Podcasts about photoshop

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Best podcasts about photoshop

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Latest podcast episodes about photoshop

InDesign Secrets
InDesignSecrets Podcast 293

InDesign Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 44:48


In this episode… News Adobe InDesign 2022  has an update (v17.01x) CreativePro Magazine issue 1 is out! On-Demand passes now available for the expanded Design + Accessibility Summit Some Totally Obvious InDesign Things We Just Learned This Year Interview with Marcus Radich from PageProof Obscure InDesign Feature: “Roger, hungry, ate 236 peaches and cantaloupes in 1904” Sponsors for this episode: > 3M's VAS: 3M's Visual Attention Software (VAS) is powerful, science-based AI that simulates the human vision system to analyze visual content and predicts with 92% accuracy what is attracting viewer attention. VAS is available as a web app and plugins for Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and XD. Start your free trial today, and enter promo code CREATIVEPRO5 for 5 additional trial credits! Links mentioned in this podcast: The Design + Accessibility Summit CreativePro Week What's new in InDesign 2022 (17.0) https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/whats-new.html What's new in 17.01: https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/kb/fixed-issues.html How to make the menus bigger on the Mac (for high-res monitors): https://osxdaily.com/2021/10/12/change-menu-bar-size-mac/ Why versions of Mac OS are all California cities: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/davidblatner_apple-mac-activity-6860597173332135936-PYWB Interview with Marcus Radich at PageProof: What is an Awk: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auk What is an orc: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orc Who is Martinho da Gloria: https://www.automatication.com/about-us/ Obvious Things We Learned (or Re-learned) Move Control Panel to the Bottom of the Screen https://creativepro.com/moving-control-panel-to-bottom-of-screen/ Accessibility tab in hyperlinks… doesn't work the way you might expect: https://indesign.uservoice.com/forums/601180-adobe-indesign-bugs/suggestions/44174832-hyperlink-alt-text-is-ignored-in-the-latest-versio InDesign icon in Publish Online embed: How to do it: https://creativepro.com/publish-online-supports-embedding-indesign-documents/ Problem: https://indesign.uservoice.com/forums/601021-adobe-indesign-feature-requests/suggestions/20459239-allow-removal-of-the-publish-online-button-that Adobe Illustrator: customizing the toolbar: https://creativepro.com/customize-your-illustrator-workspace/ and https://creativepro.com/create-a-custom-toolbar-in-illustrator/   Obscure Feature: Roger, hungry, ate 236 peaches and cantaloupes in 1904 If you make the sample text small, the Birch font will fit the whole line in the column. 

Face the Truth
Face the Truth Podcast- Ep.153 W/Ash Stryker!

Face the Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 59:07


Caricaturist illustrator Ash Stryker is an influencer, full of passion with a drive to push and challenge herself! You can count on seeing a lot more of her and her work in the future! I really enjoyed chatting with her about her digital painting techniques, approach to using Photoshop effects, presenting and competing at ISCA, meeting Kevin Nealon and more!   Check Ash out here: Instagram @ash_stryker https://www.ashstryker.com/   Please enjoy and remember to smash that like and subscribe button!   https://www.jasonseiler.com/​​​​​​​​​... INSTAGRAM-seilerpaints #facethetruthpodcast​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ #ashstryker        

WolfsCampFire
Scary Stories | I Opened My Sister's Photoshop Files

WolfsCampFire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:53


Story 1: I Opened My Sister's Photoshop Files Written by: u/HybridPumpkin Follow me on Twitter! https://twitter.com/wolfscampfire?s=09 Follow me on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/wolfscampfire/ Check out the WolfsCampFire Merch Store! https://teespring.com/stores/wolfscampfire --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wolfscampfire/support

The Enthusiasm Project
The Ins & Outs of Creator Media Kits

The Enthusiasm Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 63:07


This week I dive in to the how's, why's, and huh's of media kits. I've been publishing a monthly media kit for the past two years, and while it's not the most important resource you can have it's definitely useful and a great way to track your progress over time. This episode breaks down the parts of my media kit and also covers how I produce the PDF with Photoshop & Pages and then upload to to me website. I hope it's helpful!•Check out my media kit here:www.himynameistom.com

Latitude Photography Podcast
135 Photographs from Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Latitude Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 80:46


On my September 2021 road trip I spent six days shooting in Theodore Roosevelt National Park. This was the longest I'd stayed in any one spot. It's also where I was most prolific in my image-making. This is Latitude Photography Podcast, Episode 135 for November 21, 2021 Watch this on YouTube: https://youtu.be/7r1Q1kuJBbE   Palouse Shoot-n-Print Workshop https://brentbergherm.com/workshops/palouse-shoot-n-print-workshop/   The price is increasing 18% for Latitude Photography School on Jan 2, 2022. Sign up today to lock in current prices. https://brentbergherm.com   Year-End Challenge: Go through your 2021 images and select 10–20 that represent your best efforts of the year. Submit them to the fb group for the show so we can see what you've been up to and so that we can also cheer you on. I'd also love some brief commentary. Tell us how you've GROWN over the last year. That would be amazing. Or tell us your challenges and tell us how you plan to grow this year. Main Topic   Discuss images from TRNP Reference slide deck images in fb group or on show notes website. Resources and Links   View the pics on the show notes website: https://latitudephotographypodcast.com/episode/135   New way to support the show. Donation page on the website. One dollar will send me one mile down the road. Thank you for your support! https://latitudephotographypodcast.com/donate/   Join the notifications list to stay in the know about all the things happening here on the podcast, on my website and workshops I'm planning. I plan to send you an update every 6–8 weeks and I'll include brief stories behind the images and as always, lessons learned while making them. https://brentbergherm.com/notifications/   Shop at lensrentals.com with my affiliate link and I'll get a small commission of the sale: https://www.pntrs.com/t/TUJGRktHSkJGTk1KSEpCRkpOSkVN   I also have an affiliate link with ThinkTank Photo http://bit.ly/2IMRhOT   Peak Design affiliate link https://bit.ly/3CEpsBp   Get yourself a copy of Lumenzia, the luminosity masking extension for Photoshop published by my friend Greg Benz. This is an affiliate link and I appreciate all the support you give by using these links. https://getdpd.com/cart/hoplink/21529?referrer=3zlus6bybwqosokkk&p=101487   Find me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/brentberghermphoto/   Find the podcast facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/latitudephotographypodcast/ You'll have to answer a question, who's the host of the show. Your answer is me. Brent. I'll also accept the name of any recent guests.   Find me on instagram @brentbergherm https://www.instagram.com/brentbergherm/   Find me on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/c/brentberghermphotography Find me online at https://brentbergherm.com

Per Our Last Email
I've Been The Cousin ft. Mango y Maria of Color for Breakfast

Per Our Last Email

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 109:56


Let's be real... Maria Martinez didn't choose the pug life. The pug life chose her.

Booker, Alex and Sara - Daily Audio
Full Show: Are THESE The Most Overpaid Jobs AND Is It Okay To Photoshop A Kid?

Booker, Alex and Sara - Daily Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 34:16


Are you overpaid at your job, share with us what you do! When did it become okay to photoshop kids pics...or is it not okay to do? We play "Can't Beat Booker" with Logan in Cedar Park This dude should've TOTALLY put this on his dating profile and he wouldn't be "Waiting By The Phone" See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Chromebook Classroom Podcast
10 Links you should click (November 2021)

The Chromebook Classroom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 29:34


As part of my daily routine, I scan dozