Podcasts about Delmarva Peninsula

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Large peninsula on the East Coast of the US

  • 26PODCASTS
  • 45EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 1MONTHLY NEW EPISODE
  • Apr 27, 2022LATEST
Delmarva Peninsula

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Best podcasts about Delmarva Peninsula

Latest podcast episodes about Delmarva Peninsula

Room 42
Humanities Improve Science Communication

Room 42

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 47:28


Marybeth Shea teaches advanced composition at the University of Maryland. These courses include professional and technical writing where she typically instructs scientists and engineers in science writing, writing about the environment, and special sections under design for data analysis and computer science students. She has also co-taught special courses on big data and visualization. Recently, Shea developed a gateway course for medical humanities with colleagues in history, languages and literatures, and philosophy. She also consults with scientists – particularly environmental science teams – about communicating their findings for policy. In this episode of Room 42 we discuss how an English Professor ended up in a chicken coop. A humanist, a social scientist, and a nitrogen/ammonia scientist specializing in flow across air, soil, and water systems walk into a poultry house... What happens next? What can an environmental humanist offer to specialized interdisciplinary environmental science for policy deliberation? Scientists use scientific methods; many humanists use stasis theory, a method used by scholars to work on the human dimensions of wicked problems, such as the environmentally destructive ammonia pollution from poultry production on the Delmarva Peninsula. The choices that poultry farmers make can be a large part of the solution to reducing the ammonia pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. But how do you convey the science and the choices in the most effective way? Human values and viewpoints are central to decision making and those are best understood with humanities and social science tools, like Q-Methodology (Q). Using Q, you can probe human subjectivity and gain a deeper insight into priorities and decision making of your audience. In this session, we’ll talk about how humanistic cartoons on cards helped make clear these farmer’s attitudes to themselves, to scientists, and others. Learn how to communicate effectively to the people who hold the power of change; how to craft information that helps them understand the science behind the results of their choices; and how changes can help solve environmental challenges while maintaining their priorities. For transcript, links, and show notes: https://tccamp.org/episodes/how-humanities-studies-can-help-scientists-communicate-their-findings/

WHEN THE HUNT CALLS
Ep.74: Discussing The Delmarva Peninsula with John Barone

WHEN THE HUNT CALLS

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 55:44


On this episode, I welcome back John Barone. The topic? The Delmarva Peninsula and the rising sea level that threatens the area. John wrote a piece about it for Meateater last month and we sit down to discuss the article. You can read the article here: https://www.themeateater.com/conservation/public-lands-and-waters/rise-of-ghosts-the-fight-to-save-the-easts-coastal-forests Don't forget to leave a 5 star rating, follow the podcast, AND share this episode via your favorite social media platform. SHOW NOTES: Help support the evolution of this podcast and get your Urban Archery NYC gear here: https://urbanarcherynyc.creator-spring.com/?

NDB Media
TRAVEL ITCH RADIO

NDB Media

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 30:00


The State of Maryland is a myriad of attractions old and new. From Annapolis and Baltimore to the Eastern Shore and Delmarva Peninsula, the state benefits from its mid-Atlantic location, benign climate, and multiple transportation opens. It will also be marking multiple major anniversaries that year, including the Bicentennial of Harriet Tubman's birth, the arrival of an enormous steam locomotive at the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad, and the opening of new things to see at the Annapolis Maritime Museum, Mallows Bay Park. Hear more on Thursday, February 17, when TRAVEL ITCH RADIO hosts Dan Schlossberg and Maryellen Nugent Lee interview Tom Riford, assistant secretary of commerce for the State of Maryland. Listen live at 8p EST on iTunes or BlogTalkRadio.com or check out the archived show on Facebook after airing.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

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BookSpeak Network
"Pacific Sniper" Author David Healey is Tory's Guest on the BPP Show!

BookSpeak Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 58:00


An author, journalist, and educator, David Healey has proven himself prolific, in both the fiction and non-fiction worlds. "Pacific Sniper" is the latest in a series of novels that looks down the sight of that particular specialist, both from the American and Japanese perspectives, in an island battle.  Healey's writings take us through world and civil wars, step into the Young Adult vein with the Sea Lord books, and history of the Chesapeake Bay and Delmarva Peninsula. A newspaper reporter and editor, Healey's articles have appeared in "The Washington Times," "American History," "Chesapeake Bay Magazine" and "Running Times." He is also a speaker on numerous historical and writing topics.

Bootstrapping Your Dreams Show
#237 Innovate and discover your potential | Lt. Col. JJ Snow

Bootstrapping Your Dreams Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 42:50


Shownotes (0:55) Introduction -Colonel Jennifer JJ snow is the Chief Technology Officer at the United States Air Force. AFWERX is a United States Air Force program with the goal of fostering a culture of innovation within the service. It is intended to engage inter and extra service innovators and entrepreneurs in the operations of the United States Air Force.Jennifer serves as the government representative for technology outreach, and engagement on behalf of the command and 756 interagency action officers spanning 40 different government agencies. Snow has over 23 years of experience of successful federal civil, civilian and military leadership and management experience.She's a top innovative and focused individual recognized for the ability to consistently overcome obstacles in the defense and intelligence community. Jennifer's background is in counter prolexic approach can pronounce that counter proliferation. And that counterterrorism operations, which includes tours and deployments with Air Force, Special Operations Command special tactics, Joint Special Operations Command, the 17th training wing National Security Agency, which is known as NSA generally, junior officer crypto cryptologic, career programme, serving seventh intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance. JJ's work has been presented to the members of the National Security Council and the White House and key senior leaders across the department Department of Defence, intelligence community, and interagency to inform and highlight emerging risks and opportunities in involving technology, and technology influence environments. In our current role at AFWERX.JJ serves as the military representative for technology outreach and engagement, bridging the gap between government and various technology communities to improve collaboration and communications, foster a culture of innovation, identify smart solutions to wicked problems, and guide the development of future technologies to benefit the US Air Force Department of Defence, interagency and allied partners. JJ truly believes that anyone can be an innovator no matter their age or background. According to her, the best innovation stories exude passion, vision, and cross-cutting impact. The interview-(4:03)1. Can you tell us about your journey? I mean, you started off as a science fiction writer, you were doing so many things and now you're pushing the boundaries of technology for the United States Air Force and innovating. All these amazing things. So please help us get to know you better.(4:28) I actually started off with Fish and Wildlife Service as a wildland firefighter and a park ranger. Five years and my love of technology came through there. I was using radio telemetry to track endangered squirrel populations on the Delmarva Peninsula, sturgeons, up and down the Chesapeake Bay to study their migration. So a lot of the technologies that I started to play around with started in the Fish and Wildlife Service, and then I joined the Air Force.They were a part of the plan to pay for a master's degree and actually go back to the FBI, which is a completely different story. But doing that, I decided that, hey, I really love this and I want to stay on board as an intelligence officer where I'm looking at different types of technologies. What are the risks that they pose? What are some of the opportunities that they bring? And then how do we bring that together, you know, on behalf of national security, and then that led to my cuSupport the show (https://tetranoodle.com)

Danger on Delmarva
Minisode - Facades, Flowbird, Fireworks and the Fourth

Danger on Delmarva

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 25:53


Let's explore the happenings of the 4th of July weekend on the Delmarva Peninsula. While we were all hoping things would get back to normal, I hope that this is not the new normal.   Contact: DangerinDelaware@gmail.com (1) Danger on Delmarva | Facebook   or search for @dangerondelmarva on Facebook   Sources   https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/45-foot-chunk-of-hotel-facade-falls-onto-rehoboth-boardwalk-no-injuries/2723607/   https://apnews.com/article/technology-194cfea45ffc77adef12cca321132013   https://foxbaltimore.com/news/local/planned-blasts-may-happen-in-ocean-city-during-fireworks-explosion-cleanup   https://mdcoastdispatch.com/2021/07/06/software-glitch-results-in-free-parking-for-many-over-holiday-weekend/   https://www.oceancitytoday.com/news/ocean-city-concludes-investigation-into-fireworks-fiasco   /www.oceancity.com/downtown-fireworks-canceled-after-unintentional-explosion/   https://www.oceancitytoday.com/news/update-coastal-highway-fully-opens-after-water-main-burst/article_8d088d04-dc37-11eb-ae32-afc5c7b6cf19.html   https://www.oceancity.com/massive-error-ocean-city-tourists-charged-repeatedly-for-parking-bank-accounts-wiped-town-responding/   https://www.cnn.com/2021/07/04/us/fireworks-ocean-city-maryland-accident-explosion/index.html   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assawoman_Bay#:~:text=Assawoman%20Bay%20   https://ktla.com/news/local-news/south-l-a-community-leaders-call-for-city-to-compensate-residents-still-displaced-by-fireworks-explosion/   https://www.chincoteague.com/ponies.html   https://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2021/07/09/4-year-old-mare-dies-after-hit-and-run-crash-in-assateague-island-national-seashore/   https://thehorse.com/159972/assateague-pony-euthanized-after-being-hit-by-car/   https://countryrebel.com/woman-kicked-by-wild-horse-after-she-hits-it-with-shovel/

302 Lifestyle Beach Podcast
Will Delaware Beach Be Underwater Soon??

302 Lifestyle Beach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 32:10


For this episode of 302lifestylebeachpodcast, we have Storm Chaser Hunter Outten! Hunter Outten is a Meteorological Scientist for 12 years, and also a CEO of DelmarvaWx. W14DK-D (TV Delmarva) Weather Team powered by DelmarvaWx is providing weather coverage and information for the Delmarva Peninsula and Western Shore of Maryland. On this episode he talks about deep insights to the unique Delaware weather, stormchasing, global warming, currently increasing sea levels, weather technological advances, and many more! You can get up with Hunter Outten through facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hunter.outten If you are located within Delmarva Peninsula and the Western Shore of Maryland, you can get your weather coverage by visiting https://www.facebook.com/delmarvawx Tune in to watch the 302 episodes NOW! Keep living the 302 lifestyle, enjoy the beach, live that life!

Allerton Park Bird Club Podcast
David Yeany & Wintering Evening Grosbeak Movement

Allerton Park Bird Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 44:11


Today Nate & Evan go birding with David Yeany, Avian Ecologist for the Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program (PNHP) at the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy (WPC). David has been studying winter movements of Evening Grosbeaks in the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) for the past few years. We discuss the 5 major questions in his study.why do evening grosbeaks keep returning to this area? Do they have true site fidelity? Where do these irruptive populations return to nest? How far and wide do they roam throughout the regional landscape during winter? What can we learn about the timing of their movements? Additionally we get to know exactly how David is tracking these migrants through North America using the MOTUS and nanotags. In this amazing irruptive year for Evening Grosbeaks, we think you will really enjoy the insight David provides on this beautiful species of birds.BIODavid Yeany II serves as Avian Ecologist for the Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program (PNHP) at the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy (WPC). David joined WPC in 2011 and has 16 years of professional experience in conservation biology, conducting ornithological studies throughout Maryland and Pennsylvania. His current work includes avian ecology and monitoring, wildlife-habitat relationship studies, mapping important habitats for rare species, spatial analysis in GIS, and conservation projects for Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN), particularly birds. Some of his projects included shale gas impacts assessments on forest interior birds, bird habitat relationships in the PA Wilds region, statewide high elevation peatland bird surveys and monitoring, statewide grassland bird SGCN surveys, co-founding the Allegheny Bird Conservation Alliance, and collaborating on tracking studies of wintering evening grosbeaks and breeding Swainson’s thrush using nanotag technology and the Motus Wildlife Tracking System. David represents the Natural Heritage Program on the Pennsylvania Biological Survey (PABS) Ornithological Technical Committee. He also has been an active member of the Pennsylvania Ornithological Society since 2012, and during fall 2019, David was elected to the PSO Board of Directors. In 2020, he was elected to a three-year term on the Pennsylvania Ornithological Records Committee (PORC). Prior to joining WPC, David was the Important Bird Areas Coordinator for Audubon Maryland-DC, where he helped identify critical bird habitats, developed conservation strategies for IBAs, and conducted monitoring for at-risk bird populations. In Maryland, his projects included extensive marsh bird surveys in coastal areas of the Chesapeake Bay and Delmarva Peninsula, wintering waterfowl research, forest restoration bird monitoring, and targeted surveys of rare bird species. He has past experience working in the Wildlife Division at Fort Indiantown Gap National Guard Training Center in Annville, PA and for the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry, District 8 (Clarion) conducting wildlife and habitat inventory and research. David holds a Master of Science degree in Applied Ecology and Conservation Biology from Frostburg State University and Bachelors of Science in Biology from Messiah College. David grew up in Forest County and currently lives with his wife, Colleen, and toddler son, Drake, in Allegheny County. Useful Linkshttps://waterlandlife.org/webinars/ - Evening Grosbeak Webinar https://waterlandlife.org/buygrosbeakshirts/ - EVGR shirtshttps://finchnetwork.org/wintering-evening-grosbeak-movements - EVGR article

