Podcasts about outliers

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observation far apart from others in statistics and data science

  • 996PODCASTS
  • 1,643EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 17, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about outliers

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Latest podcast episodes about outliers

Stock Pickers
#9 - 2021 foi desafiador, 2022 com ativos baratos e 2030 com privadas que fazem exame

Stock Pickers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 68:59


Parceria do Stock Pickers com Samuel Ponsoni, apresentador do podcast Outliers e responsável pela gestão dos fundos da família Selection, da XP. Todo começo de mês, Ponsoni e Salomão se reunirão com outros especialistas de fundos para conversar sobre o que eles tiraram de mais relevante das cartas enviadas pelas gestoras no começo do mês.Edição: Nando LimaSaiba mais sobre nós: https://linktr.ee/stockpickers_

RT
On Contact: Outlier – Jimmy Carter

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 27:46


On the show, Chris Hedges discusses the legacy of the Carter administration with his biographer, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Kai Bird. Jimmy Carter, America's 39th president, who served one term from 1977 to 1981 before being defeated by Ronald Reagan, was one of the country's most enigmatic politicians. He was a bundle of contradictions, a man of deep Christian faith who would be abandoned by his evangelical base; a president who promised to place human rights at the center of his foreign policy and yet fell under the disastrous influence of his Svengali-like national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski, leading Carter to equip and arm the radical jihadists who would morph into the Taliban and Al-Qaeda, and give unswerving support to the brutal Iranian regime of the Shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. Carter preached compassion for the poor and the vulnerable while imposing punishing financial policies, deregulation and austerity measures that would take a toll on the working class and the marginalized. And yet in many ways, he was perhaps our most exemplary modern president, refraining from military adventurism, devoting tremendous effort to securing peace in the Middle East, and overseeing an administration that was free from the kinds of corruption and scandals that characterized the presidencies that followed. Kai Bird's most recent book is ‘The Outlier: The Unfinished Presidency of Jimmy Carter'.

Breakfast With Champions
Sara McCord and Anaïs Ganouna on Fireside - Building a Business Guided by Your Values is the Key to Success

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 65:29


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we listen to Sara McCord and Anaïs Ganouna on Fireside!  Sara McCord is a communications and marketing strategist who specializes in helping companies and thought leaders reach ambitious business goals through stronger content thoughtfully built across multiple channels. She's worked with a Fortune-100, billion dollar investment firms, small businesses, and thought leaders and solopreneurs; on multi-faceted communications, branding and rebranding, social media, and content strategies. Most recently, Sara signed on to build Breakfast With Champions, where she's charged with startegically growing, scaling, marketing and monetizing the brand on Clubhouse, as a podcast, and through other audience experiences. Sara got her start in editorial as a Staff Writer/ Editor at the Muse and Mashable Contributor, and her 200+ published articles have been bylined or syndicated across Cosmopolitan, Forbes, Fast Company, Time, CNBC, Good Housekeeping, and more. Anaïs Ganouna, a neurodivergent middle child to immigrant parents, lifelong entrepreneur, and questioner of all things. Her career has spanned 4 personal businesses, including 1 exit, and continues to serve multiple spirit-led businesses through Fractional CMO services, consulting, and her online membership space, Aligned Visionaries. Anaïs has served ventures like Outlier.org (from the founder of Masterclass), top 10 Apple Podcast Chasing Glory with Lilian Garcia, and countless first time founders.

TRENDIFIER with Julian Dorey
#82 - Amanda Leve: MMA, Jiu Jitsu & Taking Down A Girl Double Her Size; Society Is Soft; The Spread of Propaganda; JFK, WWII & Time Travel

TRENDIFIER with Julian Dorey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 189:53


Amanda Leve is a world-class martial artist. She is currently the 6th-Ranked No-Gi Grappling / Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Fighter globally (Women's 145 LB+ Division). Furthermore, Leve is also a PFL professional MMA Fighter. ***TIMESTAMPS*** 0:00 - Intro; The Sheik's are big Jiu Jitsu guys; Amanda's dad was crazy for Jiu Jitsu; The discipline MMA & Jiu Jitsu instills; Texas of course says everything goes in MMA; Participation trophy culture; Talking S–t & The Confidence Gene in fighters 25:50 - Amanda talks about her famous recent takedown of 270 pounder, Gabi Garcia; recapping the Pre-fight press conference with Gabi; Drug testing; How good is USADA these days?; How fast did Gabi realize she was bread in a toaster?; Talking weight differences and the Logan Paul Floyd Mayweather example in boxing; Biggest MMA bases around the world; UFC, Bellator, & PFL Promotions 49:00 - Society has gone soft; Why Amanda thinks kids should be allowed to fight; Safety Culture and its damage on kids; The Pandemic's effect on kids and schools; Amanda talks about Malcolm Gladwell's theory on the Chinese numerical system (Outliers); Environments mold people 1:06:52 - Amanda & Julian talk about their alcohol of choice; Rising Sommeliers and their desire to change the “class culture” around wine (“Dining With Skyler” & Skyler Bouchard Oppenheim's fight against wine snobbery) 1:14:42 - Amanda often thinks about the normal world pre-Pandemic; Why Amanda hates social media's hold on society; Amanda loves all conspiracies; Oliver Stone's new JFK Documentary; Julian tells a story about JFK's assassination that he heard from a guy who knew a guy who knew a guy so it's probably not reliable; China and the CCP's regime; The state of America's school system; Mixing the positives of opposite ideologies to fix poverty; The applicability of school curriculums 1:42:42 - Amanda and Julian talk history; WWII & The Holocaust; The Terrifying Quick rise of Hitler in Germany and why it happened; Amanda talks about visiting the Holocaust Museum; How vulnerable is society to falling for an authoritarian regime with psycho beliefs?; Amanda has never watched Inglourious Basterds and that is incredibly disappointing to hear; Hitler conspiracies and the ratlines; Why people can't exist without war 1:59:58 - The stress level of being a spy; Julian does a Departed impression; Amanda tells a story about the British tricking the Germans in WWII; BS meters and conspiracies; Amanda and Julian discuss propaganda; Julian gives a wild theory on the repetition of a specific word in the media over the past couple months; Politicians today vs. a decade ago; The desperation that has formed across society over the past 15-20 years 2:17:58 - Back to JFK for a minute (CIA & The Mafia); The Vatican Documents; The UFO Docs; Julian's friend Alessi's work producing James Fox's upcoming UFO documentary; Amanda discusses the Egyptians, the pyramids, and the aliens who built them; Julian wants to go back in time to have a chat with the Jesus guy and see what's what; Dinosaurs and Hippos; True Crime and Serial Killer obsession in modern culture 2:35:22 - Amanda talks about why fighting is like a drug; When the fear leaves Amanda's system; Amanda talks about why preparation is the most important thing for a fighter; Amanda's mindset coach; The weight cutting process 2:56:40 - How Amanda diagrammed Gabi Garcia's strategy; Julian and Amanda discuss the he similarities between Jiu Jitsu and how Lions hunt Giraffes; why Kobe Bryant studied Great White Sharks; How do people not drink water?; Dealing with hangovers; Amanda's upcoming fight schedule   ~ YouTube EPISODES & CLIPS: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0A-v_DL-h76F75xik8h03Q  ~ PRIVADO VPN FOR $4.99/Month: https://privadovpn.com/trendifier/#a_aid=Julian   Get $100 Off The Eight Sleep Pod Pro Mattress / Mattress Cover: https://eight-sleep.ioym.net/trendifier  Julian's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/julianddorey  ~ Beat provided by: https://freebeats.io  Music Produced by White Hot

Pop Music For Smart People
Who Runs The World: Outliers

Pop Music For Smart People

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 21:11


In this episode of Pop Music For Smart People I revisit the Who Runs The World episode with a part two. This time I am featuring three amazing female artists that are outliers of mainstream music and are paving their own music pathways. They are Grace Ives, Dora Jar and Dope Saint Jude. In this episode I feature three songs by each of these super talented women including tracks such as Mirror, Wizard and Grrrl Like. This will be a continuing series featuring amazing female musical artists so stay tuned. So come on in and listen to these three incredible women and the music they are creating. To support the show go to www.buymeacoffee.com/PMFSP Visit our website www.popmusicforsmartpeople.com and while you are there check out our merch store --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pmfsp/message

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 674 The Morning Grind - How To Become The Outlier In Your Industry

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 64:43


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Brian Benstock,  Barbara Majeski, David Spisak & Raylen Davis on The Morning Grind!        Brian Benstock: Keynote Speaker, Google Dealer Advisory Board Member, #1 Honda Certified Dealer 16x and #1 Acura Certified Dealer 15x Barbara Majeski: the “Curator of the Good Life”, Lifestyle blogger, Real Estate Investor, TV personality with regular features on the TODAY show, Inside Edition, Good Day New York and many more!  David Spisak, an Investor, 9 figure Entrepreneur, Business Growth Expert, Servant Leader, Ex-Board of Director, San Francisco 49ers, Founder of 8 companies, Google Dealer Advisory Board, Partner - 9 figure Restaurant Group,  Investor in start-ups, small and mid-level company's, CEO of HealthCheck, NetImpact, Disruptive Growth Solutions, Disruptive Growth! Raylen Davis, a Sales and Mindset coach who uses his experience in combat sports to help entrepreneurs and sales teams increase their revenue through the power of mindset and Inspirational Selling.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 645 with Anaïs Ganouna - Changing Your Perspective

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 25:31


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Anaïs Ganouna, a neurodivergent middle child to immigrant parents, lifelong entrepreneur, and questioner of all things. Her career has spanned 4 personal businesses, including 1 exit, and continues to serve multiple spirit-led businesses through Fractional CMO services, consulting, and her online membership space, Aligned Visionaries. Anaïs has served ventures like Outlier.org (from the founder of Masterclass), top 10 Apple Podcast Chasing Glory with Lilian Garcia, and countless first time founders.

Tamil Short Stories - Under the tree
Outliers By Malcolm Gladwell

Tamil Short Stories - Under the tree

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 6:13


"Under the Tree" is an initiative to re - live the child hood and our lives by relating to stories by great writers of yesteryears. The objective is to rekindle the interest of reading and showcase the Indian authors work which give rebirth to the tradition, culture. Spiritual series that is rich in Indian ethos along with Management aspects increase positivity which is much needed always..

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 617 with Anaïs Ganouna - The Art of Receiving

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 31:25


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Anaïs Ganouna, a neurodivergent middle child to immigrant parents, lifelong entrepreneur, and questioner of all things. Her career has spanned 4 personal businesses, including 1 exit, and continues to serve multiple spirit-led businesses through Fractional CMO services, consulting, and her online membership space, Aligned Visionaries. Anaïs has served ventures like Outlier.org (from the founder of Masterclass), top 10 Apple Podcast Chasing Glory with Lilian Garcia, and countless first time founders.

Outliers
#42 Mar Asset: a gestora novata que quer ser a "Dynamo dos Multimercados"

Outliers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 65:50


O episódio #42 do Outliers recebeu Bruno Coutinho e Philippe Perdigão, sócios fundadores da Mar Asset. A gestora foi criada em 2019, quando Bruno e Philippe se uniram ao sócio investidor Luis Moura que, após fundar a 3G Capital em Nova York e ter trabalhado no BTG Pactual e Citibank, montou uma estrutura para alocar, inicialmente, o seu próprio capital. O dinheiro dos sócios, portanto, é investido na mesma condição dos outros cotistas, na estratégia única da casa.O nome da gestora vem de uma paixão em comum entre os três: o surfe. “O mar é um ambiente de variáveis incontroláveis: vento, maré, tamanho da ondulação. O que controlamos é a nossa reação. É isso que pensamos no mercado também”, disse Bruno Coutinho.E o objetivo de longo prazo da gestora não é nada módico: ser para os fundos Multimercados o que a gestora Dynamo é para os fundos de ações - uma referência. Vão ter bastante trabalho duro pela frente e algumas décadas...boa sorte!Ouça o episódio completo e entenda mais sobre a Mar Asset!O Outliers reúne conversas com os gestores mais renomados do mercado e é apresentado por Samuel Ponsoni (@samuel.ponsoni), gestor de fundos da família Selection na XP, acompanhado por Carol Oliveira, coordenadora de análise de fundos da XP.

