Podcasts about Plagiarism

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Using another author's work as if it was one's own original work

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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
Plagiarism

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Best podcasts about Plagiarism

Latest podcast episodes about Plagiarism

Latinx On The Rise
Are we ready to be calladitas no more? | Convo with Kay Lopez creator of Latina's Poderosas

Latinx On The Rise

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 30:05


In 2019, Mitú had an activation at We All Grow Latina, a conference that took place once a year. In their activation they had a large sign that said, "calladitas no more," I even took a photo in front of the damn thing. However, it seems like Mitú has benefitted from the Latinx community staying silent about their alleged plagiarism. Someone who was not afraid to talk about her experience is Kay Lopez, the creator of Latinas Poderosas. She is a graphic designer who, unfortunately, had her work allegedly plagiarized by Mitú. She shared the devolution of her view on the company and how creators in the future can better protect their creations. And thanks to On The Rise Media for this production:https://www.instagram.com/_ontherisem...​Follow me on Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/latinxontherise/Twitter | https://twitter.com/LatinxOnTheRiseYoutube | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdE7h1oL4Gs0RLoRlGAuX5w

BlablaSwing
Blablaswing #43 - Marcus and Barbl "Copying one person is plagiarism, but copying many is research"

BlablaSwing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 84:02


More than 30 years of partnership,teaching and permorming all swing dances all around the world...wow! Marcus and Barbl are among the most important figures in the modern world of swing dance, it was a true honor to talk with them about their passion and their long contribution within the swing dance community. https://www.rockthatswing.com/ https://www.worldofswing.com/ If you want to learn the Killer boogie routine from Marcus : https://youtu.be/k2QIRKq5mVk Edit : 46:23 The name was not Walter Gordon, but Walter Cosdon -> https://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/walter-r-cosden-and-agnes-melcoll-the-rhumba-winners-of-the-news-photo/517325270 Thanks to Stéphanie Mai to join me for this episode. Recorded in Paris, october 2021

FULL COMP: The Voice of the Restaurant Industry Revolution
Episode 165: Going Against the Grain: Celebrity Chef Brian Malarkey

FULL COMP: The Voice of the Restaurant Industry Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 24:12


If you want to know the truth, without one ounce of sugarcoating, just call Brian Malarkey. The Celebrity Chef has spent almost two decades betting big on his version of what success looks like. Big venues, high stakes and higher revenues. Post pandemic, where everything is thinking small and capitalizing on a flush economy, he's taking a different path. In today's episode Brian and I chat about how he got to where he is today and where he thinks we're headed as an industry. TIME STAMPED SHOW NOTES [2:10] Learning on someone else's dime: Wisdom on running restaurants [3:22] Generating Income 101: Decide if you're cooking for the elite or cooking for the masses [4:19] The benefits of larger venues [5:05] Crushing the big game: Making it rain in The Roaring 20's (Part II) [7:18] Brand Awareness: Love me or hate me, they will show up. [8:24] The Business of Celebrity: Core focuses [10:50] The key to training your staff for a true hospitality experience [13:30] New deals: How to bargain with your landlord [16:57] Opinion: Why ghost kitchens are stupid [18:14] The steps to achieve success: Studying the playbook [20:03] What to avoid: Lawyers, monster kitchens, and cooking for other chefs [21:49] Plagiarism is a form of flattery: It's right there in front of you For more on the chef visit https://www.brianmalarkey.com FULL COMP is brought to you by Yelp for Restaurants: In July 2020, a few hundred employees formed Yelp for Restaurants. Our goal is to build tools that help restaurateurs do more with limited time. ________________________________ CLICK HERE to Chat with Josh Free Download: 5 Steps to Achieve a 15% Net Profit We have a lot more content coming your way! Be sure to check out the FULL COMP media universe by visiting: FULL COMP Restaurant Marketing School The Playbook Industry Town Halls

Showcase
Crypto Artwork Tops at Power 100 | MrBeast Plagiarism Claims | BRIT Awards Nominees

Showcase

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 24:41


On this episode of Showcase; NFT Tops at Power 100 00:02 JJ Charlesworth, Editor at ArtReview 00:44 James Cameron's Art 09:32 Dakar Fashion Week 11:44 Shortcuts 13:58 BRIT Awards Nominees 15:04 Apple TV's Dr Brain 16:46 Don't Look Up 19:18 MrBeast Plagiarism Claims 21:42 #NFT #BRITAwards #MrBeast

Night Clerk Radio: Haunted Music Reviews
Holiday Movie Party with Max

Night Clerk Radio: Haunted Music Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 103:52


Support Night Clerk Radio on PatreonWe're doing something a little different for the holidays! This episode we're joined by Max from the Good Brews Bad Views podcast for a special holiday movie party. We're watching the 1989 French horror film “Deadly Games (aka Dial Code Santa Claus)” and recording an audio commentary track to be enjoyed alongside the movie.If you want to skip the movie, then jump ahead to 1:36:40 to hear our thoughts on the film.Where to find Deadly GamesDeadly Games on AmazonDeadly Games on ShudderMusic SampledGo Easy On The Pepsi by 幽霊, T O G E T H E R!Support Max!Max on TwitterGood Brews Bad ViewsGood Brews Bad Views on PatreonGood Brews Bad Views on TwitterGood Brews Bad Views on InstagramRelatable Rolls - Max's RPG Actual Play PodcastRelatable Rolls on TwitterRelatable Rolls on InstagramCreditsMusic by: 2MelloArtwork by: Patsy McDowellRoss on TwitterBirk on TwitterNight Clerk Radio on Twitter

WWUTT
Saturday Special: The Ed Litton Sermon Plagiarism Scandal

WWUTT

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 43:53


By request, Gabriel Hughes does a full timeline and breakdown of the sermon plagiarism scandal involving Dr. Ed Litton, the current president of the Southern Baptist Convention. Visit pastorgabe.com for more articles!

Nasha Kasha
Nasha Kasha 290- Carol of the Bells (a repeat)

Nasha Kasha

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 28:01


Plagiarism, denial, even murder.  Our Nasha Kasha story begins with bells, and it concludes with one of the world's most endearing Christmas carols.

Dramabuds!
2x18 | IDOL: The Coup (Reviews, Recaps, and Rants)

Dramabuds!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 121:24


For the longest solo episode EVER on Dramabuds, Francine does a deep dive into IDOL: THE COUP (2021), the recently-concluded Kdrama that has consumed her mind for the past month. Get ready for a complete recap of the show's plot, an extremely detailed analysis of everything we loved and hated about this show, and a loooot of fangirling over the Kdrama (non-)couple that have set our new standard for explosive chemistry

Inside OU
National Signing Day, more staff hires and plagiarism?

Inside OU

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 69:07


Go check out our sponsor Anytime Fitness Uptown OKC on Facebook! www.facebook.com/anytimefitnessuptownokc If you want more OU content (written posts, more podcasts and film reviews with Kegan) check out our Patreon page! www.patreon.com/throughthekeyhole Go follow our social media! Facebook: www.facebook.com/KeyholePod Twitter: www.twitter.com/KeyholePod

Overthrowing Education
How to Stop Student Cheating and Promote Better Learning

Overthrowing Education

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 23:48


In this episode, I address a major problem all educators can attest to: Cheating. It's always been a serious issue, but the solutions are right in front of us. I talk about 3 key things we can do that will eliminate cheating, and also promote real learning. I also share my very favorite, true and hilarious plagiarism stories. If you are looking for laughs, here they are. Also, I realized that if I am “the guest” on this episode, I should also have to play The 5-Minute Game Show, so I borrowed the one that Aviva Levin wrote for me when she had me as a guest on her podcast Lesson:Impossible a while ago.  If you have a great cheating story to share it! Batsheva@overthrowingeducation.com   Links: Twitter: @overthrowinged   @batshevafrankel Instagram: @overthrowingeducation @batsheva.frankel New Lens Ed  Lenses of Questioning Course   Overthrowing Education Swag Shop  Twitter: @avivalevin Lesson:Impossible  My guest blog for Matt Miller/Ditch that Textbook

Murder Sheet
You Never Can Forget: The Fiasco

Murder Sheet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 105:38


There's a reason why we rarely speak about the modern day investigation into the Burger Chef. We have no confidence in the abilities of the officer who is currently tasked with looking into this high-profile quadruple homicide. And today, in the interest of transparency, we're going to tell you exactly why that is.Bill Dalton is the current lead investigator on the Burger Chef for the Indiana State Police. Ashley Flowers is a millionaire serial plagiarist who also makes true crime podcasts, most notably Crime Junkie. Together, they came up with Red Ball, a four-part podcast on the Burger Chef murders that ran in November of 2019. It was badly-written copaganda, but the backstory behind the series is even worse.You see, Flowers handed over complete editorial control of her show to the state police. In exchange for this puffery, Dalton allowed Flowers to exclusively read and monetize investigative case files that not even the families of the victims have ever been permitted to see. And the Indiana State Police collectively shrugged their shoulders at the misconduct.In this episode, we'll get into Flowers' reputation within the true crime community. We'll talk to true crime podcasters Robin Warder and Esther Ludlow, who Flowers plagiarized, as well as journalist Cathy Frye, who blew the whistle on the scandal. We'll tell you about all the unprofessional nonsense between Flowers and Dalton that Kevin witnessed firsthand. And we'll break down why exactly all of this should horrify anyone who cares about unsolved cold cases in Indiana.Because, to put it bluntly, the ISP seem to have learned the wrong lesson from this mess.Listen to Esther Ludlow's episode "Let's Taco 'Bout the Crime Junkie Plagiarism Scandal": (shorturl.at/pBDGS)Read Cathy Frye's series "Caught in the Web" about the murder of Kacie Woody: (shorturl.at/lvzI0)Watch Dalton's Burger Chef press conference here: (shorturl.at/aiqsD)Here's Adam Wren's story for the Indianapolis Monthly: (shorturl.at/klD36)Here's the Flowers interview by Tracy Hazzard of Authority magazine: (shorturl.at/eBXZ5)Here's the Flowers interview that ran on Her Campus: (shorturl.at/hoILT)Here's the article about Crime Junkie from Peter White that ran in Deadline Hollywood: (shorturl.at/ajBRV)Here's the recent article on Flowers' business moves from Variety's Todd Spangler: (shorturl.at/ouzHU)Here's Spangler's reporting on the Crime Junkie plagiarism scandal: (shorturl.at/fmxJK)Here's the New York Times report on the Crime Junkie plagiarism scandal from Derrick Bryson Taylor and Christine Hauser: (shorturl.at/jJKV5)Here's the Buzzfeed article on the Crime Junkie plagiarism scandal from Stephanie McNeal: (shorturl.at/qwDJM) Check out the Trail Went Cold from Robin Warder (shorturl.at/evwS4) and Once Upon a Crime from Esther Ludlow (shorturl.at/joxMX) wherever you listen to podcasts.Follow the Murder Sheet on social media:FacebookTwitterInstagramAnd send tips to murdersheet@gmail.com.The Murder Sheet is a production of Mystery Sheet LLC .See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast
269. Cheating And Plagiarism Software

