave were replaced. Opera singers bring love, tragedy and dialogue to French city streets with free concerts in unexpected places. And the man behind Paris' Wallace fountains, which turn 150 this year. France has a reputation for supporting new parents, with fully-paid maternity leave and a month of paternal leave, but it does not apply to everyone. Because they are appointed, and not employed, members of the National Assembly can stop and start work when they want, but they are not replaced. So when they are absent  – whether it is for giving birth or long-term illness – they lose their vote. MP Mathilde Hignet (@mathildehignet), who is pregnant with her first child, has introduced a constitutional amendment that would allow lawmakers to be replaced by their deputies when they are on maternity leave. Will anyone oppose such a proposal? (Listen @2'40'') Opera singers and musicians from the Calms collective are shaking up opera's image – taking it back to its roots in popular culture by performing in the streets. Conceived in Marseille in the wake of the Covid lockdown of 2020, the Opéra Déconfiné project has now spread to other cities. For eight weeks each summer, professional singers give free weekly mini-concerts in working class areas in a number of French towns, drawing in new audiences.  (Listen @14'40'') For 150 years 'Wallace' fountains have provided Parisians with clean, free drinking water. Laura Angela Bagnetto talks about Sir Richard Wallace, who generously supported Parisians during the Franco-Prussian war and donated the first 50 fountains to the city in 1872. (Listen @8'45'') Episode mixed by Vincent Pora. Spotlight on France is a podcast from Radio France International. Find us on rfienglish.com, iTunes (link here), Spotify (link here), Google podcasts (link here), or your favourite podcast app (pod.link/1573769878).

Spotlight on France
Podcast: pregnant in parliament, opera in Paris' streets, Wallace fountains

Spotlight on France

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 27:29


As the French National Assembly gets younger and more female, some lawmakers say it's time MPs on maternity leave were replaced. Opera singers bring love, tragedy and dialogue to French city streets with free concerts in unexpected places. And the man behind Paris' Wallace fountains, which turn 150 this year. France has a reputation for supporting new parents, with fully-paid maternity leave and a month of paternal leave, but it does not apply to everyone. Because they are appointed, and not employed, members of the National Assembly can stop and start work when they want, but they are not replaced. So when they are absent  – whether it is for giving birth or long-term illness – they lose their vote. MP Mathilde Hignet (@mathildehignet), who is pregnant with her first child, has introduced a constitutional amendment that would allow lawmakers to be replaced by their deputies when they are on maternity leave. Will anyone oppose such a proposal? (Listen @2'40'') Opera singers and musicians from the Calms collective are shaking up opera's image – taking it back to its roots in popular culture by performing in the streets. Conceived in Marseille in the wake of the Covid lockdown of 2020, the Opéra Déconfiné project has now spread to other cities. For eight weeks each summer, professional singers give free weekly mini-concerts in working class areas in a number of French towns, drawing in new audiences.  (Listen @14'40'') For 150 years 'Wallace' fountains have provided Parisians with clean, free drinking water. Laura Angela Bagnetto talks about Sir Richard Wallace, who generously supported Parisians during the Franco-Prussian war and donated the first 50 fountains to the city in 1872. (Listen @8'45'') Episode mixed by Vincent Pora. Spotlight on France is a podcast from Radio France International. Find us on rfienglish.com, iTunes (link here), Spotify (link here), Google podcasts (link here), or your favourite podcast app (pod.link/1573769878).

PSG review
Top of the table PSG beat Lyon with a Messi goal

PSG review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:51


In this episode of PSG review we have a busy agenda as a lot is happening for both men and women. PSG men play both domestic Ligue 1 football as well as continental Champions League travelling all over the map and women are finishing their this summer's transfer window soon, continuing the domestic D1 and starting their UWCL campaign as well. On top of all this, Luis Campos has had his first media outing with former PSG player Jérôme Rothen. All this is covered in English on our weekly PSG review podcast. Sunday night in Lyon PSG had a very professional performance in Lyon on Sunday night. A lot of action, great chances and initiative, the match ended 0-1 to our Parisians. Lyon did well defensively - in offence they had their pressure, but far fewer chances as you'd imagine from their possession near our box. We get to go to the international break as stand alone Ligue 1 leaders unbeaten both domestically as well as in Europe this season. UCL trip to the apartheid country The second group stage match of this UCL campaign was an effortfull affair to an apartheid country as our beloved Parisians made their way to Haifa, Israel. Long trip, security measures, hot night and poor quality pitch ensured that this was never going to be night to remember, but in the end, only three points count and that's what we travelled home with. Luis Campos speaks PSG's footballing advisor - de facto football director for the men's team, just by a different title - Luis Campos gave his first proper interview since taking charge of the team. Campos talked about the obvious talking points, but also a little bit about other things and we will tell you all you need to know about it. Women's team starting to shape up Women's mercato included genuinely very exciting news and some a little bit baffling ones. The good news first: Dutch midfielder Jackie Groening is now red and blue and that is wonderful news for this squad. We are once more cooking with gas on our midfield and not bad, but a little bit confusing news is that OL's former keeper Sarah Bouhaddi was signed. She is not known as a friend of the club and in all fairness, her best days might be behind her, but she joins the team nevertheless and we trust that her former and again current coach Prêchaur knows what he's doing as well as her former team mate from the national team, Sabrina Delannoy. Hopefully you enjoy the episode. Feel free to like, subscribe, rate and whatever else there is to do, if you so feel inclined and find us on Twitter and Instagram as @PSGhelsinki

Improbable Walks
The Roman Arena Hiding in Plain Sight

Improbable Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 16:13


This Latin Quarter episode begins at Place Émile Mâle and features the strange story of the disappearing Roman arena. We also talk about the discrete author of The Story of O, and the wonderful botanist, Bernard de Jussieu, who is responsible for my all-time favourite tree. This episode wraps up in the lush Jardin des Plantes, where so many Parisians took refuge in the shade during this past excessively hot summer.  Remember to visit my website for extra links & images. As always, thanks to Bremner Fletcher for technical expertise. The Improbable Walks theme music is performed by David Symons, New Orleans accordionist extraordinaire. 

Perspective
'Dinner for One': Cooking as therapy when life in Paris doesn't go as planned

Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 6:39


Most people have an idea about what life in Paris is supposed to look like: the cliché of intellectual conversations, perfectly dressed Parisians, iconic monuments and of course romance. But what happens when you actually move to the City of Lights and discover a different reality? Do you give up and go home? Or do you write your own story about what life in Paris is really like, especially as a foreigner? Sutanya Dacres chose the latter with her book "Dinner for One: How Cooking in Paris Saved Me". She joined us on Perspective.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, September 7, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Twenty-Third Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 439All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Blessed Frdric OzanamA man convinced of the inestimable worth of each human being, Frédéric served the poor of Paris well, and drew others into serving the poor of the world. Through the Saint Vincent de Paul Society, which he founded, his work continues to the present day. Frédéric was the fifth of Jean and Marie Ozanam's 14 children, one of only three to reach adulthood. As a teenager he began having doubts about his religion. Reading and prayer did not seem to help, but long walking discussions with Father Noirot of the Lyons College clarified matters a great deal. Frédéric wanted to study literature, although his father, a doctor, wanted him to become a lawyer. Frédéric yielded to his father's wishes and in 1831, arrived in Paris to study law at the University of the Sorbonne. When certain professors there mocked Catholic teachings in their lectures, Frédéric defended the Church. A discussion club which Frédéric organized sparked the turning point in his life. In this club, Catholics, atheists, and agnostics debated the issues of the day. Once, after Frédéric spoke about Christianity's role in civilization, a club member said: “Let us be frank, Mr. Ozanam; let us also be very particular. What do you do besides talk to prove the faith you claim is in you?” Frédéric was stung by the question. He soon decided that his words needed a grounding in action. He and a friend began visiting Paris tenements and offering assistance as best they could. Soon a group dedicated to helping individuals in need under the patronage of Saint Vincent de Paul formed around Frédéric. Feeling that the Catholic faith needed an excellent speaker to explain its teachings, Frédéric convinced the Archbishop of Paris to appoint Dominican Father Jean-Baptiste Lacordaire, the greatest preacher then in France, to preach a Lenten series in Notre Dame Cathedral. It was well-attended and became an annual tradition in Paris. After Frédéric earned his law degree at the Sorbonne, he taught law at the University of Lyons. He also earned a doctorate in literature. Soon after marrying Amelie Soulacroix on June 23, 1841, he returned to the Sorbonne to teach literature. A well-respected lecturer, Frédéric worked to bring out the best in each student. Meanwhile, the Saint Vincent de Paul Society was growing throughout Europe. Paris alone counted 25 conferences. In 1846, Frédéric, Amelie, and their daughter Marie went to Italy; there he hoped to restore his poor health. They returned the next year. The revolution of 1848 left many Parisians in need of the services of the Saint Vincent de Paul conferences. The unemployed numbered 275,000. The government asked Frédéric and his coworkers to supervise the government aid to the poor. Vincentians throughout Europe came to the aid of Paris. Frédéric then started a newspaper, The New Era, dedicated to securing justice for the poor and the working classes. Fellow Catholics were often unhappy with what Frédéric wrote. Referring to the poor man as “the nation's priest,” Frédéric said that the hunger and sweat of the poor formed a sacrifice that could redeem the people's humanity. In 1852, poor health again forced Frédéric to return to Italy with his wife and daughter. He died on September 8, 1853. In his sermon at Frédéric's funeral, Fr. Lacordaire described his friend as “one of those privileged creatures who came direct from the hand of God in whom God joins tenderness to genius in order to enkindle the world.” Frédéric was beatified in 1997. Since Frédéric wrote an excellent book entitled Franciscan Poets of the Thirteenth Century, and since his sense of the dignity of each poor person was so close to the thinking of Saint Francis, it seemed appropriate to include him among Franciscan “greats.” His liturgical feast is celebrated on September 9. Reflection Frédéric Ozanam always respected the poor while offering whatever service he could. Each man, woman, and child was too precious to live in poverty. Serving the poor taught Frédéric something about God that he could not have learned elsewhere. Learn more about the legacy of Frédéric Ozanam!  Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Critics w/o Credentials
Olsen Twin Nostalgia Party - Passport to Paris

Critics w/o Credentials

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 95:14


Devin and Chris have their passports and head over to Paris as they embark on yet another Olsen twin adventure. This one finds the girls reluctantly getting a free trip to Paris, finding random love, giving life advice to the true star of the film, Jeremy, and schooling Parisians on the importance of the water table. 