The Sonya Looney Show
The Ultimate Guide to Goal Setting

The Sonya Looney Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 33:48


We all have ideas of what we want our life to look like. It could be something like weight loss, improving speed on the bike or running, or even cooking more at home.  When you set those goals, how do you go about doing it? Have you set goals and ultimately lost motivation or simply got out of the habit? With the impending New Year, many of us like to think about what we want to accomplish. In fact, fresh starts are a great time for habit change. (link). I'm here to help you set goals for the new year or any time that will actually keep you on track. In this guide, you'll learn: The mistakes people make with setting goals how to set a process or behavior focused goals (instead of outcome goals) how big of a goal is too big strategies to avoid the self-sabotage of all-or-none thinking SMART Goals: the actual elements of setting an achievable goal some ways to track your goals how to stay motivated with your goals ove rtime define what success looks like The Mistakes People Make with Setting Goals It's normal to look at what we want to achieve with a goal. I want to lose 10 lbs. I want to finish top 10 in my race. I want to run a certain 10k or marathon time. I want to make a certain amount of money. These are all outcome-based goals. Outcome goals are focused on the product of your work. The problem with outcome-based goals? A lot of the time, they are out of our control You cannot control a race result. In some ways, you cannot control an exact dollar amount you want to make. And even if they are within our control, outcome-based goals can be demotivating. You hear of people who train to run a marathon, do the race, and never run again. Ultimately, we are trying to grow as a person or slightly change our identity. The goal of someone who wants to run a marathon is really that they want to become a runner, but if they miss this bit point, they may just run the marathon and quit running. I'm sure you have heard about process-oriented goals. In coaching, we call this behavior-oriented goals. What behaviors can you consistently commit to that will move you toward the outcome you want? The behaviors, the process, the work- that is what gets you to your goal and that is what is within your control. It's okay to have an outcome in mind, but set that goalpost and then forget about it. Ultimately, we set goals because we want to feel proud. At the end of the day, it's the consistent work we put in that makes us feel proud, even if the outcome isn't exactly what we wanted. I've felt really proud of race results that didn't even land me of the podium because I know what I did to get to that point and I was proud of my performance. As Atomic Habits author and podcast guest James Clear says, "Every action you take is a vote for the type of person you want to become." Focus on your daily actions, vote to be the thing you want to achieve. The goal isn't to run a marathon, the goal is to become a runner. The goal isn't to write a book, the goal is to become a writer. The goal isn't to lose weight, the goal is to be someone who eats healthy. What are the actions of someone who already has that identity and how can you replicate them and feel proud of them? Another problem people have is they set goals that are too big. How Big of a Goal is Too Big? The problem with unrealistic expectations or a goal too big is that it can undermine your confidence or even make you give up early in your attempt to meet your challenge. What is the optimal amount of difficulty for challenges?  When it comes to flow and performance, scientists found that just 4% past your current ability is the right amount.  Just 4%!  That's barely moving the needle and I think many of us try to dial it up by much higher numbers. I have tried taking on too much at once many times and it usually would mean I got worse. Trying to do ride a trail that is too technical or coming back after an injury expecting to be exactly where you were before is unrealistic.  Setting small action steps or small micro-challenges with skill development will continue to help you build your confidence and work towards a goal in a sustainable way.  Start where you are today, and set just manageable challenges to move forward. This is something my health coaching clients do every session- they set 2 or 3 small goals that put a brick in the wall to build toward their broader goal.  It's good to have a big vision for what you want to achieve- you may even have heard of setting a BHAG: Big Hairy Audacious Goal. I'm all for that!  But it's about taking the baby action steps, having the patience for the long-term, and committing the process.   100 small steps get you pretty far down the path, create an ingrained habit or skill, and give you the confidence and resilience to move forward.  Looking at the big picture from time to time is key, just as long as it doesn't overwhelm you making you feel like you need to do it all at once. it's important to celebrate those small wins.  We often are so focused on the future and focused forward that we forget the impressive mountain we just climbed.   Why All-or-None Thinking Doesn't Work Another landmine with goal-setting is people tend to think in all-or-none terms. Eating healthy is an easy example. How many times have you had one cookie that turned into three cookies, a pizza for lunch, chips for a snack, and fast food for dinner? We tend to self-sabotage when we slip up once. All-or-none thinking has its place in changing or maintaining certain habits. In some cases, it's easier to abstain from something completely than to approach a habit with moderation. In fact, studies show that we often are bad at guessing how moderate we are actually being. When it comes to moderation, it's essential to have clear limits and boundaries. Whether we are trying to be all-or-none or trying to moderate a behavior within certain limits, slip-ups happen. Here is why slip-ups happen and how to create a simple contingency plan for when they do. "Slip-ups" with behavior change happen for several reasons.  Setting a goal that is too big or not sustainable for the long term. Solution: set smaller action steps or easier to attain goals to keep building momentum and trend in the right direction. Sometimes our environment is set up to make it hard to be successful (if you want to drink less but your spouse buys a bottle of your favorite wine... there's Halloween candy laying around when you want to cut back on sugar, etc.) Solution: Create an environment that makes it easier to succeed (like put alcohol in inconvenient places to get to, don't put beer in the fridge so you have to wait for it to get cold if you want one, don't have candy in the house or put it somewhere out of sight and hard to get to). In addition, keep healthier options handy. Make access less convenient for habits you're trying to break and make access more convenient and visible for habits you're trying to adopt (e.g fruit bowl on the counter, wear a running watch to remind you that you are going for a run or start the day wearing your sports bra, so you're already part-way dressed to exercise). Setting a goal that we think we should do but don't really want to do, so we never actually tap into our intrinsic motivation and meaning. Solution: Set a different goal, or if this new habit is critical, find ways to make it personally meaningful and where you can feel or see the benefits.  Alright, so you know a few reasons why some of our habits don't stick, but what happens if you set boundaries and you still didn't follow through with what you said you'd do?    One thing to try is to create if/then statements to help get you back on track. I first learned about if/then statements back in engineering school when we were doing computer programming. Identifying barriers and having a Plan B can be effective. Here are some examples. If I skip my workout this morning, then I will go for a walk after dinner tonight. (or) If I skip my workout this morning, then I will make sure I invite a friend to join me for tomorrow's workout so I don't miss it again. If I open a bag of chips, then I will put one serving on a plate with a piece of fruit and put the bag in a hard-to-reach place. If I want a cookie, then I will have (insert health option) first and decide after if I still want the cookie. If I don't want to go for a run, then I'll go for a hike instead.  Never Miss Twice Another antidote to all-or-none thinking is the practice of never missing twice.  Simply tell yourself, “I missed that one time, but I will not miss twice" and then make sure that it doesn't happen.  So this week? Considering eating habits, if you eat something you didn't want to eat (or just ate too much of something), make sure your next action, snack or meal is a healthy choice.  The sooner you get back on track, the sooner you maintain your habit loop. Outliers are just that- they are not the norm.  But if you let your outliers become the new pattern, that's where consistency breaks down. Individual mistakes rarely affect the big picture unless they become consistent.  Progress is not linear, but it's what you do next when you realize you're off track that matters!  Simply having a plan can prevent us from giving up altogether. It can be the difference in maintaining momentum (no matter how imperfect it is) or psyching yourself out and degrading your confidence in your ability to follow-through with your goals.  How to Actually Set an Achievable Goal We often hear “focus on the process and fall in love with the process, don't think about the outcome.”  I do love this advice and it's something I often remind myself to remember.  I can personally think of things I've achieved where I'd say “I'll be happy when…” but that happiness is short-lived.  Being happy working towards doing something, doing your best, and focusing on daily steps to improve are great ways to feel more fulfilled and find meaning in your life.  What is a SMART Goal? You may have heard of S.M.A.R.T. goals.   SMART Goals -Specific Measurable, Action-oriented, Realistic, and Timebound. Answering the where, when, and how as specific as possible (and making sure the goal is just outside your reach rather than a pipedream) is a great place to start.  Where do you go from there?  Making sure that you have a system for tracking the goal is also of utmost importance. Research shows that it's very difficult to improve in something that you don't measure. What are some ways to track Goals? use visual cues: like a big jar on your counter and put something in the jar each time you work towards your goal with an app (I like the Strides App- no affiliation- I just like them). using a google calendar For workouts, use something like Strava use an actual large paper calendar and mark each day with an X How to Stay Motivated with Goals It's normal to lose motivation with goals or to just not feel like doing something. I addressed some specific examples when I talked about my commitment to show up during my first pregnancy. It's been a saying I've carried with me into the future. Motivation Follows Action We often wait for motivation to strike, but we really need to get started to feel motivated. Even as a professional athlete, I don't want to get on my bike half the time. I just get dressed, start pedaling, and then I decide if I want to go home. Give yourself a chance before you give up. There are days when you need rest or a break, but letting excuses overpower your actions. Commit to showing up. Enlist Support and Accountability It can be motivating to have someone to work on your goals with. Maybe that's a ride or workout buddy. Maybe it's someone you go shopping and do meal prep with. Maybe it's just someone you regularly check in with like a friend or a coach. Understanding where your own motivation comes from (intrinsic or extrinsic) and whether having an external or internal accountability motivates you will help you stay motivated. Regularly assess Successes, Learnings, Challenges I already talked about the importance of tracking your goals. It's important to revisit what is going well (instead of only focusing on what isn't going well) to help build and maintain your confidence. I recommend a weekly or bi-weekly check-in. Ask yourself what went well, what you learned, and what challenges you faced. Next, ask yourself what support you need. You can also do this with an accountability partner or coach.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner
Best of Outlier Academy – 20MP – Dave Eisenberg of Zigg Capital

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 16:07


“I do believe in direct feedback and specifically from a good place where you want the person to improve, it is one of the most helpful things you can do for someone.” – Dave Eisenberg Dave Eisenberg (@Eisenberg) is Founding Partner at Zigg Capital, a venture capital firm investing in real estate and construction technology. Before founding Zigg, Dave spent twelve years as an operator at Bonobos, TellApart, Floored, and CBRE. He started his career at Bain & Company, then moved on to found Red Swan Ventures. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/dave-eisenberg2-outlier-academy-show-notes   Chapters in this interview: Daily family time as an important habit Favorite tools including Twitter, Superhuman, and Peloton Dave's superpowers, inspirations, and favorite books On failure and success Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our weekly newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 556 with Anaïs Ganouna - Customer Personas

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 25:22


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Anaïs Ganouna, a neurodivergent middle child to immigrant parents, lifelong entrepreneur, and questioner of all things. Her career has spanned 4 personal businesses, including 1 exit, and continues to serve multiple spirit-led businesses through Fractional CMO services, consulting, and her online membership space, Aligned Visionaries. Anaïs has served ventures like Outlier.org (from the founder of Masterclass), top 10 Apple Podcast Chasing Glory with Lilian Garcia, and countless first time founders.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner
Best of Outlier Academy: Joe Percoco of Titan – Giving Everyone Access to Elite Investment Strategies

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 46:41


“There's often a binary debate occurring in society, which is about crypto assets—is the asset class a zero? And it's a bit of the wrong debate to be having. The right question to ask here is, are there crypto-assets that deserve a weighting in your portfolio?” – Joe Percoco Joe Percoco (@joepercoco) is Co-CEO and Co-Founder of Titan, an investment firm focused on leveling the playing field across the wealth spectrum. Titan manages over $500M for 30,000 clients and has recently been valued at $450 million at the close of their Series B round. Before launching Titan, Joe Percoco managed investments at Goldman Sachs and McKinsey & Company. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/joe-percoco1-outlier-academy-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: Joe's background and insights learned at Goldman Sachs and McKinsey The frustrations in investing that led Joe to build Titan Investing in international markets Building a platform that makes investing accessible to all Investing in crypto with Titan Understanding your Company OS and hiring the right people for your tribe Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our weekly newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

Filmspotting: Reviews & Top 5s
#854: Top 10 Films of 2021 (Pt. 1)

Filmspotting: Reviews & Top 5s

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 80:06


A shock comic, a gambler, a couple of exotic dancers, and Nicolas Cage all make appearances in part one of the Top 10 Films of 2021 – not to mention a singing puppet baby. On this week's show, it's "The Outliers," the films that only Adam or Josh deemed Top 10-worthy. Next week, they'll be joined by the Chicago Tribune's Michael Phillips and Dana Stevens of Slate for part two and the 'consensus' best films of the year. 0:00 - Billboard 1:15 - Top 10 of 2021: The Outliers Jimmy Montague, "70th Avenue Hustle" 45:09 - Golden Brick Finalists 48:50 - Top 10 of 2021: The Outliers, cont. 1:13:20 - Outro Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 492 with Anaïs Ganouna - One Billion Annual Sales

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 40:24


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Anaïs Ganouna, a neurodivergent middle child to immigrant parents, lifelong entrepreneur, and questioner of all things. Her career has spanned 4 personal businesses, including 1 exit, and continues to serve multiple spirit-led businesses through Fractional CMO services, consulting, and her online membership space, Aligned Visionaries. Anaïs has served ventures like Outlier.org (from the founder of Masterclass), top 10 Apple Podcast Chasing Glory with Lilian Garcia, and countless first time founders.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner
Best of Outlier Academy: Scott Belsky on Lessons Learned as a Founder, Investor, and Bestselling Author

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 53:59


“Great opportunities never have ‘great opportunity' in the subject line.” – Scott Belsky In this episode of Outlier Academy, I'm talking with Scott Belsky (@scottbelsky). After starting his career at Goldman Sachs, he left to found Behance which he later sold to Adobe. He's now the Chief Product Officer at Adobe as well as a Venture Partner at the world-renowned venture capital firm Benchmark. Scott was an early investor in Uber, Pinterest, Carta, Flexport, Airtable, and sweetgreen. And finally, he's the best-selling author of Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality and The Messy Middle: Finding Your Way Through the Hardest and Most Crucial Part of Any Bold Venture. Scott is a modern polymath. We explore his journey from entrepreneur to investor, how he approaches investing in early-stage technology companies, as well as the lessons he's learned at Benchmark, Adobe, and Behance. Chapters in this interview: 00:00:05 – Scott's learnings from his start at Goldman Sachs 00:05:35 – On co-founding Behance, and attempting to manage the “most disorganized community on the planet” 00:09:15 – Tactics for entrepreneurs and their teams 00:13:26 – The transition from startup (Behance) to large company (Adobe) 00:16:29 – How the desire to buy an education led to Scott's interest in investing 00:18:59 – Seeing an investment grow from Seed to IPO 00:22:47 – How design can move the needle for a business 00:28:21 – Scott's foray into venture capital and finding his ideal role melding investing with company-building at Benchmark 00:34:04 – On writing Making Ideas Happen and The Messy Middle 00:39:11 – Startups avoiding the fate of the “one-hit wonder” 00:43:32 – Investment trends that Scott is focusing on 00:47:31 – Scott's favorite failures   Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/scott-belsky-outliers-show-notes  Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our weekly newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

Detours and Outliers
Sinead O'Connor's “Throw Down Your Arms”

Detours and Outliers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 123:12


SINEAD GOES REGGAE! We’ve got island fever this week on "Detours and Outliers", but which island is it, Jamaica or Ireland? Where does Sinead fit on the Enya-to-Ani DiFranco spectrum? Is this a Sly and Robbie album? Where is our Britney Spears/Burning Spear mashup? Can you do a religious album without a religion? Does this album foreshadow Sinead's conversion to Islam? Can you get excommunicated from the Catholic church just by tweeting the pope? What other '90s women do we as a society owe an apology to? Are there any other reggae albums besides Bob Marley’s "Legend"? Who recorded the most authentic reggae album, Snoop Dogg, Willie Nelson, or Sinead? Throw down your arms and throw your hands in the air on this episode of "Detours and Outliers".

The Dynasty Dude | Dynasty Fantasy Football | Fantasy Football
Episode 305: Week 15 - Declining Asset or Outlier Season?

The Dynasty Dude | Dynasty Fantasy Football | Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 16:50


@CoryEvansNFL debates if 5 players are declining in dynasty value or having an outlier season. DeAndre Hopkins Ezekiel ElliottDarren WallerTyler Boyd Jerry Jeudy Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=15589943)

Founders of Web 3
P2E 2.0 - A New Economic Model for Gaming, the Audiobook

Founders of Web 3

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 48:39


In today's digitised world, gaming is becoming increasingly more relevant. The average gamer spends 8+ hours per week playing in the digital realm. For today's SPECIAL EPISODE, we bring you our very own Jan Baeriswyl with the unified audiobook version of his 3 part research piece for Outlier, readable here: https://outlierventures.io/research/p2e-2-0-a-new-economic-model-for-gaming-based-on-crypto-tokens/ We'll be back after Christmas with your regularly scheduled podcasts, but for now, enjoy!

Mike Birbiglia's Working It Out
Malcolm Gladwell: 10,000 Hours of Jokes

Mike Birbiglia's Working It Out

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 76:16


You can hear the excitement in Mike's voice as he welcomes legendary author Malcolm Gladwell, host of Revisionist History & author of Outliers as well as his latest The Bomber Mafia. Malcolm brings Gladwellian theory to why the re-telling of jokes is never as funny. They riff on evil golf courses, evil search engines, & where that YMCA pool smell might actually come from. Even Malcolm's mom Joyce makes a cameo. This may just be the tipping point for Working It Out. https://www.yesscholars.org/

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi
EN :: B3 with Cryptoassets, Polkadot News, Clean Energy Cryptocurrency

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 15:30


Drop 1: B3 goes crypto https://www.blocknews.com.br/financas/b3-planeja-ter-produtos-regulados-e-infraestrutura-para-criptoativos/ Drop 2: Polkadot news https://www.linkedin.com/posts/polkadot-network_polkadot-network-activity-6876885689120694273-QJP4 https://polkadot.network/blog/parachains-are-live-polkadot-launch-is-now-complete/ Drop 3: Crypto Clean Energy https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/itaobim-in-minas-gerais-starts-construction-works-100-solar-power-plant-paid-for-with-cryptocurrency .. And more: Bedford FC on Bitcoin https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/peter-mccormack-acquires-local-sports-club-bedford-fc-with-premier-league-ambitions Nightfall zkp launches on Polygon testnet https://blog.polygon.technology/zk-proofs-protocol-polygon-nightfall-launches-on-testnet-to-provide-low-cost-private-ethereum-transaction/ Liqi launches wine receivables token https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/bitcointrade-founder-fintech-launches-token-backed-by-credit-card-receivables/ Brasil Carbon Exchange https://www.blocknews.com.br/corporativo/primeira-bolsa-de-credito-de-carbono-do-brasil-entra-em-operacao-no-inicio-de-2022/ Crypto.com launches Brazil report https://crypto.com/research/article?category=survey&page=brazilians_looking_to_diversify_investment_portfolio_with_crypto Outlier ventures MetaFi research https://outlierventures.io/research/metafi-defi-for-the-metaverse/ Nike acquires RTFKT https://news.nike.com/news/nike-acquires-rtfkt Air Jordan NFT app https://decrypt.co/88393/michael-jordan-jumps-into-web3-solana-app-athletes-nfts-tokens Animoca+BAYC announce game https://www.animocabrands.com/bored-ape-yacht-club-and-animoca-brands-join-forces-to-make-blockchain-nft-game UMG Metaverse avatars www.engadget.com/universal-music-group-artists-avatars-metaverse-nfts-155853381.html Blockchain Association announced Star Atlas as new member + SCORE minigame https://twitter.com/BlockchainAssn/status/1471105416742555650?t=mKDQv7G9Nllf03md3W9gvQ&s=19 Hyperledger Bevel - automation framework https://www.blocknews.com.br/corporativo/hyperledger-bevel-e-novo-projeto-prioritario-da-fundacao-hyperledger/ Ukraine CBDC pilot on Stellar https://decrypt.co/88221/ukraines-central-bank-runs-digital-currency-pilot-using-stellar Kazakhstan CBDC pilot on Corda https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2021/12/16/kazakhstan-piloting-a-cbdc-on-r3s-corda-platform/ Paraguay senate approves crypto regulation https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2021/12/17/paraguays-senate-approves-proposal-regulating-crypto-mining-and-trading Tezos now on Rarible https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/rarible-integrates-with-tezos-blockchain-and-launches-own-nft-collection/ Kevin Durant partners with Coinbase https://www.linkedin.com/posts/coinbase_coinbase-welcomes-our-new-partners-kevin-ugcPost-6876963107516895232-Tpev Bitwise launches NFT index fund https://bitwiseinvestments.com/crypto-funds/nft/ Congress candidate issues NFT https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2021/12/16/congressional-candidate-kurani-dropping-2022-solana-nfts-as-part-of-campaign/ Bitfy series A + Algorand https://www.blocknews.com.br/criptoativos/bitfy-carteira-multiuso-de-cripto-recebe-aporte-de-r-133-milhoes-de-estrangeiros/ US Regulator for Credit Unions like crypto https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2021/12/16/federal-regulator-says-credit-unions-can-partner-with-crypto-providers/ Blockchain in Chinese prison https://amp-scmp-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/amp.scmp.com/tech/policy/article/3159799/chinese-province-applies-blockchain-smart-prison-system-cut-corruption Co-founder of Twitch launches game NFT platform https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/twitch-co-founder-launches-solana-game-nft-marketplace/ Radio Shack DeFi

Off Script with Chris & Robbie
Episode 63 - MALCOLM GLADWELL

Off Script with Chris & Robbie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 23:44


We speak to best selling author Malcolm Gladwell on how a bit of serendipity helped him become a writer and how he deals with setbacks.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A. Idle
OUTLIERS: The Dissection of Success

A. Idle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 28:22


How much does circumstance contribute to your success? According to Malcolm Gladwell, there are an array of hidden opportunities, out of your control, that should be the focal point of this discussion. Gladwell writes the backstory for achievement, with the help of data from many psycho-social studies. Historical events have ultimately set the stage for the creation of a few famous outliers. In conclusion, Gladwell has produced nothing less than another informative piece with the utmost integrity. Thanks Mr. G!! Side note: I am very thankful for those that listen. May you have a wonderful holiday season! All Episodes currently streaming on most podcast platforms. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Podcast Payoffs
Rewind: Animals Not Included

Podcast Payoffs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 22:03


Let's answer some juicy questions from one of our most popular episodes as Dan and Gord revisit their Facebook Live broadcast. Dan explains how he switches gears when hosting with Joe Polish or Peter Diamandis, to his solo shows where asking questions beats giving answers. If your industry is regulated to the moon, learn how to speak with confidence and keep yourself out of trouble. If you do get complaints, Gord explains how to navigate around them and keep the peace. What happened when Gord's morning radio show helped stray cats find homes? Everyone was thrilled, but one person was furious. Give this show a spin and you might never lose an argument again!In This EpisodeTo watch Dan and Gord's Facebook Live: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cUvKV9A394Subscribe to Dan's podcast with Peter Diamandis: http://podcast.diamandis.com/Subscribe to Dan's podcast with Joe Polish: https://10xtalk.com/Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outliers_(book)The Animal Rescue Foundation: https://www.arfontario.com/

The Radical Secular
74: Fascism in Today's America

The Radical Secular

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 82:50


Fascism in Today's America - Abortion and Power (00:00) Intro and T-Shirts (03:26) Abortion rights at unprecedented risk. Christophe leads Joe and Sean in a discussion of the legal history of Roe v. Wade and SCOTUS jurisprudence. Judicial vs. legislative protection for the right to privacy which includes abortion and birth control. The viability standard. Republican hypocrisy on child care budgets, and cynicism about the abortion issue in general. A humanitarian analysis of the timing of legal abortion, and some of the bad arguments against it. (37:51) Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Heath is the case that will likely result in overturning Roe. How many people will be impacted? Workarounds if Roe is overturned. Further discussion of the depth and scope and stakes of right wing attacks on women's and civil rights. (55:53) Joe discusses the appropriateness of using the word "fascism." An exploration of the agenda of the new "National Conservative" wing of the Republican party that has become the inheritor of Trumpism, through the lens of an Atlantic article by traditional conservative David Brooks. Sean outlines the 14 defining characteristics of fascism, as they currently exist in modern America. Christophe commentary. (01:13:00) Joe describes the objective measures of the global decline of democracy. The US is now officially a "flawed democracy." (01:17:19) Wrapup and Outro _________________________________ Show notes: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/06/upshot/child-care-biden.html (How Other Nations Pay for Child Care. The U.S. Is an Outlier.) https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/11/scary-future-american-right-national-conservatism-conference/620746/ (The Terrifying Future of the American Right) https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2021/12/9/22824509/summit-for-democracy-biden-america (American democracy is tottering. It's not clear Americans care.) https://www.bremertonschools.org/cms/lib/WA01001541/Centricity/Domain/222/Fourteen%20Defining%20Characteristics%20of%20Fascism%20slides.pdf (Fourteen Defining Characteristics of Fascism) https://thehill.com/homenews/news/537204-us-score-falls-in-economists-2020-democracy-index (US score falls in Economist's annual Democracy Index) _________________________________ https://www.patreon.com/theradicalsecular (Patreon) https://www.theradicalsecular.com/ (Website) Email: theradicalsecular@gmail.com Instagram: @radical_secular https://www.facebook.com/theradicalsecular (Facebook) Twitter: @RadicalSecular https://the-radical-secular.captivate.fm/ (Podcast) All standard podcast venues: Apple, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon, Gaana, Saavn

Outliers
#41 Do zero aos R$ 8 bi: nascida na pandemia, Genoa atrai investidores com apostas táticas na América Latina

Outliers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 63:25


O episódio #41 do "Outliers" recebeu Andre Raduan, sócio e gestor da Genoa Capital, fundada em 2020, em meio à pandemia. Raduan aponta como lida com o enfoque da casa em Brasil e América Latina, bem como as apostas para os próximos anos de baixo crescimento econômico no país. O "Outliers" reúne conversas com os gestores mais renomados do mercado e é apresentado por Samuel Ponsoni, gestor de fundos da família Selection na XP, acompanhado de Carol Oliveira, coordenadora de análise de fundos da XP, e Lucas Collazo, analista de fundos e estrategista de alocação da Rico Investimentos.

Stock Pickers
#8 - A volta dos que não foram (inflação)

Stock Pickers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 56:25


Parceria do Stock Pickers com Samuel Ponsoni, apresentador do podcast Outliers e responsável pela gestão dos fundos da família Selection, da XP. Todo começo de mês, Ponsoni e Salomão se reunirão com outros especialistas de fundos para conversar sobre o que eles tiraram de mais relevante das cartas enviadas pelas gestoras no começo do mês.Edição: Nando LimaSaiba mais sobre nós: https://linktr.ee/stockpickers_

We Were On A Break (Series)
Ep. 10 (Season 2): How To Get Mentored By The Best Crypto Compliance Professionals In The Industry

We Were On A Break (Series)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 19:01


How To Get Mentored By The Best Crypto Compliance Professionals In The IndustryWelcome to the episode 10 of the 2nd season of “WE WERE ON A BREAK” - Ross Voice. The series where the host, Stephen Brent Sargeant (Compliance Consultant to Bitfinex) talks to industry professionals during the CoronaVirus (COVID-19) quarantine and gains industry insights and expertise. I'm going back-to-back this week and dropping another episode discussing how to get mentored by the best compliance professionals in the industry without actually having to talk to them or asking them for mentorship. In this session, Stephen talks about some of the steps you can take to gain mentorship and get to know the best in the industry, even before meeting them in person or connecting with them on social media. I give you the tips and strategies to approach industry allstars with more meaningful conversations and deeper discussions. This episode could single handledly change your career. Hope this helps that one person that is tired of looking at themselves in the mirror and wants to take control of their life **This interview was recorded on Dec. 08, 2021**Disclaimer**The views and opinions expressed in this episode (and all episodes) are those of the host and the guests. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of their employers, contractors or any organization they may be affiliated with now or in the future. Time Stamps (Return back to your favorite point of the episode):•(0:40) – Disclaimer – You Shouldn't Ask Anyone To Become Your Mentor Without A Plan•(2:05) – The Best Way To Gain Mentorship Is Follow The Professional's Content (mentioned: ACAMS and ACFCS) •(3:08 – Determine If You Have Any Common Personal Interests / Hobbies (mentioned: Ari Redbord, Liat Shetret, Nkrumah Pierre, Shelley Schachter-Cahm, Peter Warrack, Leonardo Real, Timea Nagy, Dev Odedra, Journey Li, Nansen, Elliptic, Dante Disparte, Jeremy Allaire, Souzan Esmaili )•(5:30) – Pay To Sit Beside The Industry Leaders (mentioned: Chainalysis, Elliptic, Fintrail, CIFCA, Samky Mak, Tiffany Tsang, Faisel Saeed) •(8:58) - Find The Passion Project That These Industry Professionals Are Working On (mentioned: Rodney McInnes, David Vijan, Amber D. Scott, Outlier, Dante Disparte, Circle) •(13:45) Mentorship Should Be Mutually Beneficial (mentioned: Souzan, TCAE) •(16:05) – How To Add Value When You May Not Have All The Skills Necessary Stephen Brent Sargeant (Host)•LinkedIn (Best way to reach me) - linkedin.com/in/stephen-brent-sargeant-cams•Instagram (Everyday type stuff) https://www.instagram.com/stephen_b_sargeant/•Twitter (I communicate in GIFs) - https://twitter.com/lifesgt•Business Related Matters (Let's Collab): stephenbsargeant@gmail.comBackground Music (beat name: Leslie)•Goose Goddi (Music Producer) - https://instagram.com/goosegoddi?igshid=1paia8lwy2x3o•Beats Can Be Found On Amazon Music - https://www.amazon.com/Music-Station-Goose-Goddi/dp/B08B4BLCH1

Homeward Path: A Magic: The Gathering Podcast
Homeward Path 133: Play or Draw Pt 4 – Outliers

Homeward Path: A Magic: The Gathering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021


Midrange decks are inherently flexible and adaptive. Combo decks can threaten to just end the game at any time. Neither

Constructed Criticism Network
Homeward Path 133: Play or Draw Pt 4 – Outliers

Constructed Criticism Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021


Midrange decks are inherently flexible and adaptive. Combo decks can threaten to just end the game at any time. Neither

Muslim Makers
#95 Samir - Entrepreneur - Nourrir ses centres d'intérêts

Muslim Makers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 77:02


Groupe Telegram : https://t.me/muslim_makers Page Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/muslim.makers/ Retrouver la liste des livres recommandés par les intervenants sur l'application Gleeph : https://lnk.gleeph.net/As51h5IgGfb ---------   L'invité de cet semaine est Samir, écrivain et entrepreneur, fondateur de la startup Macaron, une application qui facilite la recherche de places de stationnement à Paris, grâce à un système d'intelligence artificielle.  Avant d'être entrepreneur, Samir a eu de nombreuses expériences à l'étranger, notamment à Genève, New-York et Londres, et il a travaillé chez WPP le plus important réseau d'agences de publicité et de communication mondial. Samir détient par ailleurs un MBA, issue de la prestigieuse université d'Oxford. Dans cet épisode, Samir nous parle son parcours mais aussi du fléau moderne qu'est l'hyperspécialisation.   Bonne écoute ! :)     --------- Références : Macaron Conseils lecture : Outliers, Malcom Gladwell Vie et mort d'Emile Ajar, Romain Gary Range, David Epstein Les mille et une nuit Pour joindre/suivre Samir : LinkedIn --------- Pour me contacter :  abdelrahmen@muslim-makers.com LinkedIn Facebook

The Dog Dish
Outliers

The Dog Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 56:56


Critter play is dominated by puppies who are cisgendered gay men. In this episode, we hear from outliers — non-mainstream folks from TCI3.

The tastytrade network
Market Measures - November 30, 2021 - How Outliers Affect IV Pops

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 10:56


During outlier market days, what happens to volatility in terms of magnitude of expansion? When trading products that are affected by implied volatility (like options), the key variable to keep track of is exposure to outlier losses. We know short options generally turn a profit until an outlier happens because IV contracts on average, and short premium trades tend to have high POPs. However, since outliers are bound to happen and their size tends to be unpredictable, keeping exposure small to begin with is the only practical defense to keep a portfolio solvent.

The tastytrade network
Market Measures - November 30, 2021 - How Outliers Affect IV Pops

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 11:47


During outlier market days, what happens to volatility in terms of magnitude of expansion? When trading products that are affected by implied volatility (like options), the key variable to keep track of is exposure to outlier losses. We know short options generally turn a profit until an outlier happens because IV contracts on average, and short premium trades tend to have high POPs. However, since outliers are bound to happen and their size tends to be unpredictable, keeping exposure small to begin with is the only practical defense to keep a portfolio solvent.

