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Ancient Cushitic language of East Africa

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  • May 20, 2022LATEST
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Kate Dalley Radio
051922 Dr Rashid Buttar WOW and Leopard Bites Are Coming Our Way Geez

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 45:27


051922 Dr Rashid Buttar WOW and Leopard Bites Are Coming Our Way Geez by Kate Dalley

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Build Teams with Fun and Play with Matt May

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 45:29


Matt May is Founder and CEO of Premier Team Building and Interactive experiences, he's also a speak and author of the Book, "Take the Fear out of Team Building." In this engaging and fun show, you can learn: Why “team building” is not a “bad word.” Why grown-ups have developed fear and anxiety around play and team building? How do you go about having fun/play yet keeping the learning real and authentic? How do you get folks to participate who just don't want to get involved.   Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services   Find out more about Matt below: Matt on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mattmayptb/ Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PremierTeamBld Matt on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/premierteambuilding/ Matt's Website: https://premierteambuilding.com/   Full Transcript Below ----more---- Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband, or friend. Others might call me boss, coach, or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker. Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as The Leadership Hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors, and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush, and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   Our special guest on today shows Matt May. He's the founder and CEO of Premier Team Building & Interactive Experiences Company. He's also a speaker, an author of the book, Take The Fear Out Of Team Building. But before we get a chance to speak with Matt, it's The Leadership Hacker News. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: The values and culture play a real part in leadership post pandemic. We're going to look at how environments have changed dramatically over the last 10 years and particularly since the pandemic. It's exposed weaknesses and for some businesses strengths and the effectiveness of company values and how they're put into practice. I want to dive in and have a quick look at how leadership drastically changes company culture and how values inform it. There's a fantastic report from the ILM called leading through values if you get a chance to get your hands on it, which gives you much more context and detail about the things I'm going to talk to you about. And just to throw something else into the mix that helps inform culture and values, right now. I wrote an article in CEOWorld Magazine and on LinkedIn called Mind The Gen Gap. For the first time, we now have four generations in the workforce, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, Millennials, and Gen Zers or Gen Zers if you're in the UK. And the reason this is important is because values is the principles, the rules of the game, and we all have perspectives based on our generations. And whilst these are not scientifically proven, it's a good barometer and we should take it into consideration. The ILM research found that 69% of people will reconsider a job if the company culture seems to be toxic, 77% felt that company culture was incredibly important to them and the values that their boss also brings to the culture and 56% ranked opportunities for growth as more important than their basic salary and package. So, the top values that impact on culture are having a person centered and authentic approach with the core elements, being congruence. In other words, your words and actions make sense to your employees. Being genuine in essence, empathy, having a deep understanding of what it feels like for employees of every grade and every level and an unconditional positive regard for the individual. And only if there is a genuine approach to demonstrate these values from senior leadership. There can be congruency throughout the organization. You'd expect wellbeing of employees to be up there and of course, it is. The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, CIPD. Run a survey of over 3000 individuals in the UK. And the survey consistently found a 38% of workers experience work stress on a weekly basis. The problem in a lot of companies is that there is no clear standalone health and wellbeing strategy. In fact, only 8% of companies had such a strategy And at least 34% of managers expressed a need for independent authority and feel unempowered to really do anything. My observation here is if we have a people centered approach, wellbeing should be part of that, and we don't necessarily need to have a strategy or strategic. We do however need to be more thoughtful and compassionate. And as a talent management and learning and development, professional. It's music to my ears, to see self-directed on autonomous learning to sit up here in the top tier, there's been a significant shift away from organizations investing in organization-wide learning programs and much more focused self-directed autonomous learning and it's becoming more prominent in most company's culture. And this means that the company values are the basis of helping employees engage when it's meaningful and when it's right for them. But this strategy provides some challenges, too. Some people really struggle to learn on their own. They do need guidance, support, and others to help them on their journey. There are people not able to extract and absorb the information in the same way and still need that for face-to-face facilitator led sessions. And there's such a thing too, to have too much freedom. The number of possibilities can create overwhelm and anxiety. So, we have to sometimes help people direct them to the most appropriate resources. And their last one on my list today is recognition. Remuneration is important for sure but recognizing staff for good jobs well done is most important and a significant indicator in value-based leadership. Many employees want to feel that their work is being valued and valuing values plays an important role in this because they should stipulate in some way that there is a recognition of the hard work outside of the salary and the direct results as a result of their work. This will also inform great culture and culture can be formed so that this becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. The final thing I want to draw our attention to is your company's purpose is not your purpose and your mission, but finding that connectivity by what you do to why they do what they do will really help you find true purpose in your work, as well as in your life Values based culture gives you the principles to accelerate progress together and purpose will anchor the activities that bring people together to drive great culture. That's been The Leadership Hacker News, lets dive into the show. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Joining on the show today is Matt May. He's the founder and CEO of Premiering Building & Interactive Experiences Company. Who's putting the fun and energy back into play. He's also a speaker, an author of the book, Take The Fear Out Of Team Building. Matt, welcome to the show my friend. Matt May: Thank you so much for having me. I'm thrilled to be here. Steve Rush: So, I'm really looking forward to our interactive experience today. But before we get into that, maybe you can just give our listeners a little bit of the journey from where it all began in theater to you and how you ended up running in interactive experiences firm. Matt May: Absolutely. So, I was in music and theater in high school, middle school. I always was creative. Hey, let's put on some sort of a show or a presentation or do something for the family and the parents and the yada, yada in the backyard, in the garage. And when I went to school undergraduate, I went for theater. I earned a dual major in theater and arts administration. So, I got that business side. I also was a camp counselor when I was a teenager. I went through a three-year counselor in training program as a camper. Took some psychology courses in undergrad, as well as a number of leadership courses. And I don't know if they're call all seminars or what but opportunities that were presented through a variety of organizations within the university setting. So that kind of all sorts of came together for me after I graduated school, I went to New York city and did the professional entertainment thing for a while, but I also was always kind of had an education thought in my head. So, I really did a number of different things. I finally left New York after five years. I said, I'm moving to sunnier pastures because I want to be able to have my coffee outside, whether it's January or June. Steve Rush: That's right, yeah. Matt May: [Laugh]. I moved to Florida in the states and really haven't looked back. But when I moved there, I started working in administration at a performing arts high school and college and had a number of different opportunities that I embraced and did. And finally sort of fell into team building per say. I happened to be bartending at a comedy show on campus at the Fort Lauderdale Performing Arts Center, the Broward Center for the Performing Arts. And the stage manager happened to be staffing an event, a team building event, just helping the company, which is actually based in Massachusetts. So not even close by. And she said, hey, do you want to do it? And I said, yeah, absolutely. And that was my first official team building as an assistant staff. And I said, oh, huh, there's something about this. So, jump ahead, several years I was facilitating, I started doing a lot of producing because of my theatre background. I was able to do production and logistics and whatnot, and finally said, you know what? I quite honestly, I'm tired of being on the front lines and not having control and what goes into all of the preparation beforehand and created my own company. And I like to call it a perfect storm because I have my logistics and my business and my entrepreneurship and my sales skills. And by the way, sales is my least favourite thing to do. But I get guess I have some sort of a knack for it. But then I also, when I facilitate jump on stage and I'm able to get people working together and be entertaining and whatnot. So, I'm able to use all of my experiences and all of my different training, whether it be from education or professional or theatre or business, and it kind of a perfect store and collides together. So that's kind of how I got to where I am now. And looking back, of course, hindsight is always 2020, I think. Oh, all right. Well, that's why I did all of those different things and worked in education and professional theatre and, you know, did some temping offices and whatnot so that all of this came together for me to where I am now, Steve Rush: Steve jobs, I think famously said you can't always connect the dots forward, but you can definitely connect them back. And that's perfect example, right? If you were trying to create the path to where you are now, you'd probably never get there. Matt May: No. And you just made me think, I don't know if I'm the only one, but I remember as a kid, when we would try to do mazes, you know, the mazes that you draw, the pen or the pencil through it all. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: Some reason, they seem to be easier going backwards. Steve Rush: Oh, that's interesting perspective. I wonder if that's something to do with the way that our brains are wired as well. Matt May: It must be, I've never really researched it, and until you mention that Steve Jobs quote, I hadn't really thought of it, but I think that's on my to-do list this afternoon. Steve Rush: Shout out to all amateur neuroscientists, or any professional ones that listen to the show, they can maybe contact us and let us know. That'll be interesting to have a look at. Matt May: Yes. Steve Rush: So, the work that you do now, it's very still theatrical, isn't it? So, you get to be that front to stage guy, but also then be that production guy as well. Is there a natural kind of thing that you prefer? Are you more of a front man or more of a production man? Where would you say you're kind of true passion lie? Matt May: Geez, that's a tough question to answer. You know, certainly being a performer as I was younger and going to school for it initially, that's instilled in me, but it's funny. I will have clients who are new clients often come up to me after an experience ended and say, where did you come from? And the first few times that happened, I didn't understand it. But now I do, when I walk into a ballroom or whatever, and I'm setting up and managing staff and we're getting ready, it's very organized and logical. And you know, I'm just doing what needs to be done and I'm talking to a client or whatever, and it's very professional, but something happens that when I jump on stage or jump in front of a crowd or grab a mic or whatever, I just inherently turn it on if you will. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: And that's what they refer to now. The challenge is, in my line of work is. I'm not there just to entertain, right. And I'm reminded of the late Alex Trebek from Jeopardy. He was never wanted to be introduced as the star of the show Jeopardy. It was always the host of the show because his feeling was that contestants were the stars. Steve Rush: Yes. Matt May: And I try to keep that philosophy that the participants in the experience, they are the stars, the light shines on them. When I start a program, I'm doing kind of what I like to think of as audience warm up. And yeah, I do my skit and whatnot, but that gets people going. But then once the experience really gets going and they get hands on, it's all about them. Steve Rush: Yeah. And of course, the biggest thing, most of all is, you're there to facilitate a learning outcome. Matt May: Exactly. Steve Rush: And that's the one thing that is different from a performance, because actually as a performer, you are still having an ambition to want to entertain, but you are not having to be as thoughtful of the specific way that you construct an experience so that somebody takes away a different learning outcome, right? Matt May: Correct. Correct. And when we're watching as patrons watching entertainment, whether it be on a screen or on a stage. We are there for them to entertain us. Where in my line of work, I'm not here to entertain you. As you said, I'm here to facilitate the experience. So, you put in as much as you're going to get out of it. Steve Rush: Exactly right. So, when we start to think about the whole concept of team building, when you mention that word to groups of individuals, what's the reason you get a different response. So, some people will love it and some people will running in fear from it. What causes that? Matt May: The simple answer in my opinion is bad experiences. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: They have been thrust into experiences that didn't have positive outcomes for them, for whatever reason. So many people think of team building as trust falls or paintball or zip lining or white-water rafting, you know, extreme sports, if you will, or sitting in a room and being told, this is how you work together as a team, while watching a slideshow, right. I don't do any of those things. And I think it's because people have been thrust into those things, or that's the majority of their experience. They just have a negative connotation in their head that team building is a bad word. Now there's also, as you mentioned, some people are very excited about it. People who are extroverted and tend to be well, extroverts generally like it more because they're excited and their energy is locomotive full speed ahead. Where people who are more introverted and maybe have anxiety, or even if it's not full-blown anxiety just don't like to be in a crowd or don't like to be in a small group because they can't hide as easily. Those people have more apprehension. So, when they hear team building, I think their negative thoughts are even more heightened. Steve Rush: Of course, in any audience, you are going to have a mix of those types of individuals, because many will be extroverted and thinkers and feelers, and others will be introverted thinkers and feelers. How do you make sure that when you are constructing a session that you are thoughtful of those different types of personalities that might come out? Matt May: Well, our experiences are designed in such a way that everybody is on an even peel, equal, right. I generally tell clients; I don't want to know who the boss is. The CEO is here, okay great. Don't tell me who he is, or she is. I don't want to know because I want to treat every single person the same. Now Murphy's Law inevitably comes into play nine times out ten, and that's the person I wind up picking on [Laugh] just organically. And then, oh, that's the CEO, well, thanks for playing [laugh]. But generally, most of our experiences, Steve call for teams of ten, and we start off having everybody in the team of ten, doing a group exercise, and they're all doing the exact same thing before they even break out into, quotes, unquote. And I'm using air quotes here, roles and responsibilities that they will be in charge of, if you will, during the experience. Everybody does the same icebreakers and the same introductory games and challenges and activities. So that everyone is completely even keel. Then a lot of times when you break off into the experience, say it's building bikes for kids. For example, some people are more mechanically inclined, or they're really good with wrenches and they want to put something together great. Somebody else is better with puzzles and mind games and mind solving great. They'll focus more on that. Other people are better at marketing. And so, they'll kind of work on their team presentation more, but by the same token, a lot of times people say, well, you try this. This is not your forte or what you would normally gravitate to, this particular component. Why don't you try this? And that allows people to see their colleagues in a whole different light. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: For example, sometimes the CEO or the C levels or the Directors, whatever will be on teams with somebody who's the front desk receptionist. And that person will, for whatever reason, wind up in more of a leadership role or whatnot. And then next thing you know, the boss is saying, you are totally underutilized signing for packages and answering the phone. We need to talk next week. And, you know, ultimately the person becomes an office manager or whatever, because he or she was seen in a different light. Steve Rush: I suspect that having the opportunity to throw away the natural conventions of the work labels gives everybody the opportunity to see how others behave and perform. Matt May: Absolutely. Steve Rush: Yeah, I love that. So as kids, when, you know, you first got up in front of your folks and did your, you know, theatre production and, you know, I probably did the same. What is it that causes some people like you, Matt, to continually have this energy to want to continually innovate and play where others like me will, you know, be a bit stuffy and go, well, I don't do any of that kind of stuff anymore? Matt May: Well, I don't know. I don't know if there's a certain quote unquote thing that is in me or not in you or whatever. I think some of it is inherent and its personality and as well as likes and desires, you know, what we follow or chase, but I think a big part of it too Steve is that we are conditioned as we grow up. Now I can only speak for the States, right. I can't speak for European school upbringing, but for the States, and this is changing to a degree, but for so long, it was sit at the desk, take the information that's presented to you, go home, do some exercises, commit it to memory, come back and regurgitate, wash, rinse, repeat, right? Steve Rush: Right. Matt May: So, as kids if we look at it, their favourite, well, I'm generalizing. Often the favourite part of the day is recess because they get to go outside and play. But as we get older, recess is removed from the school day. And by the time we're out of primary schools and into middle school, junior high, high school, and then certainly in college, we go, and we ask people to give us information and educate us that we are then going to theoretically use, but the play is gone. So, I think that's a big part of it is, just society. And don't get me wrong. Look, adulting is hard [Laugh] okay. Steve Rush: That's true. Matt May: We all have responsibilities. We can't play on the playground all day. We have to work so that we can survive and support our family or if we don't have a family, at least keep a roof over our head and keep us fed and clothed. But the fun element in our work and our workday seems to have been removed. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: And it, takes like going on a boy's weekend to have our fun or the girls. I'm going out with the girls tonight or whatever. That is how we have our fun. Well, why can't we still have fun in the workday? And I know fun is not necessarily something we use to measure success or productivity, but it doesn't mean it can't be prevalent. And it doesn't mean it doesn't help success and productivity. Steve Rush: I think you actually might be able to measure that. So, when you look at things like employee engagement, you'll see fun represent itself in different ways. So, commitment to the organization, prepared to stay, creativity, innovation, elements of peer group recognition, that kind of stuff. But often we don't apply that three-letter word to it because we feel it's got less relevance in a workplace. Matt May: Correct. Steve Rush: Would that be fair selection? Matt May: Absolutely. I think that's very fair. And I will let you in on, well, I guess it's not going to be a secret because I've already told other people coming out there right now. I am a Hallmark movie junkie. I fully admit it. I'm a sap. I'm a big romantic at heart. I love Hallmark movies. And there was one that I watch about a year ago now. And there was a line that I sort of kind of touched on a moment ago, but the line was, and I know that fun, isn't typical metric in the corporate world, but you know what it's worth because fun allows people to relax and be fully themselves, which makes them productive and more engaged. And that affects the bottom line. Steve Rush: Right. And is that something also that helps remove some of that fear and anxiety around team building as well? Matt May: Absolutely. And I've had, I don't want to say arguments. Discussions with people who have said anything competitive is not valuable in team building. Well, hold on, going back to the whole paintball, I will agree with you on that. I don't, for me, that is not exciting. That is not team building. That's just crazy, whatever. However, the majority of our team building experiences are competitive in nature. However, we're not talking about tackling each other and taking each other out with guns. We're talking about light-hearted competition. People are naturally competitive, Steve, right? Steve Rush: mm-hmm. Matt May: Again, I'm generalizing. Steve Rush: That's a fair generalization, yeah. Matt May: Yeah. When we start, we go to school, we earn, or we are provide with good grades for positive work and productive work. The mother of all, and I don't know if you have this over in the UK, but at least over here, the mother of all winnings is the lottery. People play, whether it's scratch off or the big one, people go to a casino for a night out, whatever, but they put their coin in the machine, pull that lever and they want to get the pay-out. We are competitively, we like to win things. So, when you tell people, hey, you are doing this for the winning title, and yes, you're going to win a gold medal at the end, whatever. It's just fun. We're just there to have some light-hearted competition, but people inherently enjoy that. Then they start talking smack to their colleagues. You're going down, whatever. Just again, it's all light-hearted fun. Nobody really means any ill will to each other. But doing that in an environment outside of the office allows you to see your colleagues in a different light Steve Rush: And neurologically, of course. It releases dopamine. Matt May: Right. Steve Rush: And that's a rewarding chemical transmitter, neurotransmitter that we thrive on. And you get a hit from that. So not only is it fun, it's also a learning, so you want more of it. Matt May: Exactly. We crave more of it once we've had the burst of it. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: And like I said, the whole medals, I have a discussion and I usually talk about it on when to do team building exercises. I always say, if you have people that don't know each other and coming out of the pandemic, I have hear from more and more people, we're doing the sales meeting and 75% of our team has not met each other, other than on Zoom. Okay, well, then I would recommend doing it at the beginning. Well, we wanted to wrap up the three-day conference with it. Okay, we can do that. But if you're telling me, people don't know each other yet, do it at the beginning, they're automatically going to know nine other people from their direct team. The winning team is going to win gold medals. Maybe they'll wear them at lunch that day. Maybe they'll wear them that night to the cocktail reception. We'll encourage them to wear them the rest of the three days to remind everyone that they were the winners. Good for them. Well, that's a conversation piece right there. Somebody else might come up and say, we were robbed. Yeah, well, sorry. We got the medals, right. So, it automatically creates conversation. And again, it was based on that fun competition factor. Steve Rush: So, during your experiences as well, one of the things that I've noticed through the work that you do, Matt, is that there is always a purpose behind what you do. So mentioned kids for bikes earlier. So that's something that you use, exercise as a team together, but something that's also serving communities well. Just tell us a little bit about some of the things you do. Matt May: Well, as far as the philanthropic experiences, yes. Building bikes is for kids is one. We have an experience where we build wheelchairs for veterans, or maybe not even veterans for people who are mobility challenged. Foster care programs, kids entering foster care. Kids that need snacks. They don't get them during the school day when they're on vacation, places that they can go to get the snacks because they're underserved and maybe their parents can't afford to give them a snack every day. So, all of those types of things, many companies have CSR, Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives. And if we can align with them, that's great. Because, let's say, let's be honest. If we can get something out of it, i.e., getting our teams to work together, having fun, doing something out of the norm of the workday and give back, well, then it's win-win for everybody. Steve Rush: Yeah. Ticking all the boxes, right? Matt May: Exactly. And it doesn't have to be philanthropic. It could be a culinary program and your company, I don't know, maybe your company makes salsa. We could do a salsa margarita challenge. See, oh, wait, maybe that is the next new recipe for your brand, right. Or for an alternate version of your salsa, or maybe you make hospice sauce and, well, great. Let's use your sauce in this culinary team building experience. So, there are ways to incorporate the company as well. Steve Rush: Yeah, exactly. Love it. So, have you ever had a time where you've just had a participant who's just, you know, folded arms, stuffy, I'm not getting involved in any of this? Have you ever experienced any of that? Matt May: Yes [laugh]. Steve Rush: How do you deal with that? Matt May: To be honest with you, I don't, and I'll tell you why. Usually, well, it's never not happened. So, knock on wood. The person ultimately says, well, I look like a schmuck standing over here, and I'm the one who's not having fun. Who wants to be in the corner? Right. All by him or herself. If your colleagues bring you in and you insist upon being that stuffy jerk. Okay, fine. You're only hurting yourself. So, peer pressure I guess, is the bottom line. And I say that in a positive way, not a negative way. That ultimately your peers are going to say, come on, let's go. You're being a jerk. Steve Rush: [Laugh]. Matt May: And it happens, right. If somebody doesn't have the realization by themselves, that there are only hurting themselves and look like dunce. Somebody else, or several other members of the team are going to say, come on, let's go. Now, I'll be patting myself on the back. That rarely happens because our experiences are designed in such a way that you really can't sit out, starting right at the get go. And when I facilitate, and our other facilitators have been trained to really put on the charm immediately, put on the energy immediately. So, we inherently, not we, but the participants inherently say, okay, I'm already in this. Steve Rush: The one thing I notice in those experiences as well is the other thing of course, is that, that individual's looking at everybody else having loads of fun, thinking. Now I'm losing out. Matt May: Correct. Steve Rush: So, I know over the last couple of years, Matt, you've had to really pivot your business model as we were going through the experiences of the pandemic. But I wonder having had the experience of being face to face and virtual, what the pandemics really taught us about how we participate or get involved if the case around things like team building or activities, what's it really highlighted for us? Matt May: Well, I think that it's proven to us that face to face interaction is necessary. And it's certainly good for us. We learn so much more and we get and give so much more when we're face to face. When you're on a video call, yes, you can see the person, but you may not see the person's hand gestures because the camera is close, right. And you don't get the body language. You don't get the nonverbal cues. You don't get touch, right. Human beings need touch. There's a wonderful book and its old. And it was Tuesdays with Morrie, Mitch Albom. And there was a movie made with Jack lemon and Hank Azaria, many, many years ago. And I'm paraphrasing here, but Morrie was diagnosed with ALS, and he basically taught this former student, Mitch Albom life lessons. And one of them was, when we come into this world, we are cradled by our mothers, right. Until we learn to walk. And even then, we are constantly cradled by our parents. Craving human touch. When we die, nobody wants to die alone. I know this is a grim thought. And I apologize for doing that on the podcast, nobody wants to die alone. Steve Rush: Right. Matt May: So, we crave it, but why do we push it away for the majority of our lives? Why do we begin and end with it, but not continue to make it so important to us during our adult lives? But again, going back to face-to-face, handshakes. Now, I know people are still, some of them are nervous about that and whatnot, okay. Then do an elbow, bump, whatever. But when you touch someone's hand and you grasp it, you are having a physical connection that you don't get virtually. Steve Rush: Yeah. Matt May: Now, team building experiences and other were very valuable. They still are. We do them. I personally prefer face to face, but I know a lot of people are saying, we're just not ready to go back yet or we don't have the ability to bring in everybody just yet. We've got it six months down the line, but we want to do something right now. Great. So, it's still valuable because you're getting people interacting and hopefully having fun. But the face to face in person is just so much more valuable. Yes people were doing virtual events. I get that. But this wasn't even in our brains, right. As a thought, this conversation right now. Steve Rush: Right. Matt May: Because of the pandemic is why we're having this discussion. I can't articulate this. I don't know why, but going back, we never would've thought about that before. Steve Rush: That's true. And it's fair to say I think that people certainly in my experience in the last three to five months, I would say, are really grateful in when people come together as a group, there's definitely much more appreciation for that now. Matt May: Yes. It's not just, well, we're going to a sales meeting. It's oh my gosh. We're going to a sales meeting live and in person. Steve Rush: [Laugh] and therefore there's something deeply intrinsic that you refer to as that kind of cradling. That is a, also a very real metaphor for us wanting connection with people, isn't it? Matt May: Yeah. And when we're in face to face, at least in my experience. Observe people being more organically involved, right. When you have a computer screen behind you, how many times have we seen somebody looking down and we say, oh, well, he or she's checking text messages right now, or, you know, or, oh, oh, he's reading his email, we can tell. You're not as engaged because you have so many more distractions and there's no real accountability either. Steve Rush: That's right. Matt May: And I don't use that as a negative term. I use it as a positive term, even to ourselves, we're just not accountable because we have so many other things right in front of us on that fancy screen, that when you take that away and what's in front of you is an actual face. Oh my gosh. Okay. I'm totally engaged with you right now. Steve Rush: Well, fingers crossed for wherever anybody is listening to us in the world. They're going to get back to some level of connection and normality pretty soon, anyway. Matt May: Yes, I hope so. Steve Rush: So, this part of the show, Matt, is where we start to turn the tables, you've learned lots of different teams and had lots of different leadership experiences over your career. And I'm keen to really hack into those now. So, what I'm going to ask you to do, if you can, is try and think of all of those experiences and just distill them down to your top three leadership hacks. What would they be? Matt May: One is to utilize people's strengths and not only participants, but also staff and facilitators, right. In an office setting, in an assembly line, in a factory, whatever. We hire people based upon their qualifications and skills. So, let's do the same thing in a fun atmosphere. Now, again, this is going back to what I said before. Maybe let people get outside of their comfort zone, but at least for me with staff, I always want to find the right staff person, not only the experience, but the client. Steve Rush: Right. Matt May: What's the demographic of the client who is going to work best with that demographic? So that's one. Utilizing people's skills and strengths. My catch phrase is regress to kindergarten. Take off the sport coat, take off the tie, take off the high heels, whatever you're wearing. You're in a safe space. Nobody's judging you, if they are, judge them right back, because they're probably doing the exact same thing. It's not going to go anywhere. It's kind of like what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. What happens in this room stays in this because if you don't have those inhibitions, you're going to organically be in a much better place to give of yourself for your team and the experience. And the third leadership hack. Geez, I would say. It's really kind of, my new catch phrase is, take the fear out of team building, which is the title of the book. And that is, let's give people experiences where at the end of it, they say, okay, so my goal is, when you see me walk in six months from now, you're not going to go, oh, that team building guy. Hopefully say, Ooh, what are we doing today? Or at the very least say, all right, let's see what he is got out of his sleeve today. Let's see how it compares to last time. Steve Rush: Mm-Hmm. There must have been some magical experiences you've had over your careers. If you could just maybe call one out. The most fun, extravagant experience that you've had with a group or, an individual in a group, what would that be? Matt May: It's hard to pinpoint one. And I can't remember the exact number. I facilitated a military care pack program. This is probably seven years ago or more. Those always get me. I'm a big supporter of the U.S. Military. And I know you're over in Europe, but I'm a big supporter of people who put their lives on hold to make our lives better. Steve Rush: Absolutely. Matt May: That is very important to me. So military care pack programs always hit me pretty, pretty tough. They hit me hard in a good way. Also, when you see a kid who is part of a boys and girls club or whatever, come into a room and they don't know why they're there. And then all of a sudden there are 12, 24, 50, bikes, and they're then told these are going to your organization. The look of huh, on their face is just amazing. And little ones are just, I don't have kids. I'm too old to start at this point, but boy, some of the things they do and say they just melt my heart and make me just crack up [laugh]. Steve Rush: Makes it all worthwhile, right? Matt May: Exactly. I'm always appreciative for that. Steve Rush: Well, the next part of the show we call it Hack to Attack. So, this is typically where something hasn't worked out for you. Maybe been pretty catastrophic, could have screwed up, but as a result of it, you've learned, and it's now a force of good in your life or work, what would be your Hack to Attack? Matt May: [Laugh] be careful what papers you sign to be quite honest. Steve Rush: [laugh] yeah. Matt May: Really and be careful with whom you go into business and protect yourself because you're the only anyone that's going to protect yourself. And I don't want to sound cold and snarky, but it's true. You can be a wonderful person and be very giving and loving and generous and still protect yourself. Steve Rush: Yes, you can. Matt May: And that's the business side of me, careful what you sign and know who you're getting into bed with proverbially. Steve Rush: Yeah. You're not the first guest mine you to have said that over the two years or so, we've been running the show. We must have at least half a dozen of our guests have, you know, some really similar circumstances where the greatest trusted relationships have gone wrong because of one piece of paper. Matt May: Exactly, exactly. And it's bad that happens. But it's the reality of the world we live in. Steve Rush: Certainly is. Now the last thing we're going to do is you get to go and give yourself some advice at 21. So, if that time travel happened now. You stood right in front of Matt. He's 21, you're in front of him. What's your advice? Matt May: Probably to embrace the opportunities that you're presented with wholly, don't be fearful of them. Again, hindsight is 2020. The older I get; I do subscribe more to the philosophy of everything happens for a reason. And for whatever reason right now, this is where you're supposed to be. And it may not be the happiest of circumstances, but what do you need to do to not only get through this but thrive beyond it and learn from it. Steve Rush: Great advice. Matt May: That would be my two words. It's okay. Steve Rush: Hmm. Love it. So, what's next for you and the team? Matt May: Well, we are very excited to be getting back to face-to-face experiences. Really trying to provide those to people who are ready. I hope more and more people continue to be ready and jump on this. My hope is that now, companies who are allowing people or have just made the decision to, we're not going to own real estate or rent real estate anymore, because we know work from home, works for us. Great. That money that you're saving, bring your people together. At least twice a year, quarterly is better. Have an all hands. Even if it's just lunch, an address from the CEO and a team building experience where people get to play and work together, hands on, do it. It's more important now than ever. My dream would be that it becomes instilled in everyone's minds that this is as important as ordering copy paper. Steve Rush: Right. DNA and the fabric of an organization should have all of those experiences to really exploit some of those unlearned or unobserved behaviors that you talked about earlier, right? Matt May: Exactly. Steve Rush: Yeah. So, when folks have listened into this Matt, where's the best place for us to send them so they can bump into some of the work and maybe get a copy of the book? Matt May: The best place is the website, which is premierteambuilding.com. It's premier as in like number one without the E at the end of it. But if you do happen to put it in, it'll direct you to the correct place. There's a contact form there. There's a links to Amazon where the book is. All of our social media links are there. You can follow us there. I love to travel personally. So, we do programs throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, abroad. I'd love to get over to the UK at some point. So more than happy to do that for anyone who's listening over there. Steve Rush: Course of action. Yeah, exactly. Well, Matt, listen, I've love chatting to you and you know, there's no surprise that you've been a success in the business that you're in and the energy and focus you bring to it. So, I just want to say thank you and we'll make sure all of those links are in our show notes. So, when folks have listened as well. They can dive straight over, but thanks for being on the show. Matt May: Thank you, Steve. Closing Steve Rush: I want to sign off by saying thank you to you for joining us on the show too. We recognize without you, there is no show. So please continue to share, subscribe, and like, and continue to get in touch with us with the great new stories that we share every week. And so that we can continue to bring you great stories. Please make sure you give us a five-star review where you can and share this podcast with your friends, your teams, and communities. You want to find us on social media. You can find us on Facebook and Twitter @leadershiphacker, Leadership Hacker on YouTube and on Instagram, the_leadership_hacker and if that wasn't enough, you can also find us on our website leadership-hacker.com. Tune into next episode to find out what great hacks and stories are coming your way. That's me signing off. I'm Steve Rush, and I've been your Leadership Hacker.  

Real Estate Marketing Dude
How To Use Video When New To An Area

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 40:24


Today, we have somebody in studio, we're not in studio on Zoom, that just started doing video maybe three, four months ago, consistently. He's done it in an area that let's just say most people aren't doing video, and because he was sort of sticking out like a sore thumb, he just shot right up. One of the questions we get is like, how do I use video if I'm going into a new market? Well, we're going to show you that's exactly what we're doing here.Our guest today is Stan Hartzheim is an experienced Mortgage Loan Originator who has a demonstrated history of working in the financial services industry with Certification as a Divorce Lending Professional as well as expertise utilizing FHA, VA, USDA, and specialty loan programs. Skilled in Divorce Law, Mortgage Lending, Sales, Budgeting, Customer Service, Contractors, and Nonprofit Management.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeHow to use video when you're new to an areaThe wonders of consistencyCreating a sphere of influenceResourcesLearn more about Stan Hartzheim Real Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramStan's Contact Information: (720)883-8452Stan@dblhloans.comTranscript:So how do you track new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas a real estate marketing dude. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them. Let's get startedWhat's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. What we're doing today, folks, is we have somebody in studio, we're not in studio on Zoom.That just started doing video maybe three, four months ago, consistently. And he's done it in an area that let's just say most people aren't doing video. And because he was sort of sticking out like a sore thumb, he started just like, shot right up. This is somebody one of the questions we get is like, how do I use video if I'm going into a new market? Well, we're going to show you that's exactly what we're doing here. Before I introduce our guests today, we're gonna discuss like what his journey was. But more importantly, this is a mortgage brokers isn't a real estate agent. It's a mortgage broker, who for the last X amount of years worked primarily in the Denver market, Denver, Colorado, just recently has relocated moved over to just north of where he's at into Cheyenne, Wyoming, and now is building his brand within the Cheyenne Wyoming market and seen and trying to almost like starting over again, right? He's got to create new realtor relationships, you got to create a new sphere of influence, doesn't mean he's not doing business in Denver, but he just starts he knows he needs to start building his brand there as well. So we're gonna share his story see exactly sort of how it works with the man Stan right here. And without further ado, we're gonna introduce Stan the Man to the show. Stan, how are you today, sir? I'm doing great, Mike. Thanks for having me on. Why don't you just do a quick intro to everybody first last name what you've been doing for the last 20 years of your life? And who the hell are you?Yeah, so my name is Stan hearts I'm I run a team called wh Home Loans team with a company out of Dallas, Texas called southwest funding. And I've been in the mortgage business since 2017. kind of creeping up on people, like you said down in the Denver market and building my brand down there building out a little bit of a team have our operations staff still in an office down in Aurora, Colorado,had an opportunity to move up to the wide open spaces, just outside of Cheyenne, Wyoming on a little ranch yet, and man couldn't couldn't be happier. We got 10 acres of land, got a beautiful, sprawling ranch house and a lot of wind, wind. And your and you guys were just you're just moving mainly for lifestyle, right? You just want to get more space. But you're got obviously you're gonna bring your mortgage business up there. And what were one of your biggest concerns you had before going into a new market?You know, I think like, look like anybody when you're starting out in the new market. It's like starting out a new business. And so there's some trepidation of how do I grow that business? How do I grow the brand? I think my biggest fear, however, knowing that Cheyenne was a little bit of a smaller town than Denver, obviously was, I grew up in a small town. So I kind of get it. There's some relationships there that have been going on since you know, elementary school or middle school. And when you come into that new market, how do you win over that business? You're anytime you build a business, you're stepping into relationship with people, and sometimes that means stepping between them in their existing relationship? I'm hate to say it, but that's the reality. And how do you do that? If somebody has been friends since middle school? Right. So that was kind of my challenge coming into a smaller market? Yeah, that makes I mean, that's pretty much with everybody. We get a lot of people that hey, I'm in a new market. I don't have a spare because I don't have that will video work. We will be anywhere from you there. So Stan has been Stan is in full disclosure stands one of our clients, and we want to share a story becauseStan started doing video about four months ago, I believe right about now and you just recently got we're not like creating 30 videos a month, right? We're just doing two videos, keeping it simple. But you just recently got picked up from the new station. I hear. Tell me about that.Well,it's been a variety of things have happened in the last few months. We started doing these videos, not not mortgage related. I talked about mortgages all stinking day long. So I thought it'd be a lot of fun to share my journey of learning about Cheyenne and the surrounding state of Wyoming with as many people as I could. Right away when I got here I found out that thisCities a little misunderstood. It's it's not just cowboys. Andyou know, it's there's a lot I guess I'll let me rephrase that there's a lot to do here, a lot of people don't realize it's very beautiful, it's close to the mountains, just like Denver is are on the other side of the mountain Salt Lake City. And we wanted to just kind of spread the word like this is a growing community that has a great infrastructure and a lot of really friendly people. So we started doing videos just to capture our journey around town. You know, as we met, people are winning and visited establishments, learned about the neighborhoods kind of started to zero in on where we wanted to live. We thought why not record this and have Mike and his team make it look good for us. The name of the show is actually in Stan's model like we had to. And I almost did the same thing. And I wish I would have I'm doing it now. But five years ago, and I moved to San Diego, I didn't know if I was going to sell real estate, I didn't know what the hell is gonna happen. I was literally starting over a brand new career in foreign land, foreign territory, I didn't know what the hell was going to happen. I didn't want to sell real estate. But I did have in the back of my mind that if I was the only story I'd be able to tell would be that of a transplant. And at that time, I was going to create a show called San Diego transplant and I was gonna do was just still myself being a tourist, you know, and just discovering while I learned the city, which is what Stan is doing right now. So in his case, we ended up building a show called why not? Like why not Wyoming? And it all ties in with the branding and on that, but Stan's not talking about mortgages on these videos, are you? Well, not yet. I try to avoid it.You know, I love that we came up with the name, why not? I don't know if the listeners will be able to tell. But I got a fairly dry sense of humor. And using that reverse psychology works really well. For me, I think it becomes a little bit of a funnier thing. But yeah, we try to avoid talking about mortgages, we'll do a bunch of stuff that is mortgage related.You know, what is interest rates and PMI, and so on. We teach classes up here in town, and we'll probably record some of those and get you guys to edit it. You know, it's been a lot of fun where we've caught on, like you mentioned, the news stations have have reached out to us. There's there's two big companies that run before local news stations. And they've been reaching out and asking us, hey, you know, do you want to get on our show? Do you want to advertise with us? You know, you seem like you're doing pretty good with video. The other thing that's happened that kind of came out of left field for me, because I don't think I'm some sort of trending superstar. Butyou are, oh, all of a sudden, like people are like, Hey YouTube guy, would you do our product? Would you do this or that we'll you know, we'll give you a free product, we'll we'll sponsor this or that. I didn't see that coming in a million years, I'll be honest. So that's been kind of fun and interesting to see the variety of people that are interested in what we have to say. And you're coming from a position of value. And that's what like, I think a lot of times, and maybe even now you're starting to see it. But before we even started doing this, I don't know if you'd call this conversation. Like we don't have to talk about mortgages. And as a matter of fact, and last, we talked about mortgages and more attention you're gonna get, because when you when you guys start creating videos, you start creating content, what you're really doing is you're just creating conversations, you cannot create conversations without creating content first, right. AndI want to give you guys a different analogy, especially for all your mortgage brokers out there, or even brokerage owners. And this is what this should click because a lot of times, like Mike, I just don't get it. I don't get how me doing a video on a business or me doing a neighborhood tour, this can lead the business, and I'm going to share with you how. So let's get out of the real estate business Dan, and I'm going to share with youa very important lesson I learned from taking one of the Digital Marketer courses, so I gotta give credit where credit's due. I started studying Ryan Deiss Digital Marketer, which is a very high end, or very advanced called Digital Marketing Company. They are the guys that do traffic and conversion and all these other things. Long story short, I'll never forget this. And this is the way my mind works because of one of the I don't know where I saw this was one of the training courses I bought, I was taking one of the lessons. And Ryan Deiss who's one of the CO owners of the company, back in the day before they became all famous and all that they had to they were just an online digital marketer company, right. And they brought on a roofing client, the roofing client at the time. And in Texas. How long do you think a roof lasts in a house in Texas thenI have to guess it lasts a while 2025 the severe weather that we have up here that's for sure. 2025 years, which means that the person that they sell their roof to either most likely transacts the house or dies before they need a new roof which means there is no repeat business. Right? It's not and it's not in that type of business. It's not like you get a ton of referrals. Like it's not like roofers are like through show me a roofer. It's sort of like a plumber, right? You're like hey, can plumber he's a plumber is an electrician, nothing bad about that. But I'm just saying it's not like a super duper, duper highly referral business where everyone's like, Oh, sending the roofer business. Sowhen you need them, you just need them when you need them. Right and you don't really have any loyalty towards a person that doesn't maybe you know someone maybe you don't, but it's almost like a guyHello page type business you thought you sir, find the first company you see, and that sounds good, and then you roll with it. So the point is, is that they had to come up with a marketing plan online for this company. And here's what they ended up doing. So they knew they had to go a roundabout way and think outside the box. What they did was they created a gutter cleaning service. And in the gutter cleaning service, let's just say the going rates were $99 to get your gutters clean, they charged 25 except all their gutter cleaners were experts at identifying roofing issues.What do you think happened next in?Well, I can imagine they started to identify a lot of faulty roofs or roofs with problems on a percent of their sales went through the roof, but they had to create a gutter cleaning service to identify the roof issues, right. So they had the forward thing. See when I'm looking at a lender, in your case, having video that's exactly what it is. The video is your gutter cleaning service to start having more conversations. This is true for a broker owner that's trying to recruit this is true for a lender that's trying to build more relationships. This is true for anybody. See, what we're doing is we're not creating content and videos to sell our shit. We're creating, we're creating content and videos to have more conversations to build trust that will eventually lead to us selling our shit.Right? And that's just that's just the reality of it. Right? And I want you Let's go through sort of what's happening in your market because I wanted to have you on the show. Becausewhen you have the opportunity to do something different and stick out or stand out. That's the Holy Grail. Everyone's always asking us, okay, I want to get leads. I want to get this. I want to get that, folks. Warren Buffett once famously said, when zig zag or they zag Zig. That's exactly what this business is. Because everyone can trip over a mortgage broker on the street, everyone could trip over a real estate agent on the street. And what really makes someone hire you9.9 times out of 10 it's brand and personal relationship. And if they envision themselves to working with you, would you agree with that, Stan? Yeah, I agree. And I think that is the great unknown about video. I didn't certainly know that even six or eight months ago, how much people get to know you through that video exposure. I mean, people, people walk up to me now, like, they've known me for years. And maybe I've met him once before, maybe I haven't. So the other thing that happens, just intuitively, I at least for me, as I started to create things that I say kind of routinely as part of my video making process, right and, and we went on a road trip, I decided that the best way for me to do these tours, especially in a great big state, like Wyoming was a road trip around. And so I started just telling people in my video just kind of just naturally Hey, jump in the car, let's go we're going on a trip, you know, and now it just opens up like a crazy funny line when I bumped into someone at a coffee house, Hey, come on up. And let's go we're going for a ride, you know, like, let's talk for a minute. And it just kind of it transitioned from video to real life really intuitively. What happened? The smaller the town, the easier it is, believe it or not, because think about it, like you come to San Diego is a lot of people are doing video you go to Chicago, New York or a major city. And then you're not so much you don't have as much attention on there. Even though there's more people, even those a bigger population. But you don't have as much attention because you're just one of many. Whereas in Cheyenne, you're one of only how many other mortgage brokers in the Cheyenne market are doing video.You know, there's a few people doing some real short, you know, the short, short recordings or whatever that they throw on Facebook, or maybe you know, some some reels kind of stuff, but I don't think anybody's doing YouTube. There's one real estate agent that is doing some YouTube stuff, but it's negligible. So you gotta go way up north, there's a there's a Gallup north, it's doing a really good job with YouTube videos and short, short shorts, recordings. But that's it. I mean, in the whole state, there's like two of us. That's why you got the news.I love it. So why don't you share with everybody, you know, are you nervous when you got started? What did you think, like, come through that because most people are usually like, hey, I want to do it. But everyone wants to just be done with it. But very few people actually will take action and go through and actually do it. I never understood why.But my gosh, Mike i i can tell you exactly why. You know, it started out with this goes back years. I'll be honest, this goes back to one of my first jobs when I had to do some phone, some phone work. I worked for a large hospital in Colorado, and I had to do some phone work and I'd always think Man, I hate the way I sound on the phone. And someone told me you know what, whatever you sound like is what you sound like you talk all the dang time you never shut up. So just get over it right and then I started to contemplate doing videosLast year and I'm like, Man, I got a face for radio bro. I don't know if I should be doing these videos and then people are like, whatever you look however you look man, you just, you know, you walk around all day you're not hiding under a rug. So get out there and do it. That was it. And and then the follow up to that it's just, you know, scripting like, do I am I gonna sound like a robot? Or am I gonna sound natural, I'm gonna look natural. How's this gonna come together? And I would say the first couple of videos were pretty brutal. I'm not gonna lie. I won't sugarcoat it. I stumbled over the lines, I think we recorded you know, the first one was a eight minute video, I think we recorded an hour and 20 minutes worth of stuff and just kept kind of getting through it. It wasn't, it wasn't embarrassing, because I knew somebody was going to clean it up first, I guess. But it was it was kind of brutal. But after that one, I would say literally, the very next video got 100 times easier. And then from there, they've gotten easier and easier. I still feel like I tried to read the script, or I tried to, you know, make it real polished or professional. And I'm getting over that, you know, I,you know, maybe your listeners will go check out my channel, we just did a brutal, brutal, brutal pub tour. And there was no scripting like, I'm like, Okay, I'm gonna go visit these 13 places, I'm probably going to get drunk while I do it. And I'm gonna have to try all this stuff that I learned about each of these stops, because I'm doing a little history tour with it. And you know, my brand has to teach people something. So I might as well tell them about these breweries. And you know, by the time we got to the end, did I drop an F bomb? Yeah, I did.I did, and that others did a great job of leaving it in there for me. So that was fun.You just got to have fun with it. And you know, that's what I'm learning and the nerves will go away. Have you ever, like hung out with somebody that you just can't be yourself around?A couple times, I got a brother in law thatwas trying to impress him, right. So I tried to live live large, and it's just, it's uncomfortable. You know what I mean? It's, it's no differently like that on video. Like, when you're creating content, you're just speaking to one person at a time. And you're right, like, you should I always tell people, you can't be nervous about the act of shooting video. Because if you are, why you're you control it, like you could just delete it or not post that video or not do it, you can just reshoot it, right? So the whole act of of shooting and and all that stuff is just mindset. None of this stuff is hard. Like if you truly, and I always say this on the show is like if you surely believe you're the right person for the job, whether you're a lender or a real estate agent, it actually becomes your obligation to let the world know about it. And if not, that's very selfish and shady. And if you don't agree with that, then you're not the right person for the job. So there's either one or the other. There's no in between on this. So you have to really look at that for yourselves. And everyone always says I'm the right person for the job. Well, if you're the right person for the job, why the hell are you so scared to tell the world about it? That's when it comes down to you guys. And it's not that creating content or video and all that stuff is hard. It's just something you're not used to. But I'm gonna go on a limb and stand Do you remember your first loan application? Or actually, let's do your first million dollar loan application. Within the first year or two? Were you fucking nervous?I can remember doing both. My first loan application was was utterly ridiculous in the in the day and age of technology.I wanted to be that personal touch right? So I grabbed my old paper 1003 and ran over to the people's house and wrote down all the information and I was nervous as heck. And I thought, Geez, what if I forget some piece of pertinent information? Or what if I don't, you know, get this right or I don't explain something right. And then I realized when I got back to the office, that that was the stupidest thing to be worried about, because it was a simple phone call to get the rest of the information that I maybe forgot like this. That's how I feel about video and just you maybe you do record, you know, rerecord it or you delete something and start over, but it's not the end of the world if it's not perfect on the first try. And that's kind of how that loan application when I remember the first time my first time I had showings, I was 22 years old, and I got the client from cold calling. So I would just do whatever it took back then. But I was working in the city of Chicago, I just moved back up from Carbondale where I went to college and I didn't know my way around the city of Chicago. So and we didn't have at that time we didn't have phones that had Mapquest on him. We had to go to Mapquest online and then print out the instructions, and then print this shit out. Like I would have outside brains, I would bring the Mapquest and I'd have a sheet of paper like this. And if we're looking at six properties, I would have six sheets of paper, I'd have the listing sheet on top and then beneath it would be the Mapquest instruction because I had no fucking idea where it's going. And I had to go out there and fake it till you make it with these clients. So like so what's this neighborhood like? I'm like a. And as a matter of fact, the day before the showings, I went out and I drove the route, just so I didn't look like an idiot with them in the car with me.Right and you had this is like the type of stuff that I didn't like seeoften be like, Hey, I'm not gonna go any showings because I don't know what the neighborhood is, which is no differently. So I'm not going to shoot this video because I don't know what I'm going to look like. Like folks get over yourself. No one is. And we're not that important, like, I'm not that important stands out to important, the only one who thinks that we're that important ourselves. That's right. And I think that's true as so many things, Mike, you know, we started teaching these classes in front of rooms full of people, and I can tell you even now I get nervous before we're going to go do it. But for me to sit back and say, No way, I'm too afraid I'm not going to do it. The only person I'm hurting is myself, I'm just shoot yourself in the foot with that mentality. So you know, get out of your comfort zone and go do something new. So let's, let's go into your video strategy. Totally agree. So when we started out with Stan, he started out doing a lot of stuff. Like there's different types of content you could create for different reasons. When we saw standard channel, or we're standing the opportunity, we just know that there's no one else in Cheyenne doing enchance, a big city, relatively speaking to the area, it's a city, right, any city gets searched on YouTube. And because Dan was the first one there, that's why we're able to pop his channel and say, pop his channel, he's generating lots of 1000s of views on the videos. And that's what led to him getting picked up by the news and all that stuff. But now that you've built out the channel, and you have that street club, the video that he was doing, he's referencing here is really funny. It was about what, eight minutes long, nine minutes long, give or take. Yeah. And the longer you did, you did a brew tour on site. So you guys had like the city was putting on like a Abreu history tour. Right. So I'm curious, because I haven't talked to you about this. But what people don't realize is the act of shooting, the video turns into relationship building itself, as well as other additional content you could be doing on stories and all this other stuff. So I'm curious to know, like, you're walking around on this tour, how many people were on the tour?You know, it didn't really have like a point, a starting point, you know, and then get to the end line, it was kind of jump in the middle, you know, go at your own pace sort of thing. So, I mean, there were, I don't know, hundreds of people doing the tour, but there wasn't a group of 100 are going from place to place to place, right. So and some people are going backwards to the direction we were going. So we kind of kept bumping into a few people here and there that we'd see over and over at different stops. But yeah, so it was a little bit unique in that way, just because everybody was kind of doing their own thing. How many conversations did just the fact that you had a video camera in your tripod with you start throughout the day? Oh, I mean, we had 13 stops, there had to been 40 kind of I mean, it was three at every every stop probably. And, you know, a half a dozen of those 40 or so conversations were probably people like oh, no, don't get me on camera. And I'm like, don't worry about it. You're gonna be on camera? Yeah.Then I'll get input when you're having a conversation. So what are you doing these videos for? What are you doing this for? And then he's creating an excuse to start? Well, I'm actually a mortgage broker. And what we do is we go around here and you have that conversation, which is totally different than just going up and be like, Hey, do you need a loan? Oh, by the way, my name is Stan. That's like asking a girl to get in the bed the first time you meet them, guys. This is not what you do. Right? You don't you can't just ask for business. Before you even know someone, you have to earn it.And you only earn it came out of that too is meeting meeting people and having those conversations but then also meeting either the management or owners of the establishments we were at everybody was jazzed, right? Like they're like, hey, when you know, When can you come back and let's talk more about my business. I'm like, I'd love to come back and talk more about your business. That was a really powerful part of that tour as well. So I was going right there. Perfect. So like what we should do, we'll just turn this into a coaching session, as long as we're here. What I want you to do and what you should do now is that yes, you had 10 bars, okay, now you could go to all 10 of those bars and do a business owner interview on them that gives you 10 More videos to do. See what's going to happen on the business owner interviews is that those owners are going to share that video around with their friends, family, aunts and uncles and all of those owners lips somewhere. All of those owners have a referral for Stan over the next 12 months. It's just a matter of if they're gonna give it to him. We've seen a guy this is a funny story status is funny. This is what happens with business owner interviews. So we have a dude in Northwest Arkansas and he went out and he did this business owner interview for some kind of like it was in their market it was like the new swanky hotspot right? This dude sort of The Bachelor so he was taking a chick there on a date and he went there on it he takes his girl on a date after he did the business owner interview with the owner right so here he comes he's got it he's got this girl on his on his arm he's trying to he's trying to impress her and all that pulls up to the restaurant the owner steps aside everybody come here come here I got the best table in the whole restaurant for you right here you got the perfect view brings them a bottle of wine on the house and all that the chicks like holy shit, this guy was this guy. And this is what's funny about the story is the guy goes you know later on and they start doing business together. And and he goes like this he goes seeI'd like to say something because Hey, Jay,it's funny that, you know, my wife's cousin is a real estate agent. And, you know, traditionally we're always using her, but you are now my real estate agent now. Right? So he literally, we're just talking about how do you step over prior relationships, and you do it through adding value to other people's lives, you guys know, right. And there's just so much leverage. With video, you can do that. If you're in a market like that, just imagine going out and networking with all the different businesses in that market and let them sell your stuff, right. But you have to give to receive, you should always try to give it's written in the Bible, those who give, give, give, give, get it in return in some way, shape, or form. It's just the way we're supposed to be, in my opinion. Unfortunately, a lot of us always have our hands out.And when we have our hands out, nothing really lands in them to do that. That's right. So I want you guys to think about coming from a value or if you're thinking about video come from a position of value and contribution as opposed to because it's not about the content that you're creating. It's not about what you're doing on video, it's about how you're doing it. And how you're leveraging it. Tell me really quick as a prior to Denver, what are your ratios? versus how much of your business comes from real estate agents? How much your business comes from your own sphere of influence? Where does most of you originate from? And what would you say your largest sources are, um, you know, Don, in our Denver market, I was I was pretty blessed to get in early in my career with a bunch of doctors, nurses and surgeons, and surgical techs. So I got a lot of business out of the hospital environment. Wellness, I'll get into why, but that just I fell into the right niche. And so I was really fortunate to be able to start building up my business by giving out referrals, I wasn't necessarily hounding real estate agents for their referrals, as much as I was saying, Hey, do you want to partner up? You know, I might, I might not give you as many as you give me or, or maybe I will, who knows. So I would say my business down there over the last, you know, five years or four years that I was in that market has been 60%, self generated 40% referrals, and of those referrals, you know, 3030 35% Of that number, that total number was from real estate agents. So we did pretty well within that niche. Up here in Cheyenne, it's a little different. Everybody starts out at the real estate agent level.It feels like I mean, I'm still getting another lay of the land. We've only been up here since December. Butthe banking industry is very strong here, right? A small town people are familiar with their bank, they've been banking there for a long time. So we have to overcome the stigma of going outside of the bank for a mortgage, and the relationship that that person then might have with their real estate agent friend that they've known since they were 12.You know, we we've really, I spent a lot of time last year, you'll remember some conversations, my eyebrows, like what does it mean to brand yourself like I have a logo was that my brand, like trying to make a brand. And what I found out is when we created this show, in large part thanks to you, Mike, you got me off of that topic and said, hey, it doesn't matter what that branding piece looks like that logo, you have a brand that fits your personality and who you are. And what I realized, that I love doing was teaching people stuff. And that's how the whole video series has come together, we were taking people on a ride to teach them about our local area about a local business. And that has translated from the show being called Why not Wyoming to why not university right? We got why not you and we're doing these whole series of classes around town. And when I go talk to the Board of Realtors, it's it's really interesting people know that I am there when I stand up to talk, I'm going to tell them about some new educational opportunity that's going to grow their business. Yeah, and that has been our value add that I don't think I would have put my finger on without you kind of steering my show in a direction and then allowing my personality to come out. If I was just doing mortgage related content. I just be up there droning on and on. Most peoplewhether regardless of what business you're in, even me like I'll do a video on how to do video. It's the least engaged stuff I post I swear, like and it'll be really good content. It's like our training content. Like I'll do a video on how to script a video through story. And that'll be you're gonna copy all great video good video, but truth is, is that that doesn't generate a shitload of views and attention a lot of times, same with real estate. However, I do create a lot of it because there's different content for different reasons. You see, like if you guys want to go to my website, you can go to www dot real estate marketing do.com And what you're gonna see on the website is a bunch of content. Every page on the site has a video and the reason why I created all thatstuff over the last five, six years is because when people visit our site, they're not questioning whether or not I know what I'm doing. It's sort of self evident. They're questioning how I'm doing it. And if they like me, Can you envision yourself working with a dude? Can you not envision yourself working with a dude? And truth as you guys get my personality, if you listen to my show, you know, I'm not the most perfect human being I sit every day. However, I'm 100% authentic. And what what what people really want is just a trust, and you cannot outsource authenticity, you cannot.You just can't do it. And when people I believe when people look at a lender, or an agent, or financial planner, or anybody, the first thing that comes through their mind, and people always say you don't judge a book by its cover, you're shady. If you do that, well, I'm sorry, that's just the way God made you. Everyone's going to judge a book by its cover. It's just the way that it is guys. Right? That's just the reality of it. And when you look at somebody, I could like, look at somebody, like, I could tell I'm gonna get along with that guy. Right? You get that same feeling, right? I could, I've liked that person's Mojo, I'm gonna, I'm gonna I want to drink a beer with that guy, I want to hang out with a guy. You just know who your tribe is. There's a reason why elephants hang out with elephants. Like I've never seen an elephant and a cat hanging out and watching a movie together. It's because we're naturally attracted to people that are like us, whether way way shape or form they may be there might be personality that might be erased, that might be in skin color that might be in whatever it is. But whatever it is, understand that you're the only one like it out there. And when you embrace your own individuality, and your uniqueness and your authenticity, and you scream it from the rooftops, and you're damn proud about it, that's what people are attracted to. No differently than what Stan is doing now and Wyoming no differently than what I've done on the show for the last six years. Some people are gonna like it. A lot of people aren't.I love when a lot of people aren't, because if you don't have haters on your shit, you're not doing it right. You're not meant to be perfect. It doesn't exist. God's the only perfect beam that exists in the world. And you're not him. Don't even try to compete. What you can do is embrace what you are, whom you are, how you do it, and scream that from the rooftops. And I believe that you'll be rewarded through people just like you because that's who you will track. There's not a shortage of business.There is everyone I look everyone I look at, like literally, everyone lives somewhere unless I check.So it's not a matter of if they're going to move, it's really a matter of when they're gonna move folks. Statistically, in Chicago, when I was practicing in the city was three to five years in the suburbs was four to seven. I knew my numbers because I knew if I just stayed in front of people, everything we're talking about when it comes to branding, content creation, the more people who know what you are, the more opportunities that open up. But it is mathematical not theory.If 100 people see your content, 10 to 15 of them are moving this year.The question is, are they going to use you when they do?The more you're on top of mind, the more likely that happens? Right? So this isn't rocket science. This is relationship building.This is leveraging content. And this is all based upon your personal brand.Stan, what are you going to do with? Have you tried any events with real estate agents yet on the video stuff, if you taught a I think your next move is a teacher scripting class, you have the social St Cloud scribe to do it now. And you could literally just launch an education series towards real estate agents. You could partner with real estate agents and do different neighborhood tours. You could partner with real estate agents and do different construction tours. Because you're not a real estate agent. Your job is not to sell those properties. It's their job. But you still share the same client.Yeah, I think some or all of that is in the works. You know, we we launched our educational series for real estate agents. In fact, we're doing a class this evening. It's going to be tailored at mortgages, mortgage one on one workshop, because we had to start somewhere. I would love to start at the beginning of the year. And then goal planning and you know, Vision boarding and all kinds of fun, cool, ethereal stuff like that. But here we are in May. So we thought we're gonna start with some mortgage stuff. So people remember what we do. And then next month, we've already announced our June class is going to be on social media and some video stuff. So exactly what you said. But we have been reaching out to there's a few people that like I said, are doing some of the short, you know, forum video stuff that have been doing some neighborhood tours, we want to put that on steroids. So I've been reaching out to them because they're already fairly comfortable with that given area or that neighborhood. So we're gonna go back and kind of recreate some of their neighborhood tours, but we're gonna put it on steroids with a little more viewership. You know, a little bit better quality, so on and so forth. And thenyeah, just continuing to do what we do with the business owners. I think that's that's really our kind of our strategy for the next you know, two to three months is continue getting these videos, these people on video that are owning businesses. You know, like you mentioned earlier, when youWhen you do an interview of the business owner, they let you, you know, take them in or they share it or whatever I found even on our on our beer tour, I asked every single manager of every, every all 13 places we went, I was like, Hey, do you mind if I share this, like, I'm gonna take you in this? And they were like, Yeah, that's fine. But what I found is you can't always take a business page, but you can check in at their location, which achieves kind of the same results. So I just, I'm gonna go back. And you know, we've already pushed that video out, but I'm gonna go back and repost it and just check myself in at these various different locations, even with the video we already have created, and then that way, they'll get a double dose when we go back and do their interview. So yep, I would go, definitely, I would go back and think of diners, drives and drives, but recreate that for Cheyenne, and hit up all these different pubs and bars. And I bet you that well, I mean, I know what's gonna happen, but do it. And then maybe we'll have you back on the show. And you can tell people what happened. We Awesome. Hey, I wanted to say one other thing when you were talking about not being perfect, too.You know, what a true statement. And And yet, the imperfections are the things that people are drawn to quite often. When I look at the commentary that comes through my videos, it's, it's funny how often somebody, you know, it's easy to get defensive. And so I'll read a comment where somebody's like, Hey, you didn't pronounce that, right? That's not how we say that, or whatever. And I could be like, hey, what a jerk. Why are you all up in my grill over this? I didn't even know like I say in the in the video I'm visiting, how the heck did I know that? But instead, I'm like, hey, thanks so much for educating me. That is awesome. Man, I will absolutely remember that now for the rest of my life, you know? And if you take that approach that yeah, we're not perfect. And people are going to call you out for that. But it was that that even got the engagement started. And if you don't get defensive, and you just stick with the engagement, man, all of a sudden, you're having three or four more conversations that you wouldn't have had otherwise, you know, if everything had gone perfectly, so embrace those imperfections. That's a great point, I think Jay Baer wrote a book called Hug Your Haters, addressing how to hug on haters, and then how you flip those into, you know, conversion, because you'll be amazed a lot of people will go out there and yeah, they'll hate and then you'll just address it. And then they'll before you know it, they'll be you guys will be best friends. Right? You'll just see some of those people you get, you will get some keyword keyboard warriors out there, no doubt. But that's good. Like, there's everybody who said the same, but there's no such any PR is good PR year and all the time. And who cares? If people are talking, then it's working. That's all that matters. So any other closing thoughts, Dan, that you have any tips for people advice for people, I think you want to mention, I will just go back to where I started, which is what my mentors told me your voice is, you know what it is you sound how you sound and you look how you look. And unless you're living under a rug. Don't be afraid to put that on a recording or on a video because it is who you are. And the more you act like who you are, the better the results are going to be. Love it. Stan, if you folks are in the Wyoming area, but you're licensed in other states to maybe an agent wants to reach out to you or something. Why don't you go ahead and tell people how they can reach you, they could connect with you go ahead and tell them what channel you have. And they could follow you on there if they want to check out some of your content.For comment, yeah, for sure. If you want to see the comment, it's why not? Wyoming wy And O T question mark, Wyoming. That's our YouTube channel, we are@www.db l h loans.com. That's our website. And you can always call me direct. If you have any questions about how to implement some of this stuff or what my experience has been. I'd love to answer it. 720-883-8452 Appreciate it. Stan. Keep it up, dude. Stay the course excited to see what happens in the next three to six months with this. You're doing everything right. Just keep doing it. Folks, thank you. And don't you stop listening to this podcast if folks if you need any help. And you like what you heard here today on Stan story, feel free to reach out to us. We'd like partnering with different mortgage brokers, investors, lenders, real estate agents, broker owners, recruiters, you name it in their local markets. And this is all we do. We script that and distribute videos but more importantly, we give you the right strategy that should fit your brand so that you're actually not looking awkward on video you're actually excited to get on video and that all dials and dials in with the picking up the right strategy, which is my expertise. So appreciate guys listening. Feel free to reach us you can visit real estate marketing do.com Real Estate market.com leave us a review here connect with me on Facebook, Instagram and check out our channel real estate marketing do it on YouTube. And so make sure you subscribe but we will see you guys next week. Have a great day. Stan, thank you so much. And we'll talk to you guys next week. Bye. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing do.com We make branding and video content creationSimple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training, and then schedule time to speak with a dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

What a Lad
Super Rugby Preview- Round 12

What a Lad

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 35:20


Geez last week really threw a few spanners in the mixer after the all the Aussie teams impressed. Although it was bad for our tips it is awesome for the competition having really competitive games across the board. This week Searley and I, review all the games from last week and a few players who stood out. For this week, we do our best to find you some winners, highlight some key players and most importantly try to find you some value for the punt. If you enjoy the episode, don't be shy, give it a share it's very much appreciated. This episode was sponsored by Swysh, the perfect gift for sport fans – Check them out Here Swysh

ExtraChristy - Podcast
Straining to Forget

ExtraChristy - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022


Straining to Forget Straining to Forgeta sermon by Rev. J. Christy Ramsey DOWNLOAD A LIVE RECORDING Audio from worship at the 9:30 AM Worship Service April 3,2022at Lee Vining Presbyterian Church, Lee Vining,CAand given that same day at 11 AM at Valley Presbyterian Church, Bishop, CaliforniaBoth Services were via ZOOM™edited from a flawless transcription made by edigitaltranscriptions all errors are mine. Philippians 3:4b-14 Sermons also available free on iTunes “Morning, Swimmers. How’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on a bit. Then eventually one of them looks over to the other and says, “Why did that oldster call us ‘swimmers’?” And the other fish said, “Don’t worry about that. What the heck is water?” (From the 2005 commencement speech at Kenyon College by David Foster Wallace.) We don’t think of society that we swim in all our lives. It’s invisible to us. Even though it’s all around, supporting us, hemming us in, up and down and all around. And Paul doesn’t think about society when he talks about his position in life. Paul’s terms are remote and romanticized. Pharisee? What’s the educational requirements of the Pharisee? Who is a Pharisee? What is a Pharisee? We might think we know, but we don’t. A medical procedure done on the eighth day? What does that matter? And what is the Benjamin tribe? Why does that make a difference? You know, you want to know, what does Paul sound like today? Well, I thought about it. And here’s my intro letter to the Presbyterians. If anybody has confidence in being a preacher, it’s me. I was assigned male at birth and, bonus, identify as male. I’m a cisgender person, a heterosexual in a heteronormative culture. I can say who I love in any state, and I can hold hands with my beloved in public. I can tell a grade schooler in Florida that Betty Lynn is my wife, and I love her. And my marriage is just marriage, not straight marriage. And it’s recognized by hospitals, courts, insurance, and yes, the all-important wedding RSVP. I’m a citizen from birth of the United States of America, of the Cleveland Browns people; a white Anglo-Saxon Protestant born of white Anglo-Saxon Protestants. I’m not in danger of exile from the only country I’ve known because I was brought here as a child. Nor am I told sharply to “Speak American” when I use my native language, even though it is more native to this land by 15,000 years than the King’s English brought here by colonizers. As to the law, I am a proud 48-year holder of a driver’s license and an insurance card. I hold the same country’s passport for the last 40 years. I’ve never been a refugee, an alien, or a migrant. I have a health insurance plan group number and have added recently a vaccine card with, yes, four shots recorded. My papers are so legit, I don’t need to show them when I use a check or credit card. As to zeal, ha-ha, I am a high school, Presbyterian College, and Presbyterian Seminary graduate, first-time passer of all five Presbyterian ordination examinations, an ordained Presbyterian pastor licensed to wed in four states and bury in all 50, recently elected by my Presbytery to Stated Clerk. My religious holidays are federal holidays, and work and school closings and seasonal greetings follow my religious calendar. 93% of Americans celebrate my religion’s Christmas with me. How many times did you remember to wish others a Ramadan Mubarak this week? As to righteousness under the law, no felonies, not even a misdemeanor. A clear background check and a credit score above 750. Graduate of the Sheriff’s Academy. Not so much me, but thanks to my whiteness, I can drive at night. I can sit on a porch. I can jog any road, stand on a corner, and barbecue at a park without vigilantes or police involvement and a criminal record. This is just normal for me. Maybe it’s normal for you. It’s a sea I live unaware that there is water all around me, holding me up. What is this water? This is just normal life. Maybe it’s normal for you. Maybe you rebel at cisgender, heteronormative, indigenous colonizers, the war on Ramadan, dismissing them as politically correct because that’s how normal works. You see, the way normal works is anything that isn’t white male-centered Christian with the big “C,” following heterosexual gender roles, is special, is identity politics, PC, not normal. This is the way we keep people in their place. We tell people what is normal as another way of saying, “Know your place. There’s no place for people like you in ‘normal.’” Do you know there’s others in this world? For them, what I think of normal life for me, just a given, is seen by them, by the majority of the world, as a life of privilege. Sure, I work. But in that 50-yard dash to the finish line I started about 10 yards away from the finish. Others have to do a half marathon to do that 50 yards, or get to run with their shoes tied. Or, if they’re playing beach volleyball before 2012, they have to compete in bikinis, not shorts. Some have to run the race with their shoes tied or even chained because that’s the way the world is. That’s normal. What water? We’re just swimming here. Now, many have said that Paul’s Letters Introduction is a rhetorical device, that being with Christ and the gospel is of so much greater value than the others. It is only as if the other’s trash. Do you know it’s a privilege to toss privilege in the trash? Only those with privilege can toss it. If you don’t have privilege, you are reminded often that you don’t have privilege to toss away. Only white folks can say they don’t see race. Society doesn’t give non-whites that option ever to forget. Yet even then, as we look at the whole Bible and the scriptural witness, Paul is not forgetting his normal privilege. His Roman citizenship comes in handy when he gets cross-wise with the local authorities. He claims it when he gets a chance, is using it to advance a gospel and help himself and others from punishment and even death. I guess if you’ve got it, privilege, flaunt it for the gospel. Back in Acts 16 we see Paul in prison for freeing a woman from the owners that were exploiting her labor and her talents for their own benefit and profits. Christians getting in trouble for calling out folks getting rich by oppressing others. That’s in the Bible. They are accused of these Jews were causing an uproar against the customs that are illegal for us as Romans to follow. Law and order. We’re supposed to oppress these people and make money. It’s all in the law. It’s okay. In fact, it’s required. Acts 16. And that wasn’t the only time he was arrested and used his Roman citizenship to spare himself. Ephesians, Philemon, Colossians, and Philippians are traditionally, this book itself is traditionally written during his arrest time, recorded in Acts 21 through 28. And there Paul is, again, upset and normal, being accused of bringing in Greeks. That’s right. Smuggling them foreigners, those illegals. Those people not like us that don’t belong here should go back where they belong. It’s almost as if he believes what he said in Galatians 3:28. Neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, neither male nor female. Neither male nor female? Paul. Yikes. You’d better stay out of Florida, buddy, with that gender fluid talk. No doubt many of you are firing up the emails to explain to me how it’s spiritual and only for Christians, or anything else to smooth and dilute the message. But remember, if you think this message is smooth and diluted and not upsetting, remember Paul was beaten in prison and finally killed about it. The oppressors and the powerful and the empire knew that he wasn’t just talking about thoughts and prayers. I guarantee you, if Christianity doesn’t get you in trouble with the American Empire, the economic exploiters, and the gender norm police, consider you might be doing it wrong. Gee, Christy. Just because you’re not in town, and safely away up there at Carson City, doesn’t mean you can make us feel bad about being white people. Geez. How in the world can we do this? How in the world can we be like Paul? I don’t want to go to prison. You know, we have changed the normal; haven’t we? I mean, right now I’m sitting in Carson City, preaching to you in Lee Vining. And in about an hour I’m going to be sitting here still, but preaching down in Valley Bishop, if all goes well and the technical winds hold. We have changed. I don’t know if ever you’ve been to Virginia City Sanctuary. I recommend if you ever are, stop in. J.P. will probably give you a tour. He lives across the street. But I was up there visiting. And I looked at their beautiful two-story, maybe story-and-a-half stained glass windows. Gorgeous. Gorgeous. Well, I looked where it used to be. Because they have a thick black drape, at least 20 feet long, covering the stained glass window. My goodness. Jesus would roll over in his grave if he was in the grave. And I talked to him about that. And I said, “Hey, the stained glass, you put a great big curtain over it, I see.” And he said, “Yeah, it was making a glare on the screen.” That is a miracle, friends and neighbors. That is such a change from the way we used to swim. Nothing would change. But they said, “You know, we need the screen. We need to include people that can’t be here anymore.” I’m glad to see you’re continuing it on, even though, “You don’t have to.” And I hope other churches figure out that this is a new normal, a new way of including people that can’t be included. I know a recovery group that used to meet in the church, you know, classic meet in the church every week. And, well, the pandemic, the church closed, so they had to get on Zoom. And you know what they found out? Their attendance doubled. They got more newcomers in six months than they did in six years in a physical location. Turns out people are more comfortable seeking help and being real and vulnerable when they don’t have to go into a church and be in person. Something for us to think about. Is our goal to change people’s lives, to offer help for the hurting? Or is our goal to fill up a physical presence and keep it in a room? Privilege isn’t a horrible thing. Everything I said I’m sinfully proud of. And I’m sure everything Paul said wasn’t bad things. They were good things. But they’re not the only thing. And they’re not the only way to be in the world. And what’s normal for me is not normal for others. For others it’s privilege. And when those other people say they would like the things that I take for granted, when my daughter wants to have the picture of her partner on her desk at school without being called to the principal’s office and a parents’ meeting, I take that for granted. She has to fight for it. When some people say I just want to see the people in church, I want to hear the sermon, but they’re sick or disabled or traveling, or just too much time and energy for an aged body to put out every Sunday, I take it for granted. I go to church. Why doesn’t everybody else? When my friend is at his girlfriend’s house and steps out on the porch and then goes back in the house, only to get the police called upon him and to get arrested because, you see, he’s black, and she’s white, and he must have broken in. I can go out on my porch all the time. It’s normal for me. Perhaps it’s a privilege for others. You know, Paul doesn’t say he gave up privilege. He doesn’t say that it was all in the trash and was over and done, he snapped his fingers, and suddenly he’s a wonderful person and just opened everybody and Jew to Jew and Greek to Greek and all that good stuff. But no. He said he strives. He talks about how he hasn’t attained it yet. He talked about his struggle in Philippians about how he hasn’t attained it, how he keeps on trying to get there, and he knows that the future promises something, that he is worthwhile, struggling with all this stuff and society in this life. And so too with us. I know it is with me. I was at a Presbytery down in Las Vegas, and we walked to a restaurant for a lunch with one of the people seeking to become part of our Presbytery. And one of the women had to go back to the meeting for another meeting, and she left and walked back alone. You know, I didn’t think anything of it. But the other people at the table were [gasp], “She’s walking alone? That’s not a good idea.” I guess women can’t walk places I can walk. It’s normal for me to walk through the city. It’s not something that over half our population can do without thinking. Paul also said something in Corinthians 9:22: “To the Jew I became as a Jew. To those under the law I became as one under the law. To those outside the law I became as one outside the law. To the weak I became as the weak. I’ve become all things to all people so that by any means I might save some.” Friends, how’s the water? Take a look around to see how you’re swimming and ask those that you pass by and those that you seek out what it’s like for them to be in that fish bowl. Amen.

CONK! Daily
CONK! News Daily - 5.3.22

CONK! Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 53:52


Geez, anything happen overnight? TIM CONAWAY and HANK REARDEN, seasoned journalists that they are, might have figured it all out. Then again....

Rebecca Pittenger's Podcast of Weird Songs
Episode 327: She's Giving Us a Weird Expression - Alternative Mix

Rebecca Pittenger's Podcast of Weird Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 2:22


Geez, man, I don't know which of these 2 mixes is better or worse. But this morning this mix sounds better than it did last night. I'm probably gonna re-do the vocals cuz theses vocals sound all horrible and lacking in energy and kinda dead-sounding. Poopity poop poop poop.

Phrankly Speaking
Throwback Thursday NFL Draft Day Episode featuring Cuzzo Geez

Phrankly Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 71:40


Digging in the crates for NFL Draft Day with a lost episode recorded almost one year ago today on last years Draft Day with Cuzzo Geez! Unlike this year which is lacking buzz especially at the QB position, last year was a loaded draft filled with high end QB prospects and LOTS of drama including my 49ers who moved up to 3 to draft their QB of the future and had the NFL world on the edge of their seat. We break down the 49ers drama, the top QBs, the Aaron Rodgers drama, the effect Covid had on the NFL (and NBA), the NFC least, and so much more. And now a year later we can see just how sterling our NFL analysis was, especially compared to some of the hacks that somehow get paid to do this for a living. But first I have to give a special shoutout to Cuzzo Geez favorite actor of all time, that just dropped yet another banger to add to the unbearable weight of massive bangers he's made over years! Happy Birthday Week Cuzzo!!!! Enjoy!

Rap Name Podcast
Rap Names Podcast Ep. 48 with DJ Rick Geez

Rap Name Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 57:38


Mari & Jerv are joined this week by former Clipse and DJ for Pusha T, DJ Rick Geez. They start the show by talking about their current music rotation. Then the guys get to the album they have been waiting to drop for almost a year, a full break down of Pusha T's "Almost Dry" Time Stamps Music Rotation - (1:50) Pusha T "Almost Dry" - (11:55)

BOMM: Black Opinions Matter
Rap Names Podcast Ep. 48: It's Dry Now

BOMM: Black Opinions Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 59:38


Jerv & Mari are back! They're joined by former Clipse DJ, DJ Rick Geez! Geez stopped through to discuss his current playlist, “It's Almost Dry”, the Clipse era and what it was like back then, and much more! Time Stamps Music Rotation - (1:50) Pusha T "Almost Dry" - (11:55) Produced by John Jervay - https://twitter.com/johnjervay Sign up for The Athletic: TheAthletic.com/dings Support us on www.patreon.com/countthedings Find us: www.countthedings.com Social: @countthedings @bommpodcast Facebook: www.facebook.com/countthedings Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

That Voice Podcast
115. Unlock the power of your vagus nerve with Jessica Maguire

That Voice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 30:51


Geez, you've got a nerve!And the big one is the vagus nerve. In this incredibly informative episode Physiotherapist Jessica Maguire explains what our vagus nerve is, how it affects our voice and simple, practical ways to activate it.If you're new to the vagus nerve this episode will be life changing. You'll leave with a whole bunch of tools to manage stress and speak with confidence and flow.To find out more about Jess, follow her on instagram @repairing_the_nervous_system or head to her website www.jessicamaguire.comTo find your authentic voice and make it heard join my six week online course Speak from your Soul - click here to learn more.

Idol Chat
Ambitious Go Fund Me Campaigns

Idol Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 44:48


Could someone please give this guy 5 bucks for some hats already?? Geez! Here are a bunch of outlandish.. I mean ambitious Go Fund Me Campaigns.

Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max
Kam Geez talks upcoming album Charge It To The Game & more on ”Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max”

Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 14:02


Shoutout to Dorchester and Chelsea, Massachusetts' own Kam Geez for coming on my show for an interview. Kam talked about his early life of growing up in Chelsea, Massachusetts, his first passion of playing basketball, and his beginner days of writing rhymes on his Nokia flip phone. He got into his love for acting and getting an A in his theater class when he was in high school. He also discussed his upcoming debut album Charge It To The Game that will be dropping soon. Kam announced that his new single Nothing Like It will be dropping on April 18th. Stay tuned! Kam Geez's music is available on all platforms, including YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4ZZBZB32KqAU4sqS6NwTFQ and Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/kamgeez/1057715589. Follow Kam Geez on Instagram: @high.end.geez and Twitter: @high_end_geez Follow me on Instagram and Twitter: @thereelmax. Website: https://maxcoughlan.com/index.html. Website live show streaming link: https://maxcoughlan.com/sports-and-hip-hop-with-dj-mad-max-live-stream.html. MAD MAX Radio on Live 365: https://live365.com/station/MAD-MAX-Radio-a15096. Subscribe to my YouTube channel Sports and Hip Hop with DJ Mad Max: https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCE0107atIPV-mVm0M3UJyPg.  Kam Geez on "Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max" visual on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6KivNGK7WY. 

Rebecca Pittenger's Podcast of Weird Songs
Episode 315: Everyone Stay Close

Rebecca Pittenger's Podcast of Weird Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 2:06


This is the next song in the possession album: I was in the mood to do a wee bit o' hip hop. It's about how it would be good for Timmy, Bobby, Father O'Malley, and the Me-Character to stay close cuz the world is gonna soon get scarier than it already is. Geez, man, my stuff's been a little bit apocalyptic at times lately. It's probably cuz of the stuff happening in the world in real life.

Wrote Podcast
S7Ep14 – Bud Gundy – Geez Louise

Wrote Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 44:33


Bud Gundy teases the release of his upcoming intergenerational mystery, Inherit the Lightning. We talk about the treasures to be uncovered while writing, as well as the universality of stories depicting the diversity between generations.

KB and the Doc
'Geez the first loss is a hard' - Craig McRae

KB and the Doc

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 7:23


Collingwood coach Craig McRae discusses the Pies close loss to Geelong

The South Florida Morning Show
The South Florida Morning Show HR 4 4-4-22

The South Florida Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 35:34


Geez, what is going on with all these cancelled and delayed flights? We have out aviation expert, Jay Ratliff, join us to explain it all. And this guy is an all time Floridope. Probably a bad idea to be drunk as a driving instructor...

High Hopes Sportscast
S2 E2 This guy can't play til he's 55… Geez!

High Hopes Sportscast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 76:56


In this weeks episode DJ and JJ go over a few more free agent signings, news around the league, a few things that were just announced in the past couple days, and talk about a huge rumor that was put out in the last week. Find out what QB will be given a totally new position this year, plus one of our Vikings is changing his number this year. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hhsportscast-4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hhsportscast-4/support

UBC News World
This Fairhope, AL HVAC Company Offers Urgent AC Repairs & Maintenance Contracts

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 3:05


The AC got you down? No sweat! Just call Ingersoll's Refrigeration Air Conditioning and Heating Inc. (251-928-9392) and they'll have you up and running faster than you can say "Geez, it's getting balmy around here." OK, maybe not that fast! Check them out at https://ingersollac.com (https://ingersollac.com)

Rebecca Pittenger's Podcast of Weird Songs
Episode 304: I Apologize for My Music Sucking

Rebecca Pittenger's Podcast of Weird Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 1:23


Yeah, the music I've been writing for the past month or 2 hasn't been floating my boat as much as my better stuff. It's one of those things that happens to me from time to time, and I never know how long it'll last. It's a writer's block of massive, epic proportions. Geez, man. 2021 was a really good year for music, and there were some nice little numbers in early 2022 for sure, but for most of 2022, I just haven't been feelin' it. As you noticed, I keep on doing songs, anyway, even if they all consistently suck. I think eventually, I'll get my mojo back. I think my mojo is taking a vacation because it's pooped out. C'mon back, mojo! So, in short, this song is an apology for all the people who come here, looking for the goodness of what I used to offer and get disappointed by the sucking sucky-ness, on top of my voice bein' all fucked up, as I mentioned a few days ago. Writer's blocks are dumb.

Light After Trauma
Episode 85: The Five (5) Core Wounds, Part 2 with Alyssa Scolari, LPC