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 27:30


Schooling and cheating share a long and sordid history. But what can educators do when the technology to undermine academic integrity advances faster than conventional efforts to protect it. Amy and Mike invited ed-tech executive Eric Gibbs to share updates on cheating and plagiarism software. What are five things you will learn in this episode? What threats to academic integrity have occurred as education has shifted from traditional face-to-face to online modalities? How has cheating technology evolved and what tools can be used to combat it? What is cross-language plagiarism, and how do we address it? What are the right conversations to have with students about finding their own voice?     Are current plagiarism standards in schools too strict? MEET OUR GUEST Eric Gibbs is an established first-generation college graduate and business executive with over 20+ years of domestic and international experience in K-12, higher education, and corporate markets. As a data-driven, innovative leader with a proven track record in “go-to-market” strategy creation, Eric excels at new market identification and mentorship in start-up and high-growth organizations. As President at Ouriginal, Eric helps provide text originality assessment services to over 7,700 organizations in over 80 countries. Find Eric at eric.gibbs@ouriginal.com or on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericgibbs/. LINKS The Growing Threat of Cross-Language Plagiarism International Center for Academic Integrity Cheating in academic institutions: A decade of research Importance of Originality RELATED EPISODES THE ACADEMIC INTEGRITY ARMS RACE THE GROWING IMPACT OF CHEATING DURING COVID THE HEIGHTENED NEED FOR TESTING IN 2021 ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 9a - Congress Prepares to Procrastinate and Retailers Ramping Up Security

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 28:49


Bill Handel talks about Congress and the preparations it's making to do what it does best: procrastinate. Retailers are ramping up their security as cities reroute traffic in attempts to combat organized theft rings. Psychics and astrologers are huge on Instagram, - now scammers are impersonating them. And who owns a recipe? A plagiarism claim has cookbook authors asking for a friend.

Metro Detroit Pastors Podcast
The Problem of Plagiarism Part 2: How to Become a Better Preacher

Metro Detroit Pastors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 46:30


Hosted by Mark PospisilSound Engineer and Producer: Jonathan BlosserThe Stream Roots Podcast theme song was written, recorded, and produced by Jonathan Blosser and Owen Nash.You can learn more about Barnabas Ministries by visiting www.barnabasministriesmi.org

We Make Books Podcast
Episode 72 - Vampiric Influences on Marsupial Child-rearing (Writing Influences)