The Miami Heat Beat Podcast
Hangover Time: MHB Postgame Show: Death by Outliers // Heat-Nuggets

The Miami Heat Beat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 46:08


Welcome welcome welcome to our new post game show! Hangover Time hosted by Alf and joined by Siobhan Beslow, Kenny Spence, Franky Garcia, Giancarlo Navas and Brassjazz. • Awful first half dooms the Heat • Bones Hyland the new Malik Monk? • Alarming Trend: Our 3 point defense • NOW are we concerned about Duncan? ...and more!!! Visit TICKPICK.COM/HEATBEAT today and use the promo code HEATBEAT to save $10 on your first order of NBA tickets!  Join our discord to be able to ask guests questions CLICK FOR THE DISCORD CHAT INVITE https://discord.gg/miaheatbeat STREAMS ON Twitch.Tv/MiamiHeatBeat BUY OUR NEW MERCH! http://shop.miamiheatbeat.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Boz deserves a seat at the table, life coaches, let's be directLet Me Run This By You: Gina versus plots - is it just ADD? Interview: We talk to Kate Dugan about living in Morocco, her playwriting program,  Sandy Shinner, Victory Gardens, shooting yourself in the foot, being ready or not to take advantage of opportunities, Outliers, regret, Sandra Delgado, the Bad Boyfriend years, Austin Film Festival, Ola Rotimi, Actor's Training Center, Meisner, Erica Daniels, Bikram yogaFULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited): 1 (8s):And Jen Bosworth from me this and I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all. We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? Not a whole hell of a lot. I mean, I'm, I feel I'm right. I just real, really excited to like level up my, my work life game. Like, it doesn't even mean that I, it just means that, like, I actually feel like an adult, like I just feel at 47 right now.1 (55s):I'm 47. I feel at 47. Like I'm ready. Oh girl. Wait, am I 40? No, I had a birthday. October four. Yeah. You turned 40 you're you're you're desperate to be older apparently. Oh, I've been telling people 47. Okay. So what year were you born? 75, but I'm terrible at math for 46 years. Okay. So what was I saying about being the wrong age? Oh, I just feel like at 46, right? That's my age at 46. I am finally ready to get a job, like, okay. I need a writing job, like a, B a real job, a real job of like, of like, I feel like I finally deserve, I just, I'm starting to feel like I finally deserve a seat at the table.1 (1m 47s):I love that. Yeah, I definitely do. Yeah. I mean, I just do deserve it, but like the world needs for you to have that seat at the table. Thank you. And I finally feel like that is a possibility, you know, it's interesting. And I was going to ask you about this. So there are all these Clem coaches in Los Angeles. Oh, that's funny. I was going to ask you if something about coaches, but go ahead. Okay, great. So, so God bless him and I can just see everyone is really trying to earn a living, right? So like, everyone I meet is trying to help. I know a lot of hustlers, right?1 (2m 28s):So coaches now have this language. It's fantastic. First time a coach uses language with me. I thought it was so cool. And I was so special. They all fucking use this language. Good ones, bad ones, whatever. Okay. So they get to the part. I had a free introductory session with a woman who was wonderful, nothing wrong with her. I'm talking about specific coaching language around payment and charging people talking about the fee. Okay. So therapists my in my, you know, the way it was, well, I also worked for a social service agency. So I could like just people please, my way out of it and say, well, the agency charges this, you know, all of this. Okay.1 (3m 8s):But for all the people I've seen as therapists, they're pretty straightforward. They're like, my fee is 180 an hour. This is how much your copay would. I looked up your insurance, whatever coaches have a whole nother situation where they say things like, I don't usually do this. This is what they say more than one coach say this to me. I don't usually do this, but I'm going to do something I don't normally do, which is I'm gonna let you set your fee. How much is this worth to you?2 (3m 36s):Oh God. Oh fuck you. What kind1 (3m 39s):Of invest?2 (3m 40s):$7 and 50 cents.1 (3m 42s):What kind of investment are you willing to make in your future? Whatever, whatever they get. And then2 (3m 51s):If you low ball it, it's like, well, I guess you're not recommend it to your future,1 (3m 54s):Right. Or, and you must not value. You must not yet. Right? You must not think that you're abundant enough to bring it the way. So the first time someone said this to me, I was like, this is brilliant. Like I totally, and I bought in and I was like, and I, and, and I didn't know. I was like, okay, you know, $80 a session. And then she later, and then we did that for a while later, she told me that she charges like $2,000 for, oh my God. Like a packet. And I was like, what? Okay, so right. Okay. This person did not do this the other day. I had a free introductory session. And she said that, you know, when she's a woman of color and I really adore her, but it was the same language.1 (4m 38s):And it's not, it's what they're trained to say. And so I just am, so I was so naive. I thought this was like such a cool thing. And now I'm like, wait, everyone's using the same thing, which is, I'm going to let you set your fee to tell me how much you are invested in yourself. And I'm like, wait, that's manipulative. Just set your fucking fee. And if I just said fan, and if I don't pay it, I don't pay it. And we don't work together because otherwise2 (5m 7s):You're setting up the road. I mean, setting up the dynamic where somebody is going to feel resentful, right? Like if, if you're the coach and you're not charging what you, what you think you're. I mean, what about that? Why wouldn't you turn it back on them and say like, well, I really rely upon providers to tell me what they think they're worth by having an established fee. I mean, this is, it's so crazy. It's, it's like saying actually I've had this before with, I can't think maybe babysitters, like how much you charge. Well, whatever you feel comfortable with, I don't know what to do with that. Like, I mean, I feel comfortable paying you nothing. Does that mean that's what you want to,1 (5m 48s):Right? This is what we get in trouble with when, whenever there's a barter situation as well. Like I remember, oh my God, my dad is a anyway. I remember a psychologist getting into huge trouble at a friend, my dad's friend for bartering with therapy.2 (6m 7s):Oh my God. Like, make me homemade tofu or something like1 (6m 11s):Similar, like out, like you do my yard work. I'll do. I mean, I mean, like you get into trouble. It leads to trouble. I think it's better to be out of vagueness, set your fee and not, and just say, this is my fee. And if someone wants to have a conversation about the fee and do you lower it, and then you have a further conversation, whether you decide to lower it or not is up to you. But like, yeah, I don't like this, this,2 (6m 39s):No. And let's just be direct. I mean, this is another problem that we have, like with just, I don't know, globally with communication. I just feel like people are so darn indirect and it doesn't help. I'm not, I'm not suggesting that like, I can't use more, you know, finesse or be half softer or whatever. But like at the end of the day, I just want to know what it is. You're trying to say to me, you know, and I don't want to guess about it because I'm going to guess wrong. And then you're going to feel a type of way about it. And it's unnecessary.1 (7m 12s):It's unnecessary. And I do, you know, as much as, as much as I, I always think back, I had a therapist at the, at Austin Riggs in Massachusetts and Stockbridge and Dr. Craig Pierce. Right. And he, it was interesting. I wanted to call him Dr. Craig. And he was like, no, that is not my name. And, and I was like, this guy is such a douche, but really he was setting a boundary saying, no, no, no, no, no. I'm not your friend. I'm actually not your dad. I'm not your, this isn't, we're working. We're doing serious work here. And it's either Craig or Dr. Pierce, but you can't. And at the time I was like 21 or something. I don't know what I was, but I thought what a douche, but now I'm like, oh, he actually was, was trying to help me.2 (8m 1s):Let's just get this out of the way. This is how I expect to be referred to this is how much I expect to be paid. My thing about coaches recently is I feel like everybody is doing this group delusion about, like, we can't go to therapy. So we have to say, I mean, we could pay more for a coach than we might for a therapist. We could be more revealing with a coach that we were therapists. It's just turned into the stigma of like, well, I don't want to go to therapy, but you know, I want to have a coach. And the problem with that is it's so wildly unregulated.1 (8m 34s):Yes,2 (8m 34s):Exactly. If anybody can call themselves a coach,1 (8m 37s):Right. And even this, this coach that I saw was like, yeah, it's wild Lynn regulated. And I understand that, you know, so, so there are some, you know, weird coaches and she's lovely and she's trying to make a living. The other thing that is so clear to me is everyone is trying to make a living. So there is right. Everyone's trying, I give them points for trying, like you she's trying to have a coaching business. So, so right. I don't fault her for it, but I did. I was like, so shocked that the language, I was like, oh, here we go. She's going to say the exact thing that this other coach said. So, duh, there's all kinds of like classes that for free structure that could the coaches taste.1 (9m 24s):Are you going to see her again? I mean, I'm not, no, no, no, no, no. I told her, I was like, you know, I'm just really not in a position to do coaching right now. And I'm not, I have a therapy. I have a new therapist. Let me just pay the therapist who told me what our fee was. So it was interesting. The other thing that I think was interesting is like I took, the reason I met this coach was I took a workshop on a free workshop on imposter syndrome, which is another like thing that people are really throwing around now is imposter syndrome. And self-sabotage those kinds of phrases. So I took an imposter syndrome workshop, lovely workshop. And then they said, you know, we're going to have a raffle and see who gets a free coaching session.1 (10m 5s):Well, we all, did. We all won the RAF. I mean,2 (10m 14s):Oh my God. I mean, is everything a play Like a performance piece in Los Angeles?1 (10m 24s):Yeah, it is. It is. And it's so, it's so funny, but like, so yeah, I was talking to my friend, I'm like, who went to the workshop? I'm like, oh, I won the I wasn't coaching says, she goes, so did I? And then I talked to someone else who I met when I networked with like soda. I was like,2 (10m 40s):I really respect how much it seems like people in LA are devoted to self-improvement. I really, really respect that in a way that I just feel like people out here aren't or if they are, they don't talk about it. Maybe it's what it is. But it does seem, it does seem like people in LA are either they're on a health kick or a mental health kick or they're, you know, getting sober or I just feel like there's a lot of, there's a lot of1 (11m 5s):Types here.2 (11m 8s):And I appreciate the fact that everybody talks about that openly. Because if, if people are into that stuff around here, they don't talk about it. So I ended up feeling like, you know, I'm a weirdo.1 (11m 19s):I feel like it's like, like literally like old money versus new money. I swear to God it's like old, old paradigms versus new paradigms. And like, yeah, it's out in the open here, everyone's on some kick, but at the same time, it's also lessened because everybody's talking about it all the time and it becomes like the, like a F like a farce, like not sacred in any way. It's like,2 (11m 47s):Yeah. And I bet there's a lot of people who are doing the most, like in terms of self-help and they're just still the biggest, or they're just lying to themselves about the fact that they're, they feel like they're getting better, but they're really just haven't changed at all. Yeah. I mean, I think that like, living anywhere is a problem. Well, let me get out of here. I feel like, wow, you can really feel the Puritan vibe. I mean, it's yes. You really it's like, we don't talk about feelings. We, we talk about things on the surface. We don't reveal, you know, very much about ourselves. Wow. Yeah. Keep everything. It's all, it's very buttoned up.2 (12m 27s):Wow. When I first moved here, I really appreciated that, you know, I've done some wild swings geographically, like yeah. Growing up in Sacramento was kind of one sort of thing unto itself that doesn't relate that much to California. Yeah. And then going to Chicago was like, oh, okay. I like this. These people are really down to earth. You know, then I got kind of sick of that. And then I moved to back to California, to the bay area. And I really was into that for awhile. And then I felt like, oh my God, this is all. So this is all bullshit. Like talking about everybody was an imposter. I felt like everybody was low key. So aggro. And then just this hippie, you know, talking about free level the time.2 (13m 8s):And then we moved to New York and I was like, oh, people will just get right to the point here. I really appreciate that. And I never got tired of that, but then we moved here and I thought, oh, this is new England. This is what the pilgrims they've decided a way to be. And it's very buttoned up and they haven't changed in, you know, 300 years. For, you know, have like a little ideas folder in my notes where I just make it little snippets of ideas and write them down. And I've had like six or seven that I realized are all circling around the same idea, which is, I want to have a movie or some, or some type of a script where it's a superhero, but the superhero, their power is that they can interact through some type of magic.2 (14m 8s):They can intervene in somebody else's life when they're making bad decisions. This is sort of romantic coaching and like, Hmm, maybe it's virtual reality, but they, they can kind of put themselves into the body of the person who's making the bad decisions and then help them. You know, it's like, it's basically like the therapist having none of the barriers to, you know, wellness or whatever, and just kind of getting right in there at the same time as this is a comment about how we look to other people to tell us how to behave. Anyway, the superheroes name is psyche and I love it. And, and I'm, I'm it, I'm it.2 (14m 49s):I want to kind of continue with this idea, but I am woefully terrible with plot, as I think we've talked about before. I don't know if you're talking about the podcast before and it's such a, it makes perfect sense that my given my own psychology, that plot would be the hardest thing,1 (15m 11s):Because more that,2 (15m 13s):Well, my, my mother is the first person to tell you, she's never done anything with a plan. She's always just reacted to whatever has come her way. In fact, the idea of like having a goal and working towards it was literally something I never learned until I met my husband. Wow. When like a week, a day. And he was like, what are you going to do today? And I said, oh, I think I'm going to sit out in the sun. And he said, what? I thought you were trying to be an actress. I thought you were like, well, you don't have any time to sit down and do anything. Like you have a goal. And that, and that's been my thing is like, I, I have these vague undefined or have had vague undefined goals yet that in some ways I'm working towards, but because there's no sort of master plan or not a conscious one, if don't know how to get from a, to B to C I know everything about what it looks like as you're traveling from a to B to C, I had to describe it and everything like that.2 (16m 10s):But as far as charting a course of like, this is where I'm starting, and this is where I'm going to end up. That's pretty new to me. And I feel like that's why I struggle with clot. Cause I just don't have like a lot of idea of how something unfolds.1 (16m 26s):Seriously. Literally just ADHD. Could that be,2 (16m 30s):Oh, maybe you have ADHD.1 (16m 33s):Did we talk about2 (16m 33s):This? I have add1 (16m 36s):Or add. So if you have that, this is when I talk to writers who have add that this is their exact situation. Oh, okay. Excellent. With dialogue, excellent. With everything except the actual plot pointing to a, to B, to C you just, I think you just need a class in some add meds. Like I'm serious. I, I don't think, Hey, this is not a, this is, this could be a very practical thing. So, so my father had some big problems, but was a brilliant man in a lot of ways, right? His dissertation, he could see the whole thing where it was going to end up.1 (17m 16s):He knew what he wanted people to feel when he read it. He knew he could not write the thing. So my mother ended up writing it for him. Please don't take your degree away possibly anyway, because he couldn't do the, the actual thing. So I I'm wondering, just like my thing was kind of practical of finding a coworking space and not getting a divorce kind of a situation like yours is literally like, could be a physiological response to too much stimuli going on and how to get to, to your vision. So, and maybe2 (17m 54s):I need a coach.1 (17m 56s):Well, Gina funny, you should bring that up because I was going to say to you, how much is it worth for? You know, I tried to tell you as being your coach on our pocket,2 (18m 6s):That would have been so slick. That would have been like, you're like, I, wasn't going to mention this to you, but I'm actually becoming okay.1 (18m 12s):I'm actually a coach now. So anyway, that is my 2 cents. When you start saying, when you start talking about that, I was like, wait a second. This is not a psychological problem. I don't think,2 (18m 25s):Okay. I mean, you know what? That sounds right to me.1 (18m 29s):Well, it makes a lot of work. You're not lazy and you're not, it's not like you don't have ambition. That's not true because you we've talked a lot on the podcast about how, like having some sense of power is really important to you. Maybe not fame, but power, the power that comes with that. So I'm like, all right, so that's not someone that has no ambition, right? So that's gotta be a different mechanism in the brain. That's not connecting in some way because you're also a people pleaser. So if someone, so my guess is if I w I would wonder if we did an experiment, like if you were in a class, right. And the class person was the teacher, the person in authority was like, and you trusted this person or mentor, whoever writing group, whatever the higher power is in that moment said, she said to you, Gita, you must do, you know, act one must be written by this date.1 (19m 18s):I wonder if you do it,2 (19m 20s):I would, I totally would. In fact, that's a part of me has been like, should I try to get into an MFA program? I don't think that's the answer. I class first just take a class,1 (19m 31s):The script anatomy, there's all these classes that like, that we can talk about later, but like take a class. I know I should have taken a class and not enrolled in an MFA program. Like that was what I, I mean, it was,2 (19m 44s):Can I tell you one of my favorite slash least favorite things in the world is when I have a big problem. And the answer is like, something really is. I both love and hate that. I hate it because I think, wow, why didn't I think of that? And why have I spent so much time just like ruminating and cogitating and wringing my hands about something that has like a pretty straightforward answer. Yeah.1 (20m 6s):And a lot of times, a lot of times us, I think kids that weren't really, for whatever reason, didn't get what they needed, emotionally, make all these things. Our brain works overtime to try to figure things out when this solution, like, I remember, like when I started having panic attacks, I thought I had schizophrenia. I thought I went to the doctor. He's like, you have a panic disorder, take this pill. And I was like, what? Yeah.2 (20m 31s):How could it be that easy? How could it be? How could it be? I feel like in that if I were in your shoes, I would think, no, no, no, I don't just have something that everybody else has. I have a truly unique, right. Is that what you were feeling?1 (20m 44s):Yeah. I thought I was going to end up in a state run nursing and I had a panic disorder. It was so I couldn't, and I think it gets wrapped up in shame and wrapped up and I should be able to, I could be, you know, all that shit, but yeah, it, it, it was like, he was like, no, no, no, no, you have something called a panic disorder. It's in this book and it was a DSM. He was like, it's in this book. And he read the, the stuff, the criteria. And I was like, I had that. He was like, no shit. Which is why I'm telling you to take this pill, the Zoloft. And I was like, wow, it didn't even cross my mind. The other thing is, nobody tells you about it. Like a lot of the struggle that we have, I think at, or at least that I have is internal. Right. So I don't, I'm not sharing it with people, which is why I think the podcast is good because maybe someone's listening to the podcast going, oh fuck.1 (21m 29s):Maybe I just have a panic disorder or maybe I have add, or I need a class instead of my life is over.2 (21m 36s):I'm terrible. I'm fundamentally incapable of getting any better. Yeah. Yeah. Totally. Totally. Well, thank you for that. What a gift1 (21m 42s):You gave me? Well, yeah, that's just what came forward. I'm like, wait, this is not a psychological weirdo, psychological pathological emotional problem.0 (21m 55s):Well,4 (22m 0s):Today on the podcast, we're talking to Kate, Dougan a playwriting major from DePaul theater school who currently lives in Morocco, where she teaches English. She is also a performer and has some interesting stories about her road from wanting to be a performer to deciding, to be a writer. So please enjoy our conversation with Kate Dougan2 (22m 27s):Oh my God. You haven't changed you one1 (22m 30s):Tiny bit. Let's say.3 (22m 34s):Thanks. Wow. Nice to see you girls. Do you guys look the same? I can't believe it. 30 years almost, right?2 (22m 41s):Yeah. Don't say it like that.3 (22m 43s): sorry. It's been 30 years since I graduated from high school. 