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 34:03


Childhood trauma comes in a variety of different forms – no two trauma survivors have identical histories. However, what all trauma survivors have in common are experiences with the five core wounds that have led to depression, anxiety, PTSD, and other mental health disorders. In this episode Alyssa talks about the last two (2) core wounds and how they manifest in adulthood (to hear about the first three (3) core wounds, please listen to episode 84). Alyssa also discusses how we can begin to heal from our core wounds.  **Every donation to Patreon for the month of March will go to Doctors Without Borders to help support those injured in Ukraine. Alyssa will personally match your donation. See the podcast Patreon and learn more about Doctors Without Borders below!** Patreon Learn more about Doctors Without Borders   Check out the Light After Trauma website for transcripts, other episodes, Alyssa's guest appearances, and more at: www.lightaftertrauma.com Want to get more great content and interact with the show? Check us out on Instagram: @lightaftertrauma   Transcript   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hi, everybody. Welcome back to another episode of the Light After Trauma podcast. I'm your host, Alyssa Scolari. And welcome back to part two of the two part series that we are doing on the five core wounds. This episode was a huge hit. I loved it, and you all loved it too. We actually broke our record on the podcast, which is really exciting. So thank you so much. I'm really happy to be doing part two. I hope everybody's having a good week. I'm having an okay week. I think personally, I'm doing well, but I don't know. I feel very, very heavy this week emotionally. I think everything that's going on in Ukraine is just really weighing on my soul. And I've been feeling pretty isolated as a therapist. There's been so much going on and I people that are being so affected by it, my clients included, and it just feels it's just very upsetting. Alyssa Scolari [01:31]: I don't know what's in the air, but there's been lots of crises and just really difficult moments and just bouts of injustice after are injustice, and it's hard to wrap my brain around. So I'm feeling rather heavy this week, and I'm just trying to work through those feelings. And I think the other issue that's been coming up for me a lot is feeling helpless. I feel very effective as a therapist for the most part. I have my moments, of course, but I'm feeling pretty helpless when it comes to everything that's happening in Ukraine. And I don't know what to do. So I've been really trying to rack my brain on what I can do to help, if anything, because it's very, very hard for me to sit here while other people are being so traumatized and just not do anything about it. So I actually think, what I'm going to do for the month of March is, if you become a patron on the Light After Trauma Patreon, whatever donation you make for the month of March is going to go directly to the efforts to help Ukraine. Alyssa Scolari [02:52]: And specifically, I am going to donate, or we are going to donate, to Doctors Without Borders. And Doctors Without Borders is this organization that works in conflict zones and they are partnering with Ukraine. They're helping people travel to healthcare facilities. They are making sure that people have access to healthcare and medicine. So whatever you donate, the LinkedIn of the Patreon is in the show notes, so just go right into the show notes. And I'm also going to include the link for the Doctors Without Borders so you can check it out a little bit more if you want. But, go onto the Patreon, and whatever you are able to donate would be great. And whatever you donate, I personally am going to match. So if you donate $5, I'm going to donate $5. If you donate 50 cents, I'm going to donate 50 cents. So I feel like this is a really great way for us to just join in together as a family and help when we are otherwise feeling pretty helpless. Alyssa Scolari [03:55]: Now with that being said, if you are not able to give, that is totally fine. But if you are, hey, go right ahead. I feel like that would be a great way to contribute, a great way for us to help. And I will, of course, after the month of March announce how much we have donated to Doctors Without Borders. So again, head over to the link in the show notes, and you will find everything that you need there. And with that being said, let's launch into part two today, which I'm pretty excited for. So if you haven't listened to last week's episode, you might want to go back and do that, because in that episode, we talk about the first three of the five core wounds, but we also talk about what the five core wounds are. Alyssa Scolari [04:46]: As a little recap, basically what the five core wounds are, childhood injuries, injuries to our soul, injuries to our brain. Every trauma survivor has a uniquely different story. No two trauma survivors have the same story, but all of our stories fall within the realm of these five core wounds. And last week, we talked about the first three being abandonment and rejection and betrayal. And we talked about what they are, how they can come about in childhood, and then what they manifest into in adulthood. This week, we are talking about the final two, which are humiliation and injustice. Now, we will start with humiliation. Now, humiliation, this can be felt as early as one to three years of age. And humiliation is [inaudible 00:05:50] exactly as it sounds, right? It is something that causes us to feel like we are bad. It's that feeling of wanting to crawl under a rock and die. It's belittling. And it comes out in a variety of different ways. Alyssa Scolari [06:04]: There are different types of humiliation. There's, I guess you could say indirect and direct humiliation. Maybe the phrase is... And I'm making this up. This isn't coming from anywhere, but I feel like it might be more accurate to say there's aggressive forms of humiliation, and then more passive aggressive forms of humiliation. So let me give you some examples, right? So children who are humiliated are basically being told that they are bad if they do a certain thing, look a certain way, right? So if you get a C on your test at school and your parent says, "I didn't raise no dumbass," or "What are you? A moron. You got to C on a test in the third grade?" That is humiliation. You are calling your child a horrible thing, and then your child is then internalizing that and feeling as though there is something wrong with them. "I am stupid. I am a dumbass. I am a moron." Now, school is just one of the many ways that humiliation can take shape, right? Alyssa Scolari [07:30]: A lot of humiliation also comes with potty training. If you wet the bed, if you miss the toilet, if you don't do something right when it comes to your potty training, sometimes parents or caregivers or adults may scream, may scream at you, may call you names, and this can be very humiliating. It's not so much the screaming that does it, although of course the screaming can be very traumatizing too, but that kind of borders more on rejection, I would say, but it's typically what that parent is saying and their body language. They are so angry at you. They feel some kind of way about you, almost like they feel you are a failure and that you will never get this right. Lots of children tend to experience some of their first bouts of humiliation during the potty training process. And when I say lots of children, I probably should re-say that, because potty training is, some children, they never get humiliated. Most children don't, I would think, but there are quite a few children out there who have been humiliated through potty training. Alyssa Scolari [08:56]: So with humiliation rates, sometimes it can just be very aggressive and very direct. "You're a dumbass. You're stupid. Why are you even bothering playing basketball? You sucked the whole time." Humiliation can also look like the dad on the court. You're five years old and you're in your first basketball game or t-ball game or whatever, and your mom, dad, whoever is on the sideline screaming at you, because you're not fast enough, you're not strong enough, other people are better than you. And this happens. I'm sure so many of you can relate to this. Humiliation, for me, did not happen when it comes to playing sports, because honestly, I never stood a chance in sports, but it does happen, and it is very, very devastating. Alyssa Scolari [09:45]: And then there's more passive aggressive humiliation. And sometimes that comes in the form of people who think they're trying to help you or people who are teasing you. So let me give you a few examples. I'm going to give you some personal examples. People used a lot of passive aggressive humiliation with me with my weight, right? Nobody in my family ever screamed at me for being overweight or outright told me that I was fat and lazy and this, that, and all the other negative connotations that this fatphobic world has against children or adults who are overweight. But I was a pretty chunky child. I had a lot of meat on my bones. I look at pictures of me now and I'm like, "Oh my God, I was adorable. I can't believe people called me fat as a kid." Alyssa Scolari [10:48]: I was freaking so cute. I can't even stand it, but I digress. But basically, I have distinct memories of parties, family parties. A family member, and I'm going to try hard not to out anybody here, but a family member who is no longer... She's no longer alive. When I would go to reach for food at the table, she would take my hand and kind of pull my hand away from the food, not aggressively by any means. It was kind of in a loving manner. And she would go, "Oh, don't be a little świnia. Now, for those of you who are not Polish and don't know what świnia means, it means pig. So I was a little girl going to get some food and I would be told, "Oh, don't be a little piggy." And the way it was said was almost like it came off in an endearing term, right? Alyssa Scolari [11:45]: It's like, "Oh, I love you and I care about you, and I don't want you to be a little świnia," but the impact was... I was freaking humiliated, because it was said in front of everybody else who was at the table, and it was horrifying. As another example, I remember this was maybe 10 years ago. I was at a bridal shower, and I was in the throws. Was it? It was maybe a little... Eh, it was about 10 years ago, maybe a little less. I was in the throws of my anorexia. I was a very, very low weight, a weight that I think for the people in my family thought was great. People were praising me all the time, but I was probably the sickest I've ever been in my life. And there was a bridal shower that I was at. And I was there, I was wearing this dress, everybody was complimenting me, telling me that I looked so beautiful, that they were so proud of me because I had lost all this weight. Oh, it makes my blood boil just thinking about it. Alyssa Scolari [12:55]: But basically what happened is, the dessert came out and I got up to go get a piece of cake. Now, I walked all the way across this room that we were in, and this room was massive, and I grabbed a plate with a piece of cake on it. And as I went to grab the cake, I heard this person from across the room, a family member, yell at me and she went, "You better drop that cake on the table because you don't want to gain back all that weight you lost." And everybody heard, and I was mortified. Again. I was a little bit older, but it opened up that already core wound that I had of humiliation. And she thought she was helping me. She didn't mean it in a mean way. She wasn't being aggressive. I mean, she was screaming, because hey, we're Italian, and that's what we do, we scream. But she thought that she was doing a great thing. She was like, "You got to keep that weight off. You're doing so great." Humiliated. I cannot even begin to tell you. I will never ever forget it. It was horrifying. Alyssa Scolari [14:12]: But also as a kid, I got made fun of not just for my weight, and made fun of/humiliated not just for my weight, but for the way I looked in other ways. Even something that might be as seemingly innocent as... I looked very different from the rest of my family. I'm very fair skinned, whereas a lot of the family members that I grew up with are really, really dark skin, dark hair. I'm really, really fair. So I used to be told all the time that the milk man dropped me off. And I was little. And my older cousins and stuff, they would say this to me, and I would sob and be so embarrassed and humiliated because they would then go on to be like, "Oh yeah, you don't really belong with this family. You weren't wanted, so just the milkman dropped you off." And I was little. I believed that, and it was horrible for me. Alyssa Scolari [15:10]: And then also, because I was so fair, again, I was with a bunch of family members who had very, very dark complexions, and then there's me over here. And they would say, even just at the dinner table, somebody would look over at me and be like, "Hey, where are your eyebrows? I can't even see your eyebrows. Do you even have them? Do you think they'll even grow in? Do you think you'll get them?" It was kind of in just a light teasing sort of way, but why? Why? Because to this day, I am extremely self conscious about my eyebrows. And when I look in the mirror, I wonder if anybody else can even see my eyebrows. It has become such a part of my body dysmorphia. Alyssa Scolari [16:01]: Now, of course, if my family, the people who said these things to me were to listen to this, they'd be like, "Oh my God, you're so sensitive. You're making such a big deal out of it." And that would be gaslighting, right? Because that's the thing, people who use humiliation as a form of relating or communication, especially adults to children, they're always like, "Oh, it was just a joke. What a sensitive kid. She can't take a joke. He can't take a joke. They can't take a joke." But that's not at all the case, right? If you have some of these similar experiences, this is humiliation, right? This is a core wound, and it is devastating. I have so much experience with this. I could honestly go all hunt all day. I will spare you, but parents and adults foster just this horrible fear in children that they are forever going to be criticized and that they will forever have disapproval and that they aren't good enough. Alyssa Scolari [17:10]: And when we become adults and we have this core wound of humiliation, it can go really one of two ways. Some people who have a core wound of humiliation end up being narcissists. They end up having a lot of narcissistic traits, and they can also be people who then go on to humiliate others. On the other hand, you can have people who become extremely dependent when they get older, people who feel like they constantly need the approval of others. This is something that I struggle with. Even in my profession, it took me a long time to be able to make decisions in my job and not feel like I immediately needed to call my supervisor right away and ask if I did the right thing. I was sort of dependent on the opinions of others and the approval of others to be able to function. I don't do that anymore, but I had to work so hard on knowing that I am okay as I am and that I don't need the approval of others. Alyssa Scolari [18:29]: If I would go out and I didn't have at least one person tell me that I was cute or looked great, I would feel humiliated. I would come home and I would dive right back into my eating disorder and feel like, "Oh my gosh, everybody hated me. They must have thought I looked ugly, X, Y, Z." Again, I had a ton of internalized fatphobia back then. I was extremely unwell. I'm being honest about how I was. I've worked on these things, so I don't do that anymore, but that is another way in which humiliation can show up in adulthood. So that is a heavy one, so take a deep breath if you need it, as we transition into this last one. Alyssa Scolari [19:16]: Now this last one is the fear of injustice. And this one is probably one of the lesser talked about of the five core wounds. This one isn't quite a self explanatory as the others, and it's a little deceiving based off of the name. But basically, injustice is when during your childhood, you had excessive demands that were pushed onto you by your caregiver, parent, guardian, whoever. So for example, let's say that you're the oldest and you have two younger siblings. And you're eight years old, seven years old, and you are being forced by your caregiver, your parent to take care of your younger siblings, right? Mom, dad, whoever goes to work all day and you're left at home, at eight years old, to change diapers, feed, play with your siblings, take care of them when you're truly just a child yourself, right? Alyssa Scolari [20:21]: And your parents aren't necessarily really understanding, and they're just like, "You got to do this. This is part of what being the older sibling is." It's excessive amounts of responsibility, too much responsibility with very little compassion and awareness and acknowledgement from the parent, meaning your parents or caregivers are very authoritarian and ice colds. They are very much not about your feelings. They don't really care about you getting your emotional needs met. They put a lot of pressure on you, even to meet your own physical needs and the physical needs of your siblings or whoever else is in the home, or maybe you grew up in a house where your dad was an alcoholic and he was unable to function or provide for the family and your mom made you go to work early, go to work illegally, right? When early, I mean, go to work when you're young, right? Alyssa Scolari [21:25]: Go to work, make money, support the family. Maybe you were also mom's emotional spouse, where instead of confiding in your father about her emotions, she would then turn to you because your father isn't available. Things like that create this core wound of injustice, and it causes a lot of mistrust in the world around you. It also causes this hyper-dependency, but also at the same time, core feelings of ineffectiveness and uselessness. Honestly, because when you are having such excessive demands as a child, you begin to feel like you're never good enough, because truthfully, you are not developed enough to even try to meet the demands of your caregivers. I hope that is making sense. For example, if you're in the fourth grade and you're eight years old, how are you supposed to be expected to take care of yourself, show up at school, be fully rested, and then also come home and take care of your two younger siblings, right? Alyssa Scolari [22:38]: So then let's say you go to school and you're falling asleep at school all the time and your teacher sends home a note to your parent that you're falling asleep in school and your parents screams at you and tells you that you need to get it together and that you shouldn't be falling asleep in school instead of taking a moment to reflect, "Well, why is my child falling asleep in school? What do I think I could do as a parent to support my child?" The blame is pushed onto you, and you alone as the kid. It would be completely possible to expect that you would have all these demands on you at home, and then be able to function in school, but your parent doesn't see that. Your parent expects that out of you anyway. So then all your life, you are expecting the impossible from yourself. And because nobody's perfect, we can never live up to that expectation. Therefore, as much as we need independence and perfectionism, we still feel at our core that we will never be good enough and that everything we do isn't effective and that we ultimately are useless. Alyssa Scolari [23:47]: So, that was a lot. I hope that is making sense, but basically, as you become an adult, those feelings sort of stay the same. Adults tend to just be really, really dependent. They are extremely rigid, and they are extreme perfectionistic. They have a lot of difficulty making decisions for fear of making the wrong one because they believe they're ineffective and ultimately will make the wrong one. They have a huge mistrust of other people because they have been taking care of everything their whole lives, but they also really don't trust themselves. It's a really, really scary and difficult place to be in as an adult. And as you can imagine, it makes getting into relationships, even friendships, even if we're not talking about romantic relationships, it makes all interactions that aren't superficial very, very difficult. Alyssa Scolari [24:51]: So those are the five core wounds. And one of the natural next questions would be, okay, so we know about these core wounds. We've gotten justice, we've got betrayal, we've got humiliation, rejection, and abandonment. Well, what do we do about that? What do we do? Unfortunately, that's really not a question that I can answer, that's very black and white, right? Because everybody heals from their core wounds in different ways. But I will say this, I think that understanding and acknowledging is the first half of the battle. And that's part of why we're doing this episode, because I don't think a lot of people are even aware that core wounds exist. And if we don't know it, we can't heal it. If we can't feel it, we can't fix it. Oy, I sound like such a cheesy therapist now. Geez, somebody make me stop, but I'm serious, right? In all seriousness, we really need to be aware, and awareness is really the first step in healing. Alyssa Scolari [26:04]: And I don't know what healing might look like. For me, healing has looked like not so much therapy, I guess. And I'm in therapy, right? That's no secret. I love therapy, but there's only so much that I think that can be done with talking about these core wounds. I'm very aware of what my core wounds are and I could talk about it in therapy, but I've sort of been in a place over the last couple of years... Well, ever since I started working with the therapist I have now, I've been in a place where I'm ready to really start to try to heal those wounds. Now, I feel like those wounds will always be sore spots. I'm always going to have some sensitive or tender scar tissue around those wounds, but that doesn't mean that they're going to drive my actions for the rest of my life. Alyssa Scolari [27:03]: And one way, for me, that I have been able to stop these core wounds from controlling my life is by putting myself out there and forcing myself to do the opposite of what comes naturally to me. That's part of the reason why this podcast even exists, because I am so good at being a therapist that sometimes I forget how to be a client. And I'm not saying that I'm being a client by doing this podcast, but I am very vulnerable here, and vulnerability does not come easy for me. And I am putting my trauma and my pain out there into the world. And it's, whoo, it gives me chills as I even say it, because every once in a while I'll have this voice in my head be like, "Alyssa, what the fuck are you doing? Why are you sharing this?" Right? But I'm sharing this because it's not in my nature, because my core wounds tell me that I'm not allowed to speak, because I came from family members who always said, "Don't air your dirty laundry." But my laundry isn't dirty. I'm not dirty. My issues aren't dirty. Alyssa Scolari [28:33]: Everybody struggles, everybody. So this is me pushing myself past my limits, past what I've been taught, past what I know, and trying to myself that it is okay, it is okay to speak, and that, airing your dirty laundry is just another way to add shame to mental health issues and adds to the stigma. And again, I don't blame anybody for telling me that. I don't think the people who told me that knew any better, but I know better now, so I can do better. So, so much of what has helped my healing is to just push myself and talk about it in therapy, but then I try to live it in my life. This fear of abandonment that I have, that core wound is huge for me. Alyssa Scolari [29:27]: It shows up in every way, shape, or form in my life. It shows up in ways that I still have difficulty talking about, but I still put myself out there. I still do my best to make friends. I do my best to communicate if these triggers are coming up for me. And I also do my best to try to sit with those feelings and label them for what they are, because I believe, I believe, I believe, I believe that when you label something for what it is and you see something for what it truly is, it takes the power away. Right? If I'm able to say what I'm feeling right now is a fear of abandonment because my friend has not texted me back in seven days, and I think that she hates me and that she's going to leave me probably because of something stupid I said in my last text. Right? If I'm able to look at that thought pattern and I can say, "Ooh, this is my abandonment stuff, and this is definitely coming from my core wound," suddenly things feel a lot more manageable, a lot more manageable. Alyssa Scolari [30:49]: So those are some things that I do to help. I just keep on putting myself out there and making myself vulnerable. It's scary. It's terrifying. It's horrifying. I've got a lot of work to do still, but hey, don't we all. Don't we all. And of course, therapy. I don't want to minimize therapy. Therapy helps so much, and it has helped me so much too. I just, I think in a place right now where I'm ready to put what I've learned in therapy and what I'm talking about in therapy into action in the real world. And if you're not there yet, that's fine. One of the first things you can do is really start identifying which of these core wounds do you have, if any of them. Maybe you have all of them. What do you relate to? What stings the most for you? Alyssa Scolari [31:41]: And I feel like writing about that, journaling can also be really, really helpful. So I hope that this episode was another helpful one for you. I've really loved talking about these core wounds. If you are enjoying what you are hearing, please leave a rating or review for the podcast. It means so much and helps the podcast grow. And again, in order to help with the efforts in Ukraine, anybody who becomes a Patreon member for the month of March and makes a donation, I will match that donation. And all of those proceeds will go to Doctors Without Borders. They are helping with medical aid in Ukraine. So my Patreon link is in the show notes, and the Doctors Without Borders link is in the show notes. And if you are a Patreon member, or if you become a Patreon member, you also are able to request specific episode topics. Alyssa Scolari [32:42]: So if there is a topic that you want me to speak about that I have not spoken about yet, or one that you want me to do again, but a little differently, if you are a Paton member, you can request that. So I hope that everybody has a great week. I am sending so much love to you all. I am holding you in the light. And I will see you next week. Alyssa Scolari [33:05]: Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com, or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @lightaftertrauma, and on Twitter, it is @lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over again. That's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you, and we appreciate your support.

Bb69 Channel - Film & Tv Series
444. Review Geez And Ann The Series - Teman Tapi Mantan ft Watching Movie Channel

Bb69 Channel - Film & Tv Series

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 79:07


#GeezAndAnn #SerialGeezAndAnn #hangginiJuniorroberts  Sobat BB69!  Baru baru ini di Vidio dirilis sebuah serial Indonesia terbaru Geez And Ann The Series yang dibintangi oleh Hanggini, Junior Roberts, Roy Sungkono, Gabriella Eka Putri, dan Nimaz Dewantary  Film ini merupakan lanjutan dari filmnya yang di rilis tahun lalu.   Yuk dengarkan bahasannya bersama Teman Kongkow BB69 yakni  @Watching Movie Channel     Selamat mendengarkan.   Untuk rekomendasi film untuk dibahas dapat DM langsung ke https://www.instagram.com/bb69_channel/      Jangan lupa check dan follow Goplay :https://goplay.co.id/profile/setiawan_bb69channel  See You!   Atau dapat ditulis di kolom komentar.  See You!

Marcus & Sandy ON DEMAND
You Made It Gross

Marcus & Sandy ON DEMAND

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 52:01


What do you refuse to share with you partner? Marcus & Jason's wives don't want them touching their bathroom supplies. Plus, it's that easy for a 9 year old to sneak onto a plane? Geez!

The South Florida Morning Show
The South Florida Morning Show HR 2 2-21-22

The South Florida Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 36:16


Geez, is the only thing standing between us and war in Europe a sit down meeting between Biden and Putin? This is a new development and we have the details. And the Olympics have wrapped up from China. Did you watch any of it?

Up Your Creative Genius
Gayle Edwards: How to create a bigger impact with better branding and messaging

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 40:33


Gayle Edwards is an International, award-winning Global Impact & Personal Brand Strategist, Best-selling Author and Speaker who works with Entrepreneurial and Corporate "Square Pegs" to help them build their identity and authority within their marketplace! More than that though, Gayle is a power-full and intuitive Teacher and Healer who uses her gift of recognising ‘stuck energy' to help her clients release it so they are able to communicate with confidence, clarity and conviction! If you do nothing, things stay exactly the same as they are! Gayle shows you how to become THE EXPERT in your industry rather than just another expert! Timestamp 1:47 Gayle's journey into Brand You Consultancy 15:10 Gayle shares her opinion on how technology has changed the world 16:37 Shaping the collaboration 18:24 People who influenced Gayle in her life 23:48 Gayle's definition of intuitive impact entrepreneurs 31:08 Daily routine that Gayle practices 35:00 Gayle's favorite book and tips on pivoting in life and getting through challenges Social Media Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandyouconsultancy/ Website https://brandyouconsultancy.com/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Linkedinhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Geniushttps://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/ Patti Dobrowolski 00:03 Hello superstars. Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius podcast where you will gain insight and tips to stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host, Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life.  Hey, everybody, oh my gosh, I have Gayle Edwards here. She's an international award winning global impact and brand strategist, a speaker and author. She works with intuitive impact entrepreneurs and purpose driven organisations to help them build their brand and leverage their identity to claim authority and dominate the marketplace.  Gayle, I can't believe you're here. Like I really she's like the founder of Brand New Consultancy, and she combined her spiritual gifts with 30 years in brand marketing, communications, trainings and coaching. And I just want to say we met in clubhouse because we both felt that someone in the clubhouse needed our help, she was able to help them. I don't know what happened to me. I got lost in the fray of it. But it was fantastic. Gayle, I can't wait to talk to you. Welcome to the show. Gayle Edwards 01:37 Thank you so much, Patti. And I'm so honoured and humbled to be here with you today. I'm looking forward to this exchange of wisdom actually, Patti? Patti Dobrowolski 01:47 Yeah, I know, well, because we never really got to talk just for that little brief moment. So and I've been in clubhouse where you've just dropped all these bombs of wisdom on people and you just pour into people. That's how you are. Well, how did you become that? I mean, tell everybody that's listening. Tell us your story. How did you start off doing this and then start doing what you're doing now? Gayle Edwards 02:13 Well, actually started when I was very young. So I'm a big believer that we teach what we most need to learn. Okay, so helping people to get really clear about who they are, you know, what their message is? How are they going to impact? How are they going to extend that impact.  So it's no surprise that I didn't know how to do any of that. And I, I did not know how to do any of that from a very young age. You know, I grew up learning to speak when I was quite old, I was about four, when I first got in sentences, which has been quite late. There was nothing wrong with me, I just didn't want to talk. Patti Dobrowolski 02:55 And you talk so much now that we're making up for now, which is fantastic for all of our listeners, yes. Gayle Edwards 03:05 But what that did to me, is that it made me very observant. Number one, so I became really good at reading people. I would find ways of communicating with them without having to open my mouth. Because that's what it does. It just makes you really communicating.  However, it also made me quite insecure, and very self conscious, as well. I was always the quiet kid. So you can imagine when you're in your own world like that, when you're isolated. My escape was books. So that really fired off my imagination. It really helped to strengthen up and broaden my vocabulary, as well. So by the time I was speaking, by the time I got about five, six, and started speaking, I was actually a very good speaker. A crippled with self doubt. Patti Dobrowolski 03:57 Yes. I bet, oh my gosh. Yes. Wow. Okay. With self doubt. Gayle Edwards 04:07 You know, still very shy in school. And that's, you know, that kind of really started to pay out even more. And I didn't know what I wanted to do for a career, but I knew I still really liked people because I was good with people because, yeah, it's only time so much time observing them. So I started off my career working in PR for the media. See the big BBC over here? Oh, my God. Wow. Patti Dobrowolski 04:38 Beat him off over the BBC. Yes. Gayle Edwards 04:40 Exactly. And that in fact, I used to be the BBC Proms press officer god. Yeah. You know, so that really helped my confidence. Patti Dobrowolski 04:49 Yeah, I bet. Gayle Edwards 04:50 You can't work in the media and not really, especially back then in the 80s. And also being in the BBC as a young black woman. Wow. You know, I was very distinguished or distinctive, you know, like now we have, you know, lots of diversity and inclusion, whatever. So I was very distinctive. So, because I didn't want to stand out any more than I was already standing out, and made myself confident, I became the way out. Patti Dobrowolski 05:16 What did you just act the role and then step onto it. Gayle Edwards 05:21 There's a saying that I absolutely love. And that is act as if you don't force Yeah, I don't like fake it till you make it because that does. Yeah. But act as if, and I always, you know, thought, Okay, if I was, and remember, this was the 80s. And Patti Dobrowolski 05:39 I know, yes, I'm there with you. We're probably around the same age. I'm gay. Yeah. Yeah. Gayle Edwards 05:45 So it all sounds like okay, well, if I was this successful TV media person, how would I be and that's what I didn't? Patti Dobrowolski 05:56 Yeah, fantastic. I love that. I feel like that's how my whole life has been, like, I'll just take on a role. And then I'm a business consultant, then I'm an illustrator, then I'm an actor, then I'm, whatever the moment needs, you have to step into it. And that as if principal, I think, is one of the most powerful things you can do to become more of yourself, right? I mean, to be stepped into a bigger room, don't you think?  Once you do that, you're like, Okay, if I can do that, I can do anything, if I can command the room for the first time. And I would always say to myself, you know, before, when I would first go on stage, and there, there'd be like, 1000s of people in the room, I'd be like, okay, so you only have to do this for the first time once. And then after that, so just imagine that you're on the backside of this, and it's so fantastic. And then I just go into it, you know? Gayle Edwards 06:48 Absolutely. Absolutely. And, you know, through that time, I had this real unsettling feeling, you know, when you just feel something's not right. Patti Dobrowolski 06:58 Yes, yes. Gayle Edwards 06:59 And loved my job, you know, lose jobs quite frequently, because I was able to in the 80s, you know, me you know, and I worked at various TV production companies and fashion or whatever, but I always felt you know, there's something more. Patti Dobrowolski 07:20 Something more something else. Yeah, yeah. Gayle Edwards 07:22 I spoke to my dad about it. God rest his soul, I suppose my dad at the time, and said to him, I know that want to do more, but I'm not quite sure my parents, they were immigrants from the Caribbean. And you know, they vote very firmly believed in you got a job and you stayed there for. Patti Dobrowolski 07:39 That's right. Because the safety net, right. Gayle Edwards 07:41 It's a safety net. Yeah. Really. You need to sort yourself out. You know? Patti Dobrowolski 07:48 You really need to sell yourself out. Yeah, you do. I can't tell you how many times my parents tried to make me do that. Oh, that didn't work. Yeah. Well, anyway, so then what happened? What you do and you got Gayle Edwards 08:03 I just, you know, we kept having this conversation. He said, Look, all I know, is just you just get a job that you love doing, then you don't have to worry about it. Yeah. No, I just like talking. No one's gonna pay me to speak. You know who's gonna make cuz I love to speak to people. Patti Dobrowolski 08:25 Yes. And you're good to speaking to people. Gayle Edwards 08:28 And I like speaking into people. Patti Dobrowolski 08:31 Yes, yes. Yes. Gayle Edwards 08:32 People will come to me with the challenges and yeah, they might as well and I love speaking into that, you know, and then I discovered this wonderful thing called coaching. Yeah, oh my gosh, you pay me to give them advice. You don't actually give them advice scale, you know, you kind of help them. Patti Dobrowolski 08:55 You help them pull themselves up. But Gayle Edwards 08:58 Yeah, I just love this thing called coaching. And I literally just dove in headfirst, I was all over and then NLP and then EFT tapping and, you know, and hypnosis and all kinds of different therapies or modalities or resources, I started adding to my toolbox. And all the time. I was getting more and more results with the people I was speaking to in terms of they were starting to notice. Patti Dobrowolski 09:24 Yes, I bet. Gayle Edwards 09:25 Change, you know, real. Yeah, the transformations were going. I was just playing with it at that stage. You know, yeah. Someone say to me, Oh, girl, you do that NLP thing. And I don't like spiders. And I'd be like, Yeah, let's play. And then, you know, sometime now, I mean, they'd be like, You know what, I actually took a spider out of my bath the other day and I'm like, wow, this stuff works. You know. Patti Dobrowolski 09:54 I love that. I love that because that's when you experiment with things then you learn about about it, they learn about it. And it's all I mean, that's what's true when you're coaching anybody is you're always coaching them on what you're learning right now. You don't like coach them, like there are some things you pull through from the past because you know that they're standard and they work and it's consistent. But the most exciting part of coaching is when you're doing something brand new. Gayle Edwards 10:23 Absolutely. Absolutely. You know, there was a lot going on at that time. And I knew that, that nine to five employment road wasn't really for me. So I made the decision to just jump. You know, it was after actually I attended a conference in the state of New York in Westchester. And it was nothing like we had in the UK at the time, it was called African American women on tour. It was hosted by SP magazine. Patti Dobrowolski 10:53 Now nice. Gayle Edwards 10:54 We didn't have anything like that in the UK. And I was completely in thrall, I was mesmerised. And all I remember was one lady came on stage. And she was hosting a workshop and she came on, she looked so beautiful. She was the vivacious and vibrant. And she walked on stage. And she said, I'm going to be 50 next birthday. And I've only got one regret in life. And that sort of only been living a life of purpose for 12 years. And I did a quick, dirty calculation. I thought, I'm only 34. She was 38. I've got time. Well, I came back handed in my notice there and then, and I've never looked back since that was 22 years ago. Patti Dobrowolski 11:35 Oh my god, that's so fantastic. That is so fantastic. That is amazing. Gayle Edwards 11:42 That's kind of like how I got to be this entrepreneur, how I got to be doing what I'm doing now. With? Patti Dobrowolski 11:49 Yes. Gayle Edwards 11:49 I learned all the coaching techniques and all of that stuff. But I was actually quite frustrated with coaching. Because sometimes I just wanted to take someone say no, you are more than this. You've got the answer. Patti Dobrowolski 12:00 Yeah. Right. Gayle Edwards 12:01 I really wanted to be involved in genuinely having an impact in the chat with their transformation. So I started to do other than just coaching, I started to blend it. And I always tell people that I'm not your traditional coach, you know, I'm that person, that is the proverbial kick up the bum. I am. Yes, you know, let's try this, or let's try this. I'm going to listen. But I'm also going to genuinely hold you hold your hand and help you. And you know, messaging because I've been in marketing and media and branding and communications for so long. Patti Dobrowolski 12:38 Yes. Gayle Edwards 12:39 I found that people just couldn't talk about themselves. They'd have all these wonderful ideas that have these wonderful businesses even. But the moment you ask them to speak about it, they've come up. Patti Dobrowolski 12:50 And they would and then they these little tiny things would come out and they'd be all Bumbly and kind of confused. And then you'd be left thinking to yourself, Geez, that didn't go very well. Yeah, you see, and then too, they think How come that happen? You know, how could I be so afraid that I couldn't totally express myself articulately and tell you in a nutshell on an elevator, right? Gayle Edwards 13:12 Absolutely. And then, you know, lots of people don't like the elevator pitch and, and I thought no is more than that began. Scripted, you know, and I was running networking events at that time. And when people use it themselves, they were holding up a piece of paper. And they were saying. Patti Dobrowolski 13:28 And reading their cue card or giving a talk. I'm like, please. Gayle Edwards 13:32 I don't need that, you know? Got it. You just need the confidence to say it. And that was where it started. And that's how I developed my standing up in your own hallelujah programme. Yes, does that it helps people to be more of themselves more of your time. Patti Dobrowolski 13:52 Yes, that is so fantastic. And so now that brings us up to date right now. Right? So tell me what are you excited about right now? What's happening right now? Do you want to tell people about there are so many things happening right now? Well just give us all we want to know and then I'm going to ask you questions about them of course and you more you. Gayle Edwards 14:14 So I've just launched my own podcast as well during the offseason, which I'm very excited about. I've been talking about that for a while. Good actually, that's one of the that's one of my catchphrases. You know, we say to people I dare you. How willing are you today yourself to be awesome. So that's been really, that's fantastic. I've just gone into a great collaboration with which rich woman magazine or on their brand editor so starting to collect stories and build some great issues for that because they're offline as well as online. Also, the daring be awesome network, which is a new way of networking. You know, we've been in this who knows what this has been the last time. Patti Dobrowolski 14:51 Who knows really? I'm not even gonna guess. Gayle Edwards 14:55 Exactly. But you know, networking as a result has changed. Yes, you have He's doing on online, we're starting to go a little bit out again now. So, but that has changed, because we're different. The whole experience. Patti Dobrowolski 15:10 What would you say is what you think how we're different? I want to know, from your perspective, how are you different? Gayle Edwards 15:16 So one of the things that I find is we're almost in this conundrum, you know, we've been so without proper, consistent human contact so long, that we're almost like, you know, we're grasping, we want that contact to get, but we're also wary, we're like, okay, so is this okay? You know? Patti Dobrowolski 15:41 Yes. Gayle Edwards 15:42 How are we doing this here? Patti Dobrowolski 15:44 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 15:45 Just from that basic level alone. So when you like, go put that same scenario into a networking scenario, you've got some people who want to genuinely connect, because that's how they connect with each other. Patti Dobrowolski 15:59 Yes, yes. Gayle Edwards 16:01 And then there are some who are a bit more standoffish. And so they will come across as being, you know, a bit more abrupt. That's going to change the dynamic. I've seen it already with some events, that changes the dynamic. So what I'm doing with the Daring Nielsen network, is I'm bringing people together so they can genuinely collaborate together. So they that closeness, it's not just about the networking, but it's about the collaboration. It's really working with each other. So now there's a connection, collaboration, and now we've got genuine relationships. Patti Dobrowolski 16:37 That's right. I'm so with you on this. Now, I think that so when we think about how it is that we really learn and grow, it's when we collaborate with people on stuff when we get together. And we figure out oh, yeah, you do this. And I do that, well, let's do this together, let's do an experiment together. And the best experiences I've had are collaborations where things are just wide open. Now, do you give them the opportunity to figure out how they would collaborate? Do you help create a construct by which that they get something to work on together? Do you give them a project? Gayle Edwards 17:14 So what happens is, so we have a little networking thing, period. Patti Dobrowolski 17:21 Speed networking? Are they in line? Gayle Edwards 17:25 So what they have to do rather than that standard? Oh, hi, my name is a, what they have to do. They have to give us one fun fact about their business. Patti Dobrowolski 17:34 Yes. Gayle Edwards 17:35 What is the challenge they're currently facing? Okay, good. So then we go off, we have a lovely lunch together. So they're really getting to know that. And then after much, they have to work on the challenge. So as a collective, they work on each other's challenges. Patti Dobrowolski 17:50 Oh, that's fantastic. Gayle Edwards 17:52 But now you've got all these people who you've suddenly got a team helping you the thing you are most, whatever that is, you having to go find a coach, but you've got a team of people who are sitting there, and they're giving you their feedback, they're giving you their input, they're telling you well, okay, that's a great idea that actually that does not, I can't see that would work. They're also able, because it's your ideas, every single person gets a chance to do this. So what they're also able to do is connect people with those outside of the room. Patti Dobrowolski 18:24 That's right. So you give them all your network you network with them about it's like people will often drop into, you know, I do a thing, if you want to connect with me just get into a 20 minute call. I see you have that too in your link tree, right. But people do and I'm just honestly connecting them to whoever they need. Because why not? Why not? That's the whole point. Is that because I think about. Don't you think about who influenced you like who did influence you and pull you in? Who influenced you and gave you that lift up? Gayle Edwards 18:57 So many people, the very first person to that woman that walked on that on the stage. I was at that conference because of another lady who was the keynote speaker who was a lady called Sabrina Jackson Ghandi. And she had written a book, which just landed in my lap at exactly the right time in my life, which was called sacred pampering principles for African American women. And I thought, even though I'm not African American, so back then.  It was fantastic. And because she was the keynote speaker, that's how I ended up at that conference. And that lady that walked across the stage that really grabbed me her name was Jill Diamond Taylor. Oh, yeah. Oh, honestly. And between the two of them, they were my Shiraz for a very, very long time. But then there were people here in the UK, who were really really influential and instrumental as well with my growth and my development, not just as a person but even as an entrepreneur just learning how to do business in a really professional way.  You know, people like Jatinder is the founder of the Athena network our time, you know, people like Pete, like Pico, and I absolutely adore pizza enthusiasm. I love to work works with people, you know, Dr. Marina, the founder of rich woman who just breeds belief into everyone, you can't help but be brilliant. Patti Dobrowolski 19:25 That's right. That's right, when people are filling you up with that kind of enthusiasm to I think, but you also must have had some peace inside that confidence from before that, as if, you know, stepping into it, than that must have helped you to in all those cases? Gayle Edwards 20:38 Absolutely. Absolutely. And I'm very lucky because I come from a family of very strong women. Patti Dobrowolski 20:43 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 20:43 And, you know, my mom, and my answer were very, very, you know, instrumental in my upbringing, as well, actually just can do. Is that what you mean, you can't do that? Of course, you can. Patti Dobrowolski 20:55 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 20:57 So that, I've obviously got some of that as well, because, Patti, you know, what this journey is like, it's never all uphill. You know, it's great that we're having this conversation, we're talking about some great things that have happened, but we know that there are some awful things that are happening. Patti Dobrowolski 21:12 No doubt, no doubt. I mean, with people and things and places and money and all of it, you know, structure and you know, you expand your team, and then you can track the team based on whatever you learn and grow there. Right. And and I would say to have you come to those places where you get kind of stalled out in your business, and you're thinking now, what am I doing that? What am I gonna do that? Like that? Gayle Edwards 21:38 Absolutely. You have those periods where you think, this valleys deep, am I gonna get out of here? Patti Dobrowolski 21:46 Well, now, how do you get out of there? How do they get out of there? I'm curious how many? Gayle Edwards 21:51 There's two things that saved me on a daily basis. One of them is bathing. I absolutely. I know. But that's where I do my meditation. Yeah. And when I'm in the bath, and I'm either meditated. I just find something always sparks off. Always, you know, so most evenings, I would tend to end my evening, settle down for the night by having a bath. In the bath is where I also do my gratitude. It's become a real nighttime ritual for me. And it has been for many, many years now. So that really helps me. And I always think, you know, there's always tomorrow. But then the other thing is my daughter, and my daughter is nearly 20 Now, but she. Patti Dobrowolski 22:34 She's a young woman now. Gayle Edwards 22:36 Yes. Oh, yeah. She's young, you know, upon coming, but when. So her dad and I divorced when she was eight, nine, okay. And I remember going through really dark, dark, dark, dark time. And I used to have a programme at that time called the breakthrough diva. And I remember one day, one weekend, her and I was sitting on the sofa, and I was really miserable and upset. And I was trying to be, you know, upbeat for her. Patti Dobrowolski 23:05 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 23:05 And she said, Mom, I've just got something. She was about nine at the time. She said, Mom, I've only got one thing say to you, I said, What's that makes it? She said, You're either the breakthrough diva or you're not. And I thought, okay. Patti Dobrowolski 23:22 Okay, golden tougue wisdom coming right through that child to you. Gayle Edwards 23:25 Right off the bat. And even though I no longer run that programme, you know, to this day, that's what gets me through. I just remember because, Mom, you're either the breakthrough diva or you're not. And I think, you know, I'm going to choose to be the breakthrough diva through this moment, I am going to act as if that right. It always comes back to that. Patti Dobrowolski 23:48 Now one of the things that you describe yourself as you work with intuitive impact entrepreneurs, tell me what you mean by intuitive impact entrepreneurs. Gayle Edwards 23:58 Yes. And I choose those intuitive impact entrepreneurs because they are the people who show up who have these unexplained gifts. They don't know how they do what they do. You know, they just know that they're very good at doing whatever it is. And they tend to be people who are empaths. So they, you know, they really feel other people's energy. They're very sensitive, they tend to be highly sensitive. They tend to operate if they're business owners, they tend to be very heart lead.  No, they tend to be the therapists among us, the healers, people, they have such a big heart, they just want to give them they give and they give. Yeah, and person they never give to themselves. It was the person that's always last on their list is themselves. So and they're also who are the least structured. So when it comes to business, you know, they just want to give that give it away for free but then they realise they can't pay their rent or their mortgage. Patti Dobrowolski 24:54 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 24:55 Yeah, they're the people that really resonate with me, but cuz I know what that's like, because I've been in that situation. I know that slide. So what I do for them is I provide them with the structure, the business structure. With the both the branding and the brand help them build that personal brand around. Yes, really connect with them and understand because you know, out in the wider world, they have a reputation for being fluffy. Patti Dobrowolski 25:27 Okay, that's right. That's right. Gayle Edwards 25:29 But they're not fluffy. No. Okay. They are just so heart centred, that they want to wrap you up in fluff that they did, because they care so much. So I show them and help them and educate them as to how they can have a thriving business successfully, whilst they're speaking the language of those that need to hear them? Patti Dobrowolski 25:50 Yes, yes. I love that. And then do you work with them? One on one? Do you do group stuff? How do you like to work? Are you one too many? How does it work? Gayle Edwards 26:00 I love one too many buy also loved ones? Well, because even when I'm in a one to many situation, I'll still hone down on one. Because I love to see, I like to see the transformation right there in the room. But also everybody else can see. Yeah, and that's where the real magic is. Patti Dobrowolski 26:18 I love that. I hope you come to my city. So I can experience you in that way. Because I see you only I don't see you in clubhouse. But you know what I'm saying? And I think that this, for me, I'm fascinated with the transformation myself. I think, you know, if people understood that transformation, it's not an easy course. But if you know what you're going for, then it's clear.  Because you have to understand really, that yes, vision is out there. And you always have a vision, but the goals are the things that you want to get to. And that once you achieve something, then you can look back at who you were before you achieve the goal. And then you see, ah, I've made progress. And that progress gives you confidence. Gayle Edwards 27:06 Absolutely. You know, I have clients come to me for all sorts of things that you know, patterns come to me they say things like, my business isn't working. I'm not making any money. I don't know what to post on social media, you know, and it all comes down to the same thing. It always comes down to well, who are you? You know, who are you showing up as to your clients? Maybe they don't understand you. You know, who are you showing up as on social media? Yeah. And also, I'm also a big believer that everything works, but not everything works for you. Patti Dobrowolski 27:40 You know? That's right. It's true. Gayle Edwards 27:43 You got to choose what works for you. But well, maybe have great success out there. On Instagram. Yeah, that might not be your thing. Patti Dobrowolski 27:53 No, it might not. I mean, here's my being in a room with people networking like that. That might be the way but you're gonna know yourself and find yourself. Yeah, I think I think it's Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I think everybody, there's so much selling that's going on in the world right now. You know, it just drives me crazy. And then when I have to sell something, I'm like, Oh, I'm so sorry that I'm doing this. And I just need you to know this is happening if you want to come do it, right. But what's also true is that I realised this thing this year.  And I wonder how you feel about this, you know, like people, when they set goals that the New Year's, the way we did it before was it was a resolution of something that's of the past. So you can't really go set or future cast from that place. But also I realised that goals is not just about the what you're doing with your business or these other things. It's about, I mean, in terms of money and stuff, all of getting stuff together. It's about the feeling of well want to experience. Gayle Edwards 29:00 Absolutely, Patti, and that is what you know, if we're going to get really spiritual here, that's what, from the third dimension into the fifth into the fifth dimension, this feeling is the experience, and more and more people now have to give their clients an experience of them because, especially with the pandemic, you know, yeah, so people pivoted, there's that word, so many people pivoted, you've got people coming into your industry right now doing what you do, who've only been doing it for two years, 18 months, but because they're really have locked into the whole experience. Patti Dobrowolski 29:41 They understand how to create it. Gayle Edwards 29:43 There's the now they are getting the accolades that many people who were sitting the here before the pandemic, yeah, now looking at them thinking about, I know I've got more experienced them. Yeah, but you've been slow to the market. Yeah. We're trying to work in a Very old paradigm. Patti Dobrowolski 30:01 That's right. In the old paradigm, you got to get out of it, you got to step in, I and I would say this thing too, when I think about you, and I think about what you've done. Like, these are things. I mean, you and I, we sit on a lot of history, we've done a lot of things. That's all there is to it. But what we know is, and I know this must be true for you is that we are always trying to learn something new, we know we have to learn something new. Because otherwise, we're a dinosaur. Gayle Edwards 30:29 With Dinosaurs as it is much less now. Exactly. And giving it away. You know, so you have to stay nimble, you got to stay nimble, you got to stay flexible. And that's one of the things I love about clubhouse, because it allows you to listen to millennials and people from different parts of the world, how they're doing what they're doing is great. And, you know, if you're not flexible, if you just have this rigid way of doing business, it's not sustainable. No, not sustainable. You know, people literally go past you. Patti Dobrowolski 31:08 Yeah, yeah. Well, and when you're talking about this is the thing when you earlier you said this thing about Okay. I wonder people are different now. And I think this fifth dimension piece, this is what we're talking about, we're talking about expanded consciousness that people have stepped into a bigger room, and some people have and other people are still behaving as if it's the same. And that's the middle, that's where you're missing out.  The opportunity is that no, the world is different. It's broken open, and you either step into the open broken-ness of it, and you experience yourself as a new being in that, or you are going to be left behind on the train. And then that's what's true. So how do you step into every day with a fresh mindset? What do you do that helps you to be in that fresh? You take a bath? I know that what are you curious about or looking at right now that you think of?  That thing seems fascinating to me? You said your daughter, you showed up that thing? And then you said I'm going to think I'm going to do an NFT with this? And I was like yes, you are yes you are. And if those of you that are not listening that seven non fungible token, okay, you can buy and they're going to be trading and everything we own, there's going to be a non fungible token as Gayle Edwards 32:24 easy to going that way. Yeah, it is. For me, same way, I have an evening routine, I have a morning routine. So I tend to wake up most mornings, between sort of like half five and half, six. So you know, it's kind of like my normal time. And what I do, there's two things I do immediately to always have a glass of water straightaway. So that because I have. Patti Dobrowolski 32:45 Yes, we know that's good flush of system. Gayle Edwards 32:49 Always have my water bottle. And then I actually have zoom to remember I combine my spiritual gifts. So I'm very, very good at reading cards. You know, not Tarot cards. I don't I'm not really a big Tarot lover, who like angel cards, I tend to pull an angel card in the morning. I then tend to write my intention for the day based on your card. Patti Dobrowolski 33:16 Right. Gayle Edwards 33:17 And then I go for a walk. Because I love it. Yeah, and the right thing. At that time, the morn there's hardly anyone around. Yeah, so no word of life. Patti, as I'm walking around my street surrounded around you, they probably all know me. They're probably all twitching at their curtains. They Oh, there she goes. I've got my headphones. I've got my earphones in. And I am singing gospel music at the top of my voice as I as I walk, you know, and I love it.  Sometimes I'll do a little dance, you know. And I do that to three kilometres in the morning, come back. And I'm ready to start my day. And I absolutely love that. Because I wasn't always able to do that. You know, I used to literally be on my sofa all the time. You know, just before the pandemic. I was very sick. I have cancer, unfortunately. Patti Dobrowolski 34:08 Oh my gosh, I'm sorry to hear that. Gayle Edwards 34:10 Oh, fine now, though. Excellent. And fantastic. And literally as I came out of recovery, we went into lockdown. So there was a period where I was really unsure because I was like, What am I going to do? Because the world changed? Yeah, I was sick. The world changed. Okay. Yeah, I was able to do what a lot of people did. I mean, she thought okay, what are most people gonna want to do? Well, now they're working from home. A lot of people are now going to want to build this nursery. Patti Dobrowolski 34:41 Yeah, realise their dream. They're gonna want a baby. Yes. Yeah. Gayle Edwards 34:45 I thought you know what, I'm that girl. Yeah, you are? Yes, you are. So that's what gets me excited. So many people, you know, literally finally getting the chance to live their dream Patti Dobrowolski 34:59 Then yes, yes, yes, yes, I love that. And I think, you know, there's nothing greater than helping people to step into the reality that they've always dreamed about. And it's not that far away from you. So, you know, if you're listening, you have to understand that we're in your corner here, we're here to help you step into a bigger room, no matter what it is, even if you already are in that bigger room, and you're searching around and you don't know what it is, you know, pay close attention to the gifts that come to you.  And then be grateful for every little thing. You know, everything in your world without exception is there to help you grow. So, you know, get busy and keep growing. You're so incredible, Gail. So you know, alright, I always ask people like, What's your favourite book that you're reading right now? And what's a tip you want to give us about making change and pivot? Gayle Edwards 35:54 Well, funnily enough, my favourite book, and I think this is probably my favourite book ever. And I never ever thought I would say this about this particular person. But I've got to say, Will Smith's book, I don't tend to read biographies or things like that I normally read business books. And, you know, had you asked me maybe three months ago, probably would have said something like, you know, code of the extraordinary mind or something.  But Will Smith's biography has been amazing. I've read the paper version, and the audible version. And the reason why they are both experienced audio, it's like you're at a concert almost. Yeah. And the book, the paper version, you know, the pictures of his life in his family. It's an experience. Yeah, so that's my favourite. Patti Dobrowolski 36:45 That's fantastic. I love that. Gayle Edwards 36:47 And my tip, is just do it, you know, do yourself, as I say, Just do yourself, you can literally do anything, there isn't anything that we can't do. Yuffie The very fact that we came into this world, not being able to walk and talk and fend for ourselves, and now the majority of us are able to do just that. Yeah, that in itself is a testament to what we can do as humans. So if you can do that, when we're little, imagine what we can do now. We're big. Patti Dobrowolski 37:14 I know. And if you bring that childlike mind into everyone you do then you're always going to be curious, you're going to be excited. Everything's going to be like a puppy in the car waiting to go to the park. That's what you want to be. Yeah, let's go. I know, we're going somewhere exciting. My dog can't even hold himself back. He starts to squeak as soon as we get in the car. Oh, I don't know where we're going. But I'm gonna meet people, right? And so if you can have that beginner's mind about everything I just. Gayle Edwards 37:42 And you know, Patti, one of the other things I'm excited about is the obviously I also the International Academy of universal self mastery. And what they do, they really promote this idea of play. They call themselves a playground for conscious influences. And I would say a tip for self mastery, we've got a master our own cells. Patti Dobrowolski 38:03 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 38:04 Once we become more aware of who we are, it just opens us up to so much more. Really, really does. And we've got unity of people that are just like that. Oh, that's what happens. Patti Dobrowolski 38:19 That's right. That's it. The magic happens everywhere. And I love that you're talking about stepping into yourself, know yourself, understand yourself, grow yourself. And in that self mastery, then you find I think, liberation and freedom. You're free from the constraints of what anybody says or does because you trust and know yourself and you're aligned with the universe. And so you're doing and living your purpose every day and you definitely are sister.  You are incredible. Gayle. Oh my gosh. I just feel like this like Time flew. I'm getting back because this is so incredible. I can't wait to collaborate with you on something. I know that it would be amazing. So let's just hook up either in clubhouse, out a clubhouse. I don't care. But everyone if you're listening, just read the show notes and go follow Gayle Edwards. What's your handle on Instagram? We'll just say it right here. Gayle Edwards 39:17 Gayle.edwards.brandyou. Patti Dobrowolski 39:20 Yes, go there. And then I want you to just follow her and just follow her right into clubhouse if you want to hear some amazing things from her. Thank you so much, Gayle for your time. Gayle Edwards 39:31 Oh, thank you. Thank you. It's been an absolute pleasure but you know it has gone way too quick. Patti Dobrowolski 39:38 All right, so we'll do it again soon then. I know we will. Okay, everybody you know the drill if you like the content, share it with your friends and until next time Up Your Creative Genius. Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius. Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and up your creative genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly, Patti Dobrowolski and the Up Your Creative Genius podcast. That's a wrap.