We Make Books Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:52


We Make Books is a podcast for writers and publishers, by writers and publishers and we want to hear from our listeners! Hit us up on our social media, linked below, and send us your questions, comments, and concerns for us to address in future episodes. We hope you enjoy We Make Books! Twitter: @WMBCast  |  @KindofKaelyn  |  @BittyBittyZap Instagram: @WMBCast  Patreon.com/WMBCast Episode Transcript (by TK @_torkz) [Upbeat Ukulele Intro Music] Rekka: This is We Make Books, a podcast about writing publishing and everything in between. Rekka is a published Science Fiction and Fantasy author, and Kaelyn is a professional genre fiction editor. Together, they'll tackle the things you never knew you never knew about getting a book from concept to finished product, with explanations, examples, and a lot of laughter. Get your moleskin notebook ready. It's time for We Make Books. Kaelyn: My sister just finished reading the Grisha trilogy. And she was, of course, more of a fan of the Six of Crows after reading that. But one of the things she messaged me- she was like “yeah, the ending was kind of whatever, but it is very clear that this person was reading Harry Potter when they wrote this.” R: [laughs] K: And I said “Yeah, that definitely comes through.” She gave me this whole list of like, book two is basically just The Order of the Phoenix, and the end battle with all of the Grisha and the stand downs, all this stuff, and I was like “Yeah, I guess you're right.” To be honest with you, I kinda limped through the end of that book, I wasn't thinking about that too much. But anyways, it got me thinking about influences in writing and how writers are influenced and how in some cases that's something that we're like “Yes! You can tell that this writer was influenced by such-and-such, and they weave it so beautifully into their story.” And sometimes you get my sister calling me to complain about how she basically just read Harry Potter with Russian witches.  R: So was your sister accusing the author in any way of plagiarism? K [overlapping]: Not plagiarism. R [overlapping]: As a reader I'm curious, like how the reader perceives it when it's that clear when someone's been influenced.  K: I should've asked her before we started recording this - and this is something we'll get to in there - I couldn't tell if my sister was accusing the author of laziness or unoriginality.  R: Okay. K: That's one of the things I wanted to talk about today as we're talking about influence. What is influence, how are writers influenced? How's the best way to leverage and utilize that influence? And when does influence cross into the realm of the negative? When is it no longer praise worthy? When is it, for instance, lazy, contrived, unoriginal, or, in worst case scenario, bordering into plagiarism?  R: Yeah, because that's a tricky thing - if we always wrote a completely original story, you wouldn't have something like Joseph Campbell's The Hero's Journey. Because we wouldn't have a set format that a story would take. So when somebody accuses a fantasy book of being “Star Wars with elves,” well, Star Wars was a Greek epic in space.  K: Oh, I would've called it a Western. R: Okay fine. [overlapping] I mean, people have called it a Western. K: [overlapping] I mean, both work. Both work. [laughs] R: Yeah, but I'm just saying, The Hero's Journey, Joseph Campbell is, he's studying the ancient literature, so that's why I decided to say Greek. But if we could always write something that was completely original, there would be no way to study literature with comparisons and contrasts. There are always going to be parallels between stories written in a similar culture by people who are writing in a similar society. Like, a hundred years apart, you would not necessarily detect the influence of Harry Potter in the Grishaverse. But they're not written a hundred years apart - it was maybe a decade, probably not. K: I'd be curious to go back and try to time out when these books were being written, and when that coincides with the release of the latter half of the Harry Potter books. But anyways, real quick, I'm big into definitions, so let's talk about definitions. Influence is the capacity of something - a person, a situation, a circumstance - to have an effect on another person, on the development of the situation, on the behavior of someone or something. Or, in some cases, even the effect itself. You'll notice there that influence is kind of framed as both proactive and reactive. You can influence something, or you can be influenced. We're talking today about being influenced.  R: And we're not talking about Instagram.  K: [laughs] Oh, God. You know what's funny? I went through this whole thing and I didn't even think about the concept of influencers, and now I'm depressed. R: Because you didn't or because now you are? K: [laughs] Because now I am. R: Okay. I'm sorry. I take it back, I didn't say anything.  K: [laughs] So, writers don't write in a void. It's sort of a reverse Heisenberg principle, which is “whatever you study will also change.” Whatever you read changes you, or whatever you consume changes you. So, writers don't write in a void. If you took a baby and raised them in a box with no interaction with the outside world whatsoever, well, to be honest I'm not sure they'd be capable of putting together an interesting story because they've had no influence.  R: You know what's funny, that's why I don't have kids. Because I thought about this kind of thing frequently in high school, like “what would happen if you raised a child in a padded room? And you never interacted with them, and they never saw another human?” So you're welcome, world, that I have not raised any children. Those children are welcome because I did not abuse them in such a manner.  K: [laughs]  R: But it's good to hear that someone else has had these thoughts. Although, Kaelyn and I did originally bond over the fact that we're terrified of the idea of raising children.  K: Pregnancy is just - R: And pregnancy. It's not for everybody. I recognize that for some people it's a beautiful process, but for Kaelyn and for me, it is body horror.  K: Yeah. Yeah, I mean, there's an entire nother skeleton in your skeleton. [laughs] R: Yes. And it's growing. [overlapping] It's getting larger.  K [overlapping]: It keeps getting bigger. R: And if you've never seen an MRI of a baby's skull, there's a lot of teeth in there.  K: Yeah, also they're squishy. R: Well, the MRI doesn't necessarily show that. It just shows all those chompers, waiting. Waiting.  K: Yeah. There's a lot of extra teeth in there.  R: Okay. [laughs] Where were we going? K [overlapping]: So for our writing- R [overlapping]: A child raised in a padded cell would probably write a different kind of story than somebody who's been exposed to Harry Potter.  K: Yeah, and if you take out every third word, it's their plan to destroy the world with their laser beams.  R: This reminds me of the book The Artist's Way. I think it's a month-long program designed to improve your creativity and I think maybe even to come up with… it's like NaNoWriMo but it's very classist and elitist.  K: [laughs] R: But the first thing it asks you to do is swear off all media for the month. K: Okay. R: And I put the book down right there. K: [laughs] R: Because I was like, that is literally impossible. I was in art school at the time, so I could not promise that I wasn't going to have to look at media. And also, this was written in 1992, before anybody was logging onto the internet daily.  K: Yeah, it was much easier to walk away from media for a month.  R: And I was trying to read it, I think, in 1999 or 2000, and it was even easier, at that point, to walk away from media than it would be now.  K: Yep. R: But, yes, it's called The Artist's Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity by Julia Cameron. And I imagine that Julia Cameron has a very nice life and is able to unplug from media whenever it is convenient for her to do so. K: Well, in 1992 that meant “turn off the TV.” R: Right, it meant “don't pick up a newspaper” or, you know. K: Yeah. R: In 2016 they re-released a 25th anniversary edition, and I can't imagine they did much to it, but it really probably needed a lot of re-examining to - K: Yeah. It's -  R: - to even be relevant in 2016, I can't even imagine.  K: Now, was the purpose of this to do a detox of influence from your life? R: Yes. That is exactly what it was, to avoid influence for the month and find out what you write, not what the world around you influences you to write. But I think in her case, she was treating world influence and media and current events as a negative.  K: Mhm. R: And I would argue that if you are responding to the world around you, then the politics of your creativity is going to be more relevant and more well-informed. And I think that's a good thing.  K: Well, yeah. And this is something that we can certainly talk about with influence - current influence versus longevity. You'll see a lot of writers that go out of their way to not incorporate things that might later be considered an anachronism in their writing, so that they're not influenced by that.  R: Mhm. K: So that's another good example of influence. So, let's get the elephant in the room out of the way here: influence is not copying. As we were talking about, writers don't write in a void. You're absorbing everything that you interact with and consume every day, and, whether you know it or not, it's influencing and incorporating itself into even your way of thought.  R: You hear that? So if you were following an Instagram influencer, do not copy everything they do.  K: [laughs] Yes. Please don't. But, again, it's the reverse Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Whatever you're consuming changes you. There are entire PhD programs dedicated to studying and understanding the influence that certain parts of literature have had on larger parts of literature. Influence is not a bad thing. In many ways, it's a scholarly pursuit. Go to any Wikipedia page for any sort of well-known novel, and I guarantee you there's going to be a section in there that says “Influence.”  R: Oh yeah, yeah. K: And it's going to be a couple paragraphs talking about the history of the genre, or the subject material leading up to this. Influence is, apart from being an important part of writing, an academic pursuit. So all of that said, we are talking about influence in a very positive way here. We're saying it's great to read things, and to consume and internalize them so that this can help enrich your writing. Something that you really enjoyed, something you thought was maybe unique, or something that you were like, “Oh, what if I applied that to a character that I already have?” That's a good thing. I think it enriches your writing, I think it shows layers and growth, etcetera. K: That said, sometimes influence goes the opposite way. [laughs] Sometimes you've read something and you're like, “this is terrible,” or “this was such a ridiculous ending,” or “I hated that this happened.” And that might compel you to go through your manuscript and scrub absolutely everything having to do with that. The whole point is that whether you mean to or not, you are going to be influenced by external components in your writing. You could never read anything else, and you will still be influenced by things in the world just by existing in it. But we are talking more about influences in writing here, so we'll stick with that.  R: And we assume that you are being influenced by books because, as we say, if you want to be a writer you need to also be a reader. So we're telling you, go read widely in your genre, and part of that is that we expect you to absorb some of those elements and some of those styles. On a conscious level, we want you to look at the covers, we want you to look at the themes and the tropes and everything like that, but we also expect that on a subconscious level that's going to influence you and hopefully make you a better writer within your genre. K: And if you read a lot within your genre, you will start to notice trails of influence yourself. If you read a lot of - especially maybe a really niche kind of fantasy or science fiction genre, you're going to be able to chronologically put some things in order, like “Oh yes, I can see that book A came out at this time, and then three years later this book came out, and there are certainly elements from book A that I can see coming through in book B even though they were written by different authors.” K: So, I was telling Rekka before we started recording–I went down a little bit of a rabbit hole with this, because for reasons unbeknownst to me and possibly the influence of vampiric elements, I, for whatever reason, picked up my copy of Dracula off the shelf and I've just been flipping through random parts. And then we were talking about doing this, and I was like, vampires are a really really good example of influence through literature. They're something that has always been around - the Mayans actually had a god that was basically a vampire, even though they didn't acknowledge that, bat wings and all. And there's something that–I think you'd be hard pressed to find a significant culture of any sort of longevity from history that didn't have some sort of mythological being that displayed vampire-like qualities. K: In the late 1700s, early 1800s, though, there was the vampire craze in western Europe. There were a lot of short stories and things written about vampires, even though they've been codified as part of the mythos for a long time. But even then, they were sort of holding up the folklore and traditions of vampires–they were reanimated corpses, they were bloodsuckers that came out at night to drain people of their very lifeforce. In some cases, actively rotting bodies, hunched back and demonic looking, claw-fingered and fangs and scary eyes. A lot of this was the traditional folklore. Then we start getting into sexy vampires. [laughs] R: [laughs] I was just going to say. K: [laughs] And there were a couple specific novels that did this. In 1819, John Polidori published a short story called The Vampyre, and this was the first one where the vampire was more of a character rather than just a mindless bloodsucking dead creature. R: Right. This was a vampire worthy of Bela Lugosi's eyes.  K: Oh, no one's worthy of Bela Lugosi's eyes. [laughs] R: You know what I'm saying. K: I know, I'm teasing. So, it was very popular. So then, a lot of vampire short stories and short novels were coming out where the vampires were getting a little more sophisticated, and all of these were drawing influence from Polidori's short story. It was a very successful short story. So then, in 1872, an Irish author named Joseph Sheridan [with a mock-French accent] Le Fanu - I'm assuming it's French which is why I did that accent - published Carmilla, which was a fantastic novel. And this is, I would say, probably a turning point where vampires are unabashedly being associated with a sexual element at this point. It has a not-very-subtle vampiric lesbian... stalking, I guess, going on through this book. It's fantastic, it's not that long. If you ever get a chance to read it, it's great. K: And then of course, a couple decades later in 1897, we come to Bram Stoker's Dracula. I should, by the way, say that Bram Stoker and Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu were both Irish. Ireland had a shockingly strong folklore of vampires. In some cases they were fae, which is a whole different category of supernatural elements in Ireland, and in some cases they were just reanimated corpses. Anyways, then we get Bram Stoker, who of course gives us Dracula. And this is considered the preeminent vampire guideline bible, if you will. I think when most of us - granted, Rekka and I are older millennials, but - R: [laughs] How dare you? K: I think the first vampire we heard of was Dracula.  R: Mhm. K: I actually remember, growing up, that there was a kid in my neighborhood who just thought vampires were called Draculas.  R: Yeah. I think that was probably a… Not that I thought Dracula was a noun, but I never expected Dracula to look the same way twice.  K: Yeah. Yeah, Dracula was just like - Dracula, vampire. They were interchangeable.  R: Mhm. K: And that's how synonymous this became. Now, look at all the stuff that lead up to this in order for us to get the seminal vampire novel of the time. Stoker was absolutely influenced by all these novels that came before. Something else that's really interesting that Stoker was influenced by is the sexual component of vampires in this. Like I said, that came through hard and strong. Well, maybe I should say most popularly with Carmilla. Here's something else really interesting about Stoker: he was probably gay. It's difficult and inappropriate to go back and retroactively categorize people these ways, but there's a lot of very strong… I'm trying not to say “homoerotic,” I'm trying to say… There's a lot of very - R: Queerotic? [laughs] K: Yeah, there's a- R: There's not a queer person in the universe that will argue this point with you.  K: Yeah. R: I think the LGBTQIA+ are very, very ready to claim vampirism.  K: [laughs] Absolutely. And that's a great part of the influence of this. Some of Stoker's best friends were Oscar Wilde and Walt Whitman. Actually, I believe Stoker either started writing or finished writing Dracula right after Oscar Wilde was imprisoned, and they were exchanging letters while he was in prison.  R: Mhm. K: You have to keep in mind, this was the mid-Victorian period, there's very repressed sexuality, but there was also this burgeoning underground masculine sexual component to it, where everyone - R: See people, this is what happens when you don't let people reveal their ankles.  K: Yes. Yes, exactly. [laughs] So, one of the things through Dracula is this secretiveness, this sense of penetration. Not only the fangs in your throat, but a lot of them get into your head and screw with you that way. This was not something we saw in previous iterations of vampires, who were gross, for lack of a better term. [laughs] R: [laughs] Yeah.  K: So, this influence comes through in a lot of different ways. And as I'm talking more about Dracula I can say like, “Okay, well there's a lot of very… what we would now consider queer sexual elements that we see in Dracula, coming through with the relationship between Dracula and Johnathan Harker and Dracula and Mina.” But there's also the influence of other writers who were starting to make vampires actually people, rather than Nosferatu-style monsters.  R: Right. K: Dracula, I would argue, then in turn really helped influence the next generation of common horror. At that point we're getting into H.P. Lovecraft and existential horror. Lovecraft, who, by the way, wasn't quite a contemporary of Stoker's, but was very aware and actually wrote some reviews of his writing. He didn't really like a lot of it. [laughs] I would argue that that was probably part of what influenced Lovecraft: it was a hard turn from these very sterile, white-marble, gothic horror novels to a lot of raw, and ocean, and dark mold, steam spaces.  R: You can literally write the sentence “I can't describe this.” and people are like “Woo, that is scary.” K: Yeah exactly. So much of Lovecraft is like, “it's too horrible to describe!” but it's like “Yeah, but can you tell me anyway?” [laughs] R: You mentioned earlier that an influence can be “I don't want to do this.” K: Yes. R: So, here we are. This is Lovecraft saying  “Well, Stoker wasn't racist enough for me, so I'm gonna write my own thing.” K: [laughs] Oh, God, Lovecraft. It's so hard to read some of that stuff. [sighs] Psychologists would be better at trying to figure out Lovecraft's influence than me, I'm certainly not going to. To say the man had issues is an understatement. He was more of a collection of neuroses formed into a human. Anyways, this is just something I was thinking of as a pretty-easy-to-track set of influences. We go from vampires being very loosely defined and having inconsistent characteristics based on what region the stories are being told in, to some stories published that codify certain rules about them, to their evolution from “Eww, it's a rotting, blood-drinking corpse” to “Huh, maybe I'd like date that person.” R: [laughs] Maybe I would like those lips on my bare neck! K: Yes, exactly. Which is a pretty interesting leap that really did not take that long to get from point A to point B. But all of this was just building on influence and influence, after that.  R: Yeah, all you needed was for one author to pick it up and go, “What if vampires, but sexy?” K: [laughs] Yeah. You know what's funny, we have this sort of modern-day depiction of Dracula as a very suave, debonair… what's the word I'm looking for? High-society type person.  R: Sophisticated.  K: Sophisticated, yeah. In the novel, he is those things a little bit, but he is very off-putting and he is... weird to look at, I guess I should say. R: Yeah, there's that first scene where Johnathan is eating in front of him, and you definitely get a vibe that this dude is not right.  