25, since I graduated from college.1 (22m 53s):It's a long2 (22m 54s):You go by Kate.3 (22m 55s):Yeah. I go by Kate now. I grew up from Katie. Yeah. Yeah. That's great. Yeah.2 (23m 3s):Well, Kate Dougan congratulations used for five to theater3 (23m 7s):School. I did. I did.2 (23m 10s):You are now in of all places, Morocco, what the heck's going on in Morocco?3 (23m 15s):I'm teaching a high school here at an American high school. Yeah. My husband is Moroccan. So that's how we ended up here. We met in Chicago, worked together and in 2018. Yeah. We just decided it was, you know, he, his parents are, you know, getting a little older and he had not lived in Morocco for about 20, 25 years. And so he decided, you know, he wanted maybe try to come home for a little while. And so he got a job at an American high school. He's a teacher, he's a math teacher. And so we came and then I, I started sort of in one job that didn't really work for me.3 (24m 2s):Cause I initially thought like I was coming to teach theater. Always. The reality is never quite the same as what everybody says is gonna happen. And so, but when we got here, so I tried to teach a theater class, it didn't school wasn't quite ready for it. Then I sort of morphed into teaching English as a second language. And then last year during, well, during 20 19, 20, 20, I got my teaching accreditation to teach high school English. So I teach English language and literature. So yeah. Yeah. How cool do you like it? I do, actually.3 (24m 43s):I like it a lot. I, you know, everybody says the teaching is the hardest job and in many ways, teaching really is the hardest job. Like you, it's a lot of work and it's kind of, it's almost like doing like five shows a day, but you have to write all of your own material and learn all of your own material. And you know, it, it, you have to sort of, you have to really be ready for like a group of high school kids. I mean, these are, you know, they, they want to be engaged and they want to be entertained and they want to, you know, and if you can do those things and talk to the kids and be real with them, then you know, it works.3 (25m 28s):And on days that you're not quite up for it, it's a little tough. But yeah, I do like it a lot. I mean, I think that if you like to be in the room with the kids, then, then you you're, you're going to win, you know? Yeah. There's, I think that there's unfortunately, a lot of teachers who don't necessarily like children. And so you kind of questioned that sometimes. I'm sure we've all had experiences as students in that kind of situation. But yeah, I liked the kids. I liked being with high school kids, you know, they're alive and interested and you know, they haven't given up yet.3 (26m 11s):It's true. There, there, I read something to them the other day about, yeah, they're not dead yet. They're still alive. So that's, that's what I like about it.1 (26m 21s):The other thing I was going to say is that my, my mom was a teacher and she used to say the first year of teaching, like full-time was the hardest year of her life. And she like cried every day after school and it was the most rewarding. And so I, yeah, yeah.3 (26m 39s):I mean, my first year was 2019 or 20. So 2019 to 2020, I was doing my accreditation and I was teaching part-time and that was March, 2020, obviously it was all online. And then September, we started back, it was my first year teaching full time. And, you know, we had one class that was online and then everybody, you know, the kids had the option to be online if they wanted to. So there was one class online and then there were students in school and yeah, you're just trying to, you know, learn, figure out what you're doing and teach yourself the material and, you know, stay alive and handle whatever it was.3 (27m 20s):It was, it was a very stressful year. Last year I got to the, I got to June and I was really tired and really stressed out. And I just, you know, the good part of that is I have declared this year. I will never let myself get into that state again, you know, whatever I have to do to maintain my balance is really important to me. And so far it seems to be working. I I'm feeling much more on top of things this year, so. Oh, good. Yeah. Yeah.2 (27m 55s):So beef, let's talk about the period of time you decided to go to theater school. You did, you caught up on the east coast.3 (28m 7s):Yeah. I, well, not exactly. I'm from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I know. I always thought of it as east coast. And then years later I was like, I think Pittsburgh is really Midwest. Like, I mean, it's, it's like this close to Ohio where I was from was like this close to West Virginia. So there's a whole other element going on. So it almost, you know, it is east coast, I guess, officially, but it has sort of a Midwest sort of feel like blue collar, you know, town, but yeah, so I grew up in Pittsburgh. I, I don't know.3 (28m 48s):Do you guys just want me to do grow2 (28m 49s):Performing and I do high school plays3 (28m 52s):And stuff. Okay. So not, not as much as I would've liked. I knew from a very young age that I did want to go into theater. We, we lived up the hill from a small college Washington and Jefferson college. I'm from Washington, Pennsylvania. And you know, they built a new like art center one year. And I remember going to see my first theater show there and it had just opened. And I think it was the Rainmaker. I think my dad knew the guy, the place Starbuck, and I just, you know, like, so we want to see the play and it was just the whole experience of it, you know, going to the theater and sitting in the audience and the lights and the people.3 (29m 36s):And I just remember like when the lights went down at the, at the end, I was just like, that's what I wanna do. I wanna do this, you know, how old were you? I was eight actually. So I, yeah, it got me at an early age. I wish I had gotten set on something else a little bit. But1 (30m 0s):Why Did the theater break your heart?3 (30m 5s):Ah, did the theater break? My heart? Well, I mean, it's, you know, it's, everybody's journey is different. Yeah. I mean, in some ways it's not that it broke my heart now. I feel like I just wish I had no, of course. I mean, I wouldn't change anything. I wouldn't change the trajectory. I wouldn't change that love, you know, like that feeling. But I think just like when you experience something like that, it's such a young age, like your mind gets like really set on that thing. And like, I think it's important to grow and change and you know, obviously I've done that and I've done other things.3 (30m 46s):It just, I don't know. No, because I don't wish it was really different. So I, but I, you know, we all have our moments, right. I'm sure. Of course.1 (30m 57s):Yeah. That's what this whole podcast is about where we were like, what the fuck was that? And theater broke my heart over and over again. I thought it was going to be one thing or the business and I, it was not that thing. So I, for me, it's been a off and on heartbreaking experience with the theater. And that doesn't mean that there hasn't been intense love to, you know what I mean? Like, I think it's all part of the same, but yeah. So you, you, from a young age, you were like, you saw Rainmaker and you were like, that's it? Yeah.3 (31m 25s):So that's what I want to do. And so, I mean, but like I said, it was a small town there wasn't like a whole lot going on there. I never really took any acting classes or anything until I was in high school. You know, I went like there was a, there was an acting teacher at my high school. And I just remember like going to her class and being like super excited to finally like, get to do this thing. And like, you know, she asked everybody to kind of give a spiel like about what they want to do. And so I talked about it. I was like, this is really what I want to do with my life. I'm really excited about it. I, I just, you know, this is it for me.3 (32m 6s):And, and I just remember her, like, it wasn't necessarily that day, but like at some point she just kind of looked at me and she was like, oh, you're the one that wants to be an actress. And it was like that first, like, I'm sure you guys have experienced this. It was like that first experience of like, oh, I guess like me being excited about it, isn't necessarily going to get people to be positive with me. There was certain that there was an element of bitterness, I guess, which I think happens to people, you know, and I think it happens justifiably.3 (32m 53s):And so I think, you know, it's very important to me that I don't become bitter that I, and I'm glad I haven't, but I, I felt it was a very, it was like that first experience, like, okay, this is somebody that I, I, this is something I want to do. And this is somebody that can help me. And she was just not very enthusiastic about being helpful to me, you know, like, yeah. Who knows I was, it was kind of a weird year for me. So maybe I, you know, wasn't a very good student or something, or maybe she,1 (33m 25s):She, she, that's a shitty you you're probably right on. No, no, because I know because I've done that to people. Actually, I, I feel like I've dampened peoples. I do this with my husband all the time where I rain on his parade. And she rained on your parade a little bit. I'm not saying it's not that she doesn't have good reason to rain grades, but she did. And that, that is sort of, we hear it a lot. So I would think for someone to either either blatantly or inadvertently reign on a youngster's parade in terms of their artistic dreams.3 (33m 57s):So like at high school, I wasn't really that, like, I, I think I, we did like a play for my English class or something. So I don't know. I, I try, like I was in speech and debate and I went to one meet. And let me tell you like the power of the mind. Like I got laryngitis that day. Like I got laryngitis on the bus on the way to the meet and couldn't talk all day. And then on the bus on the way home I was able to speak. And so, you know, I think, you know, there's, yeah. I mean, that's a, that's a whole other . I mean, does that mean you1 (34m 37s):Didn't keep going with speech and debate3 (34m 39s):Or you had no, I don't think I did. I don't really remember. I obviously it was not a huge part of my life because I think at some point I was like, okay, this is not the person that's going to help me. I'm not getting feeling very positive vibes here. And so I'm gonna try to, you know, do other things. So then I started taking acting classes.1 (34m 60s):Did she wait to interrupt? Did she run the speech and debate thing too?3 (35m 3s):Yes, she did. Oh, no.1 (35m 5s):So that's, I mean, there you go. I mean, that's3 (35m 8s):How my mom1 (35m 9s):Running.3 (35m 11s):Yeah. Who knows. Anyway, so then I started going to like taking acting classes in downtown Pittsburgh. There was the civic light opera, and they had like an academy of, it was musical theater, but I just took straight acting classes. I was never like really a singer or anything like that. And that was a really positive experience for me. I had a great teacher, Jill, and, you know, we did a lot of scene study and she was, she was the opposite, you know, she was a very positive person, very loving and sweet. And, you know, really, you made me feel good about what I was doing and what I could do.3 (35m 52s):So, you know, there are those people as well that, you know,2 (35m 57s):Who suggested that you could pursue it for college.3 (36m 5s):I mean, I think it was never, for me, it was just never a question like, but I long story, I didn't, I didn't, I wasn't in the acting program at DePaul, I was in the play. I was in the wait. I was in the, I was in the playwriting program. Yeah.2 (36m 27s):Why do I remember you as being in class with me? But I feel like I remember you as being one of the actors. I remember seeing you on Steve.3 (36m 38s):No, I, I, I doubt it. I, I, unless2 (36m 42s):Were you in a play onstage?3 (36m 44s):I don't think so. No. I mean, unless it was like some kind of workshop for one of my plays or something like that, but no,2 (36m 54s):I mean, do you remember me at all? I3 (36m 56s):Do remember. Yeah. I remember you guys. I remember you completely. I just, so I think I graduated. I was a year older than you guys. I think. When did you graduate? I graduated in 96. Okay. So yeah, one year older. You will, so, okay, go ahead.2 (37m 14s):Awesome. Yeah, that happened. What the hell?3 (37m 19s):Well, let me, let me dial back to, to where, cause you asked me if my teacher wanted me to go to college and for me, like there was just no other, I was going to school for theater and there was no stopping me. You know, it was funny. I've listened to some of your podcasts and, and I listened to Caitlin Kiernan's and she was just like, you know, I was 18. Like, what do you, you know, like what did I think? I don't know, but I just, this is what my mind was set on. So, so I'm sure she, she, I remember her telling me that that acting teacher, she was like of all of my, you know, she put me aside and this one other girl, Heather, who I think has actually done pretty well. I think she lives in LA and you know, there's not a lot of TV work.3 (38m 0s):And she was like, you know, she's like of my students. I think you guys have real potential to make something in this business. So she was very positive. So then I started auditioning. I auditioned for probably not enough schools. I should've heard DePaul and like Carnegie Mellon and I think some other, a couple of other schools. And so then I kind of had my mind set in Chicago. My brother lived in Chicago for a couple of years and I had gone to visit him. And I just really like fell in love with the city. And I always knew that I wanted to go to school in a city. So I kind of got my mind set on Chicago. I was like, well, if I get in the car to Carnegie Mellon, I'm from Pittsburgh obviously, but I didn't.3 (38m 45s):So then I auditioned for DePaul and I didn't get in my first, I didn't get in. And so I decided to take a year off and try again, which my dad was not super happy about, but I just had my mindset. I was like, no, I'm going to take year off. And then I'm going to try it again. I'm going to audition again. And that's it. And it ended up being, you know, I think taking your off was a good thing for me. I auditioned again and I didn't get in again. And so, you know, it's funny, like listening to these stories of you guys, like, and all the struggles that you went through and it's like, well, you know, well, at least you, you got in what's true.3 (39m 33s):Like there are different struggles. Yeah. There are different struggles for sure. But then so, and I, when I didn't get in the second time, I was just, I don't know. I think I was just set on Chicago. I was kind of set on DePaul. They'd offered me a place in theater studies program. And so I took it and then I, I decided when I was there to do join the playwriting program, and this is 1996 or 1992. And I was like, at that point I was like, literally like the only person in the playwriting program. My first year, there was like one person who was like a sophomore.3 (40m 14s):I think it was like the second or third year that Dean Corrin was there. He had just been taken on to start this program. And so, yeah. And then as I went through like a few other people joined like Diane Herrera and I think Adam Matthias was also in the writing program. And so while I was there kind of grew a little bit. Yeah. So I, it was, you know, I mean, I don't know. You just want me to keep talking? I feel like2 (40m 51s):I was just ask a question about the theater studies program, because I don't know that we've ever really talked about that program and, and how you just described it, made it sound like that's where people can go to figure out what non-acting thing they want to do in theater.3 (41m 9s):I mean, I think I, to be honest, you know, I mean, let's not kid ourselves college is about making money. Right. For, for most people it's, for-profit, it's private school. I think that they wanted to build the program and yeah. I don't know what it was. I mean, I think I did pretty good on my SATs. My grades were decent and I don't know, maybe my audition was okay. And so it was sort of, yeah, like, you know, they offered it to people like, you know, if you want to come, you're not invited to the acting program, but if you want, you can come to the theater studies program. And so I said, no, the first year, and then the second year I was like, I'm ready to go to school. I mean, sometimes I think I probably would've been better off like going to like a smaller school that didn't necessarily require an audition or something like that, but say levee.3 (41m 57s):Right. And, and so, yeah, I was like, well, I guess I'll do playwriting. And I, I, I mean, I'm glad I did it for many reasons. It was not, it ended up being a really good choice for me. I mean, I think like listening to you guys talk about the competition and, you know, sort of like, I don't do well with rejection. You know, I think you really, I don't, I don't necessarily like love to be the center of attention. And I think like, as an actor or at least to be successful on some level, you have to want that attention.3 (42m 42s):I mean, you guys do, do you feel that you like being the center of attention? She does.1 (42m 49s):Like, I love, I am constantly and mine is, if you listen to the podcast, like we talk about the psychological stuff. Like, I, I still, you know, feel like I wasn't treated right as a kid. So I'm constantly, I'm so transparent about it. I'm constantly trying to get the approval of my mother. Who's dead by the way. So yeah, I, I can say that, like, I want to belong and I want someone to say you are special and I pick you. That's like my dark sort of shadow side. And it always will be for me. I think even if I work through it, I think we all have our shadow sides and that's, and that's mine. And I think it transformed into, oh, maybe if this school likes me, that will give me that sense, but I never got that from DePaul because, you know, one it's that set up for that too.1 (43m 37s):People are bitter and weird and three it's an inside job. Yeah.3 (43m 41s):Yeah. For sure. Yeah. I mean, I think for me, like part of it was, I am the youngest of four and so I think it was like that craving for attention. Like I totally get what you're saying there. So, I mean, I like to be on stage, but like, I don't necessarily like the auditioning part of it and I don't necessarily, you know, like have to be the center of attention to parties or any of those things. But I did, you know, I really did enjoy, I really do enjoy acting like I, I do like it, but so1 (44m 12s):You, you,3 (44m 12s):You were doing a playwriting BFA. Yes. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. You did.1 (44m 18s):And your plays got workshopped.3 (44m 21s):Yeah. I mean, you know, the, the program was still very fledgling and I think because, you know, I wasn't in the acting program, you know, I had a little bit of a chip on my shoulder, I think admitted,1 (44m 43s):Wait, I just have to say, like, there's something really fierce about auditioning twice for the program and then going to theater school, studying theater studies, look at your, at a young age to say, you know what? I fucking want to go to school. So I'm going to, I mean, talk about, I, I see it as, you know, I hate calling people brave, cause I think it's kind of sending, but I think it's fierce to say I'm still going to go to this school. I mean, of course you had, I would have a chip on my shoulder so big. I wouldn't go. Yeah. You went and got an education for God's sake in a degree.3 (45m 16s):Yeah. And I, I, I got a really good education, you know, that's part of what was really positive for me. And I'll go back to the question about workshopping in a second. But what was positive for me is that the theater school had this glitch in their, in their system in because the acting students had to take so many classes cause you guys had yoga and movement to music and scene study and whoever knows what else. So like as part of your tuition, you could take up to 24 credits. And so what I did is I then got a really great liberal arts education.3 (45m 57s):I took poetry writing classes. I took like performance of literature. I took video editing. I took intro to film. I took like,1 (46m 10s):We'll do you could do that Kate? Like, how did you figure out like, oh, I have 24 credits. I'm going to use these.3 (46m 15s):I really don't. I don't know that anybody told me, I think I just figured it out at some point. And I was like, okay, well I guess I'm going to get my money's worth and I'm going to go take these other classes and these other schools and learn how to write and learn how to make films and do intro to film and learn, you know? So like I really loved college. I don't, you know, the theater school was, I don't have anything negative to really say about the theater school either. I knew what I was getting into. Like I said, I sort of had that chip on my shoulder to begin with about being part of the theater school about feeling like Jen, like you said, like about feeling like an insider, but you know, all my friends were in the theater school.3 (47m 2s):I, I love theater people. I really enjoyed that experience. But, but part of my good college experience happened outside of it in many ways, just because I kind of took the reins and I was like, okay, I'm gonna, I'm gonna have some fun with this and get a good education and, and play. And I, I loved it. I loved school. I loved learning new things and try new things. I even, I even took like a leave of absence from the theater for theater school for one quarter. Cause I did a, an overseas, I went to Ireland for a quarter.3 (47m 43s):So, and to do that, I had to take a leave of absence from the theaters. Yeah. Does that seem familiar? Yeah, probably Kelly was crying because I was supposed to be her roommate, but I never got which Kelly Kelly and Mick Adams. I was when I came back from Ireland, we were supposed to be roommates, but I never called and she just got her own apartments. And then I was like, oh my God, I don't know where I'm going to live. But yeah. So I, you know, anyway, so back to my theater school experience, so was, was positive also for playwriting. I, I don't know. I mean, I, you know, Dean Corrin was great, you know, we took like dramatic criticism we had yeah.3 (48m 30s):You know, another, another theme that I have, you know, listening to your podcast and you guys talked about it a little bit is like self-sabotage or not taking advantage of the opportunities presented to you. I feel like, because I kind of had that chip and I wanted to be an actor. Like I didn't necessarily take advantage of the opportunities, like playwriting opportunities, which came easier of course, because cause that's the way it goes, because if you want something it's not going to be, you know, it's not going to be easy, but if you're kind of, sort of like, well maybe, maybe not then the opportunities roll in, but yeah, like we had a poetry or a playwriting workshop class with Sandy Shinar she worked at victory gardens at the time.3 (49m 18s):Yeah. And she was good friends with Dean and like he had her come in as like a guest teacher one day and we were going to work my play and he'd given it to her and she had read it and, and I was just, I don't know. I, I just was like, oh God, I hate that. I really don't want to work on it. Do we have to do this? Can we do something else? And like how we shoot ourselves in the foot, you know, like what an opportunity really? And because I was insecure and scared, I'm sure like whatever psychological, you know, thing you want to come up with that, that, that we, we do to why, why we do these things for ourselves.3 (50m 1s):So, you know, and I, I had other opportunities like that along the way that I didn't necessarily take advantage of. But1 (50m 8s):Did you pull your play or did you work3 (50m 10s):On it? We didn't work on it. No, because there was somebody else in the class who was much smarter than I was and was like, oh, well here's my play. We can do my play. We can work on mine today. Yeah. I know. That's really that's.1 (50m 26s):I mean, I totally relate. And I think it, it just speaks to many things, but like, you weren't ready for that and that's it. And I, I'm starting to look at things like ready versus not ready versus good and bad. So you just weren't ready to have that experience. And we can look back and, you know, I listened to Gina and I talk to people on and we're like, we blame ourselves for that, but you just simply didn't have the emotional resources to take in that experience. And that sucks. But,2 (51m 1s):And when you're not ready, it, people could say anything to you. That person could have said, we want you to be the new resident playwright, a victory gardens. You would've said, I don't think so.1 (51m 13s):I could've gotten the laryngitis again. Like it it's, we couldn't stop.3 (51m 19s):That's so interesting. I mean, I agree with you. I think you're, I think you're right. And that's, that's hearing it come from you. It, it, it's nice Rather than me saying it to myself or trying to figure out, like, why, why do I do these things to myself?1 (51m 37s):And it's interesting having done all these podcasts, Kate, we see it over and over again. So we have the data to tell you that people have, we've heard like so many people like with these ICTs being offered these things and being like, no, I'm not going to move to LA because you know, I have an apartment in Wrigleyville. Like I'm not going to be a movie star. And people are like, what's the D we all have that. I think that's part of growing up. And I also also think it's part of expecting young people to really handle a lot of things we cannot handle.3 (52m 11s):Yeah. They're one of the books that I, I teach my students is called outliers. Have you guys read it? It's Malcolm Gladwell. And he, you know, there's a section in where he talks about practical intelligence and you know, how some people, the people that are successful, you know, they grow up with a certain family life, or, you know, maybe it's about money. It's about education. It's about these things. But it's also just knowing how to handle yourself in certain situations and knowing how to take advantage of the opportunities that are presented to you. And I think if you aren't, if you don't have that, or you're not taught that it is hard sometimes to, you know?2 (52m 50s):Yeah. And what, I just heard you, I mean, when you said, it's good to hear that from us, that made me think, oh, you've been beating yourself up about this for 25 years to yourself. Why did I squander this opportunity? Which, I mean, whether or not you did it, it's completely human. That, that you might occasionally have that thought, but have you spent a lot of time in, in regret?3 (53m 18s):I mean, I don't think so. I think I don't spend a lot of time in regret. You know, I definitely had moments over the years. I, well, a few years back, I sort of had like a little bit of a, not a breakdown, but like, I think of my midlife crisis started and like my, you know, I have two kids and my daughter was, you know, eight and my son was four and it was just kind of like, you know, you know, when kids are babies, it's just baby, baby, baby, baby. You don't, you don't have time to think about yourself. So who cares? And then like when you start to get back to yourself a little bit, it's just like, okay, I'm, you know, I'm 42 or, you know, whatever, and what have I really done?3 (54m 8s):And you know, what am I doing? And you know, is this, this, this it, I mean, I, I was teaching yoga. So, I mean, that's also a part of my journey. I mean, like I, so when I got out of school, like I did acting for a while, like, I've done some very bad independent films. Do you guys know Sandra Delgado? Oh yeah. Yeah. She, I like, we did a really bad film together in the early two thousands. And, you know, like I did like a horror film and I was like, had some small parts as mother independent films.3 (54m 52s):And, you know, I, I was trying to act and auditioning and auditioning and auditioning and like I did a couple of plays, but it was just never, you know, I just could never get to a certain point. I really just, I would have done theater and crappy theater and whatever, but I just, I couldn't, you know, for whatever reason, you know, I have the, that decade that I called the, the bad boyfriend years, so which we can all relate to on some level, which I, you know, where we all waste a lot of energy on people who don't deserve it. Oh yeah. Yeah. And then, so, so then, yeah, like a few years back, so it was kind of not in a good place.3 (55m 39s):And I was like, okay, well, I guess it's now or never. And I, I finally finished the play, so I went back to writing. Yeah. That's huge. That's awesome. You know, I finally cause I, I was like, okay, I guess if I'm going to try, I guess I gotta try. And, you know, I, I really discovered a few things. I discovered that I like writing. I, I feel good when I'm doing it. You know, there's a lot of positives to it in that way. I finished the play. I, it got, it got into like the second round at the Austin film festival.3 (56m 19s):So that was, yeah, that was pretty cool. I guess, since it was just like my first foray out of doing anything in theater in quite some time, and I had a stage reading in Chicago and then it sort of, you know, petered out after that. I, I was sending it out, sending it out, but no, no, no hits after that. But so, you know, I'm kind of gearing up to write again. So, no, I don't, I don't have, I don't, I haven't been beating myself up about it. I think that, you know, life takes a course and you can only do what you are doing in the time that you're doing it.3 (57m 0s):You only have the information that you have. You only have the life skills that you have. You only have the resources that you have. And so I think regret, I don't waste a lot of time on regret. I have enjoyed listening to the podcast and sort of like you said, Jen, like everybody's story is the same, a little bit. And that, you know, a lot of people who, you know, I've looked up to and had a lot of respect for and were really good actors and good at what they did. It just didn't happen for them. And so that's, that's like, I, yeah.2 (57m 37s):So I'm still just trying to, I'm still trying to wrap my head around why I just remember you as being an acting student, maybe it had to do with that. You were friends with Kelly and maybe because of your friendship with Kelly.3 (57m 54s):Yeah, probably that was it. Yeah. I mean, I was, I was friends with all the apartment three crew. I, yeah.1 (58m 2s):So I mean, I like, I like that even like deeper in my brain, I was like, what if I was taking on your desire to be an actor? I saw you as an actor because it was so strong that you wanted to be an actor. Like, I literally have an image of you on stage, but I actually can't3 (58m 22s):Be somebody else. Yeah. I1 (58m 25s):It's your face. It's really weird. So, anyway,3 (58m 27s):I mean, I guess at one time, like I had a play that maybe I did a stage reading of with Darryl Dickerson at school and maybe some other actors, maybe Kelly was in it. I don't know. But that would have really been like in a classroom. Yeah, yeah, no, I not an actor or, I mean, I am an actor, but none of the theater school. Yeah.2 (58m 54s):So these days, I mean, when you're talking about the work of being an English teacher, it reminded me actually, ironically, just a few days ago, I ran across a notebook that I haven't opened since I was a teacher of social studies and drama. And I re remember that I used to take for social studies. I used to write my lesson like a monologue kind of, and sort of not memorize it exactly, but almost like repeatedly rehearse it because it was not information that I already knew. I was learning the lesson right before I taught it. And teaching is so performative that during that time I was doing theater at the time.2 (59m 35s):But even if I weren't, I think I would have felt fulfilled in a performance way. Do you have that feeling about being a teacher? That it feels like a performance?3 (59m 50s):I guess what I, I do like the exchange of energy, like, like you would get from say a live audience or something like that. I don't know that I necessarily look at it as a performance, but I do feel like, yeah, you, obviously you have to be ready. You have to know what you're going to say. You have to know the material. And like, even if it is you just learning it that day or getting, you know, I feel that exchange, like, I feel good after class, like after talking with the kids and being with the kids and talking at them and, and teaching them, it does feel that way, like a little bit like that exchange of energy that you get from an audience a little bit.3 (1h 0m 35s):Yeah.2 (1h 0m 37s):Do you otherwise feel a kind of a need to do, do you have a need for any other type of creative outlet or your guys you're doing it because you're kind of getting back into3 (1h 0m 48s):My goal is to, yeah. To start writing again, like, I, I don't know how, what your, how you guys write. Like, I don't know what if you're constantly writing all the time or for me it's, it's like, I tend to sort of get inspiration and then work on something, you know, in a, in, in a period of time. Or if I create the discipline, like when I finished this play, I was getting up at like four 30 every day. I was teaching yoga at the time and the kids were, you know, still pretty young. And so I knew that the only way it was ever going to work is if I was disciplined enough to, you know, set that time aside, this is my time, my time to write.3 (1h 1m 33s):And so now, you know, after, like you said, you know, that first year is so hard, so now I'm starting to get my legs again. And I'm hoping to, yeah. Maybe start working on something I have, I've like dabbled in screenwriting before a little bit. So I'm thinking about, maybe I'm getting too into that a little bit.1 (1h 1m 57s):I have a question for you when you took playwriting. So this is interesting because it was such a young program, right. Was there any actually teaching of writing at the theater school, Like how to write a play?3 (1h 2m 12s):You know, it's funny about that. It's funny because I mean, like, I, it feels like we would write and we give it the stuff to Dean and we had deadlines and things like that. And he would give us feedback on it. You know, it's the funny thing is, is like the only, I feel like the only piece of practical writing advice that I ever got, and I, this is nothing against Dean. It's just what I remember. So Dean was awesome. I loved him. Well, we had a visiting playwright from Nigeria all over TIMI. I don't know if you remember him being there. He was there for like one quarter and he basically just like, kind of taught me to, to write a bit, you know, he's like, he's like, you have this scene here.3 (1h 2m 57s):And the guy he's at the cafe and he wants his coffee, but the waitress isn't giving him his coffee. He has to keep asking for his coffee over and over again. And it was just like, oh, you mean, I have to create like a little bit of dramatic tension in the scene, what a revelation. Right?2 (1h 3m 16s):Like it just a Mo create3 (1h 3m 17s):A moment. I felt like, you know, he gave me some real practical advice. It was just like, okay, you just have to, you know, these two people are here and you have to kind of, he wants his coffee and she won't give him his coffee and that's where the comedy comes in. And so, yeah. I don't know. I, I don't know how much, you know, they taught me about writing. I feel like I could have used a little bit of more help, like in practical matters, you know, listening to Kate's thing when you guys all went out for your showcase and that kind of thing. Like if somebody had talked to me more about submitting my work, maybe that would have been helpful.3 (1h 3m 58s):I mean, it's so weird though, to think of it at that time. I mean, I was, we were sending out headshots through the mail. We were sending out work through the mail. I mean, you have to go ,1 (1h 4m 14s):You'd have to go to what was called Kinko's then print out your play and then, and then mail it in an envelope to theaters or drop it off in person.3 (1h 4m 24s):And there was like that, like one place where you could get your headshots downtown, like the one like photography place where you could go and get like your headshots in bulk and you'd have to go pick them up. And like the blue2 (1h 4m 35s):Box. I remember the blue box.3 (1h 4m 37s):Yes. I still box exactly. You know,1 (1h 4m 44s):I think, or2 (1h 4m 45s):Yeah, something like that. So. Okay. So then let's talk about the period between graduating and we're where you are now. So you, well, you said you were auditioning,3 (1h 4m 57s):So I graduated. Yeah. And then after that, I, I, you know, I would go in spurts of productivity, you know, where I would audition a lot. You know, I was always looking at performing, you know, once again, trying to, I took a lot of classes in Chicago. I, I took classes at the actor's center. They had a lot of Meisner there. I did Steven, Steven. I have a villages program. He had a studio in like Wicker park. And so he had like a, like a, I think it was like a nine month program or something. So you would, you know, go and you'd be with the same group.3 (1h 5m 40s):And I went through a program there. I took classes downtown at, I forget what it's called now, the audition studio, or, you know, and I remember taking like an on-camera class with Erica Daniels. And who was the other, who was the lady that she always worked with? The casting director. Do you remember she was blonde1 (1h 6m 8s):Phyllis at Steppenwolf?3 (1h 6m 9s):No. It was like a casting director. Her name began with an ass. I want to say it was like Sharon or Sally, or, I dunno, she was like a big casting director at the time. So I took like an on-camera class with them, you know, I, Yeah. I don't know. It's funny cause like you, you, there's these moments where you realize like you're trying to be funny and it just, isn't funny and it just ends up really awkward. And that was one of those moments with them, you know, you're trying to impress somebody and, and she, I was sort of like chubby in high school.3 (1h 6m 57s):And so I think that as with most women who have issues with body issues, like you, you have those body issues forever. It takes a long time to shake them off. And I remember they gave me the scene. It was, the character was played by Sarah rule. Yeah. So, you know, she was a little overweight at the time, you know, and I remember kind of making this off-color joke about how, oh, I guess I see you gave me the, the part of the fat girl or something like that. Like really like probably not appropriate, but I, I meant it to be self-deprecating, but I wasn't really fat at the time.3 (1h 7m 37s):So it was didn't come off as self-deprecating it was another one of those instances where it's just like, and the woman just like hated me after that, you know? And Erica was pretty cool. I think she kind of realized that I was just nervous and awkward. And with the other woman, I remember seeing her like outside after, and she crossed the street to like, not talk to me. And I was like, oh my God, I'm such an asshole. Like, why did I say that? I didn't mean it. You know? And so I'm even blushing now I think thinking about it,1 (1h 8m 10s):You said what probably a lot of people were thinking when they would get that.2 (1h 8m 15s):Honestly, you can rest assured that absolutely every person who was there was just in an internal monologue about their own body issues. I mean, that's, that's the thing that comes up over and over again, when we feel so much shame about something like that, it's like, those people would never remember it. A and if, even if they did, they'd say with the benefit of hindsight, they might say, oh yeah, well, that just brought up for me. You know, my feelings about myself. And3 (1h 8m 44s):I mean, you know, I think, yeah, it just, it, so I took classes all over the city. I auditioned a lot, like I said, I did some independent films and then, you know, like I was still auditioning kind of in spurts over time, I think. And then I discovered yoga. And so I started doing Bikram yoga. It's just the hot yoga. I hear you guys talking about cults and cult leaders a lot on here. He's, he's one of those guys. He's a, he's a cult leader, a guru now downfall on by sexual harassment.3 (1h 9m 26s):But I started doing the yoga and that was like 2007, I think. And, you know, I had a friend who really kind of pushed me to go do the training and I wasn't really sure, but I decided to go do it. And you know, it kind of, I think, I don't know if you guys have ever done yoga, but it is sort of, you know, it kind of, it gave me something that I had been missing in a way. I think, you know, it is that, that mind body connection, I think I had been very detached from my body for many reasons, you know, abuse and all that.3 (1h 10m 7s):Like not physical abuse, but other kinds of abuse. And, and so like, I think that people get detached from their bodies. And so I think I was really connected to it in a way, and I felt good, you know, in a way that I hadn't felt in a long time. And, you know, I think that's the hardest thing. Sometimes when it goes, when you go back to theater, it's like you put so much energy into it and so much time. And I took so many classes and, you know, I enjoyed the classes and, but I just, you know, I really wanted to get on stage and it was just like, I just couldn't get there. And I think like at a certain point, you're just kind of like, what positive am I getting from this thing that I'm giving all this time and energy and love to like, what's the positives that I'm getting out of this.3 (1h 10m 55s):And I'm not, I'm not really seeing it anymore. You know, you know, I, I would get calls from people. We loved your audition. It was lovely. Please come audition for us again. So, you know, there, there were positives, but it just could never, it just really came to fruition. And so then I started doing the yoga and I, I felt really connected to it and I felt really good and in a way that I hadn't felt. And so then I started teaching yoga and I did that for like 10 years while I was having babies and raising them. And then like, yeah.3 (1h 11m 36s):So then 27 16, I started writing again.2 (1h 11m 40s):I did, I did Bikram yoga for like two years and you're just making me re remember that part of what I liked about it. It was kind of like rehearsal. I mean, cause you just go and you do the same, whatever it is, 26 poses. And the set is the same and the smell the same. And it is kind of like, it's very rich of all the nuggets, like really ritualistic.3 (1h 12m 8s):It is very ritualistic and you know, I haven't been practicing here in Morocco. Sometimes I, you know, close all the doors to my kitchen and I turn on t