Delmarva's Own Podcast
Delmarva's Own Black History Authority: Dr. Clara Small

Delmarva's Own Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 54:02


This week we are joined by Dr. Clara Small to help us begin to dig in to the vast treasure-trove of history available to us. Dr. Small is a historian who has dedicated her life to telling the story of black Americans from Delmarva. Professor Emeritus at Salisbury University, Hall spent 36 years teaching history in courses including World Civilizations, Civil Rights in American Society, African American History and related topics. It might be argued that she is the region's foremost scholar on the history of Black America on the Delmarva Peninsula. Dr. Small has authored or co-authored 7 books, with her 8th due out before the leaves bud out on the trees this spring. Titles include: Reality Check: Brief Biographies of African-Americans on Delmarva Compass Points: Profiles & Biographies of African Americans from the Delmarva Peninsula, Volumes 1,2, & 3 [Publication Forthcoming] Co-Authored: Men of Color: To Arms! Manumitted Slaves and Free Blacks from the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland Who Served in the Civil War They Wore Blue and Their Hearts Were Loyal: The United States Colored Troops of Dorchester County Maryland Her work has garnered her acclaim and recognition resulting in numerous awards including: University System of Maryland Regent's Award for Public Service Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore's Frank H. Morris Humanitarian Award The Harriet Tubman Lifetime Achievement Award Dr. Small has also served as a member of the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture. For more information about Dr. Hall and Our discussion today, visit www.delmarvasown.com. We located the music used in this episode on Youtube. Click here for We Will Overcome. Click here for Stand By Me. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-scott3/message

Wealth Through Real Estate Investing
Episode 154 - Opportunities in Student Housing with Nick Simpson

Wealth Through Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2021 19:07


Nick is the founder and CEO of Simpson Building Enterprises. Since graduating from Salisbury University's Perdue School of Business with a bachelor’s degree in Business Management, Nick has built an intimate understanding of the local real estate market and at one time held the largest real estate investment portfolio in Downtown Salisbury. In recent years, Nick developed the concept for The Ross and profitably sold numerous smaller investments to acquire the site and finalize zoning. Having focused on commercial and student housing developments worth over $50M on the Delmarva Peninsula, Nick is well connected and appropriately positioned to oversee the development of The Ross.  Previously, Nick began his entrepreneurial career at age twelve with a lawn care business, selling it prior to starting his undergraduate degree. With the proceeds of the sale, he fully funded his college education, graduated in three years, and started investing in rental properties while in college with a focus on student housing. Nick won the Bernstein Entrepreneurship competition in 2014 and was the highest-grossing salesperson in the U.S. during his 2013 summer internship with Aflac. www.simpsonbuilding.com

Going Dark Theatre
3.9 The Tale of the Skull in the Library

Going Dark Theatre

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2021 52:12


The DelMarVa Peninsula, 1769-1829 - Patty Cannon may be the first female serial killer in the United States. She also led a gang that created a Reverse Underground Railroad for thirty years, selling free Black men, women, and children South into slavery. This episode separates the myth from the truth.

Day Drinking on Delmarva
Press Play and Find Out

Day Drinking on Delmarva

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 30:11


Todd DeHart and Tony Russo talk life and culture on the Delmarva Peninsula.

The Pedalshift Project: Bicycle Touring Podcast
220: Stealth Camp Scouting on the Delmarva Peninsula

The Pedalshift Project: Bicycle Touring Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2020 23:21


A few weeks ago I set out to do some on-the-bike stealth camp scouting for a future tour of the Delmarva Peninsula. Is the eastern shore a good bet for some sneaky no-impact camping? plenty of opportunities, not all of them great further north may have more limited opportunity as a lot of the wooded areas are cleared for ag use May be a good option for a mixed paid/stealth tour Spring or fall would be best... lots of traffic and humidity in summer

Unbelievable Real Estate Stories
S2 EP 128: Student Housing Development During COVID with Nick Simpson

Unbelievable Real Estate Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2020 27:12


Today's guest is Nick Simpson, a thriving entrepreneur who started understanding the power of building out your own success at the young age of just 12. Nick focuses on a blended strategy in real estate investing, with 25% on development of student housing, and 75% of investing in existing assets. Listen along today to learn how the process of development works from start to finish, what interesting impacts COVID has made on student housing, and why it's Nick's preferred niche. Asset: Student housing is a unique asset class. Listen along to learn what differentiates this from traditional multifamily, and why it may be advantageous to your portfolio. Process: How does development work, particularly when related to student housing? Nick shares a birds eye view with us of the entire process from start to close, and explains how to ensure timelines are met when working with larger projects and teams. Strategy: How are developments profitable, and what's the ultimate exit strategy for maximum returns? Listen along to learn which strategies are most common within the student housing industry, and how to build advantages into place early on to ensure your success. Are you looking for your next investment opportunity? Our current new deal, Element 41*, is nearly full! View the Deal Overview and details here: https://www.ellieperlman.com/active-deals Nick's Bio: Nick is the founder and CEO of Simpson Building Enterprises. Since graduating from Salisbury University's Perdue School of Business with a bachelor’s degree in Business Management, Nick has built an intimate understanding of the local real estate market and at one time held the largest real estate investment portfolio in Downtown Salisbury. In recent years, Nick developed the concept for The Ross and profitably sold numerous smaller investments to acquire the site and finalize zoning. Having focused on commercial and student housing developments worth over $50M on the Delmarva Peninsula, Nick is well connected and appropriately positioned to oversee the development of The Ross. Previously, Nick began his entrepreneurial career at age twelve with a lawn care business, selling it prior to starting his undergraduate degree. With the proceeds of the sale, he fully funded his college education, graduated in three years and started investing in rental properties while in college with a focus on student housing. Nick won the Bernstein Entrepreneurship competition in 2014 and was the highest grossing salesperson in the U.S. during his 2013 summer internship with Aflac. How to Contact Nick: Website: www.simpsonbuilding.com Phone: 410-627-4592 *Disclaimer: This opportunity is open to ACCREDITED INVESTORS ONLY. This is a 506C opportunity. This is not an offer to sell securities. Investing involves substantial risks. I do not have any licenses to advise you about investing, suitability for your portfolio, or your personal situation. Always consult your own attorney, CPA, FA, and advisors to assess the suitability of this investment for your portfolio.