K: Like, he's talking about his hairy ears. [laughs] R: [laughs] Yeah. K: His weird skin, he looks ill, as if when he's making his way to the castle all of the peasantry crying and pressing crucifixes into his hands wasn't red-flag enough for him. R: No, no, no. It's just a quaint little village, this is the thing they do. There is the aspect of vampirism having the power of glamour, and I think this is probably the most effective display of it. The way that he's describing Dracula, there's nothing attractive about this man, and yet. K: He's very drawn to him. R: Mhm. K: And he wants to help him. R: As is Mina. [laughs] K: And Lucy, and all of them. So yeah, vampires. Great example of influence in literature over the course of a relatively short time, shaping something that we now consider to be commonplace.  R: Mhm. K: We've even narrowed it down farther. One of my favorite things about Dracula is, there's nothing that necessarily says he can't go in the sun in that book.  R: Right, right. [laughs] K: It's just that he has no powers after noon, I think, or he loses his powers at sunrise. So he can be outside, but he's just a regular guy at that point.  R: Mhm. K: So, obviously things continued to change and evolve there, the “no going out during the day” is held over from the much older vampire myths. Anyways. So, all of that said, how do we see influences in writing? When can we pick these out? One of the obvious is the story itself, the plot. Maybe some story arcs. R: I would argue that people tend to pick it up faster when it's a similar setting. When it's the worldbuilding, I think people notice it more. K: Okay. R: And I think, again, plot arcs and character arcs are things that we do have to recycle.  K: Absolutely. I think it's rare these days to see completely original, never-before-imagined setting. In terms of world-building, both the world itself, and in my notes here I put “world systems.” Anything from the way magic functions, or government functions, or society functions. There's only so many ways you can organize people, essentially. [laughs] So there may have been something that you came across and you're like “Oh, that's interesting. What if I did this instead?” The characters- anything from the archetypes and tropes of characters to their storylines and their redemption arcs, or even just the relationships, how they interact with each other. How the characters are broken out either into family groups or groups of friends or hierarchies within that. I think we see that a lot. With plot, we can kind of go back to what I said at the beginning of the episode: sometimes there are things in there where it's like, “this is clearly Order of the Phoenix.”  R: Mhm.  K: [laughs] We're just seeing it presented a different way. R: And again, an agent loves this, because you can say “this is my list of story comps.” And if they're successful books, the agent can use that to sell the story and then the publisher can use it to sell the book. K: Mhm. R: So even though sometimes it sounds like we are poo-pooing derivative work, if it comes across as fresh, nobody's going to poo-poo that you have a great list of comps to start with.  K: Definitely, yeah. R: And I would like to note that that is the first time we have said “poo-poo” on this podcast. I feel like that should be marked. K: That definitely needs to be denoted for posterity. R: And now it's been said three times. K: [laughs] Then there's two other areas of influence I'd like to talk about that are a little harder to quantify. One is style. And this comes more to writing style, and how you're presenting your story. For instance, being influenced by the way the author just writes in general, their style, I will harken back to one of our favorite examples here. If you've read Gideon the Ninth it is a very very unique writing style, not something I've ever come across before and I'm sure there are a lot of people who are currently in the process of attempting to imitate it; I don't know how successful they're going to be, but I bet they're trying. R: And then there are others who are influenced by it to say “Oh, I can let loose like that?” K: Yeah. Exactly. Or, “I can try something completely different that I didn't think anybody would be interested in, but if they're willing to do this then maybe they would.” Point of view or viewpoint in the book - if you've read the second book in the Locked Tomb series, Harrow the Ninth, a lot of that is written second person. The Broken Earth series, large portions of that are in second person. R: Well, the Broken Earth series, the amazing thing is it's written in all three. K: Yes, yeah. R: So if you haven't read that I can't go any further, I do not wanna spoil that, even though it's been out for years, the culmination of that book is so good that I refuse to ever spoil it. But go read it, if you haven't read it, for sure. It's a big one - K: It's a lot - R: But it is so worth it. I listen to it on audio, and I can recommend that too. K: Yeah. So both of those books have instances of strange, or - R: Disorienting? K: Disorienting's an excellent word. I remember reading Harrow the Ninth and texting Rekka and going like “Is this like this the entire time?” R: And my only response is “Did you get to the soup yet?” K: [laughs] And it was a mentality shift, and once I just was like “Okay, I fixed my brain to a point that it can accept and read this now.” But another style quality is dialogue. How you incorporate and how you use dialogue in your writing is something that I think is very easily influenced by how other people do that. This can also start feeding into the character influence there as well, how the characters talk and interact with each other is very influenced by dialogue. So then the last kind of nebulous part that I'd like to talk about, and this is a little bit different but it is worth bringing up, is historical influence. There are a lot of books and stories that are nominal retellings of either one or a series of historical events. I'll use Game of Thrones here as an example, and spoilers for anybody who hasn't read or watched - R: I don't care if we spoil Game of Thrones. [laughs] K: George R. R. Martin, well first the basis of a lot of this is the War of the Roses, which was the English Civil War. It was also called the Hundred Years' War; it was just a long, bloody, drawn-out battle of constantly changing kings and powerful families trying to get their person on the throne of England. R: And the interesting part is, it is a hundred years, so the people who started this have cast this war upon the generations to follow, and if that doesn't tell you something about where George R. R. Martin is going to be forced to take the end of the books, I don't know what will, because HBO managed to make the show take what, the war take five years or maybe ten years if that? Just the fact that it was ten seasons, right? Was it ten seasons or nine? K: It was eight seasons. R: Okay, so at most, because of the children aging on the show, it was a nine-year hundred-year war. So if George R. R. Martin is following intentionally the framework of the Hundred Years' war, none of the characters that you're rooting for are going to make it. Just in the nature of aging. K [overlapping]: And there's - you can go through and just read a brief history of the Hundred Years' War, and you'll be able to identify characters in there. Like Tyrion has some very clear Richard III vibes to him. But then there's other historical events and groups of people that he took and pulled into this. The Lannisters are such a clear parallel of the Borgia family that it's almost difficult to know that and read this and know what happened to the Borgias. The Red Wedding was based off of a famous event in Scotland where something very very similar happened to that. Some Scottish lords were invited to dinner by a Scottish lord with English leanings, and he killed all of them, to get in good with the English. R: After serving them bread. K: After serving them bread, exactly. But again, historical influence - the concept of guestright is very important in most cultures and especially in Scotland. So there's so many examples of people taking strong influence from either actual historical events or folklore and mythological events, like the Trojan War and things like that, and incorporating it into their writing. There are a lot of writers who decide “I'm gonna do a modern interpretation of such-and-such,” because maybe - for instance the Trojan War, they're very interested in classic Greek mythology and decide “Hey, that's a great story to tell; I'm gonna set it in a different place but still tell the story.” K: So that's some elements of influence, and before we wrap up here, let's address the thing we started to talk a little bit about but should definitely round out. When is influence just becoming copying, at a certain point? This is hard. Because it's really about finesse and originality. It's about taking something that you liked and putting your own spin on it, so to speak. If you're just re-creating the same story and sticking your characters into it, you're going to get called at best lazy, at worst a plagiarist. R: Yeah, there are plenty of books out there - and I have one to include in the list - that are retellings of a classic story. The problem is when you don't approach it as “how do I make this my story?” K: Yes. I'm gonna use young adult genres here because it's a little bit newer and easier to trace through this, and I'm not going to name books in this apart from the first series that I will name because that author is wildly successful. The Mortal Instruments trilogy - you could probably say series at this point, there's so many books in that world at this point - by Cassandra Clare, is one of the early and premiere urban fantasy young adult novels. This was copied so many times. Some of the authors were a little more original with where they were setting it, some of them were a little more original with where they were putting the characters or who the characters were, but the magical teeenagers who are part of a secret society that protects humanity was everywhere. ‘Cause these books were a runaway success. They were very original; no one had really seen something like this before. The Mortal Instruments created so many tropes that I can't and will not try to name them. R: And I think it's, part of that, somebody loves a book that they experienced so much that they want to hold onto that feeling forever, and one way to do that is to create something completely inspired by that same world. And this is where fanfic comes from, and fanfic is healthy, and it's a great way to express feelings of “I don't want to leave this book world.” But when you take it to a publisher and you say “This is going to sell really well because the other one that already did it sold really well,” as they say - don't follow trends in publishing, because you're five years behind. K: Conversely, a lot of people were able to get things like this published because the market wasn't inundated with this yet. R: Right, you had to be among the first to imitate a successful book, which is why they say don't follow the trends, because you won't be among the first. There are so many people out there writing that there are easily 500 people ahead of you in the queue for the publisher slush pile. K: Yeah and I wanna be clear, the first book of this entire - I'm not joking, I think there's over 20 books within this world at this point - the first one came out in 2007. So yes, the Internet was very alive and well at that point; it was not what it is now. Writing communities on the Internet were not what they are now. But all of this is to say that there were people who just straight up copied this genre, this book in some way. Either in terms of setting, in terms of characters, in terms of the magical elements of this, they just straight up copied this and I gotta be honest with you, a lot of them were not terribly successful. [laughs] Some of them were, though, and some of them made some money off of this. R: Well, for other readers who are not writers, when the same thing happens they come out of a book series and they have to wait for the next book, they want more. K: Exactly, they were looking for more. R: This is not unlike when the animation company puts out a very similar cheap animation to the latest Disney release. I worked at Blockbuster, and I saw this all the time. You'd have a big animated Disney release, and you'd have this tiny company out of who-knows-where that put together an animated copy, and they rely on parents and grandparents to grab the wrong one. This is not like trying to give the kids more of what they want, this is like “If we are gonna be next to this Disney movie on the shelf, someone will pick us up by accident and we will make money.” K: Well I always remember because a lot of Disney's classics, like the Disney renaissance movies, they were all like public domain stories. So they would just make that and they could get it out on VHS faster than Disney could - R: Yeah, they were made direct to video. K: Because Disney left it in - like everyone knew what the upcoming Disney movies were. So if you knew there was gonna be Aladdin, well, the story of Aladdin is public domain, you start making Aladdin right away. [Brief interlude of car noises] R: I literally believe that Mike's apartment is built on an overpass. K: No, just next to a road with a lot of people who drive like idiots. R: Well that was like a garbage truck, but anyway. K: That was a motorcycle. R: That was a motorcycle?? It sounded like it had at least 16 wheels. K: Yeah. R: Alright, sorry, so Aladdin - K: So everyone knew what movies Disney was making well in advance, and of course these would take years after they were announced to actually be finished and put in theatres. So if Disney says “we're making Aladdin” - R [overlapping]: Before it's in theatres! K: - well then, another small studio can also make Aladdin. The animation isn't gonna be great but then Aladdin's gonna be in the theatres and then a week later the imitation Aladdin are going to be on shelves, and grandparents are gonna go “Oh my grandchildren want to see -” R: Or “They've been talking about this movie and here it is on VHS,” and they don't know how theatre releases work and so they grab it and buy it, and they spend $18 or $15, seems like a really good deal on a Disney movie, and the animation studio makes their money back. So they do it again. K: So don't be that cheap animation studio. Don't be the person that's taking something that somebody put a lot of time, thought, and creativity into, and churning out the cheap, fast, easy-to-consume version of it. R: Yeah and I don't think, when it comes to writers - I mean I'm sure there are people out there who go “Okay this is the newest thing, I am going to behave like an algorithm and I am going to make another version of it and then release it, and I will make lots of bucks.” There are those writers that–they do that on purpose. So don't be them. But I don't think any of our audience are going to be them. And if you were thinking that that was a great way to make a successful book, let us correct you. But if you are inspired by Gideon the Ninth, or by Mortal Instruments, or anything like that - take the time to develop a story just like you would a completely inspired out of left field story, and take the time to put it together in a considerate and thoughtful and unique way, and then we approve. You get our approval. We're not promising to buy the manuscript, but we are approving a heartfelt influenced work, not an imitation that is intended to ride the wave of success of someone else. K: Exactly. R: Now when we're saying “copying,” are you talking about the publishing houses out there who literally lift the copy and try to sell it on Amazon, and just do it again and again and again as they get caught and cancelled? K: [laughs] No, no. Copying has, I think the way I'm defining it, more to do with not adding any creativity or original elements of your own, just saying “I liked what this person did, I'm going to do it too.” And listen - it's a fine line. One of the things that's really interesting about plagiarism is it's either very obvious - somebody had too many parts in a book, a novel, a poem, that are clearly just from another book - or, you've gotta go through a whole process of proving that somebody had access to something you were working on and directly lifted elements from that and put it into their book. Plagiarism is either very straightforward or very difficult. R: And, with plagiarism, they have plagiarism checkers on the Internet; I think a lot of teachers appreciate that because they can't read everything. So they can run an assignment from a student through a plagiarism checker, and that plagiarism checker can do its best with whatever it has access to in its database to catch - K: Plagiarism checkers are very good now, by the way. R: But we're talking word-for-word plagiarism. Sometimes what we refer to in the publishing world as plagiarism is actually trademark infringement. K: Yes. R: And that is difficult because if you write a story with Harry Potter in it, but you change his name and all the words are your original words, how do we run a plagiarism checker against that? K: Yes. So it's like I said, either very easy or very difficult to prove plagiarism; there's rarely a middle ground there. R: Although there are books that have been caught lifting a paragraph or two, from different books. So like the entire thing is plagiarized, but it's plagiarized from different sources. K: Yeah. You see instances of plagiarism tend to show up more in academic and scientific publishing than in fiction and genre-writing. It definitely does happen, though. R: Yup. Because, again, there are people out there who are confused about what is allowed and what is advisable in writing.  K: There are some really significant seminal works in American literature especially–I'm sure globally but I just happen to know the American ones–that are just plagiarized in certain places. And a lot of them were written in a time where it wasn't as easy to check this, so we- R: Find out much later, when it is easier, how much that was widespread. K: Yup. Exactly. R: There are nefarious people. I was referring, in my last statement, to the innocent, naive new writer, who just does not understand what is and isn't acceptable. Or, they didn't intend for it to go widespread, and they wrote a little thing for fun and end up finding out that they are not welcome and doors are being shut in their face because they crossed the line and it got noticed. K: Yeah, exactly.  R: That's the thing, a little baby writer learning about things the very hard way. It's a shame. That would be someone that you would hope would find a mentor who would guide them in the right direction before that kind of thing gets shot in their face. But with a pen name you can be reborn, as long as you reiterate yourself in better forms than the previous mistakes that you made. K: Yeah, and plagiarism should be very easy to avoid. R: Mhm. K: If you're looking at somebody else's work and saying “I wish this was mine, I'm going to make this mine,” don't do that. You should never be copying text from somebody else. Everything should be written on your own.  R: Yeah, don't go, “How did that person write it? I loved that so much.” Well yes, you did, but that's not your voice. So write it yourself. And I would say that if you close a book and you go, “Oh, I'm so inspired to write,” and you sit down and you start writing right away, don't publish that. [laughs] K: Yeah. R: There is a process to developing your own ideas even if it's mostly internal and you never grab a notebook and work out the story itself. The process of coming up with your own ideas is not “I just read this, I'm going to go write because I'm inspired and I'm going to finish that book before I do anything else.” [laughs] That's probably going to be a very derivative, if not plagiaristic, book. So don't do that. I always recommend you sit with your ideas for a while before you sit down and write it.  K: Absolutely. I mean, that's important in general. R: Carry it around like a baby, pretend you're some kind of marsupial and you have your twelve-day gestation period but you still carry that little joey around for a while before it's ready to enter the world. That's kind of the process that I recommend for a writer. K: [laughs] So there you go. Be a marsupial. R: Be a marsupial. The opossum tail has its own fingerprints which are unique to it, so there's that. Grow a prehensile tail and commit crimes with it so that you can be tail-printed later. Alright, I don't know where this story's going.  K: I like it, I like it. R: Yeah, I like it too, but it's not a good way to wrap up an episode because all we can do is just stop. [laughs] So, if you have any questions about plagiarism or inspiration, or you just want to share your inspirations and influences, you can @ us on Twitter or Instagram @WMBcast. You can find us on patreon.com/WMBcast, and we will have some more marsupial facts for you in two weeks. K: [laughs] R: [laughs] Thanks everybody for listening, and I hope this was a helpful discussion. Kaelyn and I have to go sit at a desk and figure out- have we fulfilled the promises that we made to you when we started this podcast? Because we feel like we've just kind of been indulging ourselves in what topics we bring up, so if you feel like, “Hey, you said you were going to cover this, and you never covered that,” definitely tell us that too, because we want to go back to our mission statement and make sure that every once in a while we give you an episode that's in line with that. So if you have input to that regard, please let us know. Otherwise, marsupial facts in two weeks! Thanks everyone!