Blamo! | Exploring Fashion with the People Who Shape It
178 - Willie Norris (Outlier) and Designing for Community

Blamo! | Exploring Fashion with the People Who Shape It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 49:40


My guest this week is the designer Willie Norris.She's known for her eponymous workshop and is also the design director of the New York brand, Outlier.Willie and I discuss the importance of humor in design, designing for a community, rethinking what a clothing brand should be.NYT ArticleOutlier**Sponsored by Standard & Strange – Get the facts on denim

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 201: Wire Taps—Deferred candidate with Cannabis Biz! Should they aim higher? Is the GRE score the outlier?

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 40:45


Graham and Alex are back with some belated Thanksgiving wishes, tips for R1 nerves, and a breakdown of the highly impressive Michigan/Ross employment report and Vanderbilt and Georgetown class profiles. As usual, our hosts also provide key advice to a set of real candidates. First up, a deferred enrollment applicant in their junior year appears to be doing everything right in terms of academic performance, campus leadership and entrepreneurship. They've still got to ace the test, but is their Cannabis business opportunity a 'high' risk venture? Next, our hosts discuss a candidate who has gone six for six in terms of interview invites in Round 1; should they be targeting higher profile programs in Round 2? Finally, Alex and Graham discuss a candidate who appears to have outstanding work experience and is seeking a one-year MBA. But, is one-year the best option, and should she consider retaking the GRE? This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced by Dennis Crowley in glorious West Philadelphia. Thanks for remembering to rate and review the show wherever you may listen!

Software Defined Talk
Episode 331: Graphics of Guerrillas

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 63:58


This week we discuss the rise of Web3 and make a few AWS re:invent predications. Plus, what if Billy Joel and Huey Lewis formed a band… Rundown It's a Web3 World Now — How the Hype Compares to Web 2.0 (https://thenewstack.io/its-a-web3-world-now-how-the-hype-compares-to-web-2-0/) Crypto group tries to claw back fees after failed Constitution bid (https://www.axios.com/crypto-constitution-bid-high-cost-6ab84b3b-79c0-40d0-be6b-232172a3ed7a.html) $10B is the new $1B, and we need a new framework for startup valuations (https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/23/10b-is-the-new-1b-and-we-need-a-new-framework-for-startup-valuations/) AWS Re:Invent Predictions 5 Things To Know About New AWS Channel Chief Ruba Borno (https://www.crn.com/slide-shows/cloud/5-things-to-know-about-new-aws-channel-chief-ruba-borno) Andy Jassy was reportedly surprised when Jeff Bezos asked him to take on the job of Amazon CEO: 'I wasn't clamoring for it' (https://www.businessinsider.com/jeff-bezos-choosing-andy-jassy-surprised-amazon-ceo-2021-11) “Who Is He?”: Andy Jassy, Amazon's New CEO, Enters the Ring (https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2021/11/andy-jassy-amazons-new-ceo-enters-the-ring) Relevant to your interests Amazon's Dark Secret: It Has Failed to Protect Your Data (https://www.wired.com/story/amazon-failed-to-protect-your-data-investigation/) Apple's Plan to Scan Handset Images Stopped Before It Started (https://m-cacm.acm.org/news/256904-apples-plan-to-scan-handset-images-stopped-before-it-started/fulltext) Andy Jassy's Big Idea for AWS Expansion Marred by Glitches, High Prices (https://www.theinformation.com/articles/andy-jassys-big-idea-for-aws-expansion-marred-by-glitches-high-prices) The NFT Bay Debuts to Save You a Right-Click on Someone's Precious Digital Art (https://www.tomshardware.com/news/nft-bay-debuts) Follow Matthew Ball for MetaVerse Info (https://twitter.com/ballmatthew/status/1462787490272759811) IBM tells POWER8 owners: the end is nigh for upgrades (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/22/ibm_power8_eol/) VMware withdraws major vSphere release due to bugs (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/22/vsphere_7_update_3_withdrawn/) Webhooks provider Svix snags $2.6M to simplify software management (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/21/no-code-webhooks-provider-svix-snags-2-6m-to-simplify-software-management/) Drama in the Rust community — mod team resignation (https://github.com/rust-lang/team/pull/671) The bitcoin fanatics fuel GPU shortages for gamers (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/19/gpu_makers_not_keen_on_crypto/) AWS commits to update its own Linux every other year (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/23/amazon_linux_2022/) Announcing $150M to build the end-to-end platform for the modern Web (https://vercel.com/blog/vercel-funding-series-d-and-valuation) Oracle and Google join Microsoft and Amazon in bidding for Defense Department's Joint Warfighter Cloud Capability (https://www.datacenterdynamics.com/en/news/oracle-and-google-join-microsoft-and-amazon-in-bidding-for-defense-departments-joint-warfighter-cloud-capability/) Passwordless authentication platform Stytch raises $90M (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/18/passwordless-authentication-platform-stytch-raises-90m/) Passwordless authentication platform Stytch raises $90M (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/18/passwordless-authentication-platform-stytch-raises-90m/) We got an exclusive look at the 13-slide pitch deck Stytch, a passwordless startup, used to raise $90 million from Coatue (https://www.businessinsider.com/stytch-startup-used-this-pitch-deck-to-raise-90m-from-coatue-2021-11#-13) Nonsense Dollar Tree will raise prices from $1 to $1.25 (https://twitter.com/axios/status/1463225256131375110) Sponsors strongDM — Manage and audit remote access to infrastructure. Start your free 14-day trial today at strongdm.com/SDT (http://strongdm.com/SDT) CBT Nuggets — Training available for IT Pros anytime, anywhere. Start your 7-day Free Trial today at cbtnuggets.com/sdt (https://cbtnuggets.com/sdt) Conferences THAT Conference comes to Texas January 17-20, 2022 (https://that.us/events/tx/2022/) Software Defined Talk Live Recording - THAT (https://that.us/activities/onqzzIqfp9NOeyLm67SY) DevOpsDays Chicago 2022: Call for Speakers/Papers (https://sessionize.com/devopsdays-chicago-2022/) PaperCall.io - DevOps Days Birmingham AL, 2022 (https://www.papercall.io/devopsdays-2022-birmingham-al) Listener Feedback InfraCloud is Hiring a Customer Success Engineer (https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/view/2806304163/?refId=N26Jg1NXR196pB%2BG8KRQ5Q%3D%3D&trackingId=O4BTvvSN7iujIpAR1gCxlA%3D%3D) Brian recommends Outliers (https://www.amazon.com/Outliers-Story-Success-Malcolm-Gladwell/dp/0316017930) SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Brandon built the Quick Concall iPhone App (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/quick-concall/id1399948033?mt=823) and he wants you to buy it for $0.99. Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: Wave Mic Arm LP (https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Elgato-Gaming/Audio/Wave-Mic-Arm/p/10AAN9901) The Infinite Machine (https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Infinite-Machine-Audiobook/0062990187?ref=a_library_t_c5_libItem_&pf_rd_p=80765e81-b10a-4f33-b1d3-ffb87793d047&pf_rd_r=EKPH6JXTYCGYS2SK9JKH) Matt: Corn Pudding (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dj5mJGyoYIM) for Thanksgiving Coté: J. Kenji López-Alt (https://www.youtube.com/c/JKenjiLopezAlt/videos)'s videos (https://www.youtube.com/c/JKenjiLopezAlt/videos), for example, Beef with Broccoli (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEs3qXQvg6M). Photo Credits Banner (https://unsplash.com/photos/eiY4KJ62P5Q) Cover Art (https://unsplash.com/photos/Ta-q5ZBqXRQ)

My First Band Podcast
144 – Emily Wolfe

My First Band Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 55:43


If you don't know the name Emily Wolfe yet, you will soon. The Austin-based singer, songwriter and guitarist is a few months removed from the release of Outlier, her excellent sophomore album that's earned acclaim from listeners and critics alike. Epiphone now produces a signature model guitar that bears her name, and she's about to take that guitar on the road again when she embarks on a Midwestern tour next month before what's sure to be a busy and bountiful 2022. Long before Wolfe was collaborating with Queens of the Stone Age members and sharing the stage with the likes of Joan Jett and Heart, she was playing acoustic brunch sets at restaurants and trying to make a name for herself in the Texas capital. Prior to hitting the road again (including a Dec. 9 headlining show at Cactus Club in Milwaukee), Wolfe spoke with My First Band host Tyler Maas about what it's been like getting back on the road again, the process of recording the new album with Michael Shuman and highlights from her already impressive and still-blossoming career. Over the course of the conversation, Wolfe talked about being drawn to guitar at the age of 5, immersing herself in songwriting in her teens, diving headfirst into Austin's music scene during her college years and some of the formative experiences and opportunities that — combined with her years of hard work and natural talent — helped her become the artist she is today. My First Band is sponsored by Mystery Room Mastering and Lakefront Brewery. The show is edited by Jared Blohm. You can listen to My First Band on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify and wherever else you get podcasts. You can also listen to rebroadcasts of previous My First Band episodes on WMSE every Wednesday from noon to 12:30 p.m. CST. Music used in this episode comes courtesy of Devils Teeth ("The Junction Street Eight Tigers") and Emily Wolfe ("Damage Control").