Delmarva's Own Podcast
Ferry Operator Ray Hoffman

Delmarva's Own Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2020 32:25


Ray Hoffman operates the Upper Ferry on the Wicomico River. The Upper Ferry is one of three cable ferries on the Delmarva Peninsula. The others are the Whitehaven Ferry, again crossing the Wicomico, and the Woodland Ferry, which crosses the Nanticoke River. Thanks to Tessa Stultz for the new logo! Delmarva's Own website. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-scott3/message

Cozy Ink Podcast
Interview with Andrea J. Johnson

Cozy Ink Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2020 19:01


This episode of Cozy Ink Podcast features an interview with cozy mystery author Andrea J. Johnson. We discuss her cozy mystery series, the Victoria Justice mystery series.Andrea J. Johnson is a freelance entertainment writer for the women’s lifestyle website Popsugar. Her love for insider gossip has led her to take real-life headlines and turn them into mind-bending mysteries. Her debut cozy mystery novel, Poetic Justice, finds inspiration in Delaware’s 2014 drug lab scandal and uses Andrea’s background as a court reporter to explore what would happen if the trial’s stenographer took the law into her own hands.In addition to being a writer, Andrea is a certified shorthand reporter for the State of California and a member of the National Court Reporters Association. She currently resides on the Delmarva Peninsula near the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, which is the backdrop for her new series. She is also a member of Mystery Writers of America, Romance Writers of America, and the Eastern Shore Writers Association. Moreover, she holds a copyediting certification from UC San Diego and an M.F.A. in Writing Popular Fiction from Seton Hill University.She has also written several articles on the craft of writing for such websites such as LitReactor, Funds for Writers, and DIY MFA. When Andrea isn’t developing her stories, she enjoys cuddling up with a piping hot mug of ginger tea and poring over the latest supermarket tabloids.For more information and links to Andrea's work, visit my website.Support the show (https://paypal.me/cozyinkpodcast?locale.x=en_US)

Native Stories
Kyle Harmon on Nanticoke Nation

Native Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2020 57:43


Interviewed by Nanea Lo Kyle Harmon (@xfactorsports22) describes history and his involvement with Nanticoke Nation (www.nanticokeindians.org) He is from Salisbury, Maryland and is a member of the Nanticoke Nation; He currently lives in Columbia, Maryland with his wife Cat and their three children Dominique, Preston, and Julius. Mr. Harmon was elected to serve as a Tribal Council Member in January 2016. He has taken an active role in strengthening the community through education and wellness programs. His term ended in December 2018. He was chosen to serve on the board of directors of Native American Lifelines Inc. in January 2020. He is a veteran teacher and basketball coach of 14 years. Mr. Harmon has done consultation work and travels to schools, organizations, and communities across Turtle Island or Northern America to teach his traditional Indigenous knowledge and Native culture. He is the author of a book Preston Lee Morris: A Soldier, A Man, A Father. Currently writing his second book which is a timeline of Eastern Shore Natives of the Delmarva Peninsula.

NAVASA tracks
Ghidat de Stele

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 7:44


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Borealis

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 3:08


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Omnipresent

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 3:12


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Dis Appear

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 3:20


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
For You

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 3:41


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Don't Own Me

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 3:19


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
On Slaught

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 2:18


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Intravenous

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 3:07


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Color Blind

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 3:12


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Hidden Sun

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 4:26


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Tightly Knotted to a Similar String

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 0:54


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Redusted

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 1:31


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Timeless Visions

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 5:49


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
Star Surfing

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2020 3:36


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

NAVASA tracks
The Lastronaut

NAVASA tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2020 4:11


NAVASA is an electronica altrock duo featuring Tammy Sue Everett and Gregory T. Biribauer, formed in 2014. Tammy grew up in the heart of Pennsylvania and Greg is originally from Toronto, Canada. The pair met in Denver, CO, but are now based out of the Delmarva Peninsula on the US Eastern Shore.

Delmarva Today
Delmarva Today 02-21-2020

Delmarva Today

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2020 60:27


In small towns throughout the Delmarva Peninsula, teams like the Crisfield Crabbers, Snow Hill Tigers, Slaughter Neck Giants, and Delmar Railroaders played baseball to enthusiastic crowds. We'll look at the history of Eastern Shore baseball and a new exhibit at Salisbury University's Nabb Research Center. Delmarva Public Radio's Don Rush spoke with Creston Long, director of the center, about the exhibition. In the second half we reprise an interview with Cynthia Hammer and her book "A Good Case" which takes a look at the home care industry through fiction.

A Toast to the Arts
Caroline Taylor - Author of Death in Delmarva

A Toast to the Arts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2019 30:34


Caroline Taylor discusses “Death in Delmarva.” An investigation leads Daphne Dunn to the Delmarva Peninsula and a woman so desperate to cover her crimes against undocumented workers that she will kill anyone in her way, including the girl who is quite possibly Daphne's mirror image, Charlie. www.CarolineStories.com Featured music is "Highway" by The Cravens at www.CravenSongs.com Thank you to www.JKSCommunications.com for sponsoring this segment.

Big Blend Radio
Big Blend Radio Authors Happy Hour Show

Big Blend Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2019 89:00


Join Nancy J. Reid and Lisa D. Smith, the mother-daughter travel team and publishers of Big Blend Magazines, for Big Blend Radio’s Authors Happy Hour Show. ON THIS EPISODE: - J. B. Jamison discusses his “Skwerdlock” children's series that encourages imagination and self-expression, and his Emily Graham adult mystery series that tackles danger as thrilling adventures continue. - Caroline Taylor discusses “Death in Delmarva.” An investigation leads Daphne Dunn to the Delmarva Peninsula and a woman so desperate to cover her crimes against undocumented workers that she will kill anyone in her way, including the girl who is quite possibly Daphne's mirror image, Charlie. - Featured music is by Allison August, Peggy James, The Cravens. Thanks to JKS Communications for sponsoring this show!