Metro Detroit Pastors Podcast
The Problem of Plagiarism Part 1

Metro Detroit Pastors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 34:52


Hosted by Mark PospisilSound Engineer and Producer: Jonathan BlosserThe Stream Roots Podcast theme song was written, recorded, and produced by Jonathan Blosser and Owen Nash.You can learn more about Barnabas Ministries by visiting www.barnabasministriesmi.org

Founders Baptist Church
Sermon Plagiarism

Founders Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 15:00


This week on the Straight Truth Podcast host, Dr. Josh Philpot says that a big topic nowadays, specifically within Baptist circles, but more broadly within the Evangelical world, is plagiarism among pastors. He shares that in the past, pastors have been fired from their congregations for plagiarizing. Yet today, it almost seems like this is a more acceptable thing to do. We are hearing of pastors agreeing with another pastor to share their sermons without telling their church. There is this borrowing, taking, and replicating, of the work and ideas of another pastor, then presenting it and representing it as their own. Is this appropriate- Is it ever a good idea to preach someone else's sermons- Have the men who are doing this or have done this disqualified themselves- Dr. Philpot tells us that Dr. Richard Caldwell has pastored for over 30 years now, working hard to prepare and deliver sermons from the Word of God. He asks Dr. Caldwell to share what he has to say about this, and what is his perspective on the borrowing of sermons, in part or whole-

Straight Truth Podcast
Sermon Plagiarism

Straight Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 15:09


Sermon Plagiarism | Watch This Episode on YouTube Subscribe To Our YouTube Channel Support Our Podcast Join Our Mailing List Related Messages To learn more about the responsibility of preachers and preaching, consider listening to the following sermons prepared and delivered by Dr. Caldwell to the congregation he shepherds at Founders Baptist Church. Several will expand on the passages shared Continue Reading The post Sermon Plagiarism appeared first on Straight Truth Podcast.

The Thinking Out Loud with PJ's Podcast
John MacArthur Calls Out Ed Litton For Plagiarism | A Pastor's Reaction

The Thinking Out Loud with PJ's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 21:16


John MacArthur calls out Ed Litton for plagiarism of sermons. He calls him lazy, incompitent, unsactified, and a fraud! These are strong words. Do you agree or disagree? Check out this video to see what I think! Watch the full conversation here: https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?ref=watch_permalink&v=1010458099809910 Thinking Out Loud with PJ intro music: Track: Looking Back — Declan DP [Audio Library Release] Music provided by Audio Library Plus Watch: https://youtu.be/blGrC3yY0n0Free Download / Stream: https://alplus.io/looking-back

Express Yourself!
The Importance of Vaccinations

Express Yourself!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 45:45


Are you vaccinated? If not, why not? Sidney hosts a program focusing on inoculations and interviews author Marisa Reichardt about her newest novel, A Shot at Normal. A Shot at Normal focuses around 16-year-old Juniper Jade who — after contracting the measles — sues her anti-vax parents for the right to be vaccinated. Written pre-pandemic, the book is a powerful and timely story about justice, family, and taking your shot, even when it seems impossible. With his segment, Innovation Nation, Arjin provides an historical tour of inoculations, dating back hundreds of years to Buddhist monks who drank snake venom to confer immunity to snake bite, and variolation, or the smearing of a skin tear with cowpox to give immunity to smallpox, practiced in 17th century China, and more. In Sharanya's segment, The Scribble, she reads her original poem, called “The Vaccination Cure”, the segues into plagiarism. Like how the vaccination protects people, writers have something that protects their writing called Copyrights. In the United States, the moment you write something of your own, it is protected. Although plagiarism is not illegal, it is a serious offense in the academic world. The amount does not matter, if you copied a few lines or the entire text. Many people sue plagiarizers. Since plagiarism is so dishonorable, any amount copied is considered a misdeed. Get vaccinated and don't plagiarize. • Follow us: https://www.starstyleradio.com/expressyourselfteenradio • https://www.facebook.com/ExpressYourselfTeenRadio/ • https://www.facebook.com/BTSYAcharity/ • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/expressyourselfradio/

West Virginia Morning
Opioids, Plagiarism, A Hospital Strike And Our Song Of The Week, This West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 15:02


On this West Virginia Morning, Dopesick is a new series streaming on Hulu. It details the rise of prescription opioids, namely Oxycontin, and the wreckage it has caused in Appalachia and across the nation. We talk with author Beth Macy, who helped create the show and wrote the book it's based on.