Coast Football Ramble Podcast
Season 6 Episode 12 - Cummingswatch

Coast Football Ramble Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 81:52


Pete and Luke are BACK to recap Macarthur & Perth at home! Geez, we love copping worldies.. Who's to blame?! How do we approach the next 3 games on the road?! The Swagen/Cumbus, the formation, the next 3 games - we unpack it all! See you soon #UpTheSauce 0.00-10.15 Intro/Fred's Question 10.20-33.00 Macarthur/Perth Review 33.08-51.16 Looking Ahead 51.40-79.20 Fan Questions Outro music this week from The Ritzy Kids - check them out https://www.facebook.com/theritzykids/

Up Your Creative Genius
Gayle Edwards: How to create a bigger impact with better branding and messaging

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 40:33


Gayle Edwards is an International, award-winning Global Impact & Personal Brand Strategist, Best-selling Author and Speaker who works with Entrepreneurial and Corporate "Square Pegs" to help them build their identity and authority within their marketplace! More than that though, Gayle is a power-full and intuitive Teacher and Healer who uses her gift of recognising ‘stuck energy' to help her clients release it so they are able to communicate with confidence, clarity and conviction! If you do nothing, things stay exactly the same as they are! Gayle shows you how to become THE EXPERT in your industry rather than just another expert! Timestamp 1:47 Gayle's journey into Brand You Consultancy 15:10 Gayle shares her opinion on how technology has changed the world 16:37 Shaping the collaboration 18:24 People who influenced Gayle in her life 23:48 Gayle's definition of intuitive impact entrepreneurs 31:08 Daily routine that Gayle practices 35:00 Gayle's favorite book and tips on pivoting in life and getting through challenges Social Media Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandyouconsultancy/ Website https://brandyouconsultancy.com/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Linkedinhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Geniushttps://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/  Patti Dobrowolski 00:03 Hello superstars. Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius podcast where you will gain insight and tips to stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host, Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life.  Hey, everybody, oh my gosh, I have Gayle Edwards here. She's an international award winning global impact and brand strategist, a speaker and author. She works with intuitive impact entrepreneurs and purpose driven organisations to help them build their brand and leverage their identity to claim authority and dominate the marketplace. Gayle, I can't believe you're here. Like I really she's like the founder of Brand New Consultancy, and she combined her spiritual gifts with 30 years in brand marketing, communications, trainings and coaching.  And I just want to say we met in clubhouse because we both felt that someone in the clubhouse needed our help, she was able to help them. I don't know what happened to me. I got lost in the fray of it. But it was fantastic. Gayle, I can't wait to talk to you. Welcome to the show. Gayle Edwards 01:37 Thank you so much, Patti. And I'm so honoured and humbled to be here with you today. I'm looking forward to this exchange of wisdom actually, Patti? Patti Dobrowolski 01:47 Yeah, I know, well, because we never really got to talk just for that little brief moment. So and I've been in clubhouse where you've just dropped all these bombs of wisdom on people and you just pour into people. That's how you are. Well, how did you become that? I mean, tell everybody that's listening. Tell us your story. How did you start off doing this and then start doing what you're doing now? Gayle Edwards 02:13 Well, actually started when I was very young. So I'm a big believer that we teach what we most need to learn. Okay, so helping people to get really clear about who they are, you know, what their message is? How are they going to impact? How are they going to extend that impact.  So it's no surprise that I didn't know how to do any of that. And I, I did not know how to do any of that from a very young age. You know, I grew up learning to speak when I was quite old, I was about four, when I first got in sentences, which has been quite late. There was nothing wrong with me, I just didn't want to talk. Patti Dobrowolski 02:55 And you talk so much now that we're making up for now, which is fantastic for all of our listeners, yes. Gayle Edwards 03:05 But what that did to me, is that it made me very observant. Number one, so I became really good at reading people. I would find ways of communicating with them without having to open my mouth. Because that's what it does. It just makes you really communicating. However, it also made me quite insecure, and very self conscious, as well. I was always the quiet kid.  So you can imagine when you're in your own world like that, when you're isolated. My escape was books. So that really fired off my imagination. It really helped to strengthen up and broaden my vocabulary, as well. So by the time I was speaking, by the time I got about five, six, and started speaking, I was actually a very good speaker but crippled with self doubt. Patti Dobrowolski 03:57 Yes. I bet, oh my gosh. Yes. Wow. Okay. With self doubt. Gayle Edwards 04:07 You know, still very shy in school. And that's, you know, that kind of really started to pay out even more. And I didn't know what I wanted to do for a career, but I knew I still really liked people because I was good with people because, yeah, it's only time so much time observing them. So I started off my career working in PR for the media. See the big BBC over here? Oh, my God. Wow. Patti Dobrowolski 04:38 Beat him off over the BBC. Yes. Gayle Edwards 04:40 Exactly. And that in fact, I used to be the BBC Proms press officer god. Yeah. You know, so that really helped my confidence. Patti Dobrowolski 04:49 Yeah, I bet. Gayle Edwards 04:50 You can't work in the media and not really, especially back then in the 80s. And also being in the BBC as a young black woman. Wow. You know, I was very distinguished or distinctive, you know, like now we have, you know, lots of diversity and inclusion, whatever. So I was very distinctive. So, because I didn't want to stand out any more than I was already standing out, and made myself confident, I became the way out. Patti Dobrowolski 05:16 What did you just act the role and then step onto it. Gayle Edwards 05:21 There's a saying that I absolutely love. And that is act as if you don't force Yeah, I don't like fake it till you make it because that does. Yeah. But act as if, and I always, you know, thought, Okay, if I was, and remember, this was the 80s. And Patti Dobrowolski 05:39 I know, yes, I'm there with you. We're probably around the same age. I'm gay. Yeah. Yeah. Gayle Edwards 05:45 So it all sounds like okay, well, if I was this successful TV media person, how would I be and that's what I didn't? Patti Dobrowolski 05:56 Yeah, fantastic. I love that. I feel like that's how my whole life has been, like, I'll just take on a role. And then I'm a business consultant, then I'm an illustrator, then I'm an actor, then I'm, whatever the moment needs, you have to step into it. And that as if principal, I think, is one of the most powerful things you can do to become more of yourself, right? I mean, to be stepped into a bigger room, don't you think?  Once you do that, you're like, Okay, if I can do that, I can do anything, if I can command the room for the first time. And I would always say to myself, you know, before, when I would first go on stage, and there, there'd be like, 1000s of people in the room, I'd be like, okay, so you only have to do this for the first time once. And then after that, so just imagine that you're on the backside of this, and it's so fantastic. And then I just go into it, you know? Gayle Edwards 06:48 Absolutely. Absolutely. And, you know, through that time, I had this real unsettling feeling, you know, when you just feel something's not right. Patti Dobrowolski 06:58 Yes, yes. Gayle Edwards 06:59 And loved my job, you know, lose jobs quite frequently, because I was able to in the 80s, you know, me you know, and I worked at various TV production companies and fashion or whatever, but I always felt you know, there's something more. Patti Dobrowolski 07:20 Something more something else. Yeah, yeah. Gayle Edwards 07:22 I spoke to my dad about it. God rest his soul, I suppose my dad at the time, and said to him, I know that want to do more, but I'm not quite sure my parents, they were immigrants from the Caribbean. And you know, they vote very firmly believed in you got a job and you stayed there for life. Patti Dobrowolski 07:39 That's right. Because the safety net, right. Gayle Edwards 07:41 It's a safety net. Yeah. Really. You need to sort yourself out. You know? Patti Dobrowolski 07:48 You really need to sell yourself out. Yeah, you do. I can't tell you how many times my parents tried to make me do that. Oh, that didn't work. Yeah. Well, anyway, so then what happened? What you do and you got Gayle Edwards 08:03 I just, you know, we kept having this conversation. He said, Look, all I know, is just you just get a job that you love doing, then you don't have to worry about it. Yeah. No, I just like talking. No one's gonna pay me to speak. You know who's gonna make cause I love to speak to people. Patti Dobrowolski 08:25 Yes. And you're good to speaking to people. Gayle Edwards 08:28 And I like speaking into people. Patti Dobrowolski 08:31 Yes, yes. Yes. Gayle Edwards 08:32 People will come to me with the challenges and yeah, they might as well and I love speaking into that, you know, and then I discovered this wonderful thing called coaching. Yeah, oh my gosh, you pay me to give them advice. You don't actually give them advice scale, you know, you kind of help them. Patti Dobrowolski 08:55 You help them pull themselves up. But Gayle Edwards 08:58 Yeah, I just love this thing called coaching. And I literally just dove in headfirst, I was all over and then NLP and then EFT tapping and, you know, and hypnosis and all kinds of different therapies or modalities or resources, I started adding to my toolbox. And all the time. I was getting more and more results with the people I was speaking to in terms of they were starting to notice. Patti Dobrowolski 09:24 Yes, I bet. Gayle Edwards 09:25 Change, you know, real. Yeah, the transformations were going. I was just playing with it at that stage. You know, yeah. Someone say to me, Oh, girl, you do that NLP thing. And I don't like spiders. And I'd be like, Yeah, let's play. And then, you know, sometime now, I mean, they'd be like, You know what, I actually took a spider out of my bath the other day and I'm like, wow, this stuff works. You know. Patti Dobrowolski 09:54 I love that. I love that because that's when you experiment with things then you learn about about it, they learn about it. And it's all I mean, that's what's true when you're coaching anybody is you're always coaching them on what you're learning right now. You don't like coach them, like there are some things you pull through from the past because you know that they're standard and they work and it's consistent. But the most exciting part of coaching is when you're doing something brand new. Gayle Edwards 10:23 Absolutely. Absolutely. You know, there was a lot going on at that time. And I knew that, that nine to five employment road wasn't really for me. So I made the decision to just jump. You know, it was after actually I attended a conference in the state of New York in Westchester. And it was nothing like we had in the UK at the time, it was called African American women on tour. It was hosted by SP magazine. Patti Dobrowolski 10:53 Now nice. Gayle Edwards 10:54 We didn't have anything like that in the UK. And I was completely in thrall, I was mesmerised. And all I remember was one lady came on stage. And she was hosting a workshop and she came on, she looked so beautiful. She was the vivacious and vibrant. And she walked on stage. And she said, I'm going to be 50 next birthday. And I've only got one regret in life. And that sort of only been living a life of purpose for 12 years. And I did a quick, dirty calculation. I thought, I'm only 34. She was 38. I've got time. Well, I came back handed in my notice there and then, and I've never looked back since that was 22 years ago. Patti Dobrowolski 11:35 Oh my god, that's so fantastic. That is so fantastic. That is amazing. Gayle Edwards 11:42 That's kind of like how I got to be this entrepreneur, how I got to be doing what I'm doing now. With? Patti Dobrowolski 11:49 Yes. Gayle Edwards 11:49 I learned all the coaching techniques and all of that stuff. But I was actually quite frustrated with coaching. Because sometimes I just wanted to take someone say no, you are more than this. You've got the answer. Patti Dobrowolski 12:00 Yeah. Right. Gayle Edwards 12:01 I really wanted to be involved in genuinely having an impact in the chat with their transformation. So I started to do other than just coaching, I started to blend it. And I always tell people that I'm not your traditional coach, you know, I'm that person, that is the proverbial kick up the bum. I am. Yes, you know, let's try this, or let's try this. I'm going to listen. But I'm also going to genuinely hold you hold your hand and help you. And you know, messaging because I've been in marketing and media and branding and communications for so long. Patti Dobrowolski 12:38 Yes. Gayle Edwards 12:39 I found that people just couldn't talk about themselves. They'd have all these wonderful ideas that have these wonderful businesses even. But the moment you ask them to speak about it, they've come up. Patti Dobrowolski 12:50 And they would and then they these little tiny things would come out and they'd be all Bumbly and kind of confused. And then you'd be left thinking to yourself, Geez, that didn't go very well. Yeah, you see, and then too, they think How come that happen? You know, how could I be so afraid that I couldn't totally express myself articulately and tell you in a nutshell on an elevator, right? Gayle Edwards 13:12 Absolutely. And then, you know, lots of people don't like the elevator pitch and, and I thought no is more than that began. Scripted, you know, and I was running networking events at that time. And when people use it themselves, they were holding up a piece of paper. And they were saying. Patti Dobrowolski 13:28 And reading their cue card or giving a talk. I'm like, please. Gayle Edwards 13:32 I don't need that, you know? Got it. You just need the confidence to say it. And that was where it started. And that's how I developed my standing up in your own hallelujah programme. Yes, does that it helps people to be more of themselves more of your time. Patti Dobrowolski 13:52 Yes, that is so fantastic. And so now that brings us up to date right now. Right? So tell me what are you excited about right now? What's happening right now? Do you want to tell people about there are so many things happening right now? Well just give us all we want to know and then I'm going to ask you questions about them of course and you more you. Gayle Edwards 14:14 So I've just launched my own podcast as well during the offseason, which I'm very excited about. I've been talking about that for a while. Good actually, that's one of the that's one of my catchphrases. You know, we say to people I dare you. How willing are you today yourself to be awesome. So that's been really, that's fantastic. I've just gone into a great collaboration with which rich woman magazine or on their brand editor so starting to collect stories and build some great issues for that because they're offline as well as online. Also, the daring be awesome network, which is a new way of networking. You know, we've been in this who knows what this has been the last time. Patti Dobrowolski 14:51 Who knows really? I'm not even gonna guess. Gayle Edwards 14:55 Exactly. But you know, networking as a result has changed. Yes, you have He's doing on online, we're starting to go a little bit out again now. So, but that has changed, because we're different. The whole experience. Patti Dobrowolski 15:10 What would you say is what you think how we're different? I want to know, from your perspective, how are you different? Gayle Edwards 15:16 So one of the things that I find is we're almost in this conundrum, you know, we've been so without proper, consistent human contact so long, that we're almost like, you know, we're grasping, we want that contact to get, but we're also wary, we're like, okay, so is this okay? You know? Patti Dobrowolski 15:41 Yes. Gayle Edwards 15:42 How are we doing this here? Patti Dobrowolski 15:44 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 15:45 Just from that basic level alone. So when you like, go put that same scenario into a networking scenario, you've got some people who want to genuinely connect, because that's how they connect with each other. Patti Dobrowolski 15:59 Yes, yes. Gayle Edwards 16:01 And then there are some who are a bit more standoffish. And so they will come across as being, you know, a bit more abrupt. That's going to change the dynamic. I've seen it already with some events, that changes the dynamic. So what I'm doing with the Daring Nielsen network, is I'm bringing people together so they can genuinely collaborate together. So they that closeness, it's not just about the networking, but it's about the collaboration. It's really working with each other. So now there's a connection, collaboration, and now we've got genuine relationships. Patti Dobrowolski 16:37 That's right. I'm so with you on this. Now, I think that so when we think about how it is that we really learn and grow, it's when we collaborate with people on stuff when we get together. And we figure out oh, yeah, you do this. And I do that, well, let's do this together, let's do an experiment together. And the best experiences I've had are collaborations where things are just wide open. Now, do you give them the opportunity to figure out how they would collaborate? Do you help create a construct by which that they get something to work on together? Do you give them a project? Gayle Edwards 17:14 So what happens is, so we have a little networking thing, period. Patti Dobrowolski 17:21 Speed networking? Are they in line? Gayle Edwards 17:25 So what they have to do rather than that standard? Oh, hi, my name is a, what they have to do. They have to give us one fun fact about their business. Patti Dobrowolski 17:34 Yes. Gayle Edwards 17:35 What is the challenge they're currently facing? Okay, good. So then we go off, we have a lovely lunch together. So they're really getting to know that. And then after much, they have to work on the challenge. So as a collective, they work on each other's challenges. Patti Dobrowolski 17:50 Oh, that's fantastic. Gayle Edwards 17:52 But now you've got all these people who you've suddenly got a team helping you the thing you are most, whatever that is, you having to go find a coach, but you've got a team of people who are sitting there, and they're giving you their feedback, they're giving you their input, they're telling you well, okay, that's a great idea that actually that does not, I can't see that would work.  They're also able, because it's your ideas, every single person gets a chance to do this. So what they're also able to do is connect people with those outside of the room. Patti Dobrowolski 18:24 That's right. So you give them all your network you network with them about it's like people will often drop into, you know, I do a thing, if you want to connect with me just get into a 20 minute call. I see you have that too in your link tree, right.  But people do and I'm just honestly connecting them to whoever they need. Because why not? Why not? That's the whole point. Is that because I think about. Don't you think about who influenced you like who did influence you and pull you in? Who influenced you and gave you that lift up? Gayle Edwards 18:57 So many people, the very first person to that woman that walked on that on the stage. I was at that conference because of another lady who was the keynote speaker who was a lady called Sabrina Jackson Ghandi. And she had written a book, which just landed in my lap at exactly the right time in my life, which was called sacred pampering principles for African American women.  And I thought, even though I'm not African American, so back then. It was fantastic. And because she was the keynote speaker, that's how I ended up at that conference. And that lady that walked across the stage that really grabbed me her name was Jill Diamond Taylor.  Oh, yeah. Oh, honestly. And between the two of them, they were my Shiraz for a very, very long time. But then there were people here in the UK, who were really really influential and instrumental as well with my growth and my development, not just as a person but even as an entrepreneur just learning how to do business in a really professional way.  You know, people like Jatinder is the founder of the Athena network our time, you know, people like Pete, like Pete Cohen, and I absolutely adore Pete enthusiasm. I love to work works with people, you know, Dr. Marina, the founder of rich woman who just breeds belief into everyone, you can't help but be brilliant. Patti Dobrowolski 19:25 That's right. That's right, when people are filling you up with that kind of enthusiasm to I think, but you also must have had some peace inside that confidence from before that, as if, you know, stepping into it, than that must have helped you to in all those cases? Gayle Edwards 20:38 Absolutely. Absolutely. And I'm very lucky because I come from a family of very strong women. Patti Dobrowolski 20:43 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 20:43 And, you know, my mom, and my answer were very, very, you know, instrumental in my upbringing, as well, actually just can do. Is that what you mean, you can't do that? Of course, you can. Patti Dobrowolski 20:55 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 20:57 So that, I've obviously got some of that as well, because, Patti, you know, what this journey is like, it's never all uphill. You know, it's great that we're having this conversation, we're talking about some great things that have happened, but we know that there are some awful things that are happening. Patti Dobrowolski 21:12 No doubt, no doubt. I mean, with people and things and places and money and all of it, you know, structure and you know, you expand your team, and then you can track the team based on whatever you learn and grow there. Right. And and I would say to have you come to those places where you get kind of stalled out in your business, and you're thinking now, what am I doing that? What am I gonna do that? Like that? Gayle Edwards 21:38 Absolutely. You have those periods where you think, this valleys deep, am I gonna get out of here? Patti Dobrowolski 21:46 Well, now, how do you get out of there? How do they get out of there? I'm curious how many? Gayle Edwards 21:51 There's two things that saved me on a daily basis. One of them is bathing. I absolutely. I know. But that's where I do my meditation. Yeah. And when I'm in the bath, and I'm either meditated. I just find something always sparks off. Always, you know, so most evenings, I would tend to end my evening, settle down for the night by having a bath. In the bath is where I also do my gratitude. It's become a real nighttime ritual for me. And it has been for many, many years now. So that really helps me. And I always think, you know, there's always tomorrow. But then the other thing is my daughter, and my daughter is nearly 20 Now, but she. Patti Dobrowolski 22:34 She's a young woman now. Gayle Edwards 22:36 Yes. Oh, yeah. She's young, you know, upon coming, but when. So her dad and I divorced when she was eight, nine, okay. And I remember going through really dark, dark, dark, dark time. And I used to have a programme at that time called the breakthrough diva. And I remember one day, one weekend, her and I was sitting on the sofa, and I was really miserable and upset. And I was trying to be, you know, upbeat for her. Patti Dobrowolski 23:05 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 23:05 And she said, Mom, I've just got something. She was about nine at the time. She said, Mom, I've only got one thing say to you, I said, What's that makes it? She said, You're either the breakthrough diva or you're not. And I thought, okay. Patti Dobrowolski 23:22 Okay, golden tougue wisdom coming right through that child to you. Gayle Edwards 23:25 Right off the bat. And even though I no longer run that programme, you know, to this day, that's what gets me through. I just remember because, you're either the breakthrough diva or you're not. And I think, you know, I'm going to choose to be the breakthrough diva through this moment, I am going to act as if that right. It always comes back to that. Patti Dobrowolski 23:48 Now one of the things that you describe yourself as you work with intuitive impact entrepreneurs, tell me what you mean by intuitive impact entrepreneurs. Gayle Edwards 23:58 Yes. And I choose those intuitive impact entrepreneurs because they are the people who show up who have these unexplained gifts. They don't know how they do what they do. You know, they just know that they're very good at doing whatever it is. And they tend to be people who are empaths. So they, you know, they really feel other people's energy.  They're very sensitive, they tend to be highly sensitive. They tend to operate if they're business owners, they tend to be very heart lead. No, they tend to be the therapists among us, the healers, people, they have such a big heart, they just want to give them they give and they give.  Yeah, and person they never give to themselves. It was the person that's always last on their list is themselves. So and they're also who are the least structured. So when it comes to business, you know, they just want to give it away for free but then they realise they can't pay their rent or their mortgage. Patti Dobrowolski 24:54 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 24:55 Yeah, they're the people that really resonate with me, because I know what that's like, because I've been in that situation. I know that slide. So what I do for them is I provide them with the structure, the business structure. With the both the branding and the brand help them build that personal brand around. Yes, really connect with them and understand because you know, out in the wider world, they have a reputation for being fluffy. Patti Dobrowolski 25:27 Okay, that's right. That's right. Gayle Edwards 25:29 But they're not fluffy. No. Okay. They are just so heart centred, that they want to wrap you up in fluff that they did, because they care so much. So I show them and help them and educate them as to how they can have a thriving business successfully, whilst they're speaking the language of those that need to hear them? Patti Dobrowolski 25:50 Yes, yes. I love that. And then do you work with them? One on one? Do you do group stuff? How do you like to work? Are you one too many? How does it work? Gayle Edwards 26:00 I love one too many buy also loved ones? Well, because even when I'm in a one to many situation, I'll still hone down on one. Because I love to see, I like to see the transformation right there in the room. But also everybody else can see. Yeah, and that's where the real magic is. Patti Dobrowolski 26:18 I love that. I hope you come to my city. So I can experience you in that way. Because I see you only I don't see you in clubhouse. But you know what I'm saying? And I think that this, for me, I'm fascinated with the transformation myself. I think, you know, if people understood that transformation, it's not an easy course. But if you know what you're going for, then it's clear.  Because you have to understand really, that yes, vision is out there. And you always have a vision, but the goals are the things that you want to get to. And that once you achieve something, then you can look back at who you were before you achieve the goal. And then you see, ah, I've made progress. And that progress gives you confidence. Gayle Edwards 27:06 Absolutely. You know, I have clients come to me for all sorts of things that you know, patterns come to me they say things like, my business isn't working. I'm not making any money. I don't know what to post on social media, you know, and it all comes down to the same thing. It always comes down to well, who are you? You know, who are you showing up as to your clients? Maybe they don't understand you. You know, who are you showing up as on social media? Yeah. And also, I'm also a big believer that everything works, but not everything works for you. Patti Dobrowolski 27:40 You know? That's right. It's true. Gayle Edwards 27:43 You got to choose what works for you. But well, maybe have great success out there. On Instagram. Yeah, that might not be your thing. Patti Dobrowolski 27:53 No, it might not. I mean, here's my being in a room with people networking like that. That might be the way but you're gonna know yourself and find yourself. Yeah, I think I think it's Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I think everybody, there's so much selling that's going on in the world right now.  You know, it just drives me crazy. And then when I have to sell something, I'm like, Oh, I'm so sorry that I'm doing this. And I just need you to know this is happening if you want to come do it, right. But what's also true is that I realised this thing this year. And I wonder how you feel about this, you know, like people, when they set goals that the New Year's, the way we did it before was it was a resolution of something that's of the past.  So you can't really go set or future cast from that place. But also I realised that goals is not just about the what you're doing with your business or these other things. It's about, I mean, in terms of money and stuff, all of getting stuff together. It's about the feeling of well want to experience. Gayle Edwards 29:00 Absolutely, Patti, and that is what you know, if we're going to get really spiritual here, that's what, from the third dimension into the fifth into the fifth dimension, this feeling is the experience, and more and more people now have to give their clients an experience of them because, especially with the pandemic, you know, yeah, so people pivoted, there's that word, so many people pivoted, you've got people coming into your industry right now doing what you do, who've only been doing it for two years, 18 months, but because they're really have locked into the whole experience. Patti Dobrowolski 29:41 They understand how to create it. Gayle Edwards 29:43 There's the now they are getting the accolades that many people who were sitting the here before the pandemic, yeah, now looking at them thinking about, I know I've got more experienced them. Yeah, but you've been slow to the market. Yeah. We're trying to work in a Very old paradigm. Patti Dobrowolski 30:01 That's right. In the old paradigm, you got to get out of it, you got to step in, I and I would say this thing too, when I think about you, and I think about what you've done. Like, these are things. I mean, you and I, we sit on a lot of history, we've done a lot of things. That's all there is to it. But what we know is, and I know this must be true for you is that we are always trying to learn something new, we know we have to learn something new. Because otherwise, we're a dinosaur. Gayle Edwards 30:29 With Dinosaurs as it is much less now. Exactly. And giving it away. You know, so you have to stay nimble, you got to stay nimble, you got to stay flexible. And that's one of the things I love about clubhouse, because it allows you to listen to millennials and people from different parts of the world, how they're doing what they're doing is great. And, you know, if you're not flexible, if you just have this rigid way of doing business, it's not sustainable. No, not sustainable. You know, people literally go past you. Patti Dobrowolski 31:08 Yeah, yeah. Well, and when you're talking about this is the thing when you earlier you said this thing about Okay. I wonder people are different now. And I think this fifth dimension piece, this is what we're talking about, we're talking about expanded consciousness that people have stepped into a bigger room, and some people have and other people are still behaving as if it's the same. And that's the middle, that's where you're missing out.  The opportunity is that no, the world is different. It's broken open, and you either step into the open broken-ness of it, and you experience yourself as a new being in that, or you are going to be left behind on the train. And then that's what's true. So how do you step into every day with a fresh mindset? What do you do that helps you to be in that fresh?  You take a bath? I know that what are you curious about or looking at right now that you think of? That thing seems fascinating to me? You said your daughter, you showed up that thing? And then you said I'm going to think I'm going to do an NFT with this? And I was like yes, you are yes you are. And if those of you that are not listening that seven non fungible token, okay, you can buy and they're going to be trading and everything we own, there's going to be a non fungible token as Gayle Edwards 32:24 easy to going that way. Yeah, it is. For me, same way, I have an evening routine, I have a morning routine. So I tend to wake up most mornings, between sort of like half five and half, six. So you know, it's kind of like my normal time. And what I do, there's two things I do immediately to always have a glass of water straightaway. So that because I have. Patti Dobrowolski 32:45 Yes, we know that's good flush of system. Gayle Edwards 32:49 Always have my water bottle. And then I actually have zoom to remember I combine my spiritual gifts. So I'm very, very good at reading cards. You know, not Tarot cards. I don't I'm not really a big Tarot lover, who like angel cards, I tend to pull an angel card in the morning. I then tend to write my intention for the day based on your card. Patti Dobrowolski 33:16 Right. Gayle Edwards 33:17 And then I go for a walk. Because I love it. Yeah, and the right thing. At that time, the morn there's hardly anyone around. Yeah, so no word of life. Patti, as I'm walking around my street surrounded around you, they probably all know me. They're probably all twitching at their curtains.  They Oh, there she goes. I've got my headphones. I've got my earphones in. And I am singing gospel music at the top of my voice as I as I walk, you know, and I love it. Sometimes I'll do a little dance, you know. And I do that to three kilometres in the morning, come back. And I'm ready to start my day. And I absolutely love that. Because I wasn't always able to do that. You know, I used to literally be on my sofa all the time. You know, just before the pandemic. I was very sick. I have cancer, unfortunately. Patti Dobrowolski 34:08 Oh my gosh, I'm sorry to hear that. Gayle Edwards 34:10 Oh, fine now, though. Excellent. And fantastic. And literally as I came out of recovery, we went into lockdown. So there was a period where I was really unsure because I was like, What am I going to do? Because the world changed? Yeah, I was sick. The world changed. Okay. Yeah, I was able to do what a lot of people did. I mean, she thought okay, what are most people gonna want to do? Well, now they're working from home. A lot of people are now going to want to build this nursery. Patti Dobrowolski 34:41 Yeah, realise their dream. They're gonna want a baby. Yes. Yeah. Gayle Edwards 34:45 I thought you know what, I'm that girl. Yeah, you are? Yes, you are. So that's what gets me excited. So many people, you know, literally finally getting the chance to live their dream Patti Dobrowolski 34:59 Then yes, yes, yes, yes, I love that. And I think, you know, there's nothing greater than helping people to step into the reality that they've always dreamed about. And it's not that far away from you.  So, you know, if you're listening, you have to understand that we're in your corner here, we're here to help you step into a bigger room, no matter what it is, even if you already are in that bigger room, and you're searching around and you don't know what it is, you know, pay close attention to the gifts that come to you. And then be grateful for every little thing.  You know, everything in your world without exception is there to help you grow. So, you know, get busy and keep growing. You're so incredible, Gayle. So you know, alright, I always ask people like, What's your favourite book that you're reading right now? And what's a tip you want to give us about making change and pivot? Gayle Edwards 35:54 Well, funnily enough, my favourite book, and I think this is probably my favourite book ever. And I never ever thought I would say this about this particular person. But I've got to say, Will Smith's book, I don't tend to read biographies or things like that I normally read business books.  And, you know, had you asked me maybe three months ago, probably would have said something like, you know, code of the extraordinary mind or something. But Will Smith's biography has been amazing. I've read the paper version, and the audible version. And the reason why they are both experienced audio, it's like you're at a concert almost. Yeah. And the book, the paper version, you know, the pictures of his life in his family. It's an experience. Yeah, so that's my favourite. Patti Dobrowolski 36:45 That's fantastic. I love that. Gayle Edwards 36:47 And my tip, is just do it, you know, do yourself, as I say, Just do yourself, you can literally do anything, there isn't anything that we can't do. The very fact that we came into this world, not being able to walk and talk and fend for ourselves, and now the majority of us are able to do just that. Yeah, that in itself is a testament to what we can do as humans. So if you can do that, when we're little, imagine what we can do now. We're big. Patti Dobrowolski 37:14 I know. And if you bring that childlike mind into everyone you do then you're always going to be curious, you're going to be excited. Everything's going to be like a puppy in the car waiting to go to the park. That's what you want to be. Yeah, let's go. I know, we're going somewhere exciting. My dog can't even hold himself back. He starts to squeak as soon as we get in the car. Oh, I don't know where we're going. But I'm gonna meet people, right? And so if you can have that beginner's mind about everything I just. Gayle Edwards 37:42 And you know, Patti, one of the other things I'm excited about is the obviously I also the International Academy of universal self mastery. And what they do, they really promote this idea of play. They call themselves a playground for conscious influences. And I would say a tip for self mastery, we've got a master our own cells. Patti Dobrowolski 38:03 Yeah. Gayle Edwards 38:04 Once we become more aware of who we are, it just opens us up to so much more. Really, really does. And we've got unity of people that are just like that. Oh, that's what happens. Patti Dobrowolski 38:19 That's right. That's it. The magic happens everywhere. And I love that you're talking about stepping into yourself, know yourself, understand yourself, grow yourself. And in that self mastery, then you find I think, liberation and freedom. You're free from the constraints of what anybody says or does because you trust and know yourself and you're aligned with the universe. And so you're doing and living your purpose every day and you definitely are sister.  You are incredible. Gayle. Oh my gosh. I just feel like this like Time flew. I'm getting back because this is so incredible. I can't wait to collaborate with you on something. I know that it would be amazing. So let's just hook up either in clubhouse, out a clubhouse. I don't care. But everyone if you're listening, just read the show notes and go follow Gayle Edwards. What's your handle on Instagram? We'll just say it right here. Gayle Edwards 39:17 Gayle.edwards.brandyou. Patti Dobrowolski 39:20 Yes, go there. And then I want you to just follow her and just follow her right into clubhouse if you want to hear some amazing things from her. Thank you so much, Gayle for your time. Gayle Edwards 39:31 Oh, thank you. Thank you. It's been an absolute pleasure but you know it has gone way too quick. Patti Dobrowolski 39:38 All right, so we'll do it again soon then. I know we will. Okay, everybody you know the drill if you like the content, share it with your friends and until next time Up Your Creative Genius. Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius.  Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and up your creative genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly, Patti Dobrowolski and the Up Your Creative Genius podcast. That's a wrap.

Cashflow Hacking Podcast
The Power of NO in Trading with Casey Stubbs, Ep #99

Cashflow Hacking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 21:17


Casey Stubbs is a 9 ½ year United States Army Veteran and married father of nine.  He is an entrepreneur, a leader in his local church, and is a successful business owner and trader.  Casey is dedicated to helping people from all walks of life fulfill their financial dreams, while also achieving financial freedom.  In this episode of How To Trade It, Casey shares the importance of self-discipline with practical steps to make improvements in your own life. You don't want to miss it!Subscribe to How To Trade ItYou'll want to hear this episode if you are interested in…[05:05] Integrity in life and trading[12:40] Positive self-talk[17:47] Celebrating your winsSelf-disciplineIf we are going to succeed in trading, we need to learn the fine art of self-discipline.  We must say NO to bad trades and the opportunity to make money, when the trade doesn't fit our plan. One of the greatest examples of self-discipline can be found in World Trading Champ, Mark Minervini.  It takes a great deal of restraint to pass up 1,000s of opportunities to trade and only select 22 over the course of an entire year.  If you haven't done so, check out my podcast regarding his 2021 year in review and see for yourself..   Positive Self-TalkWhen you mess up, and you will, don't punish yourself with phrases like, “Geez, I'm so stupid, I'll never be good at this.”  Instead, replace that kind of thinking with an acknowledgment of the mistake and a positive word.  For example, “Wow, I really made a mistake by not setting a stop loss on that trade.  I won't make that mistake again.  Next time, I'm going to crush it.”  You must push yourself to keep moving forward as you learn from inevitable mistakes.  Quitting just isn't an option.  Resources & People MentionedSend questions, comments, and podcast ideas to: Business@TradingStrategyGuides.comMark Minervini recent podcast episodeConnect With Casey StubbsWebsite:       https://caseystubbs.comYouTube:      https://www.youtube.com/TradingStrategyGuidesTwitter:          https://www.twitter.com/caseystubbsFacebook:   https://www.facebook.com/TradingStrategyGuidesLinkedIn:     https://linkedin.com/in/caseystubbs   Subscribe to How To Trade ItDisclaimer: Trading carries a high level of risk, and may not be suitable for all investors. Before deciding to invest you should carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience, and risk appetite. The possibility exists that you could sustain a loss of some or all of your initial investment. Therefore, you should not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. You should be aware of all the risks associated with foreign exchange trading, and seek advice from an independent financial advisor if you have any doubts. Support the show (https://caseystubbs.com)

Bloody Brilliant Beers
On the Piss Sausage of the Ocean

Bloody Brilliant Beers

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2022 92:37


Back again from the mighty Caxton Hotel. Geez the Frothies went off with the Froths this week, you have to love it. Tune in to find out what it'll take Clutz to get a crack wax! Make sure you get around our new sponsor and join the Knobby Undie Club! You can get a new pair of underwear delivered monthly straight to your door! Use code 75BEERS for 75% off the first month.

Welcome to the World of Pokémon

Hello there! Welcome to Professor Jacob's seventy-ninth lesson on Pokémon biology. And in today's class, we will be discussing Slowpoke: the Dopey Pokémon. Geez - kinda rude. Slowpoke is a water/psychic type in the Kanto region and just a psychic type in the Galar region. While this little pink fella might be adorable, it's not the brightest bulb in the box. Slowpoke is notorious for being a bit slow and forgetful. But the real appeal to Slowpoke is its tail. Secreting a sweet, delicious substance, Slowpoke's tail is a highly desired treat for both humans and Pokémon alike. They're commonly used in recipes or sold at scalper prices by Team Rocket. So beware of any shady characters trying to sell you "special" Slowpoke tails. Stranger danger, students! And there's more to learn about Slowpoke, so be sure to take plenty of notes! Welcome to the World of Pokémon is part of the Poke Casters Network.

Spirituality
#183 - Peach Geez

Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 31:47


Join my crypto trading discord https://discord.gg/TmA9GVba6j where I notify members in real time the coin I'm trading! Just copy my trade with whatever amount of money you can afford to trade with. I've been in crypto since 2015. Through trial & error and learning from every mistake, I finally have a system that repeatedly works that I'm confident in telling others to copy! I started with £7K, made that back and got my balance up to £35K profit within 2 months. I compound and trade with whatever the balance is. Now it's time to expand and tell you guys! Join the group for more information on how it all works! Follow so you never miss an episode! instagram.com/yeskingoliver Join me & like minded individuals across the world on telegram! t.me/talkwitholiverpodcast Please rate & review me! talkwitholiver.com Guest info: instagram.com/peachgeez Download my ebook! https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08LSJNQ48/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_H3vLFb1HFD0AT Inspired by Joe Rogan - The Joe Rogan Experience. Talk with Oliver Podcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

UnAborted
Abortion Activists Try To Outdo The Nazis

UnAborted

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 44:48


The Delaware Attorney General sues a local city for passing a law that simply requires the cremation or burial of abortion children. Why? BECAUSE it will “make it more difficult and costly for pregnant persons to be able to receive lawful reproductive healthcare services.” And the Germans try to own the Nazis by scrapping a Nazi-Era law which banned doctors from giving women information about abortions. Except they're behaving kind of like Nazis. If actions speak louder than words, then these abortion-activists just told us two things: The humanity of the unborn is axiomatic and they're just like Nazis. Geez… with abortion activists like this, who needs me? Date: 01/24/22 To help UnAborted create more pro-life content and take our content to the streets, become a Patron of the show at https://www.patreon.com/unaborted To help Seth reach more high school and college students through pro-life presentations around the country, become a monthly supporter at https://prolifetraining.com/donate/

All Sequels Go To Heaven
Ep. 137 - D3: The Mighty Ducks: 18th Century Mathematician Leonhard Oiler

All Sequels Go To Heaven

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 58:29


As we continue to Dip Into The Darkness, we watched D3: The Mighty Ducks. So toss on some Pantera, pick up some trash, and play some actual damn hockey, Charlie. You're such a toxic presence on this team and in this movie. And Adam Banks is really the heart of this team. Just shut up and ride the pine, Conway. Geez.

Land Academy Show
House Deals Made as Easy as Land Deals (LA 1680)

Land Academy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 14:15


Learn More About House Academy Here House Deals Made as Easy as Land Deals (LA 1680) Transcript: Steven Jack Butala:Steve and Jill here. Jill K DeWit:Hello. Steven Jack Butala:Welcome to the House Academy Show. Entertaining real estate investment talk. I'm Steven Jack Butala. Jill K DeWit:And I'm Jill DeWit, broadcasting from the valley of the sun. Steven Jack Butala:Today, jill and I talk about house deals, made as easy as land deals. Is there really, such a thing? Jill K DeWit:Yep. You know what's funny? I'll share one story with you now. And then I have another story for in a minute. Well, first of all, happy Career Path Day, for those of you who are with us and joining us in Career Path, today is day one day. One of the rest of your life. Steven Jack Butala:Jeez, that's cheesy. Jill K DeWit:I know, isn't it. Steven Jack Butala:Something's probably cheesy. Jill K DeWit:It's stupid. I know. Steven Jack Butala:Who else walked up to me and said, you are cheesy. Some people have said a lot of stuff to me. Jill K DeWit:I'll do it. Steven Jack Butala:A lot of crazy stuff to me, but not you're cheesy and fake and this doesn't work. Jill K DeWit:Well, I never say you're fake, but sometimes I say goofy. I do. I did call Aaron a goofball the other day. So anyway, it was funny, because this whole show is, house deals made as easy as land deals. So last week, and I was talking to one of the attendees who's in Career Path with us, starting today. He was talking about how, two or three years ago, I think that they were three years in now. He's adding land to his portfolio, but they were doing all houses. Started year one doing one house, year two was six houses. And then year three was 145 houses. Well, here's what the difference was. And the money was so much better. But year one, they were doing it all wrong. They were doing the renovations themselves. Steven Jack Butala:Yeah. Jill K DeWit:And they got one done. Year two, he and his partner got six done, because again, they're doing renovations. And then they realized, why are we doing this. Year three, they transitioned to what we're about to talk about today. And they're like, "I'm not doing any renovations. I'm buying it, selling it quickly, and moving on", kind of thing. And that's how they went from six to 145. He's like, "And this year we want to do 250 or something like that." And it's a small crew, but they've got it. Steven Jack Butala:Yep. Jill K DeWit:It's good. Steven Jack Butala:Before we get into it, let's take a question posted by one of our members on the landinvestors.com, online community. It's free, and don't forget to subscribe, seriously. Subscribe on the Land Academy, YouTube channel and comment on the shows you like. Jill K DeWit:Luke wrote, "If I have a signed purchase agreement and the owner gets a better offer in the mail for other land buyer. Do I have any recourse?" I think we covered this question last week. Steven Jack Butala:I think we did too. Jill K DeWit:So I'm just wondering, this is funny. So let me think of a different question that I can sub in here- Steven Jack Butala:About houses. Jill K DeWit:Real quick, that can solve our little typo. Steven Jack Butala:God, whoever produces this podcast really needs to- Jill K DeWit:Get their act together. Steven Jack Butala:Yeah. Geez. Jill K DeWit:Wonder who that is. Steven Jack Butala:Come on, podcast producer. Jill K DeWit:All right. Here's a house question for you. I'm going to say, Jill asks, "What would be a fair dollar amount that I should expect to get on a house flip. I understand the way you guys do it. You buy houses, you mark it up. You sell it to another investor. What dollar amount makes sense to you? Steven Jack Butala:Between 50 and $100,000, if you're funding it yourself. Here's an example. Buy in a market that, where, it all done, it's $600,000 let's say, five to $600,000. You're buying a house for 200, because it needs a lot of work. You buy it for 200, 250, sell it for 300, 350.

Edifying Qweens
S5/E2-Perspective is Everything(Purafide)

Edifying Qweens

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 35:32


I was talking with a friend the other day about the challenges and tribulations of life. While listening, I kept thinking, "Geez, you of all people do not deserve to be going through this." She appreciated my sympathy, but reminded me that Jesus didn't DESERVE to die a sinner's death for you and I! That pierced my soul! Too often, we want all the good that God can give, but fall apart when adversity hits. The hard times force us to put our money where our mouth is! Are we really gon' rest in the finished work of Jesus Christ?! We can...but our perspective is everything! Scriptures: James 1:5; Psalm 9:9-10; Psalms 55:22. Where you can find us: Facebook-Edifying Qweens; Twitter-EdifyingQ; Instagram-edifyingqweens; Email: EQLovesJesus@gmail.com

Above Average Podcast with Travis Crutcher
Interview with Mark Hunter of Chimaira

Above Average Podcast with Travis Crutcher

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 61:52


Excited? Geez do you think? I am over the moon stoked to share my conversation with Mark Hunter from Chimaira. Mark started Chimaira in 1998.The band has sold over a million albums worldwide and have debuted on the Billboard 200 Chart six times. 2013's Crown of Phantoms debuted at number 54 selling over 7,400 copies in its first week of release. Despite his massive success Mark has to be one of the most genuine, introspective, laid back, and just a blast to talk to people I have ever had the privilege of speaking to. Do yourself a favor and check him out on Twitch and Twitter at the links below!  Mark's Twitter click HERE Mark on Twitch click HERE Follow the show on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/AAPwithTravisCrutcher To schedule a complimentary coaching session please visit: TravisCrutcher.com To get your fitness on with Jess visit: Teamhopelifters.com Check out Rise Nutrition at: www.teamrobinson.goherbalife.com Www.Facebook.com/risenutritionclub Www.Instagram.com/risenutritionclub Check out Stephanie at: www.courageouslivingtoday.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/above-average/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/above-average/support