The MeatEater Podcast
Ep. 089: Ghost of the Marsh

The MeatEater Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2017 108:29


The Delmarva Peninsula, MD- Steven Rinella talks with Marcia Pradines of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge; Maryland Deer Biologist Brian Eyler; avid Sika hunter Steve Kendrot; and Janis Putelis of the MeatEater crew.Subjects Discussed: The pronunciation and origins of Sika deer; scoutin' in a bag; the health of Sika deer; the Delmarva peninsula; the good ol' days of Sika deer hunting; the millinery trade; bag limits, regulations, baiting, and their compatibility with wildlife conservation; woodsmanship, fair chase, and other personal ethics; controlling Phragmites and marsh migration; the little-shittin antlers on a Sika deer; the Delmarva fox squirrel as a bad mofo (redux); EHD and Blue Tongue; and more.

Roughly Speaking
The naturalists: Teddy Roosevelt and Nick Carter (episode 130)

Roughly Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2017 47:32


In this podcast, the stories of two naturalists — Nick Carter, who lives at the headwaters of the Choptank River, the longest river on the Eastern Shore of Maryland; and Theodore Roosevelt, the nation's 26th president and a lifelong naturalist.2:38: Tom Horton, long-time environmental writer and author, tells the story of the Choptank River on the Delmarva Peninsula and Nick Carter, the naturalist who lives on an old farm at its headwaters. Carter does a wonderful thing for the river – he does nothing. Horton explains in his new book, "Choptank Odyssey: Celebrating a Great Chesapeake River," with photos by Dave Harp.20:56: One of the nation’s great naturalists was also its 26th president, Teddy Roosevelt. He developed an interest in nature when he was a boy and maintained the fascination through his life. Our guest is Darrin Lunde, a museum naturalist who works at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington. He is the author of "The Naturalist: Theodore Roosevelt, A Lifetime of Exploration and the Triumph of American Natural History."Links:http://www.schifferbooks.com/choptank-odyssey-celebrating-a-great-chesapeake-river-5867.htmlhttp://crownpublishing.com/news/naturalist-darrin-lunde/#.V5o0GdIrK70

The MeatEater Podcast
Ep. 088: Conservation Through Eradication

The MeatEater Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2017 117:50


The Delmarva Peninsula, MD- Steven Rinella talks with wildlife biologist Steve Kendrot of the Chesapeake Bay Nutria Eradication Project, along with Janis Putelis of the MeatEater crew.     Subjects Discussed: back nipples; all about nutria; why an airport needs a wildlife biologist; high-quality muskrat pelts; nutria of the Pacific Northwest; emergent marshes and the changing landscape of the Blackwater Refuge; public backlash over lethal wildlife management techniques; Mute swans as the big bastards of the marsh; defending sentient life; the value of trappers to conservation and their communities; the Delmarva fox squirrel as a bad mofo; and more.   Check out the show notes here for ideas, studies, and materials referenced in this episode.

PAESTA Podcasts
How was Chesapeake Bay formed? - PAESTA Podcast Series: Episode 18

PAESTA Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2016 3:08


You Asked, We Answered! Transcript of the podcast Hello everyone, this is Jeff Steinmann. I am a sophomore at Penn State Brandywine. Today I am going to tell everyone about how the Chesapeake Bay was formed. The Chesapeake Bay was formed billions of years ago in Maryland. There are three different events that went into the forming of the Chesapeake Bay, which include: an asteroid hitting the earth, massive glacier forming, and the warming of Earth. Scientist are not sure if what hit the earth was a comet or an asteroid. Scientist are certain that the comet or asteroid, hit the earth about thirty five million years ago. [1] Scientist say that the asteroid or comet impact zone was off the Delmarva Peninsula. This peninsula connects Delaware, portions of Maryland, and portions of Virginia together. The comet or asteroid that formed the Chesapeake Bay formed a crater that is fifty five miles wide. [1] The crater formed the shape of the land for the Chesapeake Bay. There are two more events left to form the Chesapeake Bay as we know it today. The second event that helped form the Chesapeake Bay was the massive glacier forming. Scientist say the glacier formed about ten to two million years ago. Between this time a series of ice was formed from the ice age and extended the coastline about one hundred and eighty miles closer. [1] With the expanding of the coastline the next event made the forming of the Chesapeake Bay occur faster and easier. The last event that completed the formation of the Chesapeake Bay was the warming of Earth. About eighteen thousand years ago the earth begin to warm rapidly, causing the glaciers to melt. [1] With the increase in the amount of water on earth all the rivers and streams expanded. One particular river contributed to the forming of the Chesapeake Bay, and that river is the Susquehanna River, which is located in Pennsylvania. The Susquehanna River flows directly into the Chesapeake Bay, therefore when the glaciers melted the Susquehanna River overflowed into the Chesapeake Bay. The Susquehanna river fed fresh water into the Chesapeake bay, but the river still meets with saltwater closer to the ocean. The mixing of these two types of water classify the Chesapeake Bay as an estuary, which is where salt water and freshwater meet in one place. [3] Without the three events that occurred to form the Chesapeake Bay one of the largest estuaries in the world would not exist today. So many plants and animals rely on the Chesapeake Bay to provide food, water, and shelter everyday. [2] The Chesapeake Bay is habituated by about two thousand seven hundred species of plants and animals. [3] There are about three hundred and forty eight fish and one hundred and seventy three shell fish. [3] Shell fish include species of clams, oysters, crabs, and starfish. With the diverse amount of species the Chesapeake Bay produces many jobs and seafood for the United States. Therefore, without the events that impacted the formation of the bay, plants, animals, and people would be struggling without the estuary everyone calls the Chesapeake Bay. I want to thank everyone for listening to my podcast. I hope everyone enjoyed it and learned how the Chesapeake Bay was formed. Thank you and have a great day. (This audio file was recorded by Jeff Steinmann, undergraduate student at Penn State Brandywine, on April 10, 2016. References are in attached transcript.)     https://www.paesta.psu.edu/podcast/how-was-chesapeake-bay-formed-paesta-podcast-series-episode-18

The Travel Hag Podcast
#4 Branson Missouri with interview with Lynn Berry of Branson CVB, Kayaking trails in Maryland

The Travel Hag Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2016 52:44


This week Gaylene talks about BRANSON, Missouri and interviews guest, Lynn Berry, Communications Director for Branson CVB. Mindie discusses to KAYAKING TRAILS ON on the Delmarva Peninsula - flatwater kayaking and also a little bit about STONINGTON, MAINE, the largest archipelago on the North American East Coast. 

The Travel Hag Podcast
#2 Eastern Shore of Maryland, Nebraska Junkjaunt, Oxford Maryland

The Travel Hag Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2016 53:39


Minde talks about the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Delaware and Virginia (also known as Delmarva Peninsula) and talks kayaking, mansions, dining, beaches, historic towns and 73 museums. Gaylene tells about the annual Nebraska Junkjaunt that covers 300 miles of registered vendors selling all kinds of great used wares along Nebraskas most beautiful scenic byways. Guest, Cheryl Lewis, who is Town Manager of Oxford, Maryland tells about the unique opportunities for visitors to her historic Eastern Shore town. 

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over
A Dancer Who Walks for a Living (Rebroadcast) - 7 July 2014

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2014 51:40


You dream of writing the great American novel, but to make ends meet, you spend your days writing boring corporate reports. There's a difference between writing for love and writing for a living—or is there? And does a heyday have anything to do with hay? Did getting dressed to kill originally refer to soldiers? Plus, toad-in-the-hole, deadwoods, due diligence, kibosh, clues, and an election-year word puzzle.FULL DETAILSBeing a writer and making a living as a writer are often two different things. Maybe you're writing poetry at night but by day you're writing technical manuals or web copy. Journalist Michael Erard, whose day job is writing for think tank, describes such a writer as "a dancer who walks for a living." How do you make the transition between the two? How do you inspire yourself all over again to write what you love?What do you call it when you're about to jump into a conversation but someone beats you to it? Mary, a caller and self-described introvert from Indianapolis, calls it getting seagulled, inspired by an episode of The Simpsons in which nerdy Lisa works up the courage to participate in a conversation, but is interrupted at the last second by a screeching seagull.In her new book, The Introvert's Way, author Sophia Dembling refers to this experience as getting steamrolled. A different kind of interruption is getting porlocked, a reference to the visitor from Porlock who interrupted Samuel Taylor Coleridge's reverie while he was writing the poem Kubla Khan and made him lose his train of thought. Have a better term for these unfortunate experiences?Leah from Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, wants to know the origin of the name of the Delmarva Peninsula. It's a portmanteau name, made of parts of the names of the three states represented there: Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. The Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture at Salisbury University is a great source for more information. Do you keep copypasta on your computer? It's that bit of tasty text you keep ready to paste in any relevant email or Facebook post. Grant has a great one for language lovers, based on eggcorns, those words or phrases that get switched to things that sound the same. Mustard up all the strength you can, it's a doggy dog world out there!Our Puzzle Master John Chaneski has a game inspired by the recent election season. From each clue, determine the word that begins with either D-E-M or R-E-P. For example, what's the term for a part of a song that's performed all over again? Try the quiz, and if you think of any others, email us!Naomi, a Missoula, Montana, mom who's writing a magazine essay, wants to know if due diligence is the appropriate term to denote the daily, household chores that her son's new stepdad has taken on. The verdict: it's a legal term. If you're writing about personal experiences, stick with a phrase from a lower register of speech, like daily duties. We think the term due diligence is among those being misused and overused. If you're in a state of confusion, you might say I don't know if I'm Arthur or Martha. It's a slang phrase for "I'm confused" that you might hear in Australia or New Zealand, according to the Collins Dictionary.If you're dressed to kill, you're looking sharp. But does the expression have to do with medieval chivalry, or military armor of any kind? Nope. The earliest cases pop up in text in the 1800s, based on the trend of adding the words to kill onto verbs to mean something's done with force and passion and energy.If you've got crummy handwriting, you might say that it looks like something written with a thumbnail dipped in tar. But go ahead, dip that thumbnail and write to us anyway. If you've got notable handwriting of any sort, we want to see it!When you put the kibosh, or kybosh, on something, you're putting a speedy end to it. This term, usually pronounced KYE-bosh, first shows up in print when Charles Dickens used in in 1836, writing under the pseudonym Boz. In that piece, it was spoken by a cockney fellow.Martha shares a favorite poem, "The Bagel," by David Ignatow. Who wouldn't like to feel "strangely happy with myself"? This and other gems can be found in Billy Collins' book Poetry 180. For you writers toiling away at your day job, heed the advice of Zadie Smith: "Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never being satisfied." Wait, what? There has to be some satisfaction in this! Write to us about the simple pleasure that you find in the craft.Five guys walk into a diner. One orders a toad in the hole, another the gashouse eggs, the third gets eggs in a basket, the next orders a hole in one, and the last fellow gets spit in the ocean. What does each wind up with? The same thing! Although toad in the hole can refer to a sausage-in-Yorkshire pudding dish, it's also among the many names for a good old-fashioned slice of bread with a hole in it, fried with an egg in that hole, including one-eyed jack and pirate's eye.When something's in its heyday, its in its prime. What does that have to do with hay? Nothing, actually. It goes back to the 1500s, when heyday and similar-sounding words were simply expressions of celebration or joy. Grant is especially fond of the Oxford English Dictionary's first citation for this term, from the John Skelton's Magnyfycence, published around 1529: Rutty bully Ioly rutterkin heyda.Editors are great for picking up those double the's and similar mistakes, known as eye-skip errors.Do you refer to complimentary tickets to an event as Annie Oakleys? Or deadwoods, perhaps? The term Annie Oakley supposedly comes from a punched ticket's resemblance to bullet-riddled cards from the sharpshooter's Wild West shows. Deadwood is associated with the old barroom situation where you'd buy a paper drink ticket from one person and give it to the bartender. If you were in good favor with him, he might hand it back to you—that is, the piece of paper, or the dead piece of wood.In one of history's greatest stories about yarn, Theseus famously made it back out of the deadly Minotaur's labyrinth by unspooling a ball of yarn so he could retrace his steps. In Middle English, such rolled-up yarn was called a clewe. Eventually, clew took on the metaphorical meaning of something that will lead you to a solution. Pretty soon, the spelling was changed to clue, and now we've got that awesome board game and of course, that blue pooch and his bits of evidence.This episode was hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette, and produced by Stefanie Levine.....Support for A Way with Words comes from The Ken Blanchard Companies, celebrating 35 years of making a leadership difference with Situational Leadership II, the leadership model designed to boost effectiveness, impact, and employee engagement. More about how Blanchard can help your executives and organizational leaders at kenblanchard.com/leadership.--A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donateGet your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:Email: words@waywordradio.orgPhone: United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673London +44 20 7193 2113Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donateSite: http://waywordradio.org/Podcast: http://waywordradio.org/podcast/Forums: http://waywordradio.org/discussion/Newsletter: http://waywordradio.org/newsletter/Twitter: http://twitter.com/wayword/Skype: skype://waywordradio Copyright 2014, Wayword LLC.