Relay Chain
Accelerating the Web3 Metaverse with Outlier Ventures

Relay Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 79:01


This week, Joe Petrowski (Technical Integrations Lead, Web3 Foundation) is joined by Jamie Burke, CEO, and founder of Outlier Ventures, an accelerator that supports the development and growth of emerging technologies, including Polkadot. They are currently running a Polkadot accelerator through their Base Camp program. Burke describes what he set out to achieve by founding Outlier Ventures in the context of the current internet where platforms are vulnerable to state capture and coercion and are biased against users. With these flaws in mind, the pair discuss the optimal Web3 tech stack with ‘sovereignty first' as a core design principle and building a permissionless financial system in the context of the Metaverse. The conversation moves on to the Metaverse as a framework for the direction of Web3 where value and identity are transferred and owned by the user. They discuss how to navigate this realm in terms of technology, finance, and culture, and how this aggregate economy would enable a more open metaverse across lots of different use cases, from music to gaming, the creator economy, and more. Links Outlier Ventures' website (https://outlierventures.io/) Outlier Ventures Polkadot Base Camp (https://outlierventures.io/base-camp/polkadot-base-camp/) The Open Metaverse OS (https://outlierventures.io/research/the-open-metaverse-os/) Age of Surveillance Capitalism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Age_of_Surveillance_Capitalism), Shoshana Zuboff The Master Switch (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Wu#The_Master_Switch), Tim Wuh The Sovereign Individual: Mastering the Transition to the Information Age (1997, with James Dale Davidson) Highlights 00:57 Introduction to Outlier Ventures 07:00 User-centricity in Web3 and the Metaverse 11:55 Use cases of NFTs encourage blockchain adoption 18:00 Creating a Web3 Stack to enable a more open Metaverse 21:05 The success of NFTs in the gaming industry (quantifying forms of digital value) 28:40 Integrating into a digital economy to be part of the Metaverse 33:50 Introducing digital scarcity to digital assets = enabling property rights 38:10 Reworking economics primitives: Infinite scarcity through infinite worlds 41:25 Web3 as a mix of free markets, the sovereign individual and fluidity collectors 51:40 Commodification and financialization of data with blockchain technology 54:30 Data unions to empower individuals on Polkadot and Kusama 56:28 How can the Metaverse compete with physical nation-states? 1:05:00 Web3 stack for a better Metaverse user experience 1:10:00 Outlier Ventures support for the Polkadot ecosystem Special Guest: Jamie Burke.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner
Best of Outlier Academy: Dan Roller of Maran Capital on Investing in Buy-and-Build Compounders

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 73:05


We'll be back the week of November 29 with a brand new episode of Outlier Academy! In the meantime, we're sharing one of our most popular episodes with Dan Roller of Maran Capital. “What you need to do, I think, is constantly update your thesis as you go, which can allow for longer holding periods, because things do change. And at the same time, I go into investments with a multi-year horizon—but my thesis might be disproven fairly quickly.” – Dan Roller Dan Roller is Founder and Chief Investment Officer of Maran Capital Management, a boutique, value-driven investment manager with a carefully crafted portfolio of companies, including Clarus, Scott's Liquid Gold, Turning Point Brands, and Pure Cycle. Prior to starting his own fun, Dan honed his investment philosophy and process for over a decade working in research analyst and portfolio management roles at well-regarded hedge funds in New York City, including Credit Suisse First Boston and Impala Asset Management. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/dan-roller-outliers-show-notes Chapters in this interview: MOI Global Dan's background and start in the investment world The formation of Maran Capital Choosing your hunting ground and creating structural advantages  Researching and choosing companies to invest in How building investment knowledge is like training for the Ironman Examples and basics of buy-and-build companies How buy-and-build can go wrong Investing in Clarus and Turning Point Brands The value vs. growth debate Investing in SPACs Thesis drift and mental models esources for learning about investing   Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our Friday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OutlierAcademy If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

All In with Chris Hayes
From JFK to Trump: How conspiracy theorists went from outliers to insiders

All In with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 44:27


Guests: Jonathan Karl, Zoe Tillman, Amy Spitalnick, John Podesta, Michelle GoldbergTonight: New subpoenas handed down to the Proud Boys and other right-wing groups involved in January 6th—what this means for the investigation and the through line from the fringe to the mainstream Republican movement. Plus: a big legal victory in Virginia as a jury finds the people behind the deadly Charlottesville rally liable for millions of dollars in damages. Then, John Podesta on Joe Biden's battle against rising gas prices.    

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Malcolm Gladwell: The Art of Self-Reinvention

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 63:44


Longevity and mastery over any creative profession require relentless passion, conscious steps to continually reinvent your swing, and a seriousness of purpose, which results from profound self-reflection and introspection.  World-renowned journalist and writer Malcolm Gladwell joins me to dig deep into building an everlasting career as a creative and what it takes to pursue it.  Malcolm is the author of five New York Times bestsellers — The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants and the Founder of Pushkin Industries, which explore all forms of audio art. He also hosts the Revisionist History podcast, which re-examines events, ideas, people, and objects from our past—and explains how they create our present. In his upcoming intimate audio biography titled Miracle and Wonder, Malcolm collaborates with the legendary songwriter Paul Simon to explore lessons from the artist's life and career. Recorded over a series of 30 hours of conversation with Simon and the Broken Record podcast co-host Bruce Headlam, the audiobook reflects Simon's inimitably gifted artistic bent and what it took for him to tap into it.  Here are some things you'll discover in this episode: How to build the confidence to construct your intellectual life the way you want to  How to overcome the “professed” to make way for the “practical.” Why creativity and craft knows no physical or geographical boundaries Why you need to be constantly evolving to build an evergreen career Why relentless perfectionism is key to creating intentional content Why you need to archive your experiences and lessons from the past to be inimitable at your craft The timeless worth of self-reflection: how to develop the willingness to be reflective about your life experiences  Why you need to connect with your work on a more-than-objective level Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

Transformational Leader Podcast
Outliers - Malcolm Gladwell

Transformational Leader Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 45:39


Book 9 of the Leadership Book Mastermind series is Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"--the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing. Along the way he explains the secrets of software billionaires, what it takes to be a great soccer player, why Asians are good at math, and what made the Beatles the greatest rock band. Watch ‌us‌ ‌on‌ ‌the‌ ‌weekly‌ ‌‌Empowered‌ ‌Living‌‌ ‌show‌ ‌at‌ ‌noon‌ ‌on‌ ‌Thursday or on YouTube.‌ ‌ ‌ We're‌ ‌always‌ ‌looking‌ ‌for‌ ‌the‌ ‌story‌ ‌of‌ ‌Breaking‌ ‌Average‌ ‌from‌ ‌the‌ ‌communities‌ ‌that‌ ‌we‌ ‌serve‌ ‌that‌ ‌the‌ ‌world‌ ‌that‌ ‌our‌ ‌listeners‌ ‌are‌ ‌involved‌ ‌in.‌ ‌If‌ ‌you‌ ‌know‌ ‌of‌ ‌a‌ ‌leader‌ ‌out‌ ‌there‌ who‌ ‌is‌ ‌Breaking‌ ‌Average,‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌way‌ ‌that‌ ‌they‌ ‌lead,‌ ‌the‌ ‌way‌ ‌that‌ ‌they‌ ‌serve‌ ‌their‌ communities,‌ ‌their‌ ‌organizations,‌ ‌the‌ ‌leaders‌ ‌around‌ ‌them,‌ ‌we'd‌ ‌love‌ ‌for‌ ‌you‌ ‌to‌ ‌go‌ ‌to‌ ‌https://www.breakingaverage.com/podcast‌‌ ‌ ‌let‌ ‌us‌ ‌know‌ ‌of‌ ‌a‌ ‌leader‌ ‌that‌ ‌you‌ ‌think‌ ‌we‌ ‌should‌ ‌talk‌ ‌to‌ ‌as‌ ‌well.‌ ‌ Purchase‌ ‌the‌ ‌Breaking‌ ‌Average‌ ‌book‌ ‌by‌ ‌clicking‌ ‌here:‌ ‌‌http://bit.ly/breakaverage‌ ‌Connect‌ ‌with‌ ‌your‌ ‌‌Breaking‌ ‌Average‌ ‌Crew‌:‌ ‌Paul‌ ‌Gustavson ‌&‌ ‌Rick‌ ‌A. Morris‌ ‌ ‌ Produced by Rick A. Morris with R2 Multimedia, LLC

Kings Pulse: A Sacramento Kings Podcast
Don't Overreact: Sacramento's blowout loss in San Antonio could be an outlier

Kings Pulse: A Sacramento Kings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 73:17


The Sacramento Kings recorded their first loss of the season that wasn't particularly close at any point in the second half. Going into San Antonio, the Kings were favored despite lacking Tyrese Haliburton, but they came out with lackluster effort and energy. Will Griffith of the Kings Herald joins the show for the first segment to talk about why it's too early to say "this is just like last year", even though it was admittedly horrible. We also dive into Fox's breakout performance, the half-court struggles on offense, our thoughts on Walton's early season, and Marvin Bagley refusing to play. For the second half of this episode, I brought on Bruno Passos (@bouncepassos), who covers the San Antonio Spurs, to give his perspective on the Spurs' best shooing night of the year as he drives home from the stadium. I pick his brain on how much of it was simply San Antonio making shots compared to the Kings failing on their end. He hilariously identifies a primary issue with Sacramento's offense after limited exposure to the team this season and gives his thoughts on the Spurs' play-in chances this season. Also, does he think the Spurs could have any interest in trading for Marvin Bagley? Thaddeus Young for Mavin Bagley + a 2nd? Could San Antonio be in the conversation for acquiring a big name in the trade market? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dynasty Fantasy Football | Married to The Game | The FF Dynasty
Can Tua Get a Chance? Dynasty Buy Now Trade Targets- Jaylen Waddle & Michael Pittman

Dynasty Fantasy Football | Married to The Game | The FF Dynasty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 54:25


Basically a rookie, Tua Tagovailoa has played less than 12 games of NFL football and people are already throwing him to the wolves. We dive into Tua and the Miami Dolphins situation (Brian Flores & Deshaun Watson trade rumors) to see if the hate is warranted and what type of trade window might be opening up for your Super Flex Dynasty team Jaylen Waddle has moved from Outlier to full on dynasty must target. We think you should be doing what's necessary to acquire Jaylen Waddle on your dynasty teams Michael Pittman has been coming on strong in year two, we think he can develop into a potential WR 1 for you dynasty team so we recommend trying to buy now before the price gets too high To see our marvelous faces check out the video on Youtube, there's also content there that can't be found anywhere else And as always, if you  want to show your support for the show then hit us up on Patreon for exclusive content you can't find anywhere else!  For just 5 dollars a month you get direct access to us like never before with the Discord channel, Mock drafts, and extra shows...for your pleasurrre And as always, if you  want to show your support for the show then hit us up on Patreon for exclusive content you can't find anywhere else!  For just 5 dollars a month you get direct access to us like never before with the Discord channel, Mock drafts, and extra shows...for your pleasurrre Shout out to our main sponsor Revelry Brewing Company  If your local to Charleston or just visiting, their rooftop bar and sour tasting room are a must! If you are looking for a great place to host your Fantasy Football draft in lovely Charleston, SC be sure to hit up thealleycharleston.com or email Lucy directly at lucym@bowlthealley.com Find us on the Facebooks, Instagrams, or the Twitters @TheFFDynasty Casey @IamCMyers  |  Big Co @DynastyBigCo  |  Jay Wayne @JayWaynesWorld The FF Dynasty  – An easy way to listen to fantasy football

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 291 Anaïs Ganouna - 2 Millimeter Shifts

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 32:19


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Anaïs Ganouna, a neurodivergent middle child to immigrant parents, lifelong entrepreneur, and questioner of all things. Her career has spanned 4 personal businesses, including 1 exit, and continues to serve multiple spirit-led businesses through Fractional CMO services, consulting, and her online membership space, Aligned Visionaries. Anaïs has served ventures like Outlier.org (from the founder of Masterclass), top 10 Apple Podcast Chasing Glory with Lilian Garcia, and countless first time founders.

The Matt Walsh Show
Ep. 818 - Loudoun County Is Not An Outlier. There's A Sex Assault Epidemic In Public Schools.

The Matt Walsh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 65:14


Today on the Matt Walsh Show, Loudoun County continues to lie about, and cover up, the sexual assault of a student inside the girl's bathroom by a boy in a dress. But Loudoun County is not an outlier. There has been a sex abuse epidemic in public schools for decades. Also, an NBA star will not be allowed to play for his team because he refuses to get vaccinated. And Bill DeBlasio removes a statue of Thomas Jefferson. Plus, Republicans remain mostly silent about the Biden Administration's plan to monitor our bank accounts. And Demi Lovato continues to speak out about her alien encounters. In our Daily Cancellation, has the remake craze over at Disney finally gone too far?  You petitioned, and we heard you. Made for Sweet Babies everywhere: get the official Sweet Baby Gang t-shirt here: https://utm.io/udIX3 Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices