Podcasts about Northampton County

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Best podcasts about Northampton County

Latest podcast episodes about Northampton County

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 27, 2021: Groups sue Charlottesville to stop Jefferson School Center from receiving Lee statue; Charlottesville planning for resilience with RGGI funds

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 10:43


The final week of 2021 begins with a slight pause on government meetings at the local and state level, but there’s always something to document in every edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement. What phrase would you use to describe the week between Christmas and New Year’s? Boxing Week? Witching Week? Charlottesville Community Engagement is looking for a few more subscribers, each and every day! Sign up for free and decide later how you might want to contribute! On today’s program:A lawsuit has been filed to stop a Confederate statue from being given to the Jefferson School Center for African American HeritageScottsville and Charlottesville have both received additional funding from a cap and trade program to pay for flood programs The Nelson County Board of Supervisors hires a consultant to help update the Comprehensive PlanAlbemarle County offering seven drop-off locations for Christmas tree recyclingIn today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out:Winter is here, and now is the time to think about keeping your family warm through the cold Virginia months. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!Pandemic updateAs the week begins, the Virginia Department of Health reports the seven-day average for positive tests has climbed to 14.5 percent this morning and a seven-day average of 6,307 new cases. On Christmas Day, the VDH reported 8,609 new cases and 5,432 cases on Boxing Day. More on the pandemic tomorrow. Statue lawsuitTwo organizations that bid to receive the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee have filed suit in Charlottesville Circuit Court to prevent it from being awarded to the Jefferson School Center for African American Heritage. The center plans to melt the statue down and made into a new public work of art. The petition for injunction filed December 22 on behalf of the Trevillian Station Battlefield Foundation and the Ratcliffe Foundation argues that City Council overstepped its authority when it voted 4-0 in the early hours of December 7 to choose the center. “The City can legally remove, relocate, contextualize, or cover the Lee monument, but the General Assembly denied the City authority to alter or destroy,” reads the argument, which also names the center as a defendant. “A foundry is not a museum, historical society, government, or military battlefield, which are the only lawful recipients for placement of a relocated monument.”The plaintiffs seek voidance of the award and to prevent the Center from submitting another one. Alternatively they seek damages or restoration of the statue. The suit claims the city broke the Freedom of Information Act and its own procurement rules. (read the petition here)The 2020 General Assembly passed legislation allowing localities to decide for themselves if they wanted to remove war memorials, which had been protected by state law. The Virginia Supreme Court ruled in April that that state law did not apply to either the Lee statue or another Confederate statue that formerly stood in a city park. (April 1, 2021 opinion in City of Charlottesville v. Payne)Belmont Bridge updateCrews working on the replacement of the Belmont Bridge will take a break today, Thursday and Friday. The Caton Construction Group has been working on removing the eastern span of the bridge, but will take some time off for the holiday, according to a press release from the city. However, work on a waterline between East South Street and Old Avon Street will take place on Tuesday and Wednesday. The work began this past summer after several years of planning and after Council agreed to spend $7.5 million in capital improvement funds to make up a cost over-run. Learn more at the project website at belmont-bridge.com. In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out:Algorithms know how to put songs and artists together based on genre or beats per minute. But only people can make connections that engage your mind and warm your heart. The music on WTJU 91.1 FM is chosen by dozens and dozens of volunteer hosts -- music lovers like you who live right here in the Charlottesville area. Listener donations keep WTJU alive and thriving. In this era of algorithm-driven everything, go against the grain. Support freeform community radio on WTJU. Consider a donation at wtju.net/donate.Nelson County Comprehensive PlanFans of Comprehensive Plan reviews can rejoice now that Nelson County has hired the Berkley Group of Bridgewater to conduct the first update of their plan since 2014. Dylan Bishop is the county’s director of planning and zoning. They’ll be paid $160,000 for the work. “When I first accepted this position two and a half years ago, I was aware that the Comprehensive Plan update was on the horizon,” Bishop said. “Over the last couple of years there have been a few roadblocks with that but it’s also given me a good opportunity to become familiar with the current Comprehensive Plan, zoning ordinance, and subdivision ordinances.”The current plan was written by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission with an entity at the University of Virginia known as the Design Resources Center. (read the 2014 update)Bishop said the current plan does not lead the county’s land use and development decisions, and that that occurs now in the zoning ordinance.“When it’s done correctly, it should be an economic development tool,” Bishop said. “It’s often used as reference for grant applications such as Smart Scale, Virginia Outdoors Foundation grants, when you have something to point to that says our county already supports this.” Nelson County sent out a request for proposals this fall and receive three submissions. Two of the firms were interviewed and staff chose the Berkley Group. Public engagement will begin with a meeting in January.  “Once the final plan is adopted, they will follow it up with another diagnostic of the zoning ordinance and subdivision ordinances,” Bishop said. “They’ll generate recommendations that will make it consistent with our Comprehensive Plan. That will be the enforcement tool to set the vision of the comp plan as the years go on.” The Berkley Group is currently working on the Comprehensive Plan updates in Richmond County and Greensville County. They’ve recently concluded work in Northampton County and the city of Lexington. (Watch the Nelson BOS meeting)Charlottesville, Scottsville, receive flood-prevention funds Governor Ralph Northam has awarded an additional $24.5 million to help Virginia localities prepare for weather events associated with a changing climate. The money comes from Virginia’s proceeds from participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin has said he would end through an executive order after he takes office. In the meantime in this round, Charlottesville will receive $94,276 for “resilience planning and staff training” and the town of Scottsville will receive $123,346 for a planning study. Both communities were among 30 applicants for the second round of the Community Flood Preparedness Fund. In October, Charlottesville was awarded $153,500 in the first round for a project to create a two-dimensional model for the Moores Creek watershed. (Charlottesville awarded $153K for flood study from RGGI funds, October 6, 2021)Virginia became the first southern state to join RGGI in 2020 and has received $227,636,583.52 in the four auctions it has been a part of so far. Utility generators have to purchase credits to exceed a certain threshold of carbon emissions. Forty-five percent of the proceeds go to the Community Flood Preparedness Fund. According to their application, the city will put the money towards a Charlottesville Resilience Plan that will include taking an inventory of existing plans, identifying hazards and threats, and assessing vulnerabilities. “The City is applying for these grant funds to contract with an expert consultant to facilitate planDevelopment,” reads the application. “The consultant will co-create the plan at facilitated workshops with the City’s Resilience Team staff to increase staff expertise and capabilities.” The schedule anticipates the plan will be ready in mid-April. Scottsville will use the plan to develop to modernize its plans for dealing with floods. According to the application, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed a levee project in 1988 after a series of devastating floods in the mid-20th century.“This project connects to the town’s history and its future, assuring the continued safety from flooding, and laying the groundwork for new economic development,” reads the project narrative. The document goes on to state the town would like the Federal Emergency Management Agency to adjust the floodplain map to remove the designation for the former Kyosung tire factory in order to make it more attractive to redevelopment. They also want a new hydraulic model for downtown Scottsville. The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation will need to approve both documents. Resources:Charlottesville’s applicationScottsville’s applicationFull list of recipients on the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation’s webpageAlbemarle tree recyclingBeginning today, Albemarle’s Parks and Recreation Department will operate seven places where county residents can drop off Christmas trees for recycling. People are asked to remove all decorations, lights, stands, and nails before they are added to the pile. The trees will be chipped and converted into mulch. That mulch will be available beginning January 24 at both Darden Towe Park and Claudius Crozet Park. The locations:McIntire Recycling Center* – 611 McIntire Rd. Charlottesville, VA 22902Claudius Crozet Park – 1075 Claudius Crozet Park, Crozet, VA 22932Greenwood Community Center – 865 Greenwood Rd. Crozet, VA 22932Chris Greene Lake Park – 4460 Chris Greene Lake Rd. Charlottesville, VA 22911Darden Towe Park – 1445 Darden Towe Park, Charlottesville, VA 22911Scottsville Community Center – 250 Page St. Scottsville, Va 24590Walnut Creek Park – 4250 Walnut Creek Park North Garden, VA 22959Community members are asked not to bring any other yard waste, and are warned that the McIntire Recycling Center may be congested. Support the program!Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

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No Rain Date
NRD Ep. 68: CHC Prevents Drug & Alcohol Abuse Through Education

No Rain Date

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 71:29


On Episode 68 of No Rain Date, we're joined by Lisa Wolff, Manager of Community Engagement for the Center for Humanistic Change. Founded in 1979 and jointly funded by Lehigh and Northampton counties, CHC is dedicated to preventing drug and alcohol abuse via programming that educates and engages local residents from diverse backgrounds. As Lisa explains, young people are particularly at risk from drugs and alcohol, which is why many of the organization's efforts are youth-targeted and mentorship-based. Building resiliency and coping skills is a focus for programming designed for younger children, while HOPE--Heroin & Opioid Prevention Education--is designed to help high school students and adults. CHC not only works with local schools, churches, Scouts and other groups, but also offers presentations that are specifically geared for businesses. Lisa also explains how the organization has adapted to continue serving vulnerable individuals during the COVID pandemic. To learn more about the Center for Humanistic Change, including their available services, visit TheCHC.org. As always, Josh has highlights from the week that was in local news, including an important update on the Saucon Valley School District's updated health and safety plan. No Rain Date is conveniently available for listening and download on iTunes, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Deezer, Tunein, Pocket Casts, Google Podcasts and other apps, in addition to Saucon Source. To learn more about the podcast, suggest an interview subject or share feedback, please email josh@sauconsource.com. No Rain Date is produced each week by Jonny Hart and is a production of Saucon Source LLC. Love No Rain Date? You can help support it by making a voluntary contribution and becoming a Saucon Source member today. Learn more here. And don't forget to sign up to receive the free Saucon Source newsletter three times a week. You'll enjoy the convenience of having the latest news delivered to your inbox every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, as well as peace of mind of knowing you'll never miss another story.

No Rain Date
NRD Ep. 66: Local Partners in Preserving the Lehigh Valley’s Past

No Rain Date

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 67:42


On Episode 66 of No Rain Date, we're joined by Megan van Ravenswaay, Executive Director of the Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, to talk about the society's role in preserving local history, the Sigal Museum in Easton (which is part of NCHGS) and Lehigh Valley Passport to History. Passport to History is a partnership of more than 40 historic sites in and around the Lehigh Valley. All this month, member sites are participating in Lehigh Valley Passport to History Month by hosting special weekend events, with most sites open free of charge (check out the complete schedule of events here). Megan also discusses how COVID-19 has impacted the NCHGS and other local historical societies, as well as how they are working together to broaden the appeal of history from something traditional that "lives on a shelf" to interactive educational experiences that can be enjoyed all ages. As a special incentive for No Rain Date listeners to visit the Sigal Museum, Megan also shares an exclusive CODE you can use to receive free admission to the museum in August. As always, Josh has a news roundup featuring highlights from some of the week's biggest stories, in case you missed them. No Rain Date is conveniently available for listening and download on iTunes, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Deezer, Tunein, Pocket Casts, Google Podcasts and other apps, in addition to Saucon Source. To learn more about the podcast, suggest an interview subject or share feedback, please email josh@sauconsource.com. No Rain Date is produced each week by Jonny Hart and is a production of Saucon Source LLC. Love No Rain Date? You can help support it by making a voluntary contribution and becoming a Saucon Source member today. Learn more here. And don't forget to sign up to receive the free Saucon Source newsletter three times a week. You'll enjoy the convenience of having the latest news delivered to your inbox every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, as well as peace of mind of knowing you'll never miss another story.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 587 (7-26-21): On the Bluffs of Rivers and Other Waters

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:00). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-23-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of July 26, 2021.  This revised episode from August 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC - ~16 sec – instrumental This week, an instrumental selection by a Williamsburg, Virginia, musician sets the stage for exploring a kind of river feature that can be especially prominent geographically and historically.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds.MUSIC - ~32 sec – instrumentalYou've been listening to part of “James and York Bluffs,” by Timothy Seaman on his 1998 album “Celebration of Centuries.”  This tune honors York River State Park, located a few miles north of Williamsburg in James City County, and having—according to the album's liner notes—“a paradise of bluffs.”  River bluffs—also called cliffs, palisades, and other terms—are high, steep, broad banks overlooking a river.    They're found along many Virginia waterways, from Cedar Bluff on the Clinch River in Tazewell County, to Ball's Bluff on the Potomac River in Loudoun County, to Drewry's Bluff on the James River in Chesterfield County.  Bluffs can also form in coastal beach areas, such as along the Chesapeake Bay at Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Wherever they're found, bluffs are products of complicated land and water factors acting at the point of the bluff as well as upstream in a watershed.  In addition, bluffs are history treasures.  They reveal geologic history in layers of ancient sediments; they've been important in the humanhistory of many Virginia settlements and events; and they offer dramatic views of the natural history and heritage of the Commonwealth's waters. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “James and York Bluffs.” MUSIC - ~ 16 sec – instrumentalSHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 173, 8-5-13. “James and York Bluffs,” from the 1998 album “Celebration of Centuries,” copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 320, 6-13-16. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES View of a bluff at York River State Park, March 29, 2011.  Photo courtesy of Timothy Seaman.View from a bluff at York River State Park, November 19, 2010.  Photo courtesy of Timothy Seaman.EXTRA INFORMATION ON RIVER BLUFF-RELATED LOCATIONS IN VIRGINIA Following are some Virginia locations with names related to river bluffs. Ball's Bluff, Potomac River, Loudoun County.Bluff City, New River, Giles County.Bluff Point (part of Colonial Beach), Potomac River, Westmoreland County.Bremo Bluff, James River, Fluvanna County.Cedar Bluff, Clinch River, Tazewell County.Colonial Heights, Appomattox River, Chesterfield County.Drewry's Bluff, James River, Chesterfield County.Madison Heights, James River, Amherst County. SOURCES Used for Audio College of William and Mary, “Geology of Virginia/Cliffs of Westmoreland,” by Chuck Bailey, Aug. 1, 2016, online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/2016/08/01/cliffs-of-westmoreland/. County of Northampton, Virginia, “Beaches/Kiptopeke State Park,” online at http://northampton.hosted.civiclive.com/visitors/tourism/free_things_to_see_and_do/free_recreation/water_recreation/beaches. DeLorme Company of Yarmouth, Maine, Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer, 2000.  National Geographic, “Bluff,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/bluff/. National Park Service/Richmond National Battlefield Park, “Drewry's Bluff,” online at https://www.nps.gov/rich/learn/historyculture/drewrys-bluff.htm. Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority, “Ball's Bluff Battlefield Regional Park,” online at https://www.novaparks.com/parks/balls-bluff-battlefield-regional-park. OntoRichmond.com, “Civil War in Richmond—Drewry's Bluff,” video (1 min./8 sec.) online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IMITTR_wC8. Oxford Dictionary and Thesaurus-American Edition, Oxford University Press, 1996.U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resource Conservation Service, “Glossary of Landform and Geologic Terms,” online (as a PDF) at https://directives.sc.egov.usda.gov/OpenNonWebContent.aspx?content=41992.wba. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers, online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):“How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway;“NPDES Stormwater Program,” online at https://www.epa.gov/npdes/npdes-stormwater-program. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation:“Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu;“Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places:“The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html;“Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo (pages 8-11); available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21 Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 586, 7-19-21. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Water cycle introduction – Episode 191, 12-9-13; and water cycle diagrams reconsidered – Episode 480, 7-8-19. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 585, 7-12-21. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.5.8 – Earth constantly changes. Grades K-5: Earth Resources3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth ScienceES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.

oxford dictionary bay university agency music photo natural earth state audio college north america civil war impact accent dark tech water web status index land rain pond research ocean government education recreation conservation maine chesapeake bay chesapeake snow environment images yarmouth msonormal commonwealth celebration stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence williamsburg arial environmental dynamic national geographic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide waters shenandoah water resources biology northampton rivers grade colorful madison county signature bio drewry geology continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech bluff city atlantic ocean westmoreland bluff glossary natural resources grades k oxford university press environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table centuries james river cosgrove msohyperlink loudoun county smith river usi sections bluffs potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater headwater radford university new river policymakers msobodytext bmp madison heights environmental protection agency epa acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols tennessee river giles county northampton county tmdl westmoreland county geological survey united states history chesterfield county virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
No Rain Date
No Rain Date Ep. 57: Dr. Robert Robinson, An Educator in Equity

No Rain Date

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 64:59


Welcome to Episode 57 of No Rain Date, your weekly local news podcast featuring exclusive interviews with people making a difference in the Lehigh Valley and beyond. On this episode we're happy to welcome Dr. Robert Robinson, Northampton Community College’s inaugural vice president of diversity, equity and inclusion. Dr. Robinson’s background in education begins in his home state of Mississippi, where he faced challenges in receiving an education in his youth. He shares his personal story of overcoming the odds in order to ultimately earn a doctoral degree in instructional leadership from the University of Alabama. In our interview with Dr. Robinson, which begins at 20:57, he also explains how NCC is embracing the principles of diversity, equity and inclusion in ways that will not only enrich and improve the lives of its students, but also benefit all Northampton County residents. As always, Josh has a roundup of all the latest local news stories. No Rain Date is conveniently available for listening and download on iTunes, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Deezer, Tunein, Pocket Casts, Google Podcasts and other apps, in addition to Saucon Source. To learn more about the podcast, suggest an interview subject or share feedback, please email josh@sauconsource.com. No Rain Date is produced each week by Jonny Hart and is a production of Saucon Source LLC. Love No Rain Date? You can help support it by making a voluntary contribution and becoming a Saucon Source member today. Learn more here. And don't forget to sign up for the Saucon Source newsletter. Enjoy the convenience of having the latest news delivered to your inbox every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, as well as peace of mind from knowing you'll never miss another headline. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

No Rain Date
No Rain Date Ep. 48: Jessie Shappell of ITNLehighValley

No Rain Date

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2021 55:08


Welcome to Episode 48 of No Rain Date, your weekly local news podcast featuring interviews with guests from the Lehigh Valley. This week host Josh Popichak is joined by Jessie Shappell, Executive Director of ITNLehighValley, a nonprofit organization which provides affordable transportation services to seniors and visually impaired adults in Northampton and Lehigh counties. In addition to their standard services, ITNLehighValley has partnered with the Bethlehem Health Bureau and Meals on Wheels of the Greater Lehigh Valley on a program which delivers COVID vaccine doses to members of the community who can’t drive. Jessie also shares some details about an ITNLehighValley program that allows seniors to trade in their cars in exchange for rides. Don’t forget that No Rain Date is available for download on iTunes, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Deezer, Tunein, Pocket Casts, Google Podcasts and other apps, in addition to Saucon Source. Each episode features local news highlights, timely information and interviews with people who are making a difference in our community. To learn more about the podcast, suggest an interview subject or share feedback, please email josh@sauconsource.com. No Rain Date is produced by Jonny Hart.