Book Friends Forever Podcast
Episode 131: CHOP SUEY! Blind Juries, Bad Art Friend, and self censorship

Book Friends Forever Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 68:47


Grace and Alvina have an odds and ends episode where they discuss a Northampton art gallery controversy involving a blind jury, the New York Times Magazine article "Who is the Bad Art Friend", and when self censorship is a good thing. Also, Alison Morris stops by with some holiday gift shopping book recommendations. See complete show notes at www.bookfriendsforever.com. Click here to become a Patreon member: https://www.patreon.com/Bookfriendsforever1.

Raging Romantics
#29 Spilling the Tea on Romance Scandals

Raging Romantics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 69:48


For a genre that seems all hunky dory, there is certainly a lot of drama in Romancelandia. Especially when it comes to issues of authorship and publishing! This month, Jackie and Jen dish on some of the most notorious controversies, dramas, and petty squabbles (including heir own) that have rocked the steady ship of romance. Buckle in sparkly nerds. It's gonna be a bumpy ride.Let us know what your favorite scandal was at the end of the month! There's no reward...but if you email us we might remember to give you a shout out in the next episode...maybe. We forget a lot of things.Christiane SerruyaAfter 22 years of practicing law, Rio de Janeiro-based Serruya decided to become an author. After 6-7 years of writing, she had churned out more than 30 works and had one of her short stories was published in a best-selling collection.In Feb 2019 news broke that this "author" had blatantly plagiarized Courtney Milan and others. Soon authors like Tessa Dare, Lisa Kleypas, Kresley Cole, Karen Marie Moning, and over 40 others found their work copied into Serruya's. These passages ranged from short sentences with moderate rewriting to whole multi-paragraph sections that were near verbatim.Tessa Dare started a whole hashtag: “#copypasteCris”In short, Serruya says that she was not responsible for the plagiarism. Instead, she put the blame on an unnamed ghostwriter she hired from the site Fiverr..."ghostwriter" - writers for hire who are paid but receive none of the credit for the work produced.The Stratemeyer SyndicateThen she goes and plagiarizes the queen herself, Nora Roberts. Nora retaliates and takes her to international court (because Queen Nora has the powers to do so), and an injunction goes through which bars the physical or electronic sale of Serruya's books which were involved in the lawsuit, as well as barring Serruya from receiving royalties from those books. Roberts also won a monetary settlement, which she donated to literary charities.#CockyGateBasically, indie author Falena Hopkins tried to copyright the word "cocky" then tried to go back on what she said that she was trying to stop other authors from using cover designs similar to hersShe's written her Cocker Brother series since 2016. The series concerns 6 brothers and extends onto stories about their children and holidays.According to the court documents Jen went through, Hopkins was worried that there were too many other “cocky” titles out there, and readers were getting confused about which books to buy. She showed the court a few messages from people confused because they had bought the wrong books. Hopkins claimed that a lot of readers messaged her being “wait...this has a cocky word in it too but it's not you??” or “Wait, this is the same model you used!!!”Hopkins filed for trademark protection on May 1, 2018It starts devolving into a twitter battle, and Hopkins sues three people; Tara Crescent, a man who protested the lawsuit, and a publicist (on accident). Hopkins tries to argue that the use of Cocky in the title should be limited to her books only because she's got the most notoriety or something like that (read Jen's articles for more detail). The judge doesn't agree with Hopkins' argument, since "cocky" is a common-use word. The injunction is thrown out, the restraining order against the use of "cocky" is denied, and the trademark registration is cancelled.Alexa Riley...a scandal?Alexa Riley (AR) is a team of best-friend indie authors known for their spicy quick reads. At one time they were publishing on Kindle Unlimited at a rate of almost 2-3 books per month between ~2016-2018.News started coming out though that AR was not only stuffing pages (including extra blank pages in their ebooks for extra page turns and therefore more money), but also of plagiarizing, using ghostwriters, and paying for click farms"click farms" - any kind of operation intended to fraudulently interact with a website. In order to appear more legitimate, the clicks come from real people using mostly mobile devices (cheaper, smaller in size, easier to arrange).Amazon took them down almost immediately...and then nothing...else...happened?Now you can find AR's books through the library (some of them), AR's website, Eden books, iBooks, Kobo, Nook, and Scribd...The Syndicate of James PattersonPatterson uses multiple coauthors when publishing "his" books. He then publishes these books under his name and brand.Instead of being the sole author, Patterson works with lesser-known writers, providing, according to him, extensive outlines, plots, characters and notes to help drive his coauthor through the story. Patterson then, again according to him, goes through upon receipt of the manuscripts and extensively edits. Patterson does his revisions, and rewrites as necessary before sending it back to the coauthor for the next written draft. Over time the number of rewrites goes down for each new collaborator. These co-authors are paid by Patterson. Patterson then takes over the publishing process.Perceived issues with Patterson's publicationsHe calls himself the #1 bestseller...and yet...he's not?Patterson isn't completely writing his own books, and we don't know for sure the writing process with coauthors, beyond his own testimony. So can he fully call himself a bestselling author?Also, as it pertains to romancelandia...there are romance authors (and other authors out there) who have published way more books than Patterson under their own name...so what gives Patterson the right to call himself the #1 bestseller?So...Many...LinksMore on the Stratemeyer SyndicateMore on Sue GraftonChristiane Serruya:"Cristiane Serruya: Alleged Plagiarist" (SB Sarah, 2019)"Cristiane Serruya is a copyright infringer, a plagiarist, and an idiot" (Milan, 2019)"Romance novelist Cristiane Serruya accused of plagiarism" (Flood, 2019a)"The Cristiane Serruya Plagiarism Scandal" (Bailey, 2019a)Lucas Morta blog post "I've never earned any penny with any book in all these years, says Cristiane Serruya, acussed of plagiarizing more than 30 authors" (Morta, 2019)"Nora Roberts Sues Cristiane Serruya, Wins Injunction" (Bailey, 2019b)"Nora Roberts files ‘multi-plagiarism' lawsuit alleging writer copied more than 40 authors" (Flood, 2019b)"Janet Dailey and the Curious Case of the Missing Author" (Hobbs, 2021)"#CopyPasteCris: Romance Novelist Cristiane Serruya Caught in Plagiarizing Scandal" (Fernandes, 2019)"Plagiarism, then and now" (Reeth, 2019a)"Not a rant, but a promise" (Reeth, 2019b)"Let me address this" (Reeth, 2019c)"Blowback" (Reeth, 2019d)"Whiskey Tango Foxtrot" (Reeth, 2019e)"To Sum Up- Sort of" (Reeth, 2019f)"Update" (Reeth, 2019g)"Here's How I work" (Reeth, 2019h)"Readers are Amazing" (Reeth, 2019i)"Breaking news 2" (Reeth, 2019j)"Brazilian romance writer accused of plagiarizing from Courtney Milan, other novelists" (Schaub, 2019)#Cockygate"Cleaning Up the Cocky Cock-Up" (SB Sarah, 2018)"Don't Do This, Ever: Faleena Hopkins Cocks The Whole Entire ****Up" (Trout, 2018)"Trademark Case: Authors Guild Wins ‘CockyGate' Court Ruling" (Anderson, 2018)"Romance Author gets unduly cocky over registered trademark " (Whipple, 2018)"'Cockygate' Author Faleena Hopkins Backs Down From Trademark Dispute After A Settlement Is Reached" (Tsoumbakos, 2018)"How an author trademarking the word “cocky” turned the romance novel industry inside out" (Grady, 2018)"Cockygate: Faleena Hopkins Has Registered a Trademark on Cocky, and is Using it to Threaten Other Romance Authors" (Hoffelder, 2018)"Chance Carter And #Cockygate Collide" (Gaughran, 2021)"Re: Cockygate" (Hopkins, 2019)US Patent and Trademark Office status of "cocky""A cocky Lawyer Reviews #cockygate" (Youtube video, French, 2018)Alexa RileyTwitter thread by @Jenny_Trout (2019)Reddit Thread "Alexa Riley is banned from Amazon"James Patterson"James Patterson mostly doesn't write his books. And his new readers mostly don't read — yet" (Heller, 2016)"The Patterson Problem" (De Maria, 2016)"James Patterson: Author or Brand Manager" (Kelber, 2020)"The James Patterson Book Farm Must be Stopped" (Sizemore, 2021)"Stephen King mocks James Patterson for self-written blurb — and writers loved it" (Heching, 2017)"How Many Books Has James Patterson Written? Best Update [2021]" (Penn Book Center, July 2021)"Ten of the Most Prolific Authors of All Time" (Irisreading.com, 2020)

The Process
299 - Copying, Plagiarism and Inspiration

The Process

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 51:25


Industrial Design, Creative Inspiration & Personal Projects! Today, we chat about driving through the mist late at night, the legal vs ethical differences in copying and why we should reframe the term 'copying' and focus on the process instead of the product. On today's episode of “The Process” we discuss: Driving through the mist Copying vs ripping off a design Legal vs ethical differences in copying Being an industry trendsetter Following your influence The paralysis of originality How do you find your style? Plagiarism, copying and influence Copying to learn The most unique idea isn't always the best All the links, all the time! Industrial Design, Creativity & Inspiration! For Industrial Design related business inquiries: Big Design Company Website: www.bigdesigncompany.com Big Design Company email: hi@bigdesigncompany.com Follow us on Instagram! @theprocess__podcast https://www.instagram.com/theprocess__podcast/ Zak Watson // LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/zak-watson-48618517a/ Behance: https://www.behance.net/zakwatson Website: https://www.zakwatson.com/ Dylan Torraville // LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dylantorraville/ Website: https://dylantorraville.com Portfolio: https://dylanjtorraville.myportfolio.com/ Behance: https://www.behance.net/dylantorraville Send us an email to hi.theprocesspodcast@gmail.com if you have any questions or want to reach out! The Process is a podcast created by industrial designers Dylan Torraville and Zak Watson. Dyl and Zak are picking up microphones to chat about their experiences in design school, personal projects and navigating the creative process. Oh yeah, and there will be some sweet interviews with other designers and friends too.

The Marc & Kim Show
Monday, November 1, 2021 - ROCKED by a Plagiarism Scandal

The Marc & Kim Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 80:10


Kim gave her son his birthday gift early, Marc is a mini thief, and Alex O may be getting more lizards.

Machine Learning Street Talk
Siraj Raval - Stories about YouTube, Plagiarism, and the Dangers of Fame (Interview)

Machine Learning Street Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 66:44


Yannic has a conversation with Siraj Raval about his journey on YouTube, and the perils of fame. Siraj Raval was a famous ML youtuber who was caught plagiarising his content and having a catastrophic fall from grace. OUTLINE: 0:00 - Intro 1:30 - Welcome 3:15 - Starting out: From Economics to YouTube 13:00 - More Views: Plagiarizing Video Content 23:30 - One Step Up: Copying A Research Paper 29:15 - Was there another way? 39:00 - Clickbait Course: Make Money with Machine Learning 50:30 - Rock Bottom and the Way Forward 1:01:30 - Advice for Future Generations Note that the video for this interview can be found on Yannic's YouTube channel. Note - Tim wasn't involved making this episode.

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
How to differentiate between Inspiration and Copy?

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 8:16


Did you know?Arthritis led to the invention of the photo-copying machine. In this episode of #TheHabitCoach, Ashdin Doctor talks about 'Inspiration vs Copied ideas'. He shares an interesting story of how Chester Carlson invented xerox photography in order to find a solution to his arthritis. Further, Ashdin explains how the world is following and copying certain trends in their lives and shares an extraordinary perspective on how to differentiate the idea from being inspirational vs being copied. Do listen to this awesome episode and understand the fresh perspective.Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 Habit Coach app: ( https://bit.ly/2XTBvfC )Website: Awesome180 ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

SBS Hebrew - אס בי אס בעברית
SBS Jewish update, with Shane Desiatnik: New Israeli ambassador, hate video, Plagiarism of sermons allegations and more

SBS Hebrew - אס בי אס בעברית

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:03


SBS Jewish update that will cover the past week of Jewish life in Australia with Shane Desiatnik senior journalist at the Australian Jewish News and Nitza Lowenstein. In the news this week, Amir Maimon is Israel's next ambassador to Australia, Anti-Jewish hate video exposes, NIF, AJDS & Greens oppose adoption of anti-Semitism definition, Plagiarism of sermons allegations, Sydney & Melbourne out of Lockdown, with synagogues open and students return to classroom

West Virginia Morning
Plagiarism Allegation Concerns Continue And A Black Community In Coal Country Thrives, This West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:12


On this West Virginia Morning, William Turner is one of the most prolific historians of the Black experience in Appalachia. His new book, “The Harlan Renaissance: Stories of Black Life in Appalachian Coal Towns,” includes his memories of growing up in Lynch, Kentucky.

The Princess and the B
(#154) Knock it Off with the Knock Offs

The Princess and the B

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:10


Let's talk Imposter Syndrome. Ever buy a knock off? In this episode, I dive into how the Law of Karma goes into knock-offs and why you may want to reconsider ever buying a knockoff again. @crownyourselfnow In this episode, you will learn... What does buying things make you feel? (2:15) Why do you sometimes feel guilt when you buy something nice for yourself? (3:00) How do you feel when you buy knock offs? (4:15) What will you feel when you buy something special for yourself? (5:45) How would you feel if someone plagiarized your work? (8:00) Why do you buy knock offs? (9:15) What does not leaning in to your greatness say about you? (10:30) What is the intention of your purchase? (14:00) Why do you need to lean into your feelings when you make a purchase? (17:00) How does your purchase reflect who you are? (19:00) What do you need to ask your future self about your purchases? (22:00) What intention does your future self buy from? (25:00)   I'm teaching a class on October 27 @ 5PM PST on How to Profit from Guest Podcasting. Click here to join the FREE class now to see how you can apply this powerful strategy to get massive unique results in your business. https://crownyourselfcoaching.com/profit-from-podcasting-webinar   Thank you so much for tuning in! Please leave a review on iTunes here so we can keep the magic coming your way. Join the Communication Queens here: https://www.crownyourselfmembers.com/offers/soF5osCq/checkout Looking to improve your health + train your breath with Pilates? Become a Mindful Monarch and get monthly Pilates lessons and a coach + community to support your mind-body and body-mind connection: https://crownyourself.com/mindful-monarchs-membership And, one of the best ways to reprogram your subconscious mind is through hypnosis. Download my FREE 5-minute “You Are Worthy” hypnosis. GET YOUR FREE GIFT! For a 90-Minute 1:1 Consult  https://crownyourself.com/private-coaching Rule Your Body Book https://crownyourself.securechkout.com/rule-your-body-book Join the Facebook Group: "Crown Yourself Coaching" For more biz inspo + mindset tools, follow us on Instagram: @crownyourselfnow Follow my own mompreneur journey to #CrownYourself on Instagram: @kimberly.spencer For more mindset, motivation, actionable strategies, and business-building tips, check out: crownyourself.com

Trend Lightly
You Wouldn't Download a Kidney

Trend Lightly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 137:57


It's not about the kidney, it's about plagiarism. Molly and Tiffany lube you up with Kim Kardashian's SNL monologue before dragging you through the depths of this Sonya Larson/Grub Street/Dawn Dorland "drama" AKA hell. LINKS! “Who is the Bad Art Friend?” (via NYT) Robert Kolker's request to interview Sonya Larson Celeste Ng (@pronounced_ing) on Twitter post-NYT article “Bad Art Friend” court documents via Scribd What to know about the years-long plagiarism dispute involving two Boston writers that has Twitter buzzing via Boston Globe Inspiration or plagiarism? Writing hackles raised in Boston dispute via Boston Globe“The Kindest” by Sonya Larson (via court filings) “All of The Corrections Dawn Dorland Sent Us About Our ‘Bad Art Friend' blogs” (via Gawker) @KidneyGate Twitter thread from Dan Nguyen Chip Cheek's email about seeing Dawn in “Gundo”  Dawn Dorland's countersuit filing  Document 118 Document 107, page 90 (Sonya's first draft with more instances of what appears to be plagiarism and using the name “Dawn”/emails) Document 112 (more receipts, Celeste Ng iMessage correspondence) Document 120 (more receipts, “The first draft of the story really *was* a takedown of Dawn, wasn't it?” “I would just tell her you're still revising and hope that she forgets?”) IdiotsContinue Substack Joshua Luna on weaponizing a POC experience Twitter thread from Heidi N. Moore “Who is the Worse Art Friend” by Rafia Zakaria (via SubStack) “Bad Art Friend Screenshots” via Dropbox  DARVO MFA Program for Writers faculty and alumni receive NEA Fellowships Identity Fraud (via Gawker) NYT comments: “I've found that the attention-seeking amongst us, while often frustrating, are rarely afforded empathy” https://nyti.ms/3lh710p#permid=114855813 “I am a published, award-winning writer” https://nyti.ms/3AqTach#permid=114861952 “I met her once. Most of us didn't know her well (if at all).” https://nyti.ms/3086llR#permid=114862636 “The only evidence of entitlement I see here is a class one” https://nyti.ms/3AdCCnQ#permid=114853186 “I too am a teacher who serves on an academic honor committee.” https://nyti.ms/3uTZGHm#permid=114887748 “I was a student and intern at GrubStreet” https://nyti.ms/3oJIDqe#permid=114854577 “What a lot of people seem uncomfortable with is the “vulgarity” of Dorland's Facebook usage.” https://nyti.ms/3ajvLi7#permid=114903949 “As someone who knew this person, I have found it frustrating to see her framed as "just a little weird," https://nyti.ms/3uZuy9g#permid=114902971 “If, the only reason Dorland donated a kidney was kindness and altruism why did she have to tell anyone about it” https://nyti.ms/3mxGI5w#permid=114857767 “Dorlands demand that Larson validate her "altruism" is so blatantly and perversly self indulgent” https://nyti.ms/3oLKpHi#permid=114920321 “But, does this self serving action give Larson the "right" to take Dorland's circumstance” https://nyti.ms/3DshbRM#permid=114914003 “Her limited thinking there doesn't make me want to read Larson's work.” https://nyti.ms/3ls9x3S#permid=114909129 “A write-up by the UCLA Medical Center about Dorland's donation (I'm not sure I'm allowed to link to it here)" https://nyti.ms/3AoRgJ8#permid=114913506 BUY OUR MERCH! Get bonus content for Trend Lightly by the Solid Listen Network on Patreon. Follow our YouTube page. Memes, trending TikTok compilations and more.

Here's Where it Went Wrong
Photography and Plagiarism: When No One has Ever Had An Original Thought (w/ Cassidy Kulhanek)

Here's Where it Went Wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 59:41


Andrew and Wenzler welcome the very funny Cassidy Kulhanek to talk about the concept of Plagiarism! What started out as the hosts taking a very hard "Plagiarism is bad" stance, ends with Cassidy completely frying both of their minds as they dive through the history! Enjoying this podcast? Have questions, comments, or suggestions for an episode? You can reach out to Andrew and Wen on the HWIWW Twitter account! DM anytime, they'd love to hear from you! And subscribe to their Patreon to help keep the show going! Submit your Blue Wire Hustle application here: http://bwhustle.com/join Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sarah's Food for Thought
Lets Talk Copying, Plagiarism and Ethics

Sarah's Food for Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 16:56


In this episode, I chat about avoiding copying and plagiarism in your own biz, how to address it when it's done to you, and we get real about why it is even a thing! Apply for Coaching Here: https://www.sarahdhall.com/links Screenshot, tag me @thesarahdhall on Instagram, and share this on your social media!  www.Instagram.com/thesarahdhall

Plus or Bust - A Disney Podcast
49 - "Behind the Attraction" Plagiarism Offense + The Cat from Outer Space (1978)

Plus or Bust - A Disney Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 98:18


Welcome to Plus or Bust - A Disney Podcast, where each week we discuss a different, random film from Disney's streaming video service, Disney+, and decide whether or not we would recommend it or not by giving a Plus or a Bust. We also discuss various Disney news and other Disney related topics so each week is something different.On this episode we talk about the latest Disney news including a new holiday party coming to Disneyland and Behind the Attraction stealing a Youtubers art . All that and more plus our featured film discussion on The Cat from Outer Space. Does this weird space romp make for a far out feline film? Or was it better left in orbit?Find out on this episode of Plus or Bust!00:00:38 - Introductions00:01:25 - Gripe Corner - Loungefly Bags, Shang-Chi is TOO good, Raya in Emoji Blitz, 50th Happy Meal toys00:16:35 - Most Merriest Nights holiday party coming to Disneyland00:23:08 - Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance dropping virtual queue system00:30:43 - Roger Rabbit's Car-Toon Spin getting update00:37:23 - Finding Nemo: The Musical being retooled 00:42:10 - Disney announces release dates for upcoming 2022/2023 films00:45:03 - Flight of the Navigator remake coming to Disney+00:46:45 - High School Musical the Musical: The Series gets a third season00:48:09 - New trailers for Hawkeye and The West Side Story00:50:31 - Behind the Attraction series steals Youtuber's artwork01:01:22 - The Cat from Outer Space discussion01:23:45 - Final Thoughts + Verdicts01:25:25 - Outro + Social LinksArt of Engineering twitter thread - https://twitter.com/aoEngineering/status/1438648778702086153?s=20Follow us on Twitter! @PlusOrBustFollow us on Instagram! @PlusOrBustJoin our Facebook Group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/disneyplusorbustSend us an email at disneyplusorbust@gmail.comAny popping, clicking, echoing or vibrations you hear in the audio are not intentional and we're working to get it fixed for later episodes. We apologize for an inconsistent quality.Recorded 09/17/2021

Rich and Daily
Ripping Off with the Kardashians

Rich and Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 9:23


Sometimes life ISN'T a bowl of cherries. Backlash over the new Skims campaign photos released this week has Kim Kardashian and her billion-dollar company facing social media scrutiny over ripping off an artistic idea. It's the latest in a long line of cultural appropriation accusations against the Kardashian clan over the years. So, is stealing the way this family is Keeping Up?Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The BTWN Network
Holy Plagiarism

The BTWN Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 64:13


    On this episode of Polemics Report for September 21st, 2021, we opine on the archetypical SBC lackey caricatured by Bart Barber, laugh at the "Werther's Original" guy misunderstanding online ads, and answer Patron questions on the free side as a preview of some of the benefits of becoming a patron. In the Patron-only portion, we address a Patron's loving disagreement with David's interpretation of Romans 13. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4uBUibCKFc

Polemics Report with JD Hall
Holy Plagiarism

Polemics Report with JD Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 64:13


    On this episode of Polemics Report for September 21st, 2021, we opine on the archetypical SBC lackey caricatured by Bart Barber, laugh at the "Werther's Original" guy misunderstanding online ads, and answer Patron questions on the free side as a preview of some of the benefits of becoming a patron. In the Patron-only portion, we address a Patron's loving disagreement with David's interpretation of Romans 13. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4uBUibCKFc

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW
#794 - Why do men cheat?

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 12:53


RICH CELENZA and his Co-host Robert Benenati talk about why men (and women) cheat. Rich talks about how a lot of men cheat because they are given the opportunity. Men also may find themselves in a position whereas they age they may become better looking and collect more wealth which may make them more attractive to women. Robert talks about why he doesn't cheat and if you have strong relationships there is no reason to cheat. 

Mortification of Spin
Sermon Plagiarism

Mortification of Spin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021


A very old and common problem in the pastoral world has recently returned to the headlines with allegations of sermon plagiarism lodged against the newly elected president of the Southern Baptist Convention. Why is sermon plagiarism such a big deal? Does it reach beyond the simple theft of intellectual property? What are the advantages and blessings of sermon preparation for the pastor and his congregation? Join Carl and Todd for an instructive conversation! We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to win a free copy of the classic Preaching and Preachers by Martin Lloyd Jones, published by Zondervan. Register!

The Bert Show
We Share Our Thoughts On This Plagiarism Accusation Against Billie Eilish

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 5:57


We Share Our Thoughts On This Plagiarism Accusation Against Billie Eilish   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

The Higher Ed Geek Podcast
Episode #131: Eric Gibbs on Ouriginal, Plagiarism, and Academic Integrity

The Higher Ed Geek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 37:30


Go find tons of cool gear and support the show at our storefront. --- Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive perks! --- Our guest for this week's episode is  -- Subscribe and listen via Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or Spotify. Find the full show notes at higheredgeek.com/podcast --- Music by pond5.com

The Pop Culture Show
Teary-Eyed Pop Star + Let's Play “Is It Plagiarism?” + Game of Thrones Star's Singing Shocks All

The Pop Culture Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 26:52


Today In Pop Culture takes us back to the #1 song right in the middle of the 80's. Find out who “straight up went for it” on this talk show. A teary social media address from a pop star trying to keep it positive. Did these rockers plagiarize one of their hits? The Pop Culture jury decides. A movie franchise star is rapping for peanut butter and a country singer is crooning for cannabis. We take a listen to a couple of musical comebacks and superstar's latest single. Plus, the robot uprising is getting closer....Please, review and subscribe to The Pop Culture Show available on your favorite podcast network. Get Exclusive Pop Culture Show video interviews, video content and bonus video exclusively from our Instagram. Sign up for our Pop Cult and be the first to get show announcements, free stuff and insider information only available to cult members. Watch The Pop Culture Show TV channel for the most fun, interesting and intriguing guests and moments from the show available 24/7.Executive Producer: Steve BarnesHosts: Steve Barnes, Leslie Fram, Paul Cubby BryantAssociate Producer: Brad MaybeFAIR USE COPYRIGHT NOTICE The Copyright Laws of the United States recognize a “fair use” of copyrighted content. Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act states:“NOTWITHSTANDING THE PROVISIONS OF SECTIONS 106 AND 106A, THE FAIR USE OF A COPYRIGHTED WORK, INCLUDING SUCH USE BY REPRODUCTION IN COPIES OR PHONORECORDS OR BY ANY OTHER MEANS SPECIFIED BY THAT SECTION, FOR PURPOSES SUCH AS CRITICISM, COMMENT, NEWS REPORTING, TEACHING (INCLUDING MULTIPLE COPIES FOR CLASSROOM USE), SCHOLARSHIP, OR RESEARCH, IS NOT AN INFRINGEMENT OF COPYRIGHT.” THIS VIDEO/AUDIO IN GENERAL MAY CONTAIN CERTAIN COPYRIGHTED WORKS THAT WERE NOT SPECIFICALLY AUTHORIZED TO BE USED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER(S), BUT WHICH WE BELIEVE IN GOOD FAITH ARE PROTECTED BY FEDERAL LAW AND THE FAIR USE DOCTRINE FOR ONE OR MORE OF THE REASONS NOTED ABOVE. IF YOU HAVE ANY SPECIFIC CONCERNS ABOUT THIS VIDEO OR OUR POSITION ON THE FAIR USE DEFENSE, PLEASE CONTACT US AT INFO@THEPOPCULTURESHOW.COM SO WE CAN DISCUSS AMICABLY. THANK YOU. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Kingdom Roots with Scot McKnight
The Pastor and Plagiarism with Marshall Hatch - KR 181

Kingdom Roots with Scot McKnight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 35:42


Start your journey of advancing your Biblical Studies with Northern Seminary at http://seminary.edu/krapply Scot McKnight suggests, “A sermon is a person studying the Bible, encountering God in their own life and history, and then spewing it all out on Sunday morning for the good of the people of God.” Scot and Marshall Hatch have a conversation about the danger of pastors taking others' messages as if they were their own. Listen to this episode of Kingdom Roots to get guidance on how to keep your own well running deep.

The Sword & The Trowel
TS&TT: Voddie Baucham | A Response to Plagiarism Charges from Joel McDurmon

The Sword & The Trowel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 34:23


Today on The Sword and The Trowel, for a special bonus episode, Tom Ascol and Jared Longshore are joined by Voddie Baucham to address the recent plagiarism charges from Joel McDurmon against Dr. Baucham in his best selling book, Fault Lines: The Social Justice Movement and Evangelicalism's Looming Catastrophe. 50% off Fault Lines when you use the code: McDurmon | https://press.founders.org/shop/fault-lines-the-social-justice-movement-and-evangelicalisms-looming-catastrophe/ 2022 National Founders Conference: Militant & Triumphant | https://founders.org/2022conference/ IOPT Convocation: https://www.instituteofpublictheology.org/convocation/ Become a part of the F.A.M. | https://press.founders.org/fam/ Be It Resolved Conference Sermons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXMbCWFEKybJWzlfldMXWN2jQEvKNRzMS The Institute of Public Theology: https://www.instituteofpublictheology.org/ Strong and Courageous: Following Jesus Amid the Rise of America's New Religion | https://press.founders.org/shop/strong-and-courageous/ WATCH NOW: Founders Cinedoc: By What Standard? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFHfa0s1XLM Follow Founders Ministries: Website: https://founders.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoundersMin/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoundersMin Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/foundersministries/ All Founders Ministries resources are copyrighted and any use and distribution must be approved by Founders Ministries.

The Counsel of Trent
#478 – Plagiarism, or don't steal this episode!

The Counsel of Trent

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 22:15


In this free-for-all-Friday Trent explores the topic of plagiarism both in being a victim of it and also in unintentionally committing it.

Front Porch with the Fitzes
Episode 357: Olympics, Plagiarism & Hebrews 13

Front Porch with the Fitzes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 57:57


In this week's podcast the crew talks a bit about the Olympics. Then they discuss the rise of plagiarism with pastors taking other's sermons. Then Joel closes us out with a devotional on Hebrews 13.

Wretched Radio
Did Charles Spurgeon really condone plagiarism?

Wretched Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021


Wretched Radio | Air Date: July 19, 2021 Did Charles Spurgeon really condone plagiarism as some are claiming? Surprisingly pastoral plagiarism isn't the full-blown fire in the SBC that it should be. A new survey reveals men don't have close male friends anymore. What could be the reasons for this new trend? Emojis are being […] The post Did Charles Spurgeon really condone plagiarism? appeared first on Wretched.

Wretched Radio
Mailbag Friday: Lacking Assurance, Reaping and Sowing, Comedy, Plagiarism Talk with Your Pastor

Wretched Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 55:03


Wretched Radio | Air Date: July 16, 2021 Mailbag. Do you lack assurance and doubt your salvation? Can you clarify the distinction between karma and reaping and sowing? Should Christian comedians avoid using Jesus and the Bible as part of their material? You suggested recently to talk to the pastor to get his thoughts on […] The post Mailbag Friday: Lacking Assurance, Reaping and Sowing, Comedy, Plagiarism Talk with Your Pastor appeared first on Wretched.

Wretched Radio
Sermongate, Plagiarism, Your Pastor

Wretched Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 55:02


Wretched Radio | Air Date: July 6, 2021 Have you heard about Sermongate yet? When stories like this surface we have an opportunity to better understand the role of pastor. Are we considering the schedule of our own pastor? Where is the line with plagiarism? Are pastors who sell their sermons just as responsible as […] The post Sermongate, Plagiarism, Your Pastor appeared first on Wretched.