Software Social
It's Been a Year

Software Social

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 41:44


Every doctor is concerned about your vital signs, but a good doctor cares about your overall health. Your website deserves the same care, and Hey Check It is here to help- Hey Check It is a website performance monitoring and optimization tool- Goes beyond just core web vitals to give you a full picture on how to optimize your website to give your users an optimal, happy experience- Includes AI-generated SEO data, accessibility scanning and site speed checks with suggestions on how to optimize, spelling and grammar checking, custom sitemaps, and a number of various tools to help youStart a free trial today at heycheckit.comAUTOMATED TRANSCRIPTColleen Schnettler  0:02  Hey, Colleen, hey, Michelle. Good morning.Michele Hansen  0:43  It's been a year. Oh,Colleen Schnettler  0:45  it has been a year. Yes.Michele Hansen  0:48  2020. Part Two. Okay. 2021. Part two is coming to a closeColleen Schnettler  0:56  eye. That is hard to believe, isn't it?Michele Hansen  0:59  Yeah. And so I thought maybe this would be a good time to reflect on the year that has been and think about the year to come.Colleen Schnettler  1:13  I love this idea. Wow, that's so cool that we've been doing the podcast long enough that we can have a yearly reflection. We've been doing it more than a year. I know as to how a year and a half. I love it.Michele Hansen  1:26  No. So okay, so let's start out with simple file upload. And I feel like it's been a while since we've like actually talked about simple file upload. So you know, as, again, if this was a professionally edited, produced podcast, this is where the heart noises would be. Coleen, can you take us back to where you were in January of 2021. With your business,Colleen Schnettler  1:55  so in January of 2021.So in January of 2021, simple file upload was in alpha, I believe in the Heroku add on store. And so that means it was not yet available for sale. You have to get 100 users, maybe it's beta, you have to get 100 users of your product in the app store before you're allowed to list it for sale. I've my years Right, right. Yeah, yeah, no, that was okay. It was that was 2020 2020. I launched it. Yep. It was JanuaryMichele Hansen  2:35  of 2020. That it was in beta.Colleen Schnettler  2:38  Right. It December, January, it was in beta. Right? Yeah, because I have the date as of February 4 2021, I was able to make it available for sale. So the product has been available for sale since February of 2021. Wow. And this is December. And since that time, it has grown to I'm not 1200 MRR, which is very exciting. And it has been a I mean, this year has been a wild ride professionally if I look back on it, because launch simple file upload. Learned a lot while doing that. And almost even bigger than that in August of 2021. I quit my job to join the Hammerstone team. And you tookMichele Hansen  3:25  a job and then you quite registered like because you were clear Soltan starting out the year. Okay, the next couple years like,Colleen Schnettler  3:33  yeah, I basically went on this roller coaster up, I'd been consulting for years, then one of the companies I consulted for for years, convinced me to come on full time with them. And I had every intention of that being like a long term gig. It's a wonderful company. And then I think I announced on Twitter or on the podcast that I took a job and I got inundated with offers, which was pretty cool. And good to know if you're job hunting, you should probably hunt before you just take one. But then a couple months later, I had this really unique opportunity to join Hammerstone Hammerstone stone is the company co founded with my buddies, Aaron and Shawn that's building the Query Builder component and get paid to build that out and keep the IP so I had to quit the full time job in order to do Hammerstone full time and right now I'm doing Hammerstone full time paid. Yeah, so that's what that's what's going on.Michele Hansen  4:40  I mean, that's a such a journey for you to go from consulting. And then like this sort of like how much consulting do I need to do like and there's kind of period of time where you're trying to go kind of full time or, like more time on simple file upload. Then kind of Just life necessitated taking a job.Colleen Schnettler  5:05  Yeah, I think that's accurate. And I think a lot of people who are trying to build their own businesses can appreciate this. Like, I am super, super excited for those people that can go all in on their business. But I have a lot of bills. And I moved. Oh, I also moved from Virginia to California this year, gradually, Geez, what a year, man. Yeah, so I think the decision thing for me was I launched simple file upload, and the consulting the thing about what I was doing with consulting as I had more than one client, so it was just this incredible overhead of context switching. And the full time job offered me the opportunity, I had negotiated a four day workweek. So it had offered me offered me the opportunity to only have the two things I was working on. And that would have worked out great. I think, if I had stayed there, that would have been, that would have been a great choice, too. But the Hammerstone opportunity just felt too exciting and too big. It's literally exactly what I want to do to turn down. And so I want to say join them in August, and I've been working full time for the client that is funding the development of the product, it actually gives me less time on simple file upload, which is a constant, again, everyone with a job and a side project can appreciate this. It's like a constant balance, trying to find the time for all the things I want to do. But if you think about Michelle, if we go back to 2020, I don't have any products, and I have so many products, like I don't even have time for the ball. Like it's amazing, right? multiple things, right? So it's been, it's been really, really, really exciting and spectacular. And one of our friends, Pete, he's written a couple books. And he uses this phrase, expanding your luck surface area. And the concept is, like, really successful guys will always say, Oh, I just got lucky. How many times have you met someone who's running a, you know, half 1,000,002 million ARR business? It's like, Oh, we got really lucky. It's like, Yeah, but luck played a part. But this concept, I really love this concept of luck, surface area. Luck played apart, but you did all the things to position yourself to take advantage of the opportunity when it presented itself. Yeah. And so all these things we do honestly, like the podcast and launching products, and speaking at conferences, all of those things, I think, really increase the luck surface area. And so I feel incredibly lucky. But also, I also took a lot of steps to put myself in the position Hammerstone, I think is going to be the thing, Michelle, like, it's we feel the poll. I mean, it is exciting. So, you know, we feel the poll,Michele Hansen  7:53  that's interesting, like so, I mean, being on something that's like moving and people are like customers are really excited about it. I guess how do you like contrast that with the response that you get from simple file upload? Like, does that feel like a contrast?Colleen Schnettler  8:11  Oh, yeah. And I think simple file upload meets a very pressing need people have on Heroku. But outside of that, it feels like pushing, right? Like it feels like and this is this is part of growing a business like I'm not, you know, it is what it is. But it feels like, there's a lot of competitors out there. And I have to convince people to go with me, small solo business vers go with, you know, Cloudflare images, or, you know, file stack or some huge company that has servers or they're just at their disposal. And so it feels like a lot of hustle. And I don't I mean, it's a great all of it is a great learning experience. But Hammerstone I mean, people are basically asking us, they are asking to pay us for this thing that is not even done. Like, yeah,Michele Hansen  9:01  like banging down the door. I mean, there have product market fit there. But it's like, it's like very clear that like it's going to happen.Colleen Schnettler  9:11  I mean, our Early Access, based on a couple tweets my co founder sent out, we have like 200 people on an early access list. Based on we don't even have a landing page for this thing. Like it's amazing. It's really exciting. So it's been really I think Justin Jackson has this great article, I think it was this week, he sent it out, although I don't know if everyone got it this week, but it was basically about like, your market is going to determine your success. Like you can have one person who's hustling. It's not necessarily it's not just how hard you work, like you can work really hard. But it's also your market is going to determine your success. And so I don't know it just feels like so many exciting things have happened to me this year is what I'm trying to say So and I think like the Hammerstone thing wouldn't have happened if simple file upload hadn't happened. Right? So these things compound when you think about like, getting you're putting yourself out there and and, you know, the luck going back to the whole luck surface area thing.Michele Hansen  10:17  Yeah, I mean, I think that makes a lot of sense. And like the whole thing about market like, I feel like that's that's something that that Justin hits on a lot and and valuably, so because, you know, there's a quote from a famous investor that I forget who it is. But it's, you know, if maybe it's Paul Graham, when a you know, a good product meets a bad market market wins when a good team meets a bad market market wins when a bad product meets a good market market wins. And I mean, you guys have like, you know, wind is in your sails, and you are just flying along.Colleen Schnettler  10:59  Yeah, it's, it's pretty exciting. And just to clarify, I am still, I still love working on simple file upload, simple file upload is so much fun for me, because there's such a tight feedback loop. Hammerstone is still in this phase, at least the stuff I'm working on where it's big, and it's it's kind of, it's not, it's not done, right. So it kind of feels like a slog, because it's just kind of brute force and getting the work done. Simple file upload is a joy, because every time a customer emails me a question, like I can iterate and improve it. And so I still I didn't mean to I'm not sunsetting it or anything, like I'm still way into it. And I still feel like there's a way to do both right now. Yeah, I just, it's fun, like people are engaging more, I think, if you go back to founders comp, which was in October, my I was I came out of that really excited. And my goal for simple file upload was to really push to see if I could grow it a little bit. And I had hoped to get to 1500 by the end of the year, and I'm at 1200. So that's fine, right? Like it is what it is. But I think a lot more people are engaging with me than in the beginning. Remember the beginning, I couldn't get anyone to talk to me. Mm hmm. I feel like a lot more people are talking to me now. And so I have all kinds of ideas with what I want to do with it. And so yeah, I'm just over overflowing with ideas right now. So it's cool. I think it'sMichele Hansen  12:29  valuable as entrepreneurs to also have like a, like a safe little sandbox to play in to experiment where, you know, if, if you want to try something, you can, there's nobody telling you, you can't there's nobody's job relying on you, no, you're not doing it, of course, you have customers and you're responsible to them. So you can't, you know, just decide to take down your infrastructure for no reason. But like, if you want to cut the prices, 50% like, you can do that, if you want to raise him 50% You can also do that, like and you can just kind of, like learn as an entrepreneur. I mean, that's how I, I kind of loved having a full time job and a side project for a period of time because it was it was just like my safe little playground. And I think it was really, really valuable to have it as just a side project and not intending to go full time on it, because it just took that pressure off it and it made it a joy to just learn how to run a business without that fear of, you know, this has to pay for our mortgage, and like all of that kind of stuff going into that which just adds a lot of pressure when you're already when you're learning a new skill and outside your comfort zone. Like having financial pressure on top of that is really for a lot of people not very helpful mentally, like it can drive you but it's it's it's a lot of pressure.Colleen Schnettler  14:00  Yeah, I think that's a good way to describe it for me like it's a nice side income right now. And I am learning I mean that is what's so cool is tight feedback loop and I'm learning so much how to talk to customers, I made this change to my onboarding email which seems to have made a huge difference. So stop me if I told you this but my onboarding email used to be asking questions and now it's so it used to be can you tell me why you're using simple file upload and I changed it to be quick tips to help you get started fast or something like that. And that seems to really have made a difference so all these little things I'm learning that I can apply elsewhere have been really fun like I'm really enjoying it.Michele Hansen  14:44  So we talked a little bit about at founder summit of like whether you sell the business or not. We didn't I feel like that conversation was that that was a pretty strong no that you that you really enjoy it as at you know, as this little playground So I'm curious, like, as you think about this coming year, and you know, bearing in mind that humans are famously bad at predictions, and this year had so many twists and turns that you did not expect going into the year.Colleen Schnettler  15:18  Oh my gosh, right here. IMichele Hansen  15:19  mean, not not like you set a goal or almost like, like, do you have like an intention that you would want to set for the year of like? Like, what do you mean, it's a big question, but like, what do you want out of?Colleen Schnettler  15:34  out of it? Yeah, that's a fair.Michele Hansen  15:37  Sorry, is, you know, your is your founder journey? Like, is that taking you more towards Hammerstone? Is that in like, less simple file upload? And I don't I I'm starting to answer my own question. So like, just,Colleen Schnettler  15:58  yeah, I understand. So yeah, right. The end of the year, let's look forward, oh, this will be fun, because then we can look at the end of next year and be like, Oh, how well did we align? Okay, so we're going into what? 2022? That's crazy. Okay. So my vision for 2022 would be, I am getting paid by the client to develop this, this Hammerstone product, and we agreed that I'd go until August, I'm sure that can go plus or minus either side, they're pretty flexible. So my vision for 2022 would be early 2022. We're going to start launching hammers stone in Laravel. We're gonna see what the responses there and kind of see what the support burden is. And I will finish out the rails component. While I do that, I still want to put time and effort into simple file upload. I want to get it to I just want to see what does it take to grow it to 2k? Like, can I get to 2k? What does that even look like? What I do? I'm not I mean, I think I want to see you know, what it's capable of? And yeah, if someone wants to give me $200,000 for it, I'll sell it today. But I think just FYI, I'm open to that. But I think realistic or open first. I think realistically, I have a product now I did the first thing is so many people at founder Summit. Okay, I don't know if you remember this at founder Summit, we were on the bus to go to the balloon. And one of the gentlemen on the bus named Matt was talking about how he's in the market to buy a SAS and someone was trying to sell him their SAS and they kept telling him it had really low MRR, like maybe 500 bucks. And they kept telling him, oh, there's all these opportunities to grow it like, you know, you can grow it this way. And he was like, Look, if that but but it had been like this way for like four or five years. And it just been sitting at two to 500 MRR and he said something that has stuck with me. And he said, Okay, if they can really, if there's really opportunity to grow it, why haven't they done it in the five years they've had this thing? And he said it in a way that made me think, Oh, you can just you can do things to grow your SAS like, it won't. I don't know it, it was this point that like, I have control to some degree over whether this thing grows or not. And so I want to put in the work to see I mean, maybe I'll I'll timebox that maybe I'll put in the work until I think in February, it will be a good review point because it'll be a year old. If I put in the work, what happens? Can I grow this? Can I learn how to use Google Analytics and which I don't still don't know how to use? Um, can I learn how to write better copy? Can I learn how to make landing pages that appeal to my users, like, there's so much marketing, I mean, simple file upload is a it's kind of like a playground where I can learn all this marketing stuff. And that'll help me in all products. But I think my goal would be, you know, Hammerstone is going to launch in the in the spring. And then I should be done in the summer. And then we'll be doing the rails launch and rails onboarding. So I think the preponderance of my time will be on Hammerstone. But I don't know about simple file upload. I don't know if I'll sell it. I don't know if I'll continue to grow it. But I'm not going to grow. I'm not going to sell it before February, so reevaluate in February. So I have no idea what it looks like. Yeah, but I think I think the idea would be to focus more on Hammerstone and grow Hammerstone to support me, so I don't have to consult anymore. That would be pretty sweet.Michele Hansen  19:32  I think it's also worth like reminding that when you launch simple file upload, you wanted to have a product. Oh, yeah. You also like you also did not want to be a solo founder like you have always wanted to be part of a team and I think that's something that drove you to take that job was being part of a team and why you had considered previous job offers.Colleen Schnettler  19:56  Yes, I was lonely. Absolutely. Yeah, very social person. And so I was absolutely lonely.Michele Hansen  20:03  Yeah. And so I think it would make sense if like, you know, Hammerstone becomes, you know, the the focus and the thing that you really want to go for but and simple file upload is just this, you know, cool thing you have on the side. And when you have time you learn, you know, new marketing skills to make it grow a little bit, but like, it doesn't like, it doesn't have to be the thing.Colleen Schnettler  20:28  Oh, yeah, I don't I don't know, with my current time and energies. I don't think it will be. I mean, I don't see this thing getting to 10 km RR in the next year, right. Like, I just don't I don't think that's the thing I think camera showed is going to be the thing. And this will be the side project that, you know, I can continue to dabble in, or I can sell or whatever. But you're right. I just wanted to have a product. I mean, if you look back at this year, it's amazing how far I've come. Absolutely. Yeah. So that's a my self. Oh, totally. I totally am. I'm really happy with with the growth. And the stuff that I did this year for sure. So let's talk about your year in review.Michele Hansen  21:15  Gosh, okay. January 2021. Um, I mean, I guess the point to start, there is really in February, when I started writing the newsletter book, whatever I calledColleen Schnettler  21:29  February, so good month for us.Michele Hansen  21:33  Yeah, right, we have a lot like, we should go back and listen to those episodes. They're probablyColleen Schnettler  21:37  I know, we totally should.Michele Hansen  21:41  So, so yeah, so I started writing the book, as a newsletter, I didn't really know what was gonna go. totally consumed my spring launched it in July. It's crazy. And like, I'd say, there was like, you know, in the beginning, it was like, you know, 9010, like, mostly geocode do and then just a little bit of book and then towards, like, May in June, it was like 7525. And then I feel like August to October was like, almost 5050. But I think as we kind of close out on the year, and all that I'm really realizing that, you know, so like, I wrote a book, but I don't want to be a writer. I am a software entrepreneur who happened to write a book, and not a software entrepreneur who became a writer. And I think that's an important difference. And I feel like I've been struggling with this a lot of like, should I do more books stuff? Like, should I do like paid workshops and courses? And, like, should I go, you know, like, give workshops at companies? And like, Should I do a mini book that's like the how to talk to people talk things should I do podcast should I do like, or like, you know, have a podcast for the book, like showed you all this other stuff. And I could, but I just, I don't want to, and I really miss, like, my company. Like, I really miss I like, you know, working on JUCO do stuff and just find myself really missing like SEO Marketing, rather than like Info Product Marketing. I miss working synchronously with Mateus. Because I feel like so often we're kind of working in the same office, but not actually working together, because my head is elsewhere on books, stuff and whatnot. And, you know, even if there's no pressure to, like, sell more like, like, I feel like, and maybe this is a voice in my head or from other people, or I don't really know where it comes from, but it's like people like, you know, it's like, you wrote a good book that accomplish the goals, I had to teach entrepreneurs how to understand their customers, and, you know, you know, teach them that everyone has a capacity for empathy, and that they should, you know, they could have more empathy for other people and for themselves and teach them how to do that. And like get accomplished that and yet I find myself, you know, refreshing sales reports and being like, am I going to feel like I accomplished what I set out to do when I sell 500 copies or 1000 copies or 10,000 copies and and no, because the book already accomplished what I set out for it to do. It's a all in one place. I can send other founders to learn how to understand their customers and hopefully to learn more about you know, having empathy for others in themselves. I think I'll still do podcasts about the book, but I think going into To 2022 I would like to do more geocoded stuff and less book stuff.Colleen Schnettler  25:08  Okay, that sounds like a very, it sounds like something you've thought about quite a lot.Michele Hansen  25:17  Yeah, it's it's been on my mind. I've been intending to journal about it. I didn't actually journal about it.Colleen Schnettler  25:23  Oh, God.Michele Hansen  25:25  Like, I should know this. And I, I did open my journal like once. Last week, no, twice. No, I opened it twice. Okay. And then I just have I've had a lot of things I've intended to journal about. And thenColleen Schnettler  25:42  I thought about Yeah, like, in my headMichele Hansen  25:43  kind of like drafting that in my head. That's like, I don't know is, you know, I feel like I'm sort of at a crossroads of like, do I want to lean more into this, like writers stuff? And like, right? I just sat answers, just no. Adults, couldColleen Schnettler  26:02  you figure that out. I mean,Michele Hansen  26:03  like, I liked writing the book, I had so much fun. writing it as a newsletter, especially and getting feedback as I went, and then like, interviewing all the people who are reading it, like, that was awesome. Like, I love the writing process, even the really hard parts where I felt like I was doing major surgery on it every weekend, like completely rewriting it, like, but all of the, the work of being an independent writer, like, you know, and I feel like I sound like you're, you know, sort of a very typical indie hacker when I'm like, Oh, I liked you know, creating the thing, but I don't like, like, Yes, I know, I hear that, thank you. But I don't know, I don't have to sell it, like I don't, you know, it's gonna, if it's a good book, people are gonna recommend it. Like, I'll still go on podcasts, like, I'm still gonna talk about it. But that's basically the only thing I found that doesn't really drain me. Like, I feel like I died a little bit inside when I was sending those emails Black Friday week about Lady sale. Like, it's just me, like, it's not that it's not like, that's a valid marketing approach. And it works for a lot of people, but it's just, you know, we like we kind of talked a little bit about, like, founder business fit. Yes, and I've sort of been mulling over this idea about founder marketing fit, which is that, you know, we design our businesses, right, you know, sometimes intentionally and sometimes not, but fundamentally, every decision you make is a design decision in the business. And, you know, it has to be a type of business that that suits you and how you want to work and what you're good at, and, but also how you market it, that has to fit with you too. And like, for some people, you know, sending out like, sales emails, and having a cohort come in, like, whether it's for software or for a course or whatnot. Like, that's how they want to do things. And that really fits with how they like to work. For other people like me, that's like, I really like talking to people and then looking at analytics, and then writing stuff related to what people need. And then like selling that way, and actually, you know, doing active sales, negotiating with people, I enjoy all of that. And I feel like with God, I have a really, really good founder, marketing fit, like, the way we market the product works. And I feel good about it, and it plays to my skill set. And I'm always improving that skill set, but like, it's, it's very much in my wheelhouse. And I just feel like the way of promoting a book and it's just not a fit for me. Like it's just not. And, you know, I could promote it in other ways. Like, um I don't, I'm just I'm just so drained. Like, by so much of it. Like, the only thing that feels drained me is like, you know, talking to people on podcasts.Colleen Schnettler  29:16  Okay, so I felt this way about the book for a while, it feels like you're asking permission to not market it.Michele Hansen  29:22  Yeah. Because I feel like to me, like you know, there was there was this point when I was still in the drafting phase when somebody who had who had bought the preorder of it you know, made a comment I think on like LinkedIn or something that like, the book was not only helping them understand their customers better, but also helping them understand how to be a better coworker and spouse. And like, that was the moment when I knew I was like, Okay, this book has achieved what I hoped it would achieve. And then some like my like, wildest dream goal here. And now I just need to ship it. But to me like the book is a success, if I have one person have that response to it, like, I don't need to have a million people read this book, I don't even need to have 10,000 Read it, right? Like it's and it's also like this is, this is a long term asset, right? Like it's not going to expire. You know, it's sold almost 1000 copies in its first year, which is apparently a lot better than, than most books both published and self published. Like this is a long term thing, I can't exhaust myself on it now doing all sorts of things that I don't need to do that don't feel natural or like a fit to me. But just success is just not the number of copies sold. And it's not like anybody is asking for how many I've sold. But I'm like, oh, like spilled in public thing. I should be posting like a numbers update every so often. And I do that. And then I find myself like checking the sales reports every day, and I feel so drained. And it's just like, it's just, that's just not success to me. Like I just don't. I just don't, I just don't care about like, that was just not I didn't write it to make money or to sell a certain number of copies. I feel like I've kind of been stuffing down my own feelings about what success for the book looks like.Colleen Schnettler  31:38  Right? So my thought here is, why are we even talking about it anymore? don't market it. Just let it be? Oh, no, no, that that's the right thing. Right. Like I said, Okay, well do what you feel comfortable with. I'm you know, podcast. SoMichele Hansen  31:53  booked on a bunch of podcasts like, Yeah, I kind of kind of like take like a month off from doing that. Okay, but like, I like doing that. Um, but even like writing the newsletter, like, has felt like a burden. And I think it's because I've been doing all this. I've been doing all this talking about talking to customers, but I haven't had time to actually talk to customers. Yeah, I feel like I have anything to say at this point. I mean, and the point of the book was to get everything in my head out. Right, I did that. And so now I don't really? I don't know I, at least for right now. I feel like I don't have anything else.Colleen Schnettler  32:34  Yeah, well, I think that okay, so you know me very well. I am a pretty logical person. Don't read horoscopes don't go to psychics, not really into that touchy feely stuff. And I am a firm believer, despite all of that, this is totally out of line with my personality. I'm a, I'm an I'm a firm believer of like going with your energy. So if you are dreading it every time you send out a Black Friday email, I mean, you you've learned this about yourself, you know that that's not the right thing to do. So I for you, and your, you know, because you have income from another source, you can totally do that you are in no way dependent on this book income. I think it's great that you've kind of discovered this about yourself and made this decision. And you're just going to do the things that, you know, bring you energy and you love which it sounds like is the podcast promoting and just let the other stuff go turn off the notifications? Who cares?Michele Hansen  33:25  Yeah. You know, I think for like, for me, like, my theme of 2021 was the phrase soul nourishing, and I love that doing things that I felt really, really nourished my soul whether that's conversations with people who have similar values, or ideas or dreams, or writing the book, and kind of fulfilling that lifelong dream of writing a book was one of them. I don't know what 2022 is going to be, but I feel like it needs to be not just my soul getting nourished because as we've talked about, I've neglected a lot of other areas of I don't I don't know the word I'm looking for here but like, there needs to be a sort of overall wellness. Focus, I think a little bit more of a holistic, nourishing. Okay, going on. And that includes kind of like, yeah, you're such a California girl, respecting my energy, you know,Colleen Schnettler  34:43  I know right? Come over, I'll give you an SAE Bowl trophy for breakfast now. I didn't even know what else it was before I moved here. Now I'm like, Oh, I buy that shit at Costco.Michele Hansen  34:53  Yes, I'm gonna show up and you're gonna give me like crystals and essential oils. Yeah, no, no, no, no, no, no, no Yeah, I know, I, you know, it took me like a couple of months for that phrase like Soul nourishing to kind of crystallize in my head and be driving me. So it's gonna take me time for whatever this new phrase is going to be. But like, I'm very much in my head, like, like I like I went to get a massage a couple weeks ago because like, I need to work on my stress, I need to lower my stress levels, I need to go get a massage. And the massage therapist was like, I need to get you out of your head and into your body because you are so much in your head. Yeah. And and so, I don't know. I don't know. I'll let you know when I figureColleen Schnettler  35:38  out what Yeah, report back. But so for you 2020 To tell us more aboutMichele Hansen  35:43  to like I was so outside my comfort zone this year between being in a country and writing a book and promoting a book and like, all these other things, like I'm so far outside my comfort zone that I really just want like, comfort and coziness in my life. Like I want yeah, I want it to be calm and peaceful and quiet. Like I find myself missing quietness.Colleen Schnettler  36:15  And so you think for you that you don't know what that looks like, but you think that probably means more time on geocodes to working with your husband. And just chill out? Like you're kind of acclimating you've been there a year now. How long have you lived there? Gosh, when did you go here a year and a half?Michele Hansen  36:32  Like, yeah,Colleen Schnettler  36:33  the podcast. I can always no, that's because we're notMichele Hansen  36:36  talking to each other. It's like, we need a weekly appointment to make sure we talk to each other. Let's make it a public appointment. Like,Colleen Schnettler  36:44  uh, but I Yeah, okay. I know, you're talking about calm over there. And I have, for whatever reason, something you said just started all these ideas going off into my head that I'm really excited about all of a sudden. So. Yes. 2020 To be a calm year for Michelle 2023 I mean, refer to comfortingly. arity Yeah. push really hard for a yearly arity. No, I totally get that. I think, right, you worked. I mean, you hustled like, whoa, this year. So maybe this 2022 is a year where you relax into what you have built and grown for yourself. I mean,Michele Hansen  37:27  and I also, you know, did expand my luck surface area to quote peeking again. And, you know, so that means, you know, maybe there will be conference talk opportunities or other podcasts or something like, I'm open to that. It's just, I'm just Yeah, I'm just so tired. And, you know, I like, I like giving talks, but I'm not gonna, like hustle and create this, like workshop package that I can sell to companies.Colleen Schnettler  38:00  Yeah, you know what? I'm not gonna do. Okay, can I say something? Because I want to get it on record. Okay. So, earlier, you said that you were looking, you know, how drainie I'm sorry, how the marketing for the book is really draining, and you want to do things that really, you know, bring you energy. Okay, this is only 2021. So I'm thinking like, 2025 and I know, I brought this up a few times. However, now that I have a business that looks like it's gonna be really successful. Dude, we are so starting an incubator. Like we're gonna have our own venture fund, and then we're going to help people build businesses. 2025 You heard it here first.Michele Hansen  38:39  I don't know if it's a venture fund or like, it's like our own on profit income. I don't know what it looks like or something. There's gonna be a software social something.Colleen Schnettler  38:51  I feel like this is gonna happen. Like you talking about your energy levels. That'sMichele Hansen  38:55  taken but software social something is Yeah. Gonna have coming at some pointsColleen Schnettler  39:03  in the next 10 years. The future in the future. Yeah. Okay. I know, I brought it up before I just when you were talking about excitement. I was like, Oh, dude, this is this is something we're gonna maybe do someday. That'll be a good retirement job for me. Yeah, totally. Right. I mean, maybe it'll be years 20 years. I don't know. Someday. So that sounds good, though. I mean, that sounds like for you.Michele Hansen  39:29  In my backyard those are my retirement you drink gin. Yeah, like dreamed about making a little like, gin distillery My oh my gosh, are so funny on our farms smell like they smell like apricots when you bolt them. And then I'm like, Oh, Nick, amazing. Like pine. Apricot. Gin. So I don't make it now. But that's again, retirement dreamColleen Schnettler  39:48  retirement dream. Yeah, so it sounds like to sum up your money 52 Oh my gosh, to submit for 2022 It sounds like you are looking for a year of finding balance. Yeah, and all the things balance. I think I am looking for another hustle year. So 2022 is going to be another I know 2021 was a hustle year for me with Hammerstone launching and simplify, upload kind of not sure what I'm going to do with that. But 2022 for me is another hustle year I thinkMichele Hansen  40:26  2020 was like a hustle year for you as much as like a ping pong year because I feel like all over the place kind of all over the place like both like physically and yeah, work wise. And like, I would love to see you really, really grow into this role of being a founder of Hammerstone. And like, and, and bringing that to life and helping that blossom and really leaning into that because I think you have so much more to discover about yourself as a founder.Colleen Schnettler  41:04  Yeah, totally agree. I love it.Michele Hansen  41:06  Cheers to 2022 Cheers toColleen Schnettler  41:09  2022 Oh, my goodness. All right, well, I guess that will wrap up this week's episode of the software, social podcast, Happy New Year to all of you. We'd love to hear what your goals are for 2022. Or if you want to hit us with the 2021 recap. That's always fun. We love to hear everyone's stories. You can reach us on Twitter at software slash pod. Talk to you next year. It's no my favorite joke. Remember when you were a kid and used to make that joke? Like like talk to you next year? It's still a great joke. Okay,

The Marc Cox Morning Show
MCMS: "Oh, geez, Carl! Give him that!

The Marc Cox Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 33:00


Hour 3:  Mike Elam welcomes former Missouri Senator Jim Talent and a conversation about Ukriane/Russia/USA relations and oil production,  Dr Edward Peters has cyber security tips and warnings, and who was the best cast of SNL? Was it the one you remember from high school? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Haymarket Books Live
Just Resistance: Building Toward a Demilitarized and Decolonized Future

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 83:00


Join organizers and advocates to imagine and discuss building a future safe for all and free of militarization and colonization. The Immigrant Defense Project, the Center for Constitutional Rights and Haymarket Books are proud to present “The Next 20 Years: Building towards a demilitarized and decolonized future of safety for all”, the final event of a 4-part series marking the 20th anniversary of 9/11. The event commemorating International Human Rights Day brings together organizers and advocates who are building towards a world we have not yet seen, and helping to pave our collective path forward. From the abolition of borders, to the complete defunding of the military industrial complex within a future of economic, racial, gender and climate justice, we will discuss both the necessity of imagination, as well as the strategies, tactics and principles we need to win the world we deserve. To mark the 20th anniversary of 9/11, the Center for Constitutional Rights, Haymarket Books and our partners are pleased to present a 4-part series, "Just Resistance: 20 years of global struggle against the post-9/11 human rights crisis." Moderator: Mizue Aizeki is the Deputy Director of the Immigrant Defense Project (IDP). Mizue's work focuses on ending the injustices—including criminalization, imprisonment, and exile—at the intersections of the criminal and immigration systems. Mizue guides IDP's local and state policy work, including the ICE Out of Courts Campaign and IDP's campaigns to end the growing entanglement between local law enforcement and ICE. . Panelists: Lara Kiswani is the executive director of the Arab Resource & Organizing Center (AROC), and a faculty member in the College of Ethnic Studies at SF State University. Lara has been active in movements against racism and war, for Palestinian self-determination, and international solidarity for the last 20 years. Arun Kundnani is the author of The Muslims are Coming! Islamophobia, extremism, and the domestic War on Terror (Verso, 2014) and The End of Tolerance: racism in 21st century Britain (Pluto, 2007). He has previously been an editor of the journal Race & Class and a scholar-in-residence at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library. Timmy Châu (he/him) is a Viet organizer, lawyer, and facilitator based in Zhigaagoong, also known as Chicago. He started organizing with an effort called We Charge Genocide doing cop-watch and know-your-rights trainings across the City. He is the Managing Director at the Prison + Neighborhood Arts / Education Project (PNAP) where he works on building inside/outside networks of mutual support and advocacy between incarcerated and freeworld activists, scholars, thinkers, and artists. He's also a co-starter of Dissenters, a new youth-led anti-war organization, where he currently sits on the Advisory Committee. Fernando Martí is a poet, printmaker, community architect, and housing activist. His work reflects his formal training in urbanism, his roots in rural Ecuador, and his current residence in the heart of Empire in an age of climate catastrophe. His poetry, prints, altar ofrendas and utopian constructions inhabit the space between ancestral traditions of place and a futurist imagination rooted in Latinx culture. For over a decade, Fernando co-directed the Council of Community Housing Organizations. His artwork can be found regularly on justseeds.org. His writing has appeared in publications as varied as El Tecolote, Street Sheet, Geez magazine, Left Turn and Shelterforce. He shares his art and writing in a zine called Amor y Lucha. This event is sponsored by the Immigrant Defense Network, the Center for Constitutional Rights and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/SfXYOx3cGq4 Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

The Marketing Secrets Show
Biohacks, Energy, and Weirdness with Josh Forti, Part 3

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 25:38


Russell and Josh reveal the 2 biggest biohack, supplements, diets, brain food, focus & marketing. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- Russell Brunson: What's up everybody? This is Russell, welcome back to Marketing Secrets podcast. Today's episode we are going to get into a little bit of some biohacks and some things, diet, energy, supplements, what we do to be able to have our brains stronger so we can be better entrepreneurs. This was a really fun conversation, I think you're going to love it. You're going to see some of the weirdness happening in my brain, what I do, why I do it. And hopefully it gives you guys a place to start when you start looking at how do you change your health to be able to have more success in business. So hopefully you enjoy this conversation. Also, at the end of it, Josh pitches his new podcast, which is coming out here in a couple weeks, couple months. And I think I'm episode number one, so I'm sitting down with him for a two hour conversation here in the near future. Make sure you get on the waiting list for his podcast it is JoshForti.com/coming soon. And again, he'll do a little pitch for it at the end. But anyway, I hope you guys enjoyed this conversation about biohacking, supplements, health, and how it relates to you as an entrepreneur. Welcome back everyone to the Marketing Secrets podcast. We're about to move into the third topic, I don't know what it is, but I'm pumped to find out. So what's the third topic? Let's go. Josh Forti: All right, Russell, so here's the ding. You're this dude who you've got this super, super successful company, but anybody that has followed you that knows you a little bit, right? All the newbies out there might not. But you're a wrestler and you to be successful in all areas of life, which is really cool, it's one of the reasons I follow you is because you're not just... I'm going to throw rocks to Grant Cardone here, Grant we love you, but also all you care about is money. So get a life. All right? But anyway, so you have more of this complete picture, this more complete thing that you're trying to go through and do. And so for me, one of the things that I've been focusing on a lot, and it's always interesting because whatever I focus on, I share on social media. And then when I share it on social media, people start giving me ideas back, and half the time it's really great ideas, and then half the time people just hate me for no reason. They're like, you're so dumb. I'm like, oh my gosh. Okay. But anyway, for me, right now, one of the things I've been really focused on is health and fitness. Right? And I remember, I don't know, it was a year ago or whenever it was that you were freaking out about bone broth. Right? And you were like bone broth is going to be the greatest thing. Oh my God. Or whatever it is, it's going to be so cool. And it's going to help me cure cancer and not get it or whatever. And I'm like, you're so weird, dude. I don't even understand. Because I wasn't in it, right? I didn't understand it. And then I got married and my wife is a yoga instructor and so she's super, super fit. And now I'm at this point in my life where I'm like, man, my brain feels foggy a lot of days and I want it to be clear. And I'm like, oh crap, there's Russell over there talking about bone broth that one time, he was talking about brain health and all these different things. I'm like, I got to go figure this all out now. And so I hired the Shockley's. Do you know the Shockley's by the way? Kelly and Jay Shockley? They've been in Steve's MasterMind and stuff for a while. They're students of mine now, they're awesome. They live here and they do total body mastery. And it's basically, they come in, they take 15 different blood samples and hair analysis, urinalysis, all this stuff. And they go and test every single different level of your body, and they basically tell you if you're going to die or not. It's pretty great. And so I went and did that and I geeked out and came back and I'm like, there's so much here. And so I'm curious, and I think a lot of people that are, they reach a certain phase in their journey of entrepreneurship and marketing where they're like, okay, I've made some money now. So now I'm not worried about if I'm going to be able to pay the bills or pay off the credit card. And now I've got some money in the bank. And so now they start thinking about more important things. And one of the biggest things that comes up is their health, right? It's, how do I take care of my brain? How do I take care of my body? How am I going to make sure there's longevity? How do I make better decisions? Anybody that's ever studied personal development knows your brain is like this, it takes 80% of the energy in your body every day. It's like something stupid. Right? So I guess let's start with, how do you go and figure out what you're going to focus on? And what's your routine for health? What are the areas that you focus on and how did you figure out that those were the areas you should be focused on? Russell: Yeah. Great questions. It's funny because I think everyone goes through cycles where, remember I used to make fun of the people who were like me. I'll call them hippies. Like, "Oh they're such hippies." And now I'm like, "Dude, I love the hippies, they got all the good stuff. I love these people." You know? But yeah, I think the biggest thing is... It was tough for me because I was a wrestler my whole life, so I always consider myself an athlete. I thought I was in good shape. I thought... And I was. I thought I understood nutrition, I did not. I wish I could go back and compete knowing now what I know now. And so it was weird, I got done with wrestling and then my wife got pregnant with twins, literally during my last wrestling term, she was on fertility. But I wrestled in my last tournament and we found out a week later we're pregnant of twins. And then we were excited, and I wasn't wrestling or competing or working out. She was eating for three. I was eating for three or four as well. And I gained I think about, my senior year I wrestled 165. When I came back to go wrestle the next year after I graduated with the new team, I was so big, they made me wrestle the heavy weights. So I'd gained probably conservatively 60 to probably almost 80 pounds while my wife was pregnant. Josh: Oh my gosh. Russell: And then one day she had twins and lost 60 pounds overnight and I had 80 pounds on Russell. But it's weird because you don't see it. I didn't see it. I remember going back to wrestle at Boise State, and I walked through the door and Ben Cherrington, who's actually Gaethje's wrestling coach, I walked in and Cherrington is like, "Dude, your face is so fat." I'm like, "What?" He's like, "What happened to you?" I'm like, "I don't know what you're talking about." I couldn't see it. You know? And it was just weird. And anyway, so for the next seven or eight years I was in business and I didn't think about it. I was like, I had so much energy here and focus there, I didn't think about it. And eight years into my business is the very first time I remember feeling, I think I was on stage or something. And I used to wear a tie, and the tie wouldn't fit around my neck anymore. It was all this stuff and I was just like, oh, I just felt crappy. And finally I was like, okay, I have to figure this out. So I hired a trainer, got on a plan, and in seven or eight months I went from, I don't know, whatever, 26, 28% body fat down to 12% body fat. And that was cool and I felt better by myself. But the thing that I noticed the most was that I could get more done during the day. And that's when I was like, oh my God, health actually matters, not just... Like for me, if you look at my disc profile, my number one value is economics. So if I don't see the ROI of something, I won't do it, which is why I sucked at school. That's why I suck at a lot of things is because if I don't see an ROI, I would rather die than do the thing. And all of a sudden I saw the ROI of health, I was like, okay. I was like, by shifting my health, I was able to get two to three times more stuff done every single day. ROI of that is I'm getting three years worth of work done every year, which means I'm going to crush everybody else. Therefore, I'm going to go deep on this. And so that was the thing that sold me on it was just, I saw the ROI and then I became obsessed. And so I'll take you through my journey because there's different levels of things I've learned. And again, I could probably someday will write a 5,000 page book on this because it excites me. But there's the things that are the big lever, like the big levers had the biggest impact. So I'll talk about those. Josh: Yeah. Russell: The first one I understood- Josh: Can I just say a quick side note? Russell: Yeah. Josh: I love how you're coughing as we're talking about health. LOL. That's funny. Russell: I know the one time I've been sick in a decade and it's right now. Yeah it's weird, I have a stuffy noses and a... Anyway, I'm in a season of my life where there's not much sleep because my kids are wrestling. And so I leave every day at 2:30 to go to wrestling practice, and then they're cutting weight at night, and then there's tournaments, and I still got to do all the stuff I got to do. So I'm up every morning earlier than normal. Josh: It's like you're busy Russell. Geez. Russell: Yeah. It's a lot, so my health is suffering a little bit right now, which is why I am spending more time on health stuff right now because I'm losing sleep so I got to make up for it in other places. By the way, sleep though is the number one performance drug you can do. In fact, it's interesting if you study all the biohackers, the two or three biggest things is sleeping more and more sunlight, like going outside with your shirt off, getting natural vitamin D, those help more than almost any biohack you can dream, any supplement, anything. It's sleep and sunlight are the two biggest biohacks. And so, anyway, we should all spend more time outside and we should sleep more. But those are hard sometimes where, nowadays we're not sleeping and we're in an office, so those are the things. So okay, I'll step back. So the first big thing I noticed when I started the health journey back now, it's been probably 14, 15 years ago now... Maybe not that long, maybe 10 years. Anyway, whatever it was, is I went through different diets. Right? So I did a bodybuilding high protein diet, which had lower carbs. I also went through the ketogenic diet because I spent a lot of time with Pruvit when the keto movement was starting, helping them launch that. So I was trying to understand, and I went to through that. But the biggest thing I started learning is how carbs affected my brain. If I eat carbs, it made me tired, faster. You know after post Thanksgiving dinner, you eat and then all of a sudden you can't keep your eyes open. People say, it's the tryptophan in Turkey, I don't believe that, it's the mashed potatoes. Josh: I don't believe that either. I just found out this Thanksgiving that apparently Turkey makes you sleepy. I'm like, that is not the case. It is just food in general. I eat any amount of food that much, I'm sleepy. Russell: Yeah, well it's not just food, it's the carbs. The carbs make your brain tired, at least for me. And so I started realizing that, I was like, I don't want to not eat carbs because the carbs have a very important role. I did the whole keto thing for a long time where I just only ate fats, and that I don't think is right either. So your body needs all the things, but I time my day based on those things now because I know that when I introduce carbs, I'm going to be tired. So I don't introduce carbs early in the day. I don't typically eat breakfast, when I'm eating lunch it's usually high fats and high proteins. And then when I do carbs it's at night, when I do actually want my body to start falling asleep. And so if you notice, like if you look at my eating cycles, I'm still eating the same things most people are eating, but I'm eating them in different orders. Right? Like my lunch, if I'm ordering lunch today off Uber Eats, it's going to be a poke bowl and it's going to come with no bass. So no rice, no nothing, but I'm going to have fish, I'm going to have five different fish in there. Right? Because the fish has high protein plus high fat content, which affects your brain. So I'm going to eat that fish, that's going to be my brain food. But I'm not eating carbs because I don't want carbs yet. I need carbs in my diet, I need it in my body, but I don't want it until I want my body to naturally fall asleep anyway. Right? So dinner time, usually I'll be lower on carbs and as it gets closer to bedtime, then I'll go and have my rice or whatever my carbs are going to be. And because I'm like, okay, I want my brain to shut down anyway. It's like, that's when I'll introduce those things into my diet. And so for me, it's like the timing of food has been really, really big because I would normally, back in the day I eat breakfast, I have cereal for breakfast or something and I'm wrecked for the day. Or I would skip breakfast, I eat lunch and then lunch I'd go order something and it'd be a sandwich. Right? And I eat the sandwich and all the bread and I'd lose the last half of the day. So I'm very, very sensitive on how I'm timing, where I'm introducing the carbs in the day so that I can keep my focus as much as possible during the windows where I need my brain sharp and fast and ready. So that's the first phase of it for me, that's been the big thing, because that brain fog is the worst. You're like- Josh: Is the worst. Russell: I need to be... And you can cover it with caffeine. And so you kind of have it, but it's not the same. You don't have the same sharpness when you have the brain fog and caffeine. It's like going into a bathroom where it stinks and they spray Poo Pourri. It's like, now it smells like Poo Pourri flavored poop. You know what I mean? They're both there. Josh: Right, right. Russell: It's like, it's not actually clean in here. You know what I mean? Josh: Yeah. Do you use Nootropics or anything at all? Joe Rogan has that Alpha... Or I don't know if it's his, but he does that Alpha BRAIN or whatever. I use that and that... I mean, I don't use it all the time, but whenever I need to be focused, because I usually take Adderall and- Russell: The hardcore stuff. Josh: Don't take Adderall people. It's the best ever, but it is straight up... Alex Sharfin did something on it one time. And once I learned what was in Adderall, I was like, "Oh, all right. So if I take that long term, I'm basically on crystal meth basically." I mean, not, but it's like the same thing. So Adderall's great, but it's not a long term sustainable thing. So I did Alpha BRAIN and stuff, which is much healthier. Do you use anything like that? Russell: Yeah. So there's a range in this stuff, because a lot my friends are the hardcore biohackers, and there's a range. And there's, for me there's a cutoff line of where I feel comfortable. And most of my friends go way beyond that cutoff line, where I don't feel comfortable. So it's tough, you get in the Nootropic world, I feel like you got to have your, this is as far as I'll go, because if you're not careful, I have friends who pushed it all the way to the spot where there's stuff that I think they're crazy for because man, you mess up your brain you are screwed. You know what I mean? And it's not worth sometimes the increasing of, oh I'm going to get more focus here. But there's a potential of damage. So yeah. So Alpha BRAIN's great, Alpha BRAIN's definitely on the left hand side of, I can take this stuff, I feel comfortable. I love ketones, I'm still a big ketones' believer. I'm trying to think off the top of my head. There's different ones that are good. Right? For me, when you start getting into the racetams, there's a whole family of race, that's where I start freaking out. For me, my cutoff line is right before that and I don't go there because the racetams stuff and then after that, then there's the more hardcore stuff and there's microdosing on things, then there's like- Josh: Psychedelics. Yeah. Russell: Crazier and crazier, and I do not cross that line because my brain, I'd rather have... People that want the last 10% from these crazy things is not worth the potential death. Josh: But is that also a religious thing for you? Or is that? Russell: For sure. Josh: Yeah, okay. Russell: 100% religious. Josh: Yeah. Russell: Definitely religious belief, but even more so, for me it's... I don't know. I've had so many friends who... And I don't want to get political on all the different drugs and things like that. I could, if people want to, but- Josh: You can come on my show, we'll talk about it there. Russell: But honestly, I have so many friends who smoke weed because it makes them more creative. I've had friends who the brain shuts off because of it. So the potential, I might be more creative, but I could lose my brain, is not worth any amount of, that's a risk I will not ever take. Alcohol is the same thing. People are like, oh, I do this because it relaxes me. But I've seen the opposite side of that. It's like, I don't know. Yeah, I have my line, I think everyone should have a line. But there are some really good Nootropics out- Josh: I want to talk to you about that more. We'll do it on my show, because I'm super curious to know your thoughts on that too, because I smoke weed sometimes too. Russell: That's why you want to bring me on that. You're from Colorado, I know. I'm not against it- Josh: Yeah, it's legal here people. Russell: I wouldn't touch that with a 10 foot pole, no matter what of positive benefits might be on one side. So there's that. Josh: We can talk about that more at another time. But anyway, back to the- Russell: So the Nootropics stuff, so that's good. But supplementation as a whole, I used to just go and randomly buy every supplement that had a good sales pitch, because I'm a good sales guy and I love getting sold. I remember Anthony DiClementi came to my house one time and he saw my supplements and he was like, "You're taking everything, which is good." But also he's like, "There's crossover because a lot of supplements, they want a marketing pitch, they'll put 12 things in it." And all of a sudden I'm taking 30 pills and all 30 of them have this crossover, and all of a sudden I'm taking unhealthy levels of whatever this ingredient, because there's a little bit in 40 different things. Right? And so I started getting more strategic. In fact, Braven, who spoke at Funnel Hacking Live, his dad has been doing these really cool things. I'm trying to figure out, he's coming out next week actually to do some more work with me. But I'm trying to figure out how to help turn that into a business that I can introduce to entrepreneurs, but basically comes and tests your blood. And basically your blood testing is like, Hey, instead of just randomly taking stuff because you think so, it's like, here's where your markers are at, and then they create custom supplements based on that. They get all these- Josh: That's literally what the Shockley's did for me. That's 100%. I have this whole long list, like this long of every single different level of every nutrient in my body. It's crazy. Russell: Those are really powerful because then you're not just guessing and you can get in trouble when you're guessing. I've seen people who've had issues because they've shotgun approached it, which I've done for years in the past. And so I'm a big believer in that now, where you're taking stuff, and so to make sure you're optimized is a big thing. And one of the fascinating things, I've heard people talk a lot about gut health in the past, but I didn't understand gut health until I did this because he was showing me that the amount of fats and proteins I'm taking aren't being digested enough based on my blood levels. And he's like, the biggest thing that I need to do is start focusing more on my gut. And so I didn't really know what that meant, so this has been a big, huge thing for me now that has had a huge impact, is understanding gut health and how to do things like that. So a couple things. Number one, I have this on my desk here in my house, this is... What are these things called? These are the digestive enzymes. Right? These are actually Braven's, if you go to GainesinBulk.com you can buy them, but these are the digestive enzymes. So before I eat anything now, I pound a handful of digestive enzymes, just consistently, because it helps you digest your food. If you've got lactose intolerance, if you've got, which I do, I'm lactose intolerant on some things, it helps your body digest those things so you don't have the same issues. You have less gash, you have less bloating, less annoyance when you eat. So I pound these before every single meal. That's my first tier is digestive enzymes, I'm sold on those. I carry a little pouch to me when I travel, every I go, and before I eat anything, I pound enzymes, and that's been a big gut health thing. Number two is, every society outside of America, they eat fermented food with every meal, but Americans don't. So in Germany they eat Sauerkraut, in China it's kimchi, there's different things like that. And so that was a big thing, he's like, "Your proteins aren't being digested because you don't have anything fermented in your stomach at any given time." And so now I buy a jar of Sauerkraut and every night at dinner, when I'm eating my bigger meal, I eat Sauerkraut with the meal because it's getting those things in there. And I used to hate Sauerkraut, there's some really good ones actually nowadays that are insanely good. So I eat Sauerkraut a lot. Kombucha, I used to make fun of that. And some kombucha scared me, because they're really high alcohol content, but- Josh: Oh really? I didn't know that. Russell: Yeah. So for me it's like, but there's some kombucha, the kombucha, however you say it, they'll actually pull the alcohol content out of it. There's some that taste like, I don't have it right here, but there's these ones, there's a whole company. There's a company that made kombucha's that taste like Coke and Dr. Pepper and Mountain Dew. And it literally tastes exactly like Coke and Dr. Pepper, and Mountain Dew, and it's kombucha. Josh: No way. Russell: Insanely good. So those are- Josh: Okay, you got to send me a link to that. I got to try that. Russell: Yeah, they're awesome. And then this is my new obsession, it's called Alive, GTs puts it out, and it's a mushroom Root Beer and it's got reishi, chaga, and turkey tail. I drink two of these a day, they deliver to my house from Whole Foods. I am obsessed, these are my favorite thing in the world. And it's all gut health stuff. So it's figuring those things out. The first tier of gut health is digestive enzymes, the second is fermented food while you're eating, then third is adding in kombucha's and things like that, it just helps your body break down stuff, digest it, and it gets... Because I don't know about you, but for years I'd eat stuff and I'd just get digested and bloated and then you don't feel good. You don't want to do things. Josh: Yeah. Russell: And now I don't have those problems like I used to. And that's been a huge... Anyway, so those are some of the tiers of things. Like for me, it's timing my food, taking supplements, like Nootropics and things to a certain level to help increase your mind. Josh: Right. Russell: And then the gut stuff is, your gut and your mind. There's studies I've read, I don't know how, I don't understand it all, but they say when you're an embryo your brain and your gut are connected, and then they separate and there's this brain gut thing. And so when your gut's not doing well, it affects your brain and vice versa. So it's like those two organs are the ones to really focus on the most. Josh: Yeah. My mom was big, so my sister, when she was, oh gosh, I think it was five years old, had epilepsy. Like seizures every eight minutes, like full out seizures, completely. And we took her to the number one child epilepsy doctor in the whole world that was over in the Cleveland Clinic. And they like looked at my parents and were like, "We have no idea what's wrong with your daughter. She's just going to have seizures for the rest of her life." And my mom went on this whole thing and cured her through diet. And that's when she discovered the whole gut thing and everything like that. And so ever since then, my mom's... I always tell my mom, I'm like, "Mom I love you to absolute death, obviously when you die it's going to be the worst thing ever." And I'm like, "One of the biggest things I'm going to miss when you're gone is whenever I have a problem, whenever I'm sick, whenever I don't feel well, whatever, I just call my mom." And I'm like, "Mom, what do I do?" And she knows, and it's always the natural thing. I haven't been to the doctor in probably 10 years because anything that's wrong, I just call her so- Russell: Natural is good. Josh: Yeah. She's all about that. Russell: Natural stuff is fascinating. Like again, I used to make fun of people and say they're hippies, but man, I got a Natural Path here in town I go to. Before Funnel Hacking Live I was like, I can't get COVID. And so he came in and hooked me up to IVs and things and all these. It's crazy. They do muscle testing, what things your body needs. I don't know. Again, all this stuff I used to think was like crazy, woo-woo, weird stuff. And the more I get into it, the more I'm just like, man, this stuff's amazing. I think everyone should find a Natural Path, find something that's good. As a first line of defense it's preventative, but also when you do get sick, looking at those options, because they don't wreak havoc on your body like some of the... And there's a time and a place for all those things, right? There's time to play- Josh: Yeah, for sure. For sure. Russell: You need traditional medicine, but man, there's this non-traditional side that's based off of thousands of years of people doing this stuff that is amazing. And it's looked down upon here in America unfortunately, I think it's gaining more and more popularity. But man, it's fascinating and important to, I think for all of us to understand and to be willing to look at. Josh: Yeah, for sure. Well, I appreciate you sharing more about that. I'm sure that you could talk about that for a long time. Last question on that and then we can wrap it up here. What are the things that you just absolutely stay away from in your diet? I mean, obviously for you, there's some faith elements in there too, so feel free to talk about that. We already talked about hard drugs and things like that, but diet related. Do you drink soda? Or are there certain things that you absolutely stay away from and you just don't do for health reasons? Russell: Yeah. So really decide, as a Mormon, it's alcohol, tobacco, coffee, and tea, those are just chopped off. And then anything worse than that obviously like- Josh: And tea? Russell: Yeah. I think- Josh: I didn't know tea was- Russell: We can have green teas, but not like the... Or something. I don't know. I don't even know. Josh: I don't like tea, but that's super interesting. I didn't realize tea. I knew alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Russell: Yeah. Then on the other side, then it's like, as I was trying to master and understand really diet and stuff, when all is said done calories... And again, I'm friends with all the health influencers, so I see the wars online, calories versus that and all that stuff. But calories do matter, but the type of calories matter as well, right? You can lose weight on a Twinkie diet, if you're eating 1500 calories a day of Twinkie, but you're got to feel like crap. Right? So I'm very conscious of that, so I do not drink soda, for a lot of reasons, but the biggest one is if I'm going to waste calories on something, I am not going to drink a soda, I'm going to eat ice cream. Right? I'm all for- Josh: Right. Russell: It, but I would never waste it on something like that because I feel like you're just drinking pure. So I'm not perfect, I'll go off on binges and eat stuff I want, but I would never drink pop, like I just don't. I would rather spend my calories somewhere else. Josh: It's soda Russell, it's soda. Russell: Soda. Yeah. In Utah, we called it Pop. But yeah, I think in the rest of the world it's soda. Anyway, so I don't do those kind of things. Josh: It is soda, Pop's not a thing. Russell: I'm also thinking, I'll go somewhere and there's a dessert, so I'm like, oh. And I'll try something and I'll take the first bite, and I judge, is this worth the calories? And if it's, yes, then I'll go pound the rest of it. If it's not I'll throw it away. Right? Like for example, cookie dough. If my wife brings home a tub of cookie dough or something, I eat it. And its worth the calories, I don't care what it is, that's so good I will eat that and I'll deal with the consequences later. Right? But then I'll eat something like a Pop Tart, and it's like, oh, this is not worth the calories. The soda or whatever, not worth the calories. Have you had those Mochi ice creams before? Josh: Mm-mm (negative). Russell: Oh my gosh, they're Chinese things. Anyway, they're the most amazing, I'll eat 4,000 calories of that because it's worth it. It's worth any extra effort I have to have because it's that good. And so for me, it's just like, I judge everything, is this worth the calories? If not, I just throw it away and I won't eat it. I won't put in my mouth. You know what I mean? Josh: Yeah. You ruined me with Crumbl Cookie. Russell: Oh yeah, those are worth the calories. Josh: Dude. Freaking, you're the one that I saw it on your Instagram story, you opened it up and you're like, "These are the most amazing things ever." I was like, what are those? And I looked it up and there's one five minutes from my house. And so now we go there all the time and I'm like, they're so good. Right? Russell: They're worth the calories. Josh: And people don't get it until you have one. And you're just like, oh. So we try to limit our consumption of that. But you're the one that got me on that and now we're... I hate you and I love you at the same time for them because they're so good. Russell: Yeah. I'll judge that. So let's say I need to eat something, it's like is it Crumbl Cookies or Subway? I would not eat it subway because it's not worth the calories for this nasty bread and all these things. You know? But I will definitely sacrifice it for a Crumbl Cookie. So anyway, that's my Litmus test. I don't think most biohackers would live by that model but for me, it's like, I eat pretty much the same thing 99% of the time. But when I'm going to mess up, I want to mess up with the best stuff and not stuff like, oh, I ate that thing and now I feel like, that wasn't even good, why did I do that? I want to make sure I'm doubling down and if I'm going to mess up, then I'm going deep on something that's worth it. Josh: Yep. Yep. All right. Well thank you for sharing Russell, I appreciate it. This was, I think it was a good batch of three episodes for us. Knock it out. Russell: That awesome. Hope you guys enjoyed this. If you like conversations like this, that aren't necessarily marketing related, but based on all the other weird stuff going on in my head, and Josh's head, let us know and we'll do more of these. And thanks man for doing this, I appreciate it. And we'll see you guys on the next episode of the Marketing Secrets podcast.

Faith And Capital
90 | Jubilee is not a metaphor w/ Geez Magazine

Faith And Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 46:46


Kateri from Geez Magazine joins the pod to discuss the soon-to-be-released issue, "Sound the Trumpet." We talk Jubilee and the importance of making Jubilee not just something we read about in the scriptures but something we ought to fight to realize historically and materially today. If the concept of Jubilee is to have any meaning for us today, it will be so in light of imperialism and colonialism.The hymn "Trumpet in the Morning" that is featured in the episode and in the new issue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2L-gu5dDxWoCheck out and subscribe to Geez Magazine! It's a wonderful resource for religious communities and individuals.Follow Geez on instagram, twitter, and facebook.Support the show: patreon.com/faithandcapitalOr leave a one time contribution at with PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/faithandcapitalLeave an iTunes rating and review.Faith and Capital is on instagram, twitter, and facebook.Email me: faithandcapital@gmail.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/faithandcapital)

Stranger Connections
Jennifer Dowker; discovering a message in a bottle - 95 years later, then finding the writer's family

Stranger Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 31:12


What if you were the captain of a glass bottom boat that takes people on shipwreck tours?What if you became world-famous accidentally after finding something while cleaning the underside of your very own glass bottom boat? It pays to clean, kids! : )Boat Captain Jennifer Dowker was cleaning the underside of her glass bottom boat when something green down below caught her eye. How could she know this discovery would become the story shared 'round the world, even connecting with the family of this find?A real life message in a bottle was found by Dowker, who collects cool stuff when she is doing her Shipwreck Tours in Lake Cheboygan, Michigan. She now has a heckuva cool addition to her collection and the story connected is quite touching. Listen in as Captain Dowker shares this great tale about meeting the daughter of the writer who dropped a note into Lake Cheboygan 95 years ago. Also learn how this single Mom taught herself, along with her three sons, how to create and sustain a business plan and successful "Nautical North Family Adventures" scuba tour company. I learned that Dowker's mantra seemed to be "Just do a little bit more" and she adorably adds; "Geez, go for it". Facebook: Nautical North Family Adventures"www.nauticalnorthfamilyadventures Glass Bottom Shipwreck Tours, Snorkeling and More

House Music DJ Mixes by dattrax
Episode 58: hOuSe MuSiC iS tHe aNsWeR » StRiCtlY HoUse mUsIc

House Music DJ Mixes by dattrax

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 156:23


Welcome to Showcasing House Music DJ Mixes by dattrax!!                                                  Hello from Toronto, Ontario, Canada to Fellow House Fiends Everywhere!! This virus lockdown BS madness has not ended after almost two years. Of course not! When power and money are involved, well, you know how this story ends. Always follow the money and that's what the story really is about because it's not about public health and safety. Yours or mine.Enough of my rant. It is what it is. This is our new reality. Geez. Jabbed or not, let's not judge or treat each other badly, we all have our reasons for choosing either. Let's respect that as we're all different, with different lives, concerns, kids or no kids, constraints, jobs, temperaments, desired outcomes, etc.We (Jim and I have been best friends & DJ partners when we spin live for over 30yrs!!) hope that you're doing what you can to make sure that you're doing well. "Your happiness is paramount". As the great comedian and philosopher, Patrice O'Neal has preached many times in his life. RIP.If you are not well, then it'll affect those around you that need you. It trickles down from you to your family and friends, your co-workers, your company, the communities that you belong to, online and offline.One day at a time. One problem at a time. Just do what you can handle and control and don't worry about the rest. It's the worrying that slowly kills us.We hope that Danny Tenaglia doesn't get mad that his famous, "Music is the Answer" classic house anthem's name has been taken, tweaked, and is now the name of this mix. LMAO!!The first track is a vinyl that I bought in 1998, and then a digital copy from Traxsource a year or so again.It'll set the right tone for you. The first track of a mix or of a live set is my favourite first part because it's the first contact with the dancers or your listeners.Sadly and frustratingly, this mix took 12 attempts, yes, LMAO. I had originally bought a batch from Traxsource of 24 hawt tracks. That took a month to listen to 2,000 tracks at 2-5 seconds each, then I had 120 tracks in my digital crate, then it took two weeks in the cracks of time between work and life to dwindle that down to 24, then I had to wait a week to get the 30% email promo from Traxsource. It's a journey.Then spent hours finding what I felt would be fun mixed with these new tracks. Mixed a few sets, didn't like the blends, deleted them. Then picked a new first track and went a few directions, listened, and wasn't feeling it. Changed the first track again. Now we're at mix number five! Every time you choose a different opening track, you change the vibe, so this went on until mix nine. I usually don't change directions so much but the process of making a mix that I love sort of reflects either the stability or chaos in my life at the time.Then I was, "Eureka!!" This is the feeling that I wanted, but what TF happened? Of the 24 tracks that I bought, now there are only 6 on this mix. Geez. It is what it is. Then I had a DJ talent problem, the mixes had parts where I brought in the wrong tracks or I train wrecked mixes. So the last three attempts were trying to refine what I finally LOVED! Then on the final run, I realised after listening to the completed mix three times, "HORY SHET!!!" (In a thick Chinese accent. I don't have one, just like to use it from time to time). I forgot one of the 6 new vocal house tracks. No problem. I did two runs on the next mix and have decided to put that beautiful work of art as the bookend, the last track of the next mix that I'm working on.As always, tracks are chosen and mixed with love. Pouring all the negative and positive energy into it, so hopefully, it at least brings a smile into your life. Enjoy Fellow HouseHeadz!! Until next time. Be good and be well!!---------------Reach out to us and comment if you like our mixes. Just Google 'dattrax' and you'll find all places online that we've been a part of. Please share with other like-minded individuals.---------------There's a PayPal donate button on the right if you're on our main Podomatic site if you want to buy us a beer to say cheers ; )Our PayPal donation email if you are listening to our mixes on another platform. Any amount of support is welcomed. We appreciate you! dattrax@gmail.com---------------42 Tracks in 2hrs and 35mins!!As always - massive thanks to the amazing vocalists, producers, DJs, and dancers (even in your homes or while walking about) for their incredible advancement of this beautiful musical genre!! Makes us all feel young, vibrant, and extremely happy!!Run For Cover (Rx Seven Dub) Seven Dub Pro-ZakInto The Sun Damian Lazarus, Jem Cooke Crosstown RebelsI got somebody new, MAW mix nakedmusic_pleasureseeker_nakedmusic Nicolas Jaar - And I Say (Xinobi Edit) Nicolas Jaar Full Disclosure (feat. Sabrina Chyld) (Original Mix) N'Dinga Gaba, Sabrina Chyld Puro MusicSomething I'm Going Through (Extended Mix) DJ Rae, David Morales Tinted RecordsI