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over
A Dancer Who Walks for a Living (Rebroadcast) - 15 July 2013

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2013 51:19


You dream of writing the great American novel, but to make ends meet, you spend your days writing boring corporate reports. There's a difference between writing for love and writing for a living—or is there? And does a heyday have anything to do with hay? Did getting dressed to kill originally refer to soldiers? Plus, toad-in-the-hole, deadwoods, due diligence, kibosh, clues, and an election-year word puzzle.FULL DETAILSBeing a writer and making a living as a writer are often two different things. Maybe you're writing poetry at night but by day you're writing technical manuals or web copy. Journalist Michael Erard, whose day job is writing for think tank, describes such a writer as "a dancer who walks for a living." How do you make the transition between the two? How do you inspire yourself all over again to write what you love?What do you call it when you're about to jump into a conversation but someone beats you to it? Mary, a caller and self-described introvert from Indianapolis, calls it getting seagulled, inspired by an episode of The Simpsons in which nerdy Lisa works up the courage to participate in a conversation, but is interrupted at the last second by a screeching seagull.In her new book, The Introvert's Way, author Sophia Dembling refers to this experience as getting steamrolled. A different kind of interruption is getting porlocked, a reference to the visitor from Porlock who interrupted Samuel Taylor Coleridge's reverie while he was writing the poem Kubla Khan and made him lose his train of thought. Have a better term for these unfortunate experiences?Leah from Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, wants to know the origin of the name of the Delmarva Peninsula. It's a portmanteau name, made of parts of the names of the three states represented there: Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. The Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture at Salisbury University is a great source for more information. Do you keep copypasta on your computer? It's that bit of tasty text you keep ready to paste in any relevant email or Facebook post. Grant has a great one for language lovers, based on eggcorns, those words or phrases that get switched to things that sound the same. Mustard up all the strength you can, it's a doggy dog world out there!Our Puzzle Master John Chaneski has a game inspired by the recent election season. From each clue, determine the word that begins with either D-E-M or R-E-P. For example, what's the term for a part of a song that's performed all over again? Try the quiz, and if you think of any others, email us!Naomi, a Missoula, Montana, mom who's writing a magazine essay, wants to know if due diligence is the appropriate term to denote the daily, household chores that her son's new stepdad has taken on. The verdict: it's a legal term. If you're writing about personal experiences, stick with a phrase from a lower register of speech, like daily duties. We think the term due diligence is among those being misused and overused. If you're in a state of confusion, you might say I don't know if I'm Arthur or Martha. It's a slang phrase for "I'm confused" that you might hear in Australia or New Zealand, according to the Collins Dictionary.If you're dressed to kill, you're looking sharp. But does the expression have to do with medieval chivalry, or military armor of any kind? Nope. The earliest cases pop up in text in the 1800s, based on the trend of adding the words to kill onto verbs to mean something's done with force and passion and energy.If you've got crummy handwriting, you might say that it looks like something written with a thumbnail dipped in tar. But go ahead, dip that thumbnail and write to us anyway. If you've got notable handwriting of any sort, we want to see it!When you put the kibosh, or kybosh, on something, you're putting a speedy end to it. This term, usually pronounced KYE-bosh, first shows up in print when Charles Dickens used in in 1836, writing under the pseudonym Boz. In that piece, it was spoken by a cockney fellow.Martha shares a favorite poem, "The Bagel," by David Ignatow. Who wouldn't like to feel "strangely happy with myself"? This and other gems can be found in Billy Collins' book Poetry 180. For you writers toiling away at your day job, heed the advice of Zadie Smith: "Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never being satisfied." Wait, what? There has to be some satisfaction in this! Write to us about the simple pleasure that you find in the craft.Five guys walk into a diner. One orders a toad in the hole, another the gashouse eggs, the third gets eggs in a basket, the next orders a hole in one, and the last fellow gets spit in the ocean. What does each wind up with? The same thing! Although toad in the hole can refer to a sausage-in-Yorkshire pudding dish, it's also among the many names for a good old-fashioned slice of bread with a hole in it, fried with an egg in that hole, including one-eyed jack and pirate's eye.When something's in its heyday, its in its prime. What does that have to do with hay? Nothing, actually. It goes back to the 1500s, when heyday and similar-sounding words were simply expressions of celebration or joy. Grant is especially fond of the Oxford English Dictionary's first citation for this term, from the John Skelton's Magnyfycence, published around 1529: Rutty bully Ioly rutterkin heyda.Editors are great for picking up those double the's and similar mistakes, known as eye-skip errors.Do you refer to complimentary tickets to an event as Annie Oakleys? Or deadwoods, perhaps? The term Annie Oakley supposedly comes from a punched ticket's resemblance to bullet-riddled cards from the sharpshooter's Wild West shows. Deadwood is associated with the old barroom situation where you'd buy a paper drink ticket from one person and give it to the bartender. If you were in good favor with him, he might hand it back to you—that is, the piece of paper, or the dead piece of wood.In one of history's greatest stories about yarn, Theseus famously made it back out of the deadly Minotaur's labyrinth by unspooling a ball of yarn so he could retrace his steps. In Middle English, such rolled-up yarn was called a clewe. Eventually, clew took on the metaphorical meaning of something that will lead you to a solution. Pretty soon, the spelling was changed to clue, and now we've got that awesome board game and of course, that blue pooch and his bits of evidence.This episode was hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette, and produced by Stefanie Levine.....Support for A Way with Words also comes from National University, which invites you to change your future today. More at http://www.nu.edu/.--A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donateGet your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:Email: words@waywordradio.orgPhone: United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673London +44 20 7193 2113Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donateSite: http://waywordradio.org/Podcast: http://waywordradio.org/podcast/Forums: http://waywordradio.org/discussion/Newsletter: http://waywordradio.org/newsletter/Twitter: http://twitter.com/wayword/Skype: skype://waywordradio Copyright 2013, Wayword LLC.