Smart Talk
Smart Talk: Counting the number of lives lost to COVID

Smart Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2021 46:11


Listen to Smart Talk every weekday at 9am and 7pm on WITF 89.5 & 93.3. You can also stream WITF radio live on our website or ask your smart speaker to “Play WITF Radio.” The first COVID death in Pennsylvania was recorded on March 18, 2020 — a Northampton County man whose family was already … Continue reading "Smart Talk: Counting the number of lives lost to COVID"

Black Entrepreneur Experience
BEE 212 Fifth-Generation Cotton Farmer, Puff Daddy of Cotton, Julius Tillery ~ Bonus

Black Entrepreneur Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2020 38:18


We are a business that centers and uplifts the Black community closest to the cotton fields in Northampton County, North Carolina. We create genuine and distinguished home décor, jewelry, and accessories hand-made with cotton that we cultivate and care for. Julius is a native of the Roanoke Valley, North Carolina, and a 5th generation cotton farmer. He founded BlackCotton in 2016 to honor his roots and promote Black-grown cotton. He leads the BlackCotton team from the headquarter in Garysburg, NC, and oversees all matters related to the business and its opportunities. Julius  is the North Carolina State Coordinator for the Black Family Land Trust. His career has focused on working as an advocate and resource provider in the North Carolina agriculture and environmental sectors since 2009. Julius currently serves on Southern SARE’s Administrative Council and the North Carolina Forestry Advisory Council. You can find Julius anywhere between his farm working on producing crops, on another farmer’s farm helping consult with new enterprise development, or any meeting that is focused on improving the lives of farmers and farming communities across the US. Julius is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a degree in Economics and minor in Entrepreneurship.         Website: https://www.blackcotton.us

Out d'Coup Podcast
Out d'Coup LIVE | Tara Zrinski - Candidate for State Rep in Lehigh Valley's PA138th District

Out d'Coup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2020 42:58


On today’s show, I am thrilled to welcome Tara Zrinski to the show. Tara is the Democratic party candidate for State Rep in the Lehigh Valley's 138th State House district in Northampton County. If you haven’t been paying attention to this race yet, now is the time. Tara is campaigning on health care for all, protecting our environment, and protecting our democracy from corruption and the influence of big money. But more than that, she has consulted with workers, nurses, environmentalists, and community organizations to craft integrated policies that put the health of working families and our communities first. (Tara will bring the strength of these organizations to Harrisburg).  Born and raised in Bethlehem, Tara was elected to Northampton County Councilwoman in 2017. She has been an advocate for clean energy and sustainability. She worked as a Solar Energy Consultant for SunPulse Solar, supplementing her adjunct faculty career teaching Philosophy at Northampton Community College, Lehigh County Community College, and Lehigh University. Any Out d’Coup listener will be well acquainted with the challenges faced by adjunct faculty.  Tara is the Chair of the Energy, Environment, and Land Use Committee in Northampton County and a member of the committee of the same name at the County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania. In 2018, she formed the Industrial Hemp Ad Hoc Committee for Industrial Hemp to explore the economic development potential of the emerging crop and identify areas necessitating government support for farmers and industrial hemp business entrepreneurs. In 2015, she self-published her first children's book, "All Ducks Are Birds, But, Not All Birds Are Ducks," a logic book for children which she wrote and illustrated.  Tara just got a big endorsement from Bernie Sanders as part of a battalion of candidates progressives are organizing behind to help take control of the PA House and Senate.  https://www.vote4zrinski.org/ A special shout out to Jonathan Mann who wrote our theme song, “There Are No People in the Future.” Check out all is great stuff on his YouTube page and follow him on Twitter @songadaymann

No Rain Date
No Rain Date Ep. 21: Mayor David Heintzelman & Jessica O’Donnell

No Rain Date

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2020 75:37


Welcome to Ep. 21 of No Rain Date, Saucon Source’s weekly local news and current events podcast. This week our guests are Hellertown mayor and Heintzelman Funeral Home owner David Heintzelman, who joins us to discuss his business’s innovative new on-site event center, as well as topics such as Trick-or-Treat safety in the COVID-19 era; and Jessica O’Donnell, Executive Vice President of Affiliated Chambers at the Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce. The GLVCC has been instrumental in helping local businesses secure grants and loans during the pandemic, and recently assisted with awarding more than $8 million in grants to Northampton County businesses that have been negatively impacted by COVID-19. Both of our guests play important roles in promoting the borough as a great place to live, do business and have fun, and they share their thoughts about new business openings, upcoming open houses and other events in a discussion you’ll surely find informative. Josh has a roundup of all the latest local news, as well as a couple of important messages about listener feedback and becoming a Saucon Source member. If you value our community news, we would appreciate your support!

Lehigh Valley with Love Podcast
The Arc of Lehigh and Northampton Counties | Advocating for Those Disabled | Golf Tournament 9/25/2020

Lehigh Valley with Love Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2020


Check out  www.arcoflehighnorthampton.org and their upcoming golf event www.arcgolfclassic.givesmart.com for more information! We speak with Mitch Lenett, Director Of Development, and Chris Kaklamanis, Events and Marketing Director, at The Arc of Lehigh & Northampton Counties. The Arc of Lehigh and Northampton County’s 36th Annual Allen D. Deibler Memorial Golf Tournament Presented by The Kyle David Group will be held on September 25! “The vision of the organization is that all persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities be fully included in the community with the right to choose where they live, learn, work, and play. The Arc of Lehigh and Northampton Counties is an affiliate of The Arc of Pennsylvania and The Arc of the United States and we are associated to the chapters of The Arc across Pennsylvania. Our local chapter of The Arc took shape in 1967 and we were officially incorporated here in the Lehigh Valley on January 6th, 1975.” This episode is brought to you by Made Possible in the Lehigh Valley  Learn more about how they are telling Lehigh Valley stories and how it can help you! Welcome to the Lehigh Valley with Love Podcast. The aim of this podcast is to connect you to stories and personalities living in or affecting the Lehigh Valley area of Pennsylvania, encompassing the cities of Allentown, Bethlehem, and Easton and many other wonderful communities in-between. We talk to business owners, musicians, authors, students, politicians, and maybe even you. Get all of our links here. Want to be a guest? info@lehighvalleywithlovemedia.com Subscribe to the Lehigh Valley with Love Podcast.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 539 (8-24-20): A Few Noteworthy Numbers about Virginia’s Waters

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2020


Click to listen to episode (5:19) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImages SourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.)Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-21-20.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 24, 2020.  This week’s episode is intended especially for Virginia science students and their teachers in grades 4 and 6, and for anyone interested in water-related numbers. MUSIC - ~ 20 sec – instrumental That’s part of “The Water is Wide,” a traditional Scottish tune, performed by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va.  It sets the stage for exploring some numbers and facts about the wide variety of Virginia’s water resources.  We start with some mystery sounds about water bodies, that is, places that contain surface water.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds, and see if you know these four kinds of water bodies. SOUNDS – ~ 23 sec If you guessed river, stream, lake, and estuary, you’re right! Those were sounds from the James River in Lynchburg; a small stream in Montgomery County; a boat on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County; and waves in the Chesapeake Bay, which is the United States’ largest estuary.  An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal water body where fresh water and salt water mix. According to a 2019 state government report, Virginia has almost 43,000 square miles of surface area, and about 3300 of those square miles are covered by surface waters.  That includes over 100,000 miles of rivers and streams; 160,000 acres in 248 publicly-owned lakes, not counting hundreds of privately-owned lakes or ponds; over 2300 square miles of estuaries; over 1 million acres of wetlands; and 120 miles of Atlantic Ocean coastline. All surface water bodies have an associated watershed, that is, the land area that drains to the water body at any given point.  Small-stream watersheds might cover considerably less than one square mile, while large-river watersheds can cover thousands of square miles, such as the over 10,000 square miles in the James River watershed, almost one-fourth of Virginia’s landscape. Besides surface water, the other main component of water resources is groundwater.  Underground formations of rock or other materials that yield water in wells are called aquifers.  Aquifers occur all over Virginia, varying in rock type, size, depth, and amount of water they hold and yield.  One particularly large example is the Potomac Aquifer, the major source of groundwater in Eastern Virginia; it’s found from Georgia to New Jersey. We know a lot about water in Virginia, but many unknowns—about climate change, groundwater, streams, and more—will probably still be wide-open questions when today’s elementary students have become tomorrow’s scientists. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use his version of “The Water is Wide.”  We close with some more music, with a title appropriate for wandering around to explore Virginia’s great diversity of waters.  Here’s about 20 seconds of “Wandering Boots,” by the Charlottesville- and Nelson County, Va.-based band, Chamomile and Whiskey. MUSIC - ~19 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The version of “The Water is Wide” heard here, from the 2006 album, “Jamestown—On the Edge of a Vast Continent,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.  More information on this traditional tune is available from Jürgen Kloss, “Just Another Tune/‘The Water Is Wide’—The History Of A ‘Folksong’” (July 2012), online at http://www.justanothertune.com/html/wateriswide.html. “Wandering Boots,” from the 2013 album “Wandering Boots,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey, used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at https://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 265, 5-11-15. The sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio as follows:James River at Percival’s Island in Lynchburg, Va., June 15, 2013; small stream flowing through a wetland in Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., July 27, 2016;boat on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va., August 31, 2013;Chesapeake Bay at Kent Island, Maryland, June 22, 2010.Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode. More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES James River at Lynchburg, Va., June15, 2013. Small stream in Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va. (Montgomery County), June 2, 2015.Claytor Lake as seen in Claytor Lake State Park, Pulaski County, Va., September 23, 2012. Chesapeake Bay as seen from the boat ramp in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Va., October 7, 2007.Map of Virginia's major river watersheds, from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia’s Major Watersheds,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “The Estuary,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/ecosystem/the_estuary_system. Hampton Roads Sanitation District, “What is the Potomac Aquifer?” online at https://www.hrsd.com/swift/potomac-aquifer-diminishing-resource. Carrie Jensen et al., “Headwater stream length dynamics across four physiographic provinces of the Appalachian Highlands,” Hydrological Processes, Vol., 31, No., 19, 15 September 2017; accessed online at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/hyp.11259 (subscription may be required).  This research article has some numbers on the watershed area of small streams. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, “Basic Information about Estuaries,” online at https://www.epa.gov/nep/basic-information-about-estuaries. U.S. Geological Survey, “Aquifer Basics,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/ogw/aquiferbasics/index.html. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school:“Aquifers and Groundwater,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/aquifers-and-groundwater?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects; “Groundwater,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater; “Surface Water,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/surface-water;“Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Status of Virginia’s Water Resources – A Report on Virginia’s Water Resources Management Activities,” October 2019, online at https://rga.lis.virginia.gov/Published/2019/RD416/.  This report is the source (Appendix 1 page 30) for the numbers cited in this episode.  The 100,000 miles number used in the audio is the estimate used in the report for non-tidal rivers and streams.For More Information about Water Resources in Virginia or Elsewhere Alan Raflo, “Divide and Confluence,” Virginia Water Central, February 2000, pages 8-11, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. This is a basic introduction to watersheds and to Virginia’s main river basins.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, “How’s My Waterway?” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway.  Formerly called “Surf Your Watershed,” this site allows users to locate watersheds and watershed information across the United States.U.S. Geological Survey, “Virginia and West Virginia Water Science Center,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/va-wv-water. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil_and_water/hu.shtml.  This site provides detailed information on how watersheds are designated, plus access to interactive maps of Virginia’s watersheds. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia’s Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil_and_water/wsheds.shtml. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Watershed Roundtables,” online at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterQualityInformationTMDLs/WatershedRoundtables.aspx.  This site provides access to online information about watershed groups in Virginia’s major river basins.Virginia Department of Health, “Private Well Water Information,” online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/environmental-health/onsite-sewage-water-services-updated/organizations/private-well-water-information/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (DWR), “Rivers and Streams,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/rivers/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Groundwater” and “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject categories; the latter category has entries for specific rivers and other water bodies, including the Chesapeake Bay. Following are links to some episodes on various topics related to this week’s episode. On Geography GenerallyEpisode 265, 5-11-15 – on the subject of geography (used “Wandering Boots”). On Groundwater Episode 75, 8-15-11 and Episode 379, 7-31-17 – on springs. Episode 258, 3-23-15 – on winter precipitation and recharge of groundwater.Episode 306, 3-7-16 – an introduction to groundwater. Episode 534, 7-20-20 – on Eastern Virginia groundwater.On Watersheds Episode 140, 12-10-12 – on early exploration of the Chesapeake Bay and tributary rivers. Episode 156, 4-8-13 – on watershed basics. Episode 209, 4-14-14 – on the Blue Ridge and three major watersheds. Episode 251, 2-2-15 – featuring a musical tour of several river basins.Episode 288, 11-2-15 – on mountain gaps, including their role as watershed divides. Episode 334, 9-19-16 – featuring a quiz on rivers and watersheds, covering major Virginia river basins.Episode 397, 12-4-17 – on headwater streams and related research. On Estuaries Episode 326, 7-25-16 – an introduction to estuaries. On Wetlands Episode 429, 7-16-18 – an introduction to marshes and other kinds of wetlands. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION This episode is intended to support specifically the following Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs).2010 Science SOLs Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme 4.9 – Virginia natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms. Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme 6.7 – natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems; Virginia watersheds, water bodies, and wetlands; health and safety issues; and water monitoring. Earth Science Course ES.8 – influences by geologic processes and the activities of humans on freshwater resources, including identification of groundwater and major watershed systems in Virginia, with reference to the hydrologic cycle. Following are some other SOLs that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2013 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2010 Science SOLsGrades K-6 Earth Patterns, Cycles, and Change Theme 3.9 – Water cycle, including sources of water, energy driving water cycle, water essential for living things, and water limitations and conservation. Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme 6.9 – public policy decisions related to the environment (including resource management and conservation, land use decisions, hazard mitigation, and cost/benefit assessments). 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme 1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms. Grades K-3 Economics Theme 2.8 – natural, human, and capital resources. Virginia Studies Course VS.10 – knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. World Geography Course WG.2 – how selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth’s surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.

Straight Talk with Dean and Marc
Replay from 03.25.19 - Black Cotton and Raleigh Little Theatre

Straight Talk with Dean and Marc

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2020 119:58


Julius Tillery has innovative thoughts on Cotton.... On his website, he says "Black Cotton, a company that is going to change the game for you, me, all of us. Black Cotton comes from us, and is meant for us! For many years, cotton was the number one crop our people produced in the South, by our hands and feet, for no wage or compensation. After the Emancipation Proclamation, many of our ancestors made mere pennies off of the cotton produced from sharecropping. What’s worse, for the amount of money that’s made in the same industry today, black cotton farms are still making just pennies compared to the billions earned by their counterparts.I grew up in this system of poverty cotton farming. My farm home county of Northampton County in North Carolina is one of the poorest performers of economic health in the state by county, but it’s also ranked number two in the state for cotton production. Are we raising crops for our communities to suffer? As a black farmer, it has been depressing to see each year go by with farming communities struggling and deteriorating, while our efforts continue to be exploited across the world for others to profit."   we look forward to our discussion about how business is going, and what he feels the future is like for Black Farmers...   The number to call is 6466688393 and we hope that you wil tell your friends and family to join us in this discussion on black farming and it's merits and benefits...Who knows we might even motivate someone into farmingAlso joining us will be Charles Phaneuf of one of our premiere theatre companies....I first met Charles when he was a student from D.C. coming down to work at Durham Arts Council and have been impressed by his work ever since..

Straight Talk with Dean and Marc
Replay from 03.25.19 - Black Cotton and Raleigh Little Theatre

Straight Talk with Dean and Marc

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2020 119:58


Julius Tillery has innovative thoughts on Cotton.... On his website, he says "Black Cotton, a company that is going to change the game for you, me, all of us. Black Cotton comes from us, and is meant for us! For many years, cotton was the number one crop our people produced in the South, by our hands and feet, for no wage or compensation. After the Emancipation Proclamation, many of our ancestors made mere pennies off of the cotton produced from sharecropping. What’s worse, for the amount of money that’s made in the same industry today, black cotton farms are still making just pennies compared to the billions earned by their counterparts.I grew up in this system of poverty cotton farming. My farm home county of Northampton County in North Carolina is one of the poorest performers of economic health in the state by county, but it’s also ranked number two in the state for cotton production. Are we raising crops for our communities to suffer? As a black farmer, it has been depressing to see each year go by with farming communities struggling and deteriorating, while our efforts continue to be exploited across the world for others to profit."   we look forward to our discussion about how business is going, and what he feels the future is like for Black Farmers...   The number to call is 6466688393 and we hope that you wil tell your friends and family to join us in this discussion on black farming and it's merits and benefits...Who knows we might even motivate someone into farmingAlso joining us will be Charles Phaneuf of one of our premiere theatre companies....I first met Charles when he was a student from D.C. coming down to work at Durham Arts Council and have been impressed by his work ever since..

Thee Twin Radio
Episode 6: Juneteenth Celebrating The Culture

Thee Twin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2020 67:43


This show was inspired by yesterday's event in Northampton County. We talked about the history of Juneteenth, the culture of the black community and our hope for the future. The addressed the Thirteenth Amendment and I was able to share an interview with one of my homies in law enforcement. Big S/O to my special guest for this episode, KT and Fressh Jay. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theetwin/support

Lehigh Valley with Love Podcast
Lehigh Valley with Love Podcast Episode 109: COVID19 Interviews with Filament Innovations, St. Luke’s, and Northampton County Elections

Lehigh Valley with Love Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2020


This episode is brought to you by Walter Investment Partners! We’re back! Over the course of the past two weeks, we’ve put out more than fifty video podcast episodes on our Youtube, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter feeds. We’ve been fortunate to talk to local business leaders, non-profit contributors, and awesome community members. We took three […]

My Private Hellertown: Stories, Culture & Politics from the Saucon Valley
EPISODE 4: SPECIAL POLITICAL EDITION: "The M Word"

My Private Hellertown: Stories, Culture & Politics from the Saucon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2019 22:41


On the latest podcast, I'm joined by Democratic political consultant and Lower Saucon resident Jeff Kennedy for a conversation about the dicey subject of a borough-township merger. Is it time to get serious about what seems to some observers a long overdue move, or will the forces that prevented the last merger efforts prevail again? We'll dive deep and explore the possibilities.

Fifty Feminist States
Episode 19 - From concerned community members to outraged activists—environmental grassroots organizing against coal ash in Northampton County, NC

Fifty Feminist States

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2019


In the third of three special episodes from northeastern North Carolina, Amelia speaks to Joyce Buffalo, Wanda Flythe, and Deborah Ferruccio about their successful grassroots campaign to keep a coal ash storage facility out of their county.Fifty Feminist States is no longer releasing new episodes. Click here to follow Amelia's next podcasting project Softer Sounds.

Fifty Feminist States
Ep 16 pt 3 - North Carolina

Fifty Feminist States

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2019 45:32


In the third of three special episodes from northeastern North Carolina, Amelia speaks to Joyce Buffalo, Wanda Flythe, and Deborah Ferruccio about their successful grassroots campaign to keep a coal ash storage facility out of their county. Please support future seasons of the Fifty Feminist States podcast by pledging to our Kickstarter campaign today.

Womxn 2 Womxn: A Gender Leadership Podcast
Self-Care Is the Best Care

Womxn 2 Womxn: A Gender Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2019 17:54


This week we're talking about wellness in the workplace and in academia. We had the privilege of talking with Annie Francis, a 3rd year doctoral student in the UNC School of Social Work. Guest Bio Annie Francis received her bachelor’s degree in Sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and worked as a child welfare social worker in Northampton County immediately following graduation. She returned to UNC as a NC Child Welfare Leadership Scholar and received master’s degrees in Social Work and Public Administration. Francis previously worked as a child welfare social worker for the Orange County Department of Social Services and the coordinator of student affairs for the UNC School of Social Work. Her areas of interest include poverty, community development, child welfare and issues related to Native American identity. Francis’ ultimate goal is to improve both accountability and practice within North Carolina’s child welfare system by identifying and minimizing barriers to dissemination and translation of evidence-based interventions. She is a member of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe of North Carolina. Additional Resources 4 Self-Care Practices for Women of Color in the Workplace Why Are Women of Color Excluded from Conversations about Work-Life Balance? Why There Is More Holding Women Back from Wellness Than You Think This podcast is a creation of the Womxn of Worth Initiative at UNC-Chapel Hill with support from the American Association for University Women (AAUW). This podcast features the song “mountaintops in the sky” by Artificial.Music, available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Straight Talk with Dean and Marc
Black Cotton's Julius Tillery and Raleigh Little Theatre's Charles Phaneuf

Straight Talk with Dean and Marc

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2019 119:58


Julius Tillery has innovative thoughts on Cotton.... On his website, he says "Black Cotton, a company that is going to change the game for you, me, all of us. Black Cotton comes from us, and is meant for us! For many years, cotton was the number one crop our people produced in the South, by our hands and feet, for no wage or compensation. After the Emancipation Proclamation, many of our ancestors made mere pennies off of the cotton produced from sharecropping. What’s worse, for the amount of money that’s made in the same industry today, black cotton farms are still making just pennies compared to the billions earned by their counterparts.I grew up in this system of poverty cotton farming. My farm home county of Northampton County in North Carolina is one of the poorest performers of economic health in the state by county, but it’s also ranked number two in the state for cotton production. Are we raising crops for our communities to suffer? As a black farmer, it has been depressing to see each year go by with farming communities struggling and deteriorating, while our efforts continue to be exploited across the world for others to profit."   we look forward to our discussion about how business is going, and what he feels the future is like for Black Farmers...   The number to call is 6466688393 and we hope that you wil tell your friends and family to join us in this discussion on black farming and it's merits and benefits...Who knows we might even motivate someone into farmingAlso joining us will be Charles Phaneuf of one of our premiere theatre companies....I first met Charles when he was a student from D.C. coming down to work at Durham Arts Council and have been impressed by his work ever since........... 

Weave
37: Black Cotton with Julius Tillery

Weave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2018 31:30


Julius Tillery is a cotton farmer from Northampton County in North Carolina, and the founder of Black Cotton. Show Notes: www.gistyarn.com/episode-37

TwistedPhilly
Episode 76: The Husband Didn’t Do It

TwistedPhilly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2018 48:39


On November 21, 2014, 33 year old Jessica Padgett from Northampton County, Pennsylvania, ran an errand on her lunch break.  Her coworkers at Duck Duck Goose Child Care expected her back within about 30 minutes.  Jessica left work that day a little before 1PM, her youngest child still at the day care where he went … Continue reading "Episode 76: The Husband Didn’t Do It"

Master Your Story
Ep 005 - Living Your Story Through Leadership with Northampton County Executive John Brown

Master Your Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2017 9:21


Key Trait #1: You must have a vision. We've all heard the saying "You must stand for something, or you'll fall for everything." But what does that really mean? Standing firm when it comes to your company's policies and procedures is all well and good, but it doesn't speak to having a vision. As a leader, you have to learn to communicate your vision or the vision of your company to the people you want to follow you. Key Trait #2: You must have passion. Your employees want passion; in fact, they'll go to the ends of earth because of it, live and die for it. Think of the sailors who traveled with Christopher Columbus or Leif Ericsson to explore uncharted territory. Their leaders' passion inspired them to take on new and very dangerous challenges. Key Trait #3: You must be a team builder. To become a great leader, you must develop a great team or, one might say, a well-oiled machine. But how do you do that? You can start by handing off responsibility to your team and letting your team to run with it. Don't breathe down their necks and don't micromanage, but make yourself available if questions or problems come up. For more leadership information log on to (http://kimiplyler.com)

Classic Poetry Aloud
601. Written in Northampton County Asylum by John Clare

Classic Poetry Aloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2013 1:47


John Clare read by Classic Poetry Aloud www.classicpoetryaloud.com Twitter: @classicpoetry Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/poetryaloud Giving voice to the poetry of the past. ------------------------------------------- Written in Northampton County Asylum by John Clare I am! yet what I am who cares, or knows? My friends forsake me like a memory lost. I am the self-consumer of my woes; They rise and vanish, an oblivious host, Shadows of life, whose very soul is lost. And yet I am—I live—though I am toss'd Into the nothingness of scorn and noise, Into the living sea of waking dream, Where there is neither sense of life, nor joys, But the huge shipwreck of my own esteem And all that 's dear. Even those I loved the best Are strange—nay, they are stranger than the rest. I long for scenes where man has never trod— For scenes where woman never smiled or wept— There to abide with my Creator, God, And sleep as I in childhood sweetly slept, Full of high thoughts, unborn. So let me lie,- The grass below; above, the vaulted sky. Reading © Classic Poetry Aloud, 2007.

Geologic Podcast
The Geologic Podcast: Episode #42

Geologic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2007 52:13


THE TRIALIntroIn the Court of Common Pleas of Northampton County, Pa.CIVIL DIVISIONNancy Clark- plaintiffvs.George Hrab- defendanttrial no. 1998-CE-483Wednesday, January 20th, 1999BEFORE:The Honorable Robert E. Simpson, Jr. JudgeAppearances:Richard Santee, esquire: for the plaintiffKenneth Roos, esquire: for the defendantNancy Clark, plaintiffGeorge Hrab, defendantRobert Steelman, witnessPaula Ring Zerkle, witness ...................................... Mentioned in the show: The reissue of [sic] at CD Baby and iTunes; Nun from the album Vitriol at CD Baby and iTunes. And as always: visit the sites in the Geologic Universe. Have a comment on the show, a topic for Minoishe Interroberg, or a question for Ask George? Drop George a line and now you can write to Geo's Mom, too! Go buy some things! Get George's music at CD Baby and iTunes, and Non-Coloring Book at Lulu, both as download and print edition. Ms. Information says: The Geologic forum poll is still open. Cast your vote in the sidebar or vote here. Thanks so much.

Classic Poetry Aloud
Written in Northampton County Asylum by John Clare

Classic Poetry Aloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2007 1:47


Clare read by Classic Poetry Aloud: http://classicpoetryaloud.podomatic.com/ Giving voice to classic poetry. --------------------------------------------------- Written in Northampton County Asylum by John Clare I am! yet what I am who cares, or knows? My friends forsake me like a memory lost. I am the self-consumer of my woes; They rise and vanish, an oblivious host, Shadows of life, whose very soul is lost. And yet I am—I live—though I am toss'd Into the nothingness of scorn and noise, Into the living sea of waking dream, Where there is neither sense of life, nor joys, But the huge shipwreck of my own esteem And all that 's dear. Even those I loved the best Are strange—nay, they are stranger than the rest. I long for scenes where man has never trod— For scenes where woman never smiled or wept— There to abide with my Creator, God, 15 And sleep as I in childhood sweetly slept, Full of high thoughts, unborn. So let me lie,— The grass below; above, the vaulted sky.

The Dave Pamah Show
Fix Yourself The Process Way of Life with Faust Ruggiero

The Dave Pamah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 1970 36:28


Faust A. Ruggiero's professional career spans almost 40 years, and is diversified and compelling, as it has consistently established new and exciting cutting-edge counseling programs in its pursuit of professional excellence and personal life enhancement. He is a published research author, clinical trainer, and a therapist who has worked in settings that have included clinics for deaf children, prisons, nursing homes, substance abuse centers, inpatient facilities, and as the President of the Community Psychological Center in Bangor, Pennsylvania. In that capacity, he developed the Process Way of Life counseling program, and has developed it into a formal text presented in the Fix Yourself Handbook. Upon graduating from Mansfield University in 1977, Mr. Ruggiero enrolled in the graduate program in Psychology at Illinois State University. There, with a dual major in clinical and developmental psychology, with a minor in research, he assisted in the publication of several research articles, including his thesis “The effects of prosocial and antisocial television programs on the cognitions of children”. Upon leaving graduate school, Mr. Ruggiero began working with Antoinette Goffredo counseling services providing psychological intervention to adolescent deaf children. There, he helped Ms. Goffredo develop a behavioral management program for profoundly deaf children with residual hearing. In 1982, he accepted a position with the Lehigh Valley Alcohol Counseling Center. There he provided individual counseling services to clientele suffering from alcohol abuse and addiction, including the introduction to both the twelve-step recovery process, and family and intervention services. It was at the alcohol counseling center, where Mr. Ruggiero was asked to develop a Phase 2 counseling program for individuals convicted of drunk driving offenses. In 1984, Mr. Ruggiero left the Alcohol Counseling Center to pursue a treatment position at Northampton County prison. There, he provided psychological and substance abuse intake and counseling services to inmates. He coordinated all substance abuse services, and program development services for inmates. In 1986, he obtained his certification in substance abuse treatment in the state of Pennsylvania. He left Northampton County prison in 1989 pursue his endeavors at the Community Psychological Center on a full-time basis. As president of the Community Psychological Center, Mr. Ruggiero continued to provide services to individuals, families, those suffering with substance abuse, abused women and women in transition, couples and marriage counseling, counseling for veterans, law enforcement, and other first responders. In 1994, Mr. Ruggiero accepted an invitation to become a trainer for the Department of Health in Pennsylvania. Mr. Ruggiero also provides counseling services for first responders, law enforcement, and other emergency personnel. Following several years of experimentation regarding the various therapeutic approaches, Mr. Ruggiero developed and began utilizing the Process Way of Life Program. The program consists of over fifty internal human processes, which can be accessed and developed to help clients address the various conditions which were affecting their lives. After the program was developed, it was rigorously researched and tested, and changes were made culminating in the approach presently being used by Mr. Ruggiero at the Community Psychological Center. In the summer of 2016, Mr. Ruggiero decided to develop the Process Life Program into a text that can be published, and would help people in need address the difficult situations that are affecting their lives. The Fix Yourself Handbook was completed in December of 2019. On February 1st, 2020, The Fix Yourself Handbook received the Silver Award from The NonFiction Authors Association. On May 2, 2020, it received the Gold Award from Literary Titan. On September 1st, 2020, it received the Bronze Award from Reader's Favorite. He has appeared on television and radio shows, and podcasts discussing the Process Way of Life presented in The Fix Yourself Handbook both nationally and internationally. The Fix Yourself Handbook II; The Journey Continues is currtently in development. Website: https://www.faustruggiero.com  If you love this show, please leave us a review. Go to:- https://ratethispodcast.com/rate and follow the simple instructions. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-dave-pamah-show/donations