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain
084: Understanding the Architecture Labor Movement

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 59:24


Episode 084: Understanding the Architecture Labor Movement Who is the Architectural Workers United?  The Architectural Workers United is organizing towards making architecture more equitable, the profession more just, and our built environment more resilient. Join us as we interview Andrew Daley and Jess Myers to learn more about the architectural labor movement, unions, and the history of labor practices in architecture. What are the biggest misconceptions? What is the benefit? What are the most common questions people ask? We'll discover all of this and more as we discuss why there is a growing group of advocates standing behind AWU. Guests: Andrew Daley is an organizer, activist, and licensed architect living and working in Brooklyn. He is currently working with the https://www.goiam.org/ (International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers )(IAMAW) on organizing efforts within the architecture industry. He has 12 years of experience working for a number of offices in multiple states, most recently for 7 years at SHoP Architects as a Project Director working on US embassies worldwide. Jess Myers is an assistant professor in https://www.risd.edu/academics/architecture (Rhode Island School for Design)'s architecture department. Her podcast https://www.htbdpodcast.com/ (Here There Be Dragons) offers an in-depth look into the intersection of identity politics and security policy in public space through the eyes of New Yorkers, Parisians and Stockholmers. Her work can be found in https://www.archpaper.com/ (The Architect's Newspaper), https://thefunambulist.net/ (The Funambulist Magazine), https://failedarchitecture.com/ (Failed Architecture), https://www.dwell.com/ (Dwell) and https://www.larchitecturedaujourdhui.fr/ (l'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui). (Read more about Jess on https://www.madamearchitect.org/interviews/2018/3/26/enthusiasm-and-effort-jessica-myers-on-staying-critical-and-learning-on-the-fly (Madame Architect).)

30 Morbid Minutes
The Paris Catacombs: A Labyrinth of Death

30 Morbid Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 31:01


Overflowing cemeteries and rampant disease forced 18th century Parisians to find a new place to inter the dead; the Paris Catacombs, a series of abandoned mining tunnels running 200 miles beneath the city. We cover the circumstances that led to the creation of this mass tomb, learn about the enthusiasts known as "cataphiles," the past and presence perils of this macabre landmark, and more. Go to http://dietsmoke.com and use promo code 30MM for 20% off. Go to http://lectricebikes.com to get $100 off any eBike purchase. Follow us on Social: https://twitter.com/elysewillems https://twitter.com/JessicaVasami

The Earful Tower: Paris
Did you know a giraffe once walked to Paris?

The Earful Tower: Paris

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:19 Very Popular


This week we reveal the story of the giraffe that walked to Paris in 1827 and made everyone go bananas. This story, especially the bit about Parisians going berserk for giraffes, is the subject of our new children's book: Grace the Giraffe in Paris.  A bit of background: The giraffe walked from Marseille to Paris in 1827, a gift to the King Charles X of France from Egypt. This true story is fascinating. A giraffe hadn't been in France for 300 years, so practically no one had ever seen one. The arrival of this creature, which we've named Grace, caused a huge sense of excitement and curiosity, fashion trends, wild hairstyles, and general pandemonium. Especially in Paris.  We figured this was an ideal story to turn into a book... so we did it. So, meet Grace the Giraffe in Paris.  In this podcast episode you'll hear me and Lina re-telling the true part of this story in detail, then explaining how and why we turned it into our new children's book.  And as with our other books, we're going to self-publish this one, and we'll launch it on Kickstarter to cover our printing and distribution costs. In short: We don't want to pay for 2,000 books unless we know people want them.  So, when this link goes live (it doesn't work yet), we'd really love it if you bought a copy or two. Who knows, maybe you want to get your name on the map at the back where we'll rename Paris streets. Boulevard Gee indeed!  This is where you will soon be able to order the book.  (theearfultower.com/grace)

Headline Books
THE LOST SONG OF PARIS by Sarah Steele, read by Samara MacLaren - audiobook extract

Headline Books

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 8:27


She played for love. She fought for freedom. Inspired by incredible true events, The Lost Song of Paris is a heart-wrenching story of lost love, danger and espionage and one remarkable woman's bravery in World War Two, from the best-selling author of The Missing Pieces of Nancy Moon and The Schoolteacher of Saint-Michel. This unforgettable novel is perfect for fans of My Name Is Eva, The Shut Away Sisters and The Secret Messenger. 'For a moment she closed her eyes and imagined she was perched on the diving board at the Piscine Molitor, the sun beating down on her bare shoulders and the sound of Parisians at play beneath her. All she had to do was jump.' 1941. Darkness descends over London as the sirens begin to howl and the bombs rain down. Devastation seeps from every crack of the city. In the midst of all the chaos is a woman gripping a window ledge on the first floor of a Baker Street hotel. She is perched, ready to jump. And as flames rise around her, she is forced to take her chances. 1997. Amy Novak has lost the two great loves in her life: her husband, Michael, and her first love, music. With the first anniversary of Michael's death approaching, Amy buries herself in her job as an archivist. And when a newly declassified file lands on her desk, she is astonished to uncover proof that Agent 'Colette' existed—a name spoken only in whispers; an identity so secret that it has never been verified. Her discovery leads her to MI6 'godmother' Verity Cooper—a woman with secrets of her own—and on to the streets of Paris where she will uncover a story of unimaginable choices, extraordinary courage and a love that will defy even the darkest days of World War Two....

Girls Talk Comics
Ep 79: The Butcher of Paris

Girls Talk Comics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 50:15


Did you know the Butcher of Paris is a real serial killer? And that he did some hella f*cked up stuff during World War II, specifically during the Nazi occupation of Paris? Dude was definitely a monster who barely needed an excuse to engage in his messed up acts. The most riveting part of his psychosis was that he had convinced himself he was a “hero” fighting for liberation, when he was actually harming the most vulnerable Parisians of the time - Jewish Citizens. This graphic novel summary of his crimes provides pretty solid, non-speculative documentation of his dealings. Check it out!

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus
Episode #60: Stigmas Surrounding Mental Health, Rekt Religions & An Alternative View Of The Bible With Erik & Marc, Hosts - From Survivor To Thriver Podcast

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 79:59


INTRODUCTION: Co-hosts Erik DaRosa and Marc Fernandes are upending the front-end of mental health conversations. Each week, they tackle different mental health topics through honest and relatable “kitchen table” conversations with real people who are helping to shatter mental health stigmas and find their voices. We aim to normalize discussions around mental health topics and remind our audience they are not alone, there is strength in community and "it's perfectly ok to not always be ok." Our podcast is more than just a podcast. It is a

Grey History: The French Revolution
1.41 The September Massacres Part III

Grey History: The French Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 74:23


How did the September Massacres change the character of the French Revolution? How did they alter the course and trajectory of the revolutionary project? How did average Parisians react to the gruesome events? These are the questions explored by the third and final part on the dark days of September 1792.Episode Extra:A behind-the-scenes video on the September Massacres episodes. Support the Show & Access Bonus Content:https://www.patreon.com/greyhistoryWish to make a one-off donation to support Grey History?https://ko-fi.com/greyhistorySend your questions, praise, and scorn here:https://greyhistory.com/contact/Sign Up for the Newsletter:https://mailchi.mp/0e846e8d26f5/grey-history-newsletterFollow on Social Media:https://www.facebook.com/greyhistorypodcastshttps://www.instagram.com/greyhistorypodcasts/https://twitter.com/greyhistorypodOverview of the September Massacres:https://greyhistory.com/french-revolution-articles/the-september-massacres/Upcoming Episodes:1.42 The Corsican Revolution (Bonus Episode exclusively for Patreons)1.43 The Invasions of France and Poland

The Grand Tourist with Dan Rubinstein
I Bought a Château: Fulfilling the Dream

The Grand Tourist with Dan Rubinstein

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 59:13 Very Popular


In the age of the pandemic, nearly everyone fantasizes about moving to a bigger house. A lucky few have realized the ultimate renovation challenge: the French château. On this episode, Dan speaks with interior designer Timothy Corrigan, who has owned many, as well as Anna and Philipp Mayrhofer, two vlogging former Parisians who are transforming a charming château in Normandy into a guesthouse. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ridiculous Romance
Colette Pt. 2: Mimes, Mummies, and A Panther with A Gun!

Ridiculous Romance

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 64:10


After ditching her Willy, Colette was introduced to the brilliant, crossdressing lesbian Missy de Belbeuf! Together they created a mime show that shocked Parisians into a riot by showing women kissing, and worse - wearing pants! But when Colette captured the heart of a journalist, his lover "The Panther" went prowling for revenge. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Death Becomes Her
Those Resourceful Parisians

Death Becomes Her

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 8:36


LiElla takes us through the history of the Paris Catacombs and discusses a resourceful burial option available in our culture.

Footy Prime The Podcast
This Just In! The soccer season never ends

Footy Prime The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 63:26


Nations League action in every corner of the world at a time when normally we'd be watching World Cup games has Brendan Dunlop, James Sharman, Craig Forrest and Jimmy Brennan feeling like maybe there is too much soccer being played right now. The crew debate how sustainable this busy schedule is for the game's best players, and what coaches can really take away from these Nations League games at the end of the club season as CanMNT get set to play Honduras on Monday.    England's scoreless draw with defending European champions Italy in an empty Molineux did little to excite the boys, as did Switzerland's first minute win over Cristiano Ronaldo-less Portugal. This sparked a conversation on which super power would be most valuable to have. Naturally the guys couldn't agree with each other, even when "flying" feels like the obvious answer.    Darwin Núnez's expected arrival at Liverpool and PSG parting ways with Mauricio Pochettino, setting the path for French World Cup winner Zinedine Zidane to fly in to lead the Parisians to Champions League glory also get talked about.    Presenters: James Sharman, Craig Forrest, Jimmy Brennan, Brendan Dunlop and Dan Wong Voice Over Talent- Jeff Cole This podcast has content that may use words and share tales that offend, please feel free to use your best discretion.  Parental discretion is advised. Be advised this episode includes explicit language.

The Missing Chapter: History's Forgotten Stories

The couple ran, hand-in-hand, to the nearest bicycle shop; nervous, frantic, and desperate with the looming armies advancing in the past days. The radios had announced hours earlier that the city would not be defended from the approaching Nazi forces. The couple didn't have a car; none of the trains were running; two million Parisians had already fled. Hans and Margret tried out the tandem bike for sale but realized that they couldn't manage. Instead, the anxious pair resorted to buying spare bicycle parts, which cost them as much as they had been paying for a month's lodging at a respectable hotel—the manic inflation reflective of the exodus at hand. Hans somehow constructed two separate bicycles that night, from the hodgepodge of pieces they had purchased the day prior. Early the next morning, under the cover of still dark skies, the couple departed the city, with the explosion of mortar shells audible in the distance. They carried with them some food rations, a little clothing… and the manuscript for a children's book. This is the story about a story… and a couple, whose harrowing tale of survival in the face of grave evil, would help give the world one of its most beloved characters. Go to The Missing Chapter Podcast website for more information, previous episodes, and professional development opportunities. Don't forget to click subscribe! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/themissingchapter/support

Faith Backstage
Brandon & Marianne Di Puma

Faith Backstage

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 83:10


The Di Pumas are starting their ministry journey to the city of Paris, France! During our conversation we talked about France's culture, why Parisians have a resistance to organized religion, and what the Gospel could mean for the people who call Paris home. They also shared why a two-year delay caused by the pandemic might have been exactly what they needed, and some of the challenges they expect to have over the coming years.Support Brandon and Marianne financially: https://ppay.co/1foNwTie3s4Get updates: https://the-dipuma-family.epistle.today/Support Faith Backstage: https://www.patreon.com/faithbackstage

Travel with Rick Steves
677 Parisians; Heart of Italy; The Scent Trail

Travel with Rick Steves

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 52:00 Very Popular


Author Graham Robb describes a few of the extraordinary historical characters of Paris. Then vintner and tour guide Cecilia Bottai shares tips for planning a getaway to the relaxed "green heart" of central Italy. And author Celia Lyttelton tells us how she traveled the world to find the ingredients for making her very own custom perfume. For more information on Travel with Rick Steves - including episode descriptions, program archives and related details - visit www.ricksteves.com.

Billy Newman Photo Podcast
Billy Newman Photo Podcast | 213 Nikon F4 Film Camera, Command Line Tools