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over
A Dancer Who Walks for a Living - 19 November 2012

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2012 51:26


You dream of writing the great American novel, but to make ends meet, you spend your days writing boring corporate reports. There's a difference between writing for love and writing for a living—or is there? And does a heyday have anything to do with hay? Did getting dressed to kill originally refer to soldiers? Plus, toad-in-the-hole, deadwoods, due diligence, kibosh, clues, and an election-year word puzzle.FULL DETAILSBeing a writer and making a living as a writer are often two different things. Maybe you're writing poetry at night but by day you're writing technical manuals or web copy. Journalist Michael Erard, whose day job is writing for think tank, describes such a writer as "a dancer who walks for a living." How do you make the transition between the two? How do you inspire yourself all over again to write what you love?What do you call it when you're about to jump into a conversation but someone beats you to it? Mary, a caller and self-described introvert from Indianapolis, calls it getting seagulled, inspired by an episode of The Simpsons in which nerdy Lisa works up the courage to participate in a conversation, but is interrupted at the last second by a screeching seagull.In her new book, The Introvert's Way, author Sophia Dembling refers to this experience as getting steamrolled. A different kind of interruption is getting porlocked, a reference to the visitor from Porlock who interrupted Samuel Taylor Coleridge's reverie while he was writing the poem Kubla Khan and made him lose his train of thought. Have a better term for these unfortunate experiences?Leah from Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, wants to know the origin of the name of the Delmarva Peninsula. It's a portmanteau name, made of parts of the names of the three states represented there: Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. The Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture at Salisbury University is a great source for more information. Do you keep copypasta on your computer? It's that bit of tasty text you keep ready to paste in any relevant email or Facebook post. Grant has a great one for language lovers, based on eggcorns, those words or phrases that get switched to things that sound the same. Mustard up all the strength you can, it's a doggy dog world out there!Our Puzzle Master John Chaneski has a game inspired by the recent election season. From each clue, determine the word that begins with either D-E-M or R-E-P. For example, what's the term for a part of a song that's performed all over again? Try the quiz, and if you think of any others, email us!Naomi, a Missoula, Montana, mom who's writing a magazine essay, wants to know if due diligence is the appropriate term to denote the daily, household chores that her son's new stepdad has taken on. The verdict: it's a legal term. If you're writing about personal experiences, stick with a phrase from a lower register of speech, like daily duties. We think the term due diligence is among those being misused and overused. If you're in a state of confusion, you might say I don't know if I'm Arthur or Martha. It's a slang phrase for "I'm confused" that you might hear in Australia or New Zealand, according to the Collins Dictionary.If you're dressed to kill, you're looking sharp. But does the expression have to do with medieval chivalry, or military armor of any kind? Nope. The earliest cases pop up in text in the 1800s, based on the trend of adding the words to kill onto verbs to mean something's done with force and passion and energy.If you've got crummy handwriting, you might say that it looks like something written with a thumbnail dipped in tar. But go ahead, dip that thumbnail and write to us anyway. If you've got notable handwriting of any sort, we want to see it!When you put the kibosh, or kybosh, on something, you're putting a speedy end to it. This term, usually pronounced KYE-bosh, first shows up in print when Charles Dickens used in in 1836, writing under the pseudonym Boz. In that piece, it was spoken by a cockney fellow.Martha shares a favorite poem, "The Bagel," by David Ignatow. Who wouldn't like to feel "strangely happy with myself"? This and other gems can be found in Billy Collins' book Poetry 180. For you writers toiling away at your day job, heed the advice of Zadie Smith: "Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never being satisfied." Wait, what? There has to be some satisfaction in this! Write to us about the simple pleasure that you find in the craft.Five guys walk into a diner. One orders a toad in the hole, another the gashouse eggs, the third gets eggs in a basket, the next orders a hole in one, and the last fellow gets spit in the ocean. What does each wind up with? The same thing! Although toad in the hole can refer to a sausage-in-Yorkshire pudding dish, it's also among the many names for a good old-fashioned slice of bread with a hole in it, fried with an egg in that hole, including one-eyed jack and pirate's eye.When something's in its heyday, its in its prime. What does that have to do with hay? Nothing, actually. It goes back to the 1500s, when heyday and similar-sounding words were simply expressions of celebration or joy. Grant is especially fond of the Oxford English Dictionary's first citation for this term, from the John Skelton's Magnyfycence, published around 1529: Rutty bully Ioly rutterkin heyda.Editors are great for picking up those double the's and similar mistakes, known as eye-skip errors.Do you refer to complimentary tickets to an event as Annie Oakleys? Or deadwoods, perhaps? The term Annie Oakley supposedly comes from a punched ticket's resemblance to bullet-riddled cards from the sharpshooter's Wild West shows. Deadwood is associated with the old barroom situation where you'd buy a paper drink ticket from one person and give it to the bartender. If you were in good favor with him, he might hand it back to you—that is, the piece of paper, or the dead piece of wood.In one of history's greatest stories about yarn, Theseus famously made it back out of the deadly Minotaur's labyrinth by unspooling a ball of yarn so he could retrace his steps. In Middle English, such rolled-up yarn was called a clewe. Eventually, clew took on the metaphorical meaning of something that will lead you to a solution. Pretty soon, the spelling was changed to clue, and now we've got that awesome board game and of course, that blue pooch and his bits of evidence.This episode was hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette, and produced by Stefanie Levine.....Support for A Way with Words also comes from National University, which invites you to change your future today. More at http://www.nu.edu/.We're also grateful for support from the University of San Diego. Since 1949, USD has been on a mission not only to prepare students for the world, but also to change it. Learn more about the college and five schools of this nationally ranked, independent Catholic university at http://sandiego.edu.--A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donateGet your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:Email: words@waywordradio.orgPhone: United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673London +44 20 7193 2113Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donateSite: http://waywordradio.org/Podcast: http://waywordradio.org/podcast/Forums: http://waywordradio.org/discussion/Newsletter: http://waywordradio.org/newsletter/Twitter: http://twitter.com/wayword/Skype: skype://waywordradio Copyright 2012, Wayword LLC.