Billy Newman Photo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 43:04


Donate to the podcast directly with the links below. ⚡️Donate any amount from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet ( including Cash.App ) to Billy Newman https://strike.me/billynewman ⚡️Donate $5 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay5 ⚡️Donate $11.11 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay11 ⚡️Donate $50 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay50 If you feel you are getting value from this, please help by becoming a supporter and send some sats. *New* You can send a Bitcoin Lightning payment direct from the Cash.app Get a Bitcoin Lightning wallet for free instant transfers https://breez.technology https://muun.com https://bluewallet.io Value streaming payments system enables listeners to send Bitcoin micropayments to podcasters as they listen, in real-time. Start streaming value! It's easy to remember: http://value4value.io/ newpodcastapps.com I use https://fountain.fm If you're looking to discuss photography assignment work, or a podcast interview, please drop me an email. Drop Billy Newman an email here. If you want to look at my photography, my current portfolio is here. If you want to read a free PDF eBook written by Billy Newman about film photography: you can download Working With Film here. If you get value out of the content I produce, consider making a sustaining value for value financial contribution, Visit the Support Page here. You can find my latest photo books all on Amazon here. 0:14 Hello, and thank you very much for listening to this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. Thanks a lot for listening. My name is Billy Newman, I was just talking the other day about using terminal on the Macintosh terminal has been a Unix interface. It's been in the Macintosh operating since about the year 2000. When, what was it when they switched over from whatever like Mac OS nine to Mac OS 10. And that was the transition when they kind of switched the framework over to a Unix based framework, I think where they call it Darwin on the Macintosh. Really interesting love the way that that works. That's really what makes the Mac OS mac os 10. So stay was so so useful was a lot of the work that was done to set it up on an older framework of a Unix file system. But but really cool stuff. So I talked a little bit about that on the last flash briefing, what I wanted to talk about today was a specific command the sips command. So as this is a photo oriented flash briefing, the sips command is really cool, it allows you to do all this, this internal image processing that that I really didn't think you would be able to do in it right away. But like for, I guess, for instance, you can resize a whole folder of photographs to some preset resolution. So if you're in a hurry, and you had a folder of images that were maybe full size, and you wanted to have a copy of those images, but you wanted to have a web size version, say there were only 2500 pixels across, you know, you've seen one or two, like kind of shrink them down a little bit from their full size JPEG version. So you maybe would make a copy of that folder on your desktop, let's say you go to terminal, you'd orient yourself to that directory and then I think you'd type in sips and then I think it was like space z or something like that. And then you'd like list the file directory for where the photos are located. And then you like type in like a certain syntax to give you the the files or sorry, not the file size, but the JPEG resolution that it's going to re render that image to and then when you hit enter, it executes the command and then within terminal renders out or you can you can kind of watch it render out as it kind of goes to each of those images and reframes it resizes it and then gives you the new file size and the directory of Finder. It's really cool to see it's kind of fun to to try out, especially if you're kind of in a hurry. And if you want to kind of get geeky into into stuff in Terminal but the sips command you can do terminal man space sips si PS. And you can learn a little bit more about the image processing system inside the Mac. 2:56 You can see more of my work at Billy Newman photo comm you can check out some of my photo books on Amazon. I think you can look at that Bitly Newman under the author's section there and see some of the photo books on film on the desert, on surrealism on camping and cool stuff over there. I wanted to touch him today and talk about a trip that I just just finished up going on out to have to Central Oregon over to the high desert area in Eastern Oregon I guess it's Eastern Oregon kind of over near the bend area we went up to Smith rock this last week and did some camping out over there had a great time is it's pretty nice but we did the the hike over there at Smith rock and I guess I wanted to do just to kind of short podcast about about the area over by by Smith rock some of the hiking that you can do and some of the trip and photo stuff that we were working on over there but yeah, I had a great time and nobody Smith rock took off for a pretty quick easy weekend trip. You know what's great about living here in Oregon on like the I five corridor is you can just kind of jump over to Eastern Oregon over over the cascade pass which is definitely tracking a drive it's different than that just being on the freeway, but it's pretty cool Yeah, jumping over the highways and getting over kind of into the backcountry in the Cascades and then heading over over the past and then down into the high desert area of Eastern Oregon over there. So yeah, when three sisters headed over to Terra bond, and then went into the Smith rock State Park area. Really man the thing I guess I should say is Yeah, Smith rock is just world class camping or hiking area. You really can't camp there. I guess you can kind of camp out in a tent. You can kind of bivouac there. I guess some of the rock climbers do that. But there's also like another spot the area we can to is this campground called skull hollow, which is about maybe five miles away or so it's really not too far of a drive but yeah, hop in the car, go around the mountain. And then on the backside of that you can you can hang out and set up a camp. I think it's there. We were at was Probably I guess I guess it's BLM maybe it's like state forest or some of the stuff but it was dispersed camping areas so you can kind of drive up this road pull out on the side and kind of walk your tent over and you know just go feet and set it up hang out is all free and you're just sitting out there in the, in the scrub of the sagebrush and on some lumpy ground and I think there's like open range cattle that walk through there to other times we would camp there in the past I think Marina and I had been there maybe years ago and we had camped just a couple spots off and the place that we were this weekend we put up the tent hung out there had the car parked there and then that morning we woke up in the tent we could hear like a bunch of big footsteps around and sounds and animals and we were thinking oh man, that's weird. And we had zip the screen on the tent looked outside and we were surrounded by cows. Were you out? Yeah, I don't know because because it's going to walk through in their little group during the night or during the morning and ended up in the acreage around where we were yeah kind of cool about open range cattle and stuff but it's fun hanging out over there yeah check it out the Scott Hall campground was cool get our camp set up over there was cool had a couple tenths going and yeah, took off went over to Smith rock did the hiking trip over that that was pretty cool. That's where we did some of our photo stuff most of the hike was like kind of a cool afternoon hike. It's really a great one because it's it's a couple miles it's definitely challenging. If you're not super used to hiking you could do it but you could you should try it out for a little bit. We're not trained for Urbino get ready I got busted up my feet I got some hotspots and stuff so it's like maybe there's three miles four miles I'm not sure it takes about four hours or so you got to take in like an average sort of mellow pace you but it's cool you know the the lower part you know goes around like the crooked river maybe it's only two hours I don't know we went around the lower part around the crooked river which is really cool how the way that the area was formed is really like if you kind of look at it from the outside me the ranch land it's all surrounding is this pretty high or it's higher in elevation is just kind of this this flatter area and then it comes up to the crooked river where it drops off into this rim Rock Canyon and then Smith rock is the volcanic 7:18 remnant that's been left there as the erosion of the river is kind of wrapped by it and pulled away all the sediment that was there that would just kind of make it look like a average boring hillside and so now you have these these really exposed like vivid kind of crisp volcanic rocks that are just alien to the activity that we see and erosion commonly across the earth here so smooth rock get pretty cool pretty unique spot to go hike around at but yeah really fun to kind of jump in there really interesting kind of spot to be yeah did the hike around the crooked river side up to the backside were like monkey faces I was really cool with with a couple people that hadn't been there before so we got to catch on that that area for the first time. And yeah, monkey face is such a cool phenomenon because really when you come around that corner it does. And through is the anthropomorphic I guess it's animal Yeah, anthropomorphic look like and like that's when you make an animal a person right? What is it when you make a rock an animal hmm I don't know that word, but it looks like a monkey it just looks like a monkey's face. So it's called monkey there's no way so so yeah, we hiked around that spire of monkey face and started going up the misery Ridge trail. It's just a bunch of switchbacks. It kind of gets you up in elevation to get you to the top of the Smith rock rock there and yet walked around the top here for a bit and then hiked down the backside of it yeah really cool spot to check out over on the Smith rock side there's a bunch of other camping and hiking and stuff you can kind of do there other than just the the top over loop of the trail but there's there's other shows that kind of go around the east side of the park that's got some really cool stuff and then we're just talking about hiking and taking pictures and stuff a little bit so far but really the cool thing there is all the rock climbing stuff that you do all the the sport climbing that goes on and and I think that's really cool we there's there's a there's really a lot more hikers there today than there were there were sport climbers there's there's definitely like a handful of people that were out there but I didn't see and it's probably because the conditions were I think scheduled to be pretty bad like I think it was raining a lot of the day so I don't think a lot of people probably set up their their rock climbing rigs for a day in the rain but but I've definitely seen people there and really odd times of the year like super early March middle of the winter, early April and stuff maybe there's better time of the year to to do some of the types of climbs and stuff but yeah, I was hoping to find some people do like a multi pitch climb. I remember seeing that a couple years ago on one of the surfaces where you're just thinking like Wow, those people are hundreds of feet up. That means you like to bring the rope up once and then pull it all up and then lead climate again and then like bow I just like wow, how do you do that? That's so so yeah really scary kinda interesting stuff how to do all the all the rock climbing stuff. But man I wish I wish I knew a little bit more about I got to do it kind of 10:14 what I don't know as, I guess would be like gym sport climbing for weeks not not months even. And it's fun it's fun to check out from the learning about but man like being on the rock over and Smith rock is a lot different I got to go climb over there one time years ago. And just like getting on the rock and trying to like fill out the routes and stuff is so much different than kind of going for that hole on the wall and the rock gym and stuff it's just really interesting kind of get the experience of being hot and cold. And having all your like outdoor gear on and stuff and you know, you just kind of exposed to the wind and the elements and stuff. And then you're also trying to like pull up this pull up this mountain side too at the same time. So it's kind of fun. It's it's cool getting used to data, no trying to rock climb stuff. But man Yeah, interesting during the climb and being delayed and doing all that stuff. As far as stuff goes, we did a couple a couple 360 things that was kind of cool going over to Smith rock and shooting. But trying to get into some 360 photo work where last year, we did like a lot of a lot of video clips, which is really cool. I really liked those stock video clips, we produced a lot of places and we shot a ton of photos too, which is awesome. But But now I'm also trying to get into a bunch of a bunch of pieces where we can, well, I want to try and get the I want to try and get like collections of photos. And then I'm sort of starting to learn about where you can put these in like virtual tours. So you could put maybe four or five or whatever would take you know, you kind of go to the specific spots in a location or something and then you you get the 360 photograph and then you can kind of pieces together as a tour. So you can go from one 360 to the next 360 is sort of this immersion well, so I'm trying to check that out trying to learn about if, if that'll work for me very well. But But yeah, I've tried to do some 360 photo stuff where you take the photo, then you pull it into Affinity Photo, that's another program. I'm using it on the Mac right now, I think it's available on PC as well. It's sort of a Photoshop competitor, you can buy outright, I think for maybe $79 or something like that. It's it's really not as expensive as the the Creative Cloud purchases for continuation. But the reason I guess I bring up affinity photos, it's kind of noted as one of the better tools right now to project your stitch two 360 photo as an actual actual rectilinear projection in the program. And then you can still use the editing programs in the program. So so like, I guess, like the new Final Cut Pro has an ability to project the 360 photograph while you're editing it. So you could add in new materials to it like, I don't know, like just plates of information, they'll stay up in the 360 space that you're at as you move through it. It's interesting how it is you can kind of stitch things into the fabric of the scene within Final Cut in the video, and you can heal your Nadir point. So the base view is your Nadir at the top of you as your Zenith point. So the native point and a 360 photograph is where that tripod is going to be or where you are going to be in the photographer is going to be below it sort of thing. So So that's kind of an interesting part of it, where you got to kind of go through and I guess this is what affinity is for is you open up the photo after it's stitched, you open it in affinity and then you can go down and heal out the base there where your tripod was or where the person was that was taking the picture. And then you can have this kind of full 360 photograph without kind of a block at the bottom that said it's just a couple people. So yeah, it's kind of cool. So I'm trying to open it up in affinity and do a couple color adjustments to it, which is cool, that you can go through and do do kind of like post color correction stuff to some of the photographs, you can kind of do that with the 360 video, but you also kind of can't do it with the 360 video as well. And kind of add some color correction. Like you can't have been Final Cut. But it's really not the same as photo editing, I guess, you know, obviously. But it's kind of cool. We've been having a good time trying to edit together those the 360 photos. I'm trying to go through a bunch of the photos I've taken last year as well. And put those together and hope to well no is it? What is that 361 I skip in my mind right now there's like this 360 view here. I think it's V or VR. And it's sort of like a YouTube channel for 360 videos and stuff. YouTube also takes 360s as well as much other places. But it's Yeah, it's kind of a cool little photo and video sharing site for 360 content and social network and app and all that kind of stuff. But yeah, I put some stuff up there and it's we've got two people that are specifically interested in looking at 360 images and content would go But yeah, it's mostly it's kind of fun. So yeah, 360 staff, so photo staff had the Canon equipment out there. I was trying to take some landscape photos was cool. The the weekend weather was I think I had mentioned there was kind of a forecast to rain. Really that was like some thunderstorms that were blowing across the Cascades. I think they're just a bigger weather system 15:06 overall this weekend, not to mention the Perseids, which is you get back to on another podcast that was probably this, but they got kind of clouded out for me. Shoot, 15:15 I want to see some meteor showers. So I'm not talking about the proceeds. But I guess kind of going back. 15:25 Just the campus stuff, it was cool. We were really happy that we got to go out and do the camping stuff. And sorry that we didn't get to see the Parisians. But I don't know, I guess we're camping out and stuff. So that was pretty cool. It was thunderstorms that rolled over the Cascades. And then we have these big hits. We're really fortunate that I guess the big system, which I look really active, I pulled up the weather map on on dark sky, the weather app that I have on my phone. And you can see just this big red hotspot, maybe 25 miles or 30 miles to the north east of us. And it was probably just, you know, a ton of rain, hail ton of lightning. So I'm really glad we didn't get wiped over by that. That's pretty cool. But really, yeah, it was a cool kind of textured night where there's just a lot of clouds. And like a lot of kind of thunderstorms and stuff. It's cool that the airplanes are kind of coming in real low, they had to go around around this huge thunderstorm system. So they were coming in real low, and kind of making these sort of strange routes. But just kind of fun to see that I remember seeing that a couple of times in the past when thunderstorms have come in, and airlines would have to take just these kind of big alternate routes to get around this, this thunderstorm cells. So that was kind of cool. Check it out. We were taking pictures of it as the sun was going down when there's a rainbow kind of right as the evening was coming, coming to a close of our camp. So I was refund got some cool pictures, that and that's what I love. I love that that time of day or you know, right at the end of the day, it's a certain type of lighting effect that happens when there's really like mostly clouds over the sky. But right as the evening the western sky has a gap where it's clear, and the sun is able to shine through that pocket there and you get a lot of light that bounces back between the cloud surface above you and the ground below you where you're kind of in this little pocket where it just sort of sort of reflects against itself but you get this kind of warmer, sort of diffuse town around everything kind of changes the way the shadows are, it's different than overcast, you know where you get a diffusion of the shadows, but this one you get a really crisp kind of saturated quality to the light and it's a lot better than I think the softer sort of white light that you get in the diffuser stances of overcast days. But yeah, you get a lot of cool kind of rich contrast in those landscape photos with that kind of lighting condition sort of during that golden hour time with the right kind of cloud effect and stuff really beautiful really soft kind of easy to expose for photography kind of lights up. Yeah beautiful spot to be really kind of surreal, colorful looking. location and evening and yeah, fun hanging out, watch the thunderstorms, camping out getting rained on, maybe getting one a little bit. All part of the experience of being outside being in Eastern Oregon definitely got a little sunburn sore, all the rest of it. But yeah, going out and camping and stuff. You can check out more information at Billy Newman photo comm you can go to Billy Newman photo.com Ford slash support. If you want to help me out and participate in the value for value model that we're running this podcast with. If you receive some value out of some of the stuff that I was talking about, you're welcome to help me out and send some value my way through the portal at Billy Newman photo comm forward slash support, you can also find more information there about Patreon and the way that I use it if you're interested or feel more comfortable using Patreon that's patreon.com Ford slash Billy Newman photo. 18:53 So I was looking around at different options. I really liked a lot of the Nikon stuff, but I also noticed I really liked the Nikon stuff, I'll leave it at that. I just noticed that sometimes some of the accessory equipment outside of the body that you might buy, I bet some of the lenses are expensive, or they're a little more expensive than maybe some of the commensurate lenses that might be available over in canon. And I remember back in college someone was mentioning to me that they were going to switch from Nikon over to canon because canon was a bigger company. I don't know if this is really a reason or not. It was interesting logic though, to kind of think through at the time that that canon was a larger company selling more lenses, making more cameras making more equipment. And so they had more resources, more staff, more designers, working on cameras, building cameras, and doing research and development to kind of bring that that forward. And I think even maybe now that's still perhaps true like if you if you look at some of the technologies in Nikon versus canon like we're just kind of to take a base idea of it, though I love Nikon stuff a lot but If you were to take like the D five, I think that's a 20 megapixel sensor. Whereas in if you were to look at the newer nine or barmy, canon five D Mark four that's I think like 3136 I don't know it's out there in the 30 maybe I think it's a 30 megapixel camera. And I think perhaps the five D Mark three is a 23 megapixel camera. So it was interesting, just kind of noticing a couple of those things. Now I understand that there's benefits to the lower megapixel rating for some of the low light performance that you get a high SLS. And I think that's maybe sometimes where Nikon performs well. But then there's also Sony who's producing 42 megapixel cameras and they're doing incredible things in low light, but also even better stuff with a seven s, which I think is the the version of the camera that's specifically around some of the higher end video features. And I think it's a 12 megapixel camera that does incredible stuff in low light, like almost like you know, 100,000 so you can get really amazing low light images and low light video. So it's interesting how how that that kind of sensor technology works. But all that being said, it's just interesting that for a long time, even way back in history, like to the beginning of the digital SLR, I think canon was way ahead in what they're producing, as far as their sensors go, and what they're able to produce, like megapixels, or in fidelity of an image I think they had they had a what was the first one, I think Nikon did not have a full frame digital SLR and tell the Nikon d3 came out which was a fantastic camera. And I had that one also as a use camera that about later loved the d3. But it was interesting that they Yeah, like they didn't have a full frame DSLR camera option until 2007, I think when that came out, whereas on the Canon inside, I think that the EOS one, D, the one DS is that right? I think it was the one DS was the first was the first full frame camera produced by canon. And that was way back. And I think that was still like around eight megapixels, or maybe 10 megapixels for the mark two and that they had some technology that was just far more advanced for the time of 2000 to 2003 2004. Then what canon had going on prior to when Nikon, you know what I mean? Right? So anyway, that fast forwards to, to me in fall of 2018 I'm looking around for another camera purchase because I was going to be moving I was going to be taking a job where I was I was going to be working every day doing family portrait photography, and a lot of like wedding photography stuff to where I needed to depend on the memory card system that would be in the camera where like on the Sony side, like I had mentioned before, there were some limitations to it. And one of the other limitations was that it only accepted SD cards, which are right now I'm actually kind of learning are fine, you know, you can use an SD card for just about anything, but I also liked the opportunity, or the option to have compact flash card or maybe it's a USM USM USD. That's $1 I'm not sure but the compact flash card system that that goes in, I always thought that was like a little bit more professional when you put that in. And I just wanted like more memory options. So with the I think the five D Mark three that I decided to pick up used that had the the Compact Flash slot, and it also had the SD card slot, and you had the ability to record to nadp video and you had the ability to take photographs, you had the ability to do like high frame rate burst series for photographs. And it just seemed like it seemed like it was a great workhorse camera that the five D series and I think that's what people have been talking about, even since like the five D Mark two when they announced the the HD video recording features on DSLRs. So I think that when even before that, you know it was just it was one of the top top use cameras for wedding photographers and stuff. So for me, I was trying to find something that would be like a good workhorse camera where it could always kind of count on it and the battery system and the memory card and the lens arrangement that would be available to me that I could really just be hammering away on frames, and and then be bringing those in editing them and then kind of delivering them to clients in a pretty fast manner. So I thought that would be something that would help me out. And I think I was right. I think it was a good choice though. There are fantastic options with like the ACE seven, Mark three, or the a seven, three and the a seven are three. I think both of those have kind of solved a lot of those issues that I've been talking about where they've adjusted the battery system. And they've adjusted the just some of the blackout problems that I was talking about before, but but I was happy to switch over to the cannon side of it. I think also because that reason I was talking about two words. Yeah, no blackout, and I really liked being able to use the through the lens viewfinder of the SLR as opposed to the digital SLR or just looking at it on the screen so all those reasons were kind of why I wanted to get back to the the DSLR system instead of the the interchangeable lens camera system but it was great so so back I think in September I was looking around a lot I sold the a seven are off and then I was trying to hunt around for options for me to get a well priced canon five D Mark three and then I also bought one for Marina so she had a five D Mark three body and then we could kind of share lenses for two so I wanted to get up and running and I wanted to talk about like some of the lens stuff that I was interested in too It's interesting kind of switching over to canon now just kind of seeing you know what's available and what's available in the US market which for me and for you know someone that doesn't want to spend a ton of stuff getting a pretty high level professional level set of photography equipment, it's interesting to kind of comb around through the US market and figure out good pieces to use I think almost every camera system I've ever had it's been something that I've made a purchase of off of the US marketplace in some manner you know, I haven't bought a new film camera that's for sure. So it was interesting kind of tried to figure that out a little bit and I've always had really good luck with that I hear some bad stories out there but really it seems like a lot of photographers take pretty good care of their their camera equipment in a way that at least seems really quite usable for me so what I ended up with it at some point and I save a ton of money doing it too and I don't have to deal with the heavy depreciation because like by the time I I end up wanting to sell it it really hasn't moved that much in the marketplace a lot of the time you know it only ends up being like a few $100 to purchase that camera because when you sell it again you get a lot of that money back and as opposed to well I'll get into that story a second but but like when I made a purchase of it that camera was really quite new and it had appreciated a lot and value from the new price the new sticker price from the in the store in the camera store price to what it was when I bought it used so so it was a fantastic deal to kind of pick it up and find like a good one out there. So so yeah back in was it back in September I was hunting around in Oregon trying to find a good five D Mark three body so I was trying to debate a little bit I was looking around on eBay for five D Mark threes that would be available and I was looking around on kth and those are two locations that I kind of made purchases from before when I was making a purchase online. I like eBay and I sold a bunch of stuff on eBay I sold my a seminar on eBay, I sold my d3 when I that made a purchase the d3 I think from K h and I sold that d3 on eBay and I made my money back it was great, it worked pretty well. But when I was looking around I didn't really find the price point that I wanted for the five D Mark three line I think those are all running around 18 or 1900 bucks for the five D Mark three bodies are being sold but I'm sure I don't know it seemed like the market was a little lower than that at the time. And then when I looked on kth it was sort of the same story were ones that were in bargain condition you know where they'd been pretty beaten up or probably had been the you know, someone's wedding photography camera where it would really hammered out 100,000 or 200,000 frames already had a few seasons of weddings over the last couple of years and the person was trying to offload that gear and then you know upgrade to their their five D Mark for their one dx or something like that. So I kind of wanted to stay away from those in a way I'm sure they would have been functioning cameras and the way that they had been reported but there's really no way to like get an observation of the camera and its function in your hand while you have it to see that it's really like as clean or as in good condition as you'd want it to be for something that you're going to spend 18 $100 for when I was buying used cameras it was sub $1,000 purchases so it was like well you know, it's got a couple scuffs on it or something like that, but but really they were always quite nice in in their physical condition. So what I ended up deciding to do was instead of making a purchase on eBay or on kth what I decided to do was try and check out the the local marketplaces so I went on Craigslist to look at the classified listings that were there in the photo and video equipment for sale listing in my area. And I kind of scoured across Oregon to find you know a couple good pieces so I was trying to look in the Portland area. I was looking over in the bend area I was looking in the Eugene area and I was also looking up into like the Seattle and Tacoma area as well because I thought well you know if I need to then I'll drive up a little ways and I might save hundreds of dollars trying to make a purchase for a nice camera system. So I thought that might be a good idea. And then in addition to craigslist I was also getting into the Facebook marketplace where I was selling a ton of mag. My stuff from a house when I was trying to set up this move over here to Maui. So I was looking around at that I was saying well maybe I can check out and see if there's camera equipment that are also listed there too. And that actually worked out really well. I was pretty impressed with it. So for the camera bodies I found two canon five D Mark three bodies one of them I found over I'm banned for $1,000 flat which is incredible deal i think i think i got that brand on that one. It it had been used I think for for just like a single project that that someone had I think they don't need to have a business or they're paid to do it. So they made a purchase of a five D Mark three and then they shot like a series of web instruction like instructional videos for YouTube for a company that had purchased it and then they hadn't used that equipment in a while since then. So they were going to sell that camera off and get some of their money back. So I got the camera for $1,000 even which was fantastic. It really barely even had like rub marks on it on the base of it. You know like when you look at the camera body physically, the rubber was in fantastic shape. And the baseplate like where the tripod would go I think was the only area where there's a little bit of a scuff but it was fantastic. It was really cool that that it worked out so well for me so I made a purchase of that camera for 1000. Then I was looking around and I found another one up in the Portland area that a real estate agent had bought to take photographs of their property and then I think they'd found out that they didn't really want to five D Mark three but they wanted a Sony camera. And so they made a purchase of a Sony camera just a few months after that. And then to make up the cost of that purchase they wanted to sell off the Canon five D Mark three that they had and so I saw and I got the box too which is interesting I got the box for the five D Mark three had the receipt from the camera store that they bought it for it was you know 20 $600 when they bought it maybe 12 months ago or 11 months ago and I looked at the shutter count of it. There's maybe 1900 pictures have been taken on the camera body when I made a purchase of it so it was really almost like a brand new camera. I think I was put 1000 frames on it a day at the job that I had so 32:15 yeah it was I I've already broken it in quite a bit more than it had been when I made a purchase of it so it was really cool getting such a new camera for such a low price so saving a few $1,000 trying to put it put the these this package of equipment together was excellent and I was really happy to do that. And that was one thing I noticed about the the Canon US market is there's just and this is sort of back to that thing it's a bigger company and they're selling more cameras out there so it was cool that there's just so much used gear out in the market where as opposed to you know if I was looking for a D 100 on the Nikon side or or a D four or something like that it would be pretty hard to find those bodies I guess in that condition or you know in that way and then for that price it seemed like and same same goes for like a Canon one dx that I was trying to find that on the US market those are really held by professionals or sports photographers and those bodies were really be and still very expensive when I was looking around for them. But it seemed like there's so many people that were interested in doing wedding photography or doing photography as a hobby that they would kind of lean into the higher price range and pick up a five D Mark three and then find out why maybe I don't want it or maybe I want to switch over to a five D Mark for now. And so they were ditching those and offloading those for way lower prices. So it was excellent time to kind of come in pick those cameras up and and kind of start getting set up but the other thing I noticed is that Okay, so now we have the five D bodies. Now we're going to need lenses to work on these so what I was looking for was the the USM as well what was it the 24 to 70 f two a lenses that were for like the professional full frame cameras and I was fortunate to find those again on the Facebook marketplace I think I found one in the Eugene area and I got a USM 124 to 70 which was a great price and then I also found a USM 224 to 70 that had been used more I definitely could tell that it had been used more this even though was a newer version lens that it definitely had I think some more wear on it and that's that's probably the lens that though still works great still has great optical clarity but it's probably the one that seems the most tired when I'm using it sometimes so it's interesting sometimes but but I'm sure I probably put a ton of work on it to just kind of racking it back and forth trying to get all these different photographs I was trying to shoot so i don't know i lenses don't last forever and they're mechanical pieces. But but these are really well built you know these, these professional hourglass systems are really sturdy and well built and I was really impressed with how they were working. So I had a great time using it and I didn't really I seem to run into any problems while I was trying to produce produce photographs with it but I found yeah I found one of them one of the lenses in the Eugene area and then I found another one up in Portland so I drove up to pick that lens up and then add you know add to five D Mark threes and 224 to 70 f two eight lenses to throw on there to do a bunch of the family portrait stuff and a bunch of the you know kind of lifestyle images that I was trying to do so it was a great starting setup for me to kind of get and then move out from and so I had been working with that for a couple months and I've been trying to kind of expand from that since then and so the stuff that I'm looking for now well so I started looking into like some things for like real estate photography and one of the things that's always required for that stuff is is like a really wide angle lens. So when I was looking around with the company that I was working with they were looking for images between 17 millimeters full frame and 20 millimeters on a full frame camera and so I went ahead and I purchased the the 17 to 40 millimeter f four lens it was actually really quite inexpensive i mean you know, again coming from like the Nikon so when I thought like wow that's gonna be more than $1,000 to pick up to pick up a lens for it was really low price I think it was about $520 to buy a new 17 to 40 millimeter 36:30 lens that was like that Yeah, the f4 that I was talking about. So I picked that one up to do some of the real estate photography and that amortize pretty quickly to get into it to use that for real estate jobs. It kind of paid for itself just in a couple jobs along without the cameras themselves and the 24 to 70 sort of paid for themselves by hammering out a bunch of family portrait sessions with them. So both of those things kind of worked out pretty well but in addition to that what I'm looking for is like the 50 millimeter f one four lens I was looking at that too and I'm looking at those new because and this is sort of i'm saying is it's just it seems like Canon lens prices are sort of dropping down a bit maybe there's newer lenses and I know there's you know the there's way higher end lenses but the 50 millimeter f one for kind of lower end lens perhaps is I think 299 which is really super cheap i think that's that's what I paid for a 35 millimeter dx lens on my on my old camera system, you know, on the Nikon stuff so so I was I think what was it like that the 28 millimeter f two lens I had for my Sony camera that was like 450 bucks when I bought it used right so it was awesome to find to find like that 50 millimeter f1 for for 299 and then in addition to that, for other portrait stuff, if I wanted to do it, I could pick up an 85 millimeter f1 eight for 299 also and I was like wow these are way more reasonable price ranges then then what I thought so it just really for for not that much, you could probably put together a full range of prime lenses that I'd want to use and I could put together a full range of zoom lenses that I wanted to use that were all kind of higher end glass that that would be great for you know, professional stuff, or the lifestyle stuff or the you know, whatever kind of photography stuff I wanted to expand into. And then on top of that I 38:25 was looking at the though I would love an FTA I was looking at the zoom lenses and one thing I've kind of learned from this job that I was working with is is really when you're working with compression and like when you're working like with with zoom and you're using the compression of the lens past you know 70 millimeters like into the 80 millimeter or 100 millimeter out to 200 f two A is a is a real soft and a lot of times if especially if you're taking pictures of a couple people together and you're not trying to just rack right into to focus in on an eye and even when you're taking a picture a portrait of someone you really have to kind of crank it up to f4 f5 to get a depth of field that's thick enough to get their their nose, their eyes in their ear in focus and the way that you'd need to and it seems like well you know, like love super shallow depth of field but it seems like you want to get the person in focus so you got to get a few parts of them and focus. Remember taking self portraits you know like I hold the camera out in front of me with the with the Canon 50 millimeter one eight. I tried to take a picture of Marina and I somewhere and I remember Marina would be just just on the plane in front of me, you know, because we're trying to stand right next to each other and maybe I would be in focus. But then Marina just one or two inches in front of my nose would be completely out of focus. It would look just like a super blurry kind of washed area because the depth of field was so shallow. That's where I was trying to, you know, kind of finally learning like oh yeah, okay, so maybe f1 eight isn't absolutely what you have to have for every photograph that you take or f1 for or whatever might be, so I was gonna find in that part out where Okay, well I'm gonna have to rack this out to like f5 or f8 anyway to get a sharp photograph of the thing that I'm trying to get an image of. So I have kind of rounded out that I'm going to be fine for a lot of the landscape photography that I'm interested in doing, I'm going to be fine kind of jumping into lenses that are around that f4 line. So I was looking at the the USM 72 200 f4 lens that they have. And so I think it's, I think that the two eight, the f2 eight lens that's 70 to 200 is like around 1500 bucks, but the f4 is about 600 bucks, I think it's like 599 to pick up a 70 to 200 USM lens now it doesn't have the image stabilization on Nikon, I call it vibration reduction is that right? But it doesn't have the image stabilization and I think it is probably lacking some of the some other additional features because I know there's two versions after that, that escalate in price quite a bit. But if you're looking for that older one, it's still available on Amazon for 599, which is a great price. If you want to get a 70 to 200 I think that was really cool and there's a lot of things you could do with it. Again, like I was saying with the compression, if you're going out to 225 millimetres and you're shooting it f4 that's going to give you a really nice bokeh in the background. And you're going to get the person in focus if you need to, if you're shooting a portrait and if you're shooting some kind of landscape or wildlife scene, you're going to be able to do a lot with that too. You're just gonna have a lot of flexibility in what you're able to do I love fast lenses I'd really like to always push for you to wait or have 1.2 or something like that but but I'm loving the fact that there's an opportunity for me to get a whole range of focal lengths as I'm trying to transition over into new gear for a much much lower price than what I was expecting so I think that's pretty cool I've been pretty happy with this transition over into canon equipment so far and it's been it's been interesting you know the the thing that I'm thanks a lot for checking out this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. Hope you guys check out some stuff on Billy Newman photo.com few new things up there some stuff on the homepage, some good links to other other outbound sources, some links to books and links to some podcasts like this a blog posts are pretty cool. Yeah, check it out at Billy numina photo.com. Thanks a lot for listening to this episode and the back end. Thank you Next

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson

Jimbo welcomes James Horncastle, Alvaro Romeo and Julien Laurens into the Euro pod as we approach crunch time across the continent. The Champions League semi-finals are delicately poised with Liverpool expected to progress past Villarreal and Man City and Real Madrid expected to produce more chaos. The panel are also predicting some epic atmospheres in the Conference League semi-final second legs in Marseille and Rome. Christoph Biermann discusses the possibility of an all-German Europa League final as the nation starts to take the competition seriously again. Trabzonspor and Linfield are champions at a canter, just like PSG were. Can the Parisians persuade Zidane to become the new manager? Plus Bologna's inspired form, Dortmund's need for reinvention and a miserable year for Atletico. RUNNING ORDER:  • PART 1a: Mino Raiola passes away (02m 00s) • PART 1b: Moment of the weekend (05m 00s)  • PART 2: Champions League semi-final previews (09m 30s) • PART 3: Advantage Milan in the Serie A title race (22m 00s) • PART 4: Christoph Biermann on the Bundesliga and Europa League semis (37m 00s) • PART 5: Trabzonspor, Linfield and the race for Europe in France & Spain (50m 00s) SIGN UP TO THE ATHLETIC TODAY FOR £1 A MONTH FOR THE FIRST 6 MONTHS • theathletic.com/totally   GET IN TOUCH: • follow us on Instagram • find us on Facebook • send us a tweet: @TheTotallyShow   READ STUFF ON OUR WEBSITE: • check out thetotallyfootballshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Morning Meeting
Episode 85: The 60s Love Affair That Ignited L.A.'s Cultural Explosion

Morning Meeting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 30:22


This week, Ashley and Mike look at the young Hollywood super-couple who lit a match for the cultural explosion in 1960s Los Angeles. AIR MAIL contributor Mark Rozzo joins the show to discuss his new book about Dennis Hopper and Brooke Hayward, and how their art-loaded home in the hills became the center of gravity for everyone from Warhol to Didion to the Hells Angels. There's also a revealing conversation about why Parisians are grumpy about their city, a look at some unique new grooming trends, and a strange new body enhancement attracting everyone from soccer moms to influencers. All this and more make this week's episode one you won't want to miss.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Morning Meeting
Episode 85: The 60s Love Affair That Ignited L.A.'s Cultural Explosion

Morning Meeting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 30:23


This week, Ashley and Mike look at the young Hollywood super-couple who lit a match for the cultural explosion in 1960s Los Angeles. AIR MAIL contributor Mark Rozzo joins the show to discuss his new book about Dennis Hopper and Brooke Hayward, and how their art-loaded home in the hills became the center of gravity for everyone from Warhol to Didion to the Hells Angels. There's also a revealing conversation about why Parisians are grumpy about their city, a look at some unique new grooming trends, and a strange new body enhancement attracting everyone from soccer moms to influencers. All this and more make this week's episode one you won't want to miss. View on Air Mail →

Emily Is Not In Paris: The Podcast
Meet Founder of Ferdinand Duval, the newest French Online Shopping Platform | Alicja Grzadkowska

Emily Is Not In Paris: The Podcast

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 47:05


By way of Canada, Alicja Grzadkowska now calls Paris home.  Since her arrival a mere 3 years ago she has founded a literary magazine and a company that curates the French & European brands that Parisians love to wear. Founded in the Marais neighbourhood of Paris in 2021, Ferdinand Duval is a marketplace that curates the French & European fashion brands that Parisians love to wear.✩ Where to find Alicja ✩➫ Insta: @ferdinandduval➫ Website: ferdinandduval.com➫ Magazine: ferdinandduval.com/blogs/storiesSupport the show (https://paypal.me/pools/c/8AMn73M6IO)

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 150 Part 1: How Maison Auclert is Refreshing Ancient Jewelry for a Contemporary Audience

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 23:08


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the beauty of ancient and antique jewelry may not be evident at first, and why that makes them all the more interesting to Marc How ancient jewelry has been passed through generations of collectors What streets to visit for the best jewelry shopping in Paris How Marc sources jewels from antiquity, and why provenance is of the utmost importance  Why Marc chose to list the prices of his pieces in his boutique window display About Marc Auclert The grandson of an antique dealer, Marc Auclert has had a passion for antique jewelry and objects of curiosity from a young age. Having spent over 20 years working for some of the most prestigious jewelry houses worldwide, including De Beers and Chanel, he opened Maison Auclert in 2011. The boutique specializes in mounting museum-worthy ancient jewels as pieces of contemporary jewelry.  The works of art selected to be mounted are sourced from a broad range of periods, cultures and geographical regions. Each object is chosen for its beauty and rarity; each elegant mounting is designed to showcase, and not overwhelm, the objects' preciousness, color, patina, shape or symbolism. Designed to celebrate and enhance the singularity of each Antique work of art, every piece in the Maison Auclert collection is unique, hand-made and embellished by the artisans of the best contemporary workshops in Paris. Additional Resources: Website Instagram Photos Available on TheJeweleryJourney.com Bague camée Julia et Saphirs Roman Cameo Ring  White and black two-layered onyx cameo representing the bust to the right of Julia Mamaea, mother of Emperor Severe Alexander, Roman Art  of the 3rd century AD,  mounted on an 18K red gold ring with a surrounding of sapphires (total 1.39 carat).    BO Impression 4 Intailles Impression Intaglio Earrings 18K gold long earrings, set with a Burmese ruby (1.05 carat), an emerald (0.56 carat), 6 diamonds (0.63 carat) and 4 “Grand Tour” intaglios (19th century) in  amethyst, chalcedony and carnelian, and their impressions in gold   Bague Profil Hélios Helios Ring Oxidized silver ring with a cut-out that reveals the effigy of the god Helios on a gold stater from Rhodes of the 5th century B.C.   Bracelet Cuff Agathe Miel Agate Cuff Large cuff bracelet in 18K brushed gold set with 5 rhomboid-shaped agate necklace beads, known as "Medicine Beads" for their prophylactic power, Indo-Tibetan art of the 1st Millennium B.C..    Collier Intaille Magique Magical Intaglio Necklace Pendant set with a lacunary hematite «  magical » or gnostic intaglio engraved with the right part of a gnostic lion-head deity, the sliced winged-head of the Gorgon in the left hand, two  scarabs, Greek letters (ΑΓΒΑ for the magical incantation Abraxas, ΙΑω for the jewish god Yahwe, etc.), Egyptian scarabs and stars in the field, Egypto-roman Art from the 1st-3rd century A.D., a modern extrapolation of the missing part hand-engraved in 18K gold, mounted on a black lacquered chain.      Transcript: Thanks to jewelry designer Marc Auclert, you can wear a piece of jewelry history around your neck. At his Paris boutique Maison Auclert, Marc transforms jewels from antiquity into contemporary pieces, all while preserving the soul of the original jewel. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about why ancient jewelry carries more emotion than contemporary pieces; how he finds jewels dating back to BC; and why the time it takes to appreciate antique jewelry is well worth it. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Here at the Jewelry Journey, we're about all things jewelry. With that in mind, I wanted to let you know about an upcoming jewelry conference, which is “Beyond Boundaries: Jewelry of the Americas.” It's sponsored by the Association for the Study of Jewelry and Related Arts, or, as it's otherwise known, ASJRA. The conference takes place virtually on Saturday and Sunday May 21 and May 22, which is around the corner. For details on the program and the speakers, go to www.jewelryconference.com. Non-members are welcome. I have to say that I attended this conference in person for several years, and it's one of my favorite conferences. It's a real treat to be able to sit in your pajamas or in comfies in your living room and listen to some extraordinary speakers. So, check it out. Register at www.jewelryconference.com. See you there. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week. Today, my guest is Marc Auclert of Maison Auclert. After stints at some of the world's most prestigious auction and fashion houses and having lived all over the world, he now combines museum-quality antiquities with contemporary settings and fashions them into unique and wearable jewelry. We talked with Marc pre-Covid and are pleased to be visiting with him again. We'll hear all about his jewelry journey today. Marc, welcome to the program. Marc: Sharon, thank you for inviting me again. Sharon: So glad to have you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It seems you've been everywhere. Marc: Well, not really. Recently we've been a bit stuck at home. Sharon: That's true. Marc: But beyond that, business has started back and that's really nice. Clients are back in Paris. Parisians are starting to spend again. It's been nice since Christmas. We've had a very good time. The journey is continuing. This company, which I founded in 2011, is 10 years old, so it's pretty old. This is a landmark. Sharon: Congratulations. That is a big deal. Marc: Thank you. I've worked for many grand houses for whom 10 years would be nothing, but when it's your own company, 10 years is a sweet number, I must admit. I'm very happy. It's doing well in the sense that it's making momentum. It's becoming more and more known, and this is extremely important. Today's awareness is tomorrow's success. Sharon: That's true. Marc: My first goal when I opened the company was not to make sales, though it is very important that the company has the cashflow in order to survive, but my first real goal was to build awareness, because I knew from my business experience that today's awareness is tomorrow's sales. Sharon: Well, you got a lot of press early on. Marc: Yes, I've been very lucky. First of all, don't forget I've been in the business for many, many years, so I know many actors, including the press people. So, when I opened my business, I was able to very easily reach out to lots of key people in the communications industry. This, of course, was a great help, and then it was a snowball.  You start getting some press releases, and other people take interest. You get French press, then the English will look at it, then the Americans will look at it, etc. So, that's been very, very good.   Sharon: That's quite a lot of presence. How did you get into jewelry? Did you always like it? Marc: I guess so. I have no clear memories of saying to myself, “I want to do this.” The only thing I remember is when I was a child, I was fascinated by the crystal world. I moved from collecting rough crystals to liking cut gemstones. After my general studies I thought, “Oh, that could be interesting, to do a course in that field.” That's how I went to the GIA in New York, but it was more like a hobby than anything. It was a crisis at the time when I was getting my first job. It wasn't very easy to get a first employment, and one of the possibilities was to join the industry. As I had general studies under my sleeve plus a GIA diploma, that was my first job I got. That's how I got interested in jewelry, from crystals to faceted stones to jewelry. Today, to continue the journey, as you call it, I'm more interested in antique jewelry, antique gold, intaglios, cameos and things like that, which is continuing on that path.   Sharon: Why is it that jewelry from antiquity fascinates you?   Marc: I think it's because I understand modern jewelry very well and it doesn't fascinate me. Only very few people and very few pieces fascinate me. It's not because they're not good; they are wonderful. But the proposition we're getting, it's an easy proposition, whereas if you look at antique jewelry, antique stones, antique jewels, be them historical or in museums or whatever, I think they're more difficult to understand because they're less pleasing to the eye, but technically and in terms of art history, they're much more interesting. That difficulty makes them so much more attractive to me, and that's why I'm selling them to my clients, basically.  Sharon: And they sell to you, I presume, when they bring in something and tell you about it. Marc: Absolutely. Your question is very important because when you look at a 15th century B.C. intaglio, it's tiny; it's not even an inch long. If you don't actually sit down and have a proper look at it and detail it, which requires a few minutes, then you don't get it. This is really in opposition to what we see today in jewelry companies' displays. It's, bang, in your face. It's gorgeous. It's luminous. It's full of diamonds and stones and it's evident. Those antique intaglios are not evident. That's what I like. Sharon: When did you first start encountering antique jewels? At the auction houses? At the fashion houses?  Marc: When you're interested in jewelry like you or me, we've been in museums. That's when you get that first encounter and you compute those first pieces you get to see, so there isn't a step where you actually shift to that. Actually, you get to see them on a regular basis. You don't stop, really, but they're growing on you. At a certain age—because I do think it's a question of acquired taste, hence a question of age—they come back to you. You know these are interesting pieces you need to go back to and understand. So, to answer your question, I've been looking at them for a long time, but I've been starting to understand them not so long ago. Does that make sense?   Sharon: Yes, I think I understand. I think you're looking at a 15th century piece and the person on it is talking to you, in a sense.   Marc: Exactly. It says so much about the history of art, about humanity, about who did it, how he did it, what tools were used and in what environment. Think no electricity, no motor, everything was handmade in a dark workshop in the pits of a town like Rome or Alexandria. Then you start to understand who wore it, why they wore it, on what they wore it, on what occasion, and you're really entering history. That's fascinating. Sharon: You were with some prestigious auction houses—was it Sotheby's?—and you started the high jewelry at Chanel. How did you segue to this? Marc: For me, it's a journey. It's a jewelry journey. You start with easy pieces, diamonds for instance. Diamonds are easy. You look at a 10-carat, D, flawless, XXX emerald cut, type 2A with a comb, that's easy. Everybody loves it. You don't need to be especially knowledgeable to get it. As you are working with those items, in parallel you know that there are other things that are gorgeous and much more difficult to understand. As you grow older, that's where your interest goes towards.  You start with the beginning. You start with the diamonds and the gemstones. You start with the gorgeous jewelry, and then you move slowly to Art Deco pieces, then to 19th century, then you go to the 18th century. Then you go to more difficult, the Renaissance, Medieval. Then you go to Byzantine jewelry, and then you enter the whole world of antiquity: Roman, Hellenistic, Greek, Mesopotamian, Egyptian. The further you go up the stream, the more difficult it is, because it's not as appealing to the eye as your 10-carat cut diamond. Sharon: I don't stumble across the 10-carat so much, but I can understand what you're saying. Marc: Well, you see them in the windows.  Sharon: Tell us about Maison Auclert. Tell us about the business and what you do. What do you describe at a dinner party if somebody asks? Marc: It's exactly how you explained it in the introduction. My job is to find antiques. They can be Mesopotamian; they can be 19th century German or French. The definition of antiques is very broad. There is no geographic location. It can be South American Pre-Columbian; it can be French; it can be Asian, depending on what I find and what my taste goes for.  When I see those antiques, I have to think about how I'm going to introduce them onto a piece of jewelry. Often antique dealers show me beautiful pieces and say, “Look at this. It's gorgeous. You could make a lovely piece of jewelry out of that.” No, to make a piece of jewelry, you also need some requirements, which is that it has to be jewelry pretty. It's not because it's antique that it will be jewelry pretty. It has to be durable. It has to have the right color, the right sheen, the right durability. That's also an important factor. If it's too brittle and too fragile, you're not going to mount it on a piece of jewelry, especially on a ring. In addition to the antique purchasing, which is what all antique dealers do, I also introduce the notion of the jewelry mounting aspect of it.  So, my first job is buying antiques. My second job is then to design around them. That's another interesting factor in what I do, in the sense that you have designers that take hours, that think about things for hours and ponder and come back to the drawing. In my case, it's a very instinctual type of creation. When I look at an antique piece, very rapidly I know what I'm going to do with it. If I don't know what I'm going to do with it, I still buy it. Then it'll be in my box for many, many months before I have an idea. Basically, if I don't have the idea straightaway, I forget.  It's kind of like, “Take me, because you're going to do this.” It's simultaneous. It's rather interesting, the way it works in my little head. I know other designers that work for hours and hours and come up with wonderful designs. In my case, maybe I'm very lazy, but the design comes straightaway, and that's that.  Then, of course, I finalize it. I speak with the workshop and say, “This is what I have in mind. Here's a quick sketch. How are you going to make it happen?” There's the whole technical part of it that is discussed with the workshop. That's why you have to work with wonderful workshops in the sense that they have to bring that notion of technicality, which is important. That's how the piece of jewelry gets constructed on paper. Then they will take it onboard—when I say “they,” it's the workshop. I only use Parisian workshops—and they will start building the piece with a wax model and then cast it in gold. I will go the workshops once a week to follow the building of the piece. Why is that important? Because in the case of my jewelry it's only one-of-a-kind pieces, so each piece is actually a prototype. So, I have to be there on a regular basis. That's the reason why I can't outsource in Italy or Asia or whatever. It has to be made around the corner. I am Parisian. It has to be made in Paris.    Sharon: It's not because the workshops are better. It's just that they're close to you.   Marc: Or better. Parisian work is really, really good.   Sharon: Are they?   Marc: Yes, definitely. A company like Tiffany, they produce their high-end jewelry in Paris. I think that says a lot. You have lovely, wonderful jewelers in Italy and Lebanon. We've met them over the years, but I must admit in Paris, we still have a knowhow that is extremely important. How long will they last? I don't know, but right now, it's still very much cared for.   Sharon: How do you find these antiquities? Where do you find them?   Marc: All over the world. I browse a lot on the internet. I check all the sales at auction houses, big auction houses, small auction houses, tiny, local, regional auction houses. I have two workers who help me look for what I'm looking for: antique dealers, of course, collectors, private people. But I have to be very careful because, as you know, there are different problems involved with antiquities, regional problems like in the Middle East. There have been lots of naughty diggings being done in certain regions, and hence you get some illegal pieces arriving on the market. That for me is a no-no, first of all because ethically it doesn't suit me at all, and secondly, I'm a young company, so I can't afford to be in a pickle. That for me is very, very important. It's key. The whole issue of provenance, which has to be pristine, is very important. So, I only buy from very, very reliable auction houses, antique dealers, collectors, private people only if I know them very, very well. If someone came off of the street and said, “Hi, look, I've got these wonderful intaglios. Are you interested?” my answer would have to be, “Sorry, no,” just because of those subjects.   Sharon: For some reason, I envision that most of your clientele is male. Is it both?   Marc: It's absolutely both. It's the same as in the classical jewelry industry. 50 percent of my clientele is female; 50 percent is male. I see exactly the same pattern as the Place Vendome. She will walk in; she will buy for herself, or she will be scouting and then she will be back with someone else to pay for the piece of jewelry because it's a gift. It's exactly the same pattern, with more and more women buying the jewelry for themselves. I often get ladies that already have the engagement ring, the tennis bracelet—yes, antique isn't everything—and they're in for an intaglio, for instance. They don't own a Roman intaglio and that's what they would like, and that's something they will come and do on their own, definitely, especially as the prices are softer than with precious stone jewelry.   Sharon: Do people stumble on your store? You have a nice storefront. I haven't been there for a few years now.   Marc: It hasn't changed. It's still there, still the same. Now, to answer the question, there are two things. It's the network. The network is very, very important in any business, especially if it's a retail business. When I started that business, I already had a client book, and that proved to be extremely important. I also have business partners who have very, very good contacts, so that's great. That definitely was, how do you say, a jumpstart? That was a very good jumpstart in the beginning.   The second very important thing, as you mentioned, is obviously the location. I have a small boutique, but it's very well located. In Paris right now, the good retail is concentrating around Place Vendome, Rue St. Honoré, Rue de Castiglione. This area, which always has been good, is now becoming excellent. Avenue Montaigne is going down. St. Germain is going down, to the benefit of the area where I happen to be very lucky to have a boutique.    Sharon: You are in a fabulous location. Are people walking along the street?   Marc: I'm in the middle. All the big the palaces and hotels are around us: the Ritz, the Meurice, the Bristol, Mandarin Oriental. Most of the big hotels are around this area. Of course, you can imagine the type of clientele that walks in front of the window, and that's wonderful for a small company like mine. 

Bump in the Night
Episode 3: The Paris Catacombs

Bump in the Night

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2022 47:48


Join Kyla and me as we explore the Paris Catacombs! The beautiful yet morbid tunnels beneath the streets of Paris. The resting place of 6 million Parisians! Come along as we explore the dark history around the catacombs and some of the dark legends that were born in those dark tunnels! Follow us here as well! Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCukburB36IWZn5D16ll_4CA Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bump_in_the_night_podcast/ Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@bumpinthenightpodcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bumpinthenightpodcast/support

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert
Michael Bublé, Rose Matafeo (Extended Cut) | Commander In Speech

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 39:25


Ukraine's president addressed the U.S. Congress on Thursday and closed his speech with a direct appeal to President Biden for a no-fly zone and more weapons. In other Russia news, Stephen wonders if he will be the next American sanctioned after the Kremlin announced they will begin sanctioning media figures who are critical of Russia's war in Ukraine. Meanwhile, fans of big potatoes may be bummed to hear about a ruling from the folks who track world-record size tubers, and Stephen imagines how Parisians might have reacted to watching their iconic Eiffel Tower grow by 20 feet this week. Next, Michael Bublé had the experience of a lifetime when he got to work with Paul McCartney, who produced Michael's cover of “My Valentine” on his new album, “Higher,” which is available everywhere on March 25th. And in this Pod Show exclusive extended interview, Rose Matafeo finds common ground with Stephen Colbert as the two discuss their bungee jumping experiences in New Zealand. Season two of her show “Starstruck” premieres March 24th on HBO Max. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Chalke Talk
Anne Sebba

Chalke Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 52:49


Les Parisiennes 1939-49How did the women of Paris live, love and die in the 1940s? Why did some Parisians collaborate while others resisted? From saving other people's children, to embracing Nazi philosophy to retreating to the Ritz with a lover, acclaimed writer, Anne Sebba, examines the many different choices made by the Parisiennes in order to survive the war. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson

Jimbo is joined by Michael Cox, Tom Williams and Duncan Alexander as perhaps two grandiose football projects come to an end. Roman Abramovich is sanctioned meaning that Chelsea Football Club are frozen as a commercial asset. What does it all mean? The Athletic's Matt Slater takes us into uncharted territory. PSG collapse again as Real Madrid overcome the Parisians in the Champions League. How good is Benzema and why does this exit hurt more than any other for PSG? In the Premier League this weekend, the panel all make Spurs favourites at Old Trafford, while wondering if an Everton relegation would be the biggest in decades. Plus there's Adele stats, offsides provoked and Cottee in disguise. And it's the Inter Totally match-up everyone has been waiting for – Michael Cox versus Daniel Storey. RUNNING ORDER:  • PART 1: Abramovich sanctioned with Matt Slater (02m 00s) • PART 2: Real Madrid 3-1 PSG (07m 30s)  • PART 3: The rest of the Champions League midweek (29m 00s)  • PART 4: Man Utd v Spurs and Arsenal v Leicester previews (39m 00s) • PART 5: The battle at the bottom (50m 00s) • PART 6: Inter Totally Cup – Cox v Storey (60m 00s) SIGN UP TO THE ATHLETIC TODAY FOR £1 A MONTH FOR THE FIRST 6 MONTHS • theathletic.com/totally   GET IN TOUCH: • follow us on Instagram • find us on Facebook • send us a tweet: @TheTotallyShow   READ STUFF ON OUR WEBSITE: • check out thetotallyfootballshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Loulabelle’s FrancoFiles
Loulabelle's FrancoFiles Ep 61 - After the war. One woman's story of the raw, beautiful, real Paris.

Loulabelle’s FrancoFiles

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 48:43


www.LoulabellesFrancoFiles.com  *Loulabelle's FrancoFiles on Instagram - @loulabelles_francofiles  *We often think of Paris as the beautiful tourist Mecca flooded with cutesie photo ops of flowers, promenades, cafes and gorgeous doors. But under all of that beauty is a rawness. A wonderful strength and determination to survive. I chatted to Parisian Lise Buisson Primaud whose family struggled through the war in ways most of us can't or don't want to imagine, but the after effects of the war lasted more than a generation. Hearing Lise talk about HER Paris really highlighted that for me. I'm so grateful to those courageous Parisians who didn't give up. They're one of the reasons why we still have the Paris we all adore today. Tune in to hear Lise talk about her early story in post war Paris, growing up in Montparnasse in the 14th arrondissement.  Whilst times were tough, she and her siblings never complained or wished for a different life. They had each other.We find it hard to imagine this reality they all lived and whilst Lise says we shouldn't dwell on the difficult times, (one of the strategies she employs which assists her to be such an amazing survivor I think) it is important to remember this period of history to avoid being repeated.Eventually Lise and her little family moved to Australia, but with her husband and her children Lise would visit and go back to France often.Lise now teaches French in south east Melbourne, Australia.Hear Lise's fave music by Jacques Brel and also traditional fave cuisine Les Rillettes.

The Leopard and the Lily's podcast
Episode 88 - After Etienne Marcel

The Leopard and the Lily's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 19:58


In this episode, the Dauphin is invited back into Paris, and restores his relationship with the Parisians. Charles of Navarre surrounds Paris. The French can't pay for their King's ransom. You can reach me at leaopardandlilies @ gmail.com or https://www.facebook.com/theleopardandthelily Dates: July 31, 1358: Étienne Marcel dies August 1, 1358: Paris invites Prince Charles back; Charles of Navarre has a draft treaty with England drafted August 2, 1358: The Dauphin returns to Paris August 3, 1358: Charles of Navarre renounces his homage and attempted crowning August 4, 1358: Charles of Navarre occupies Melun August 22, 1358: Queen Isabella dies August sometime, 1358: Pope Innocent IV recalls his legates and asks them to help the Regent and the Companies make peace September 21, 1358: Stephen Cusington arrives in London with Charles of Navarre's proposed treaty November something, 1358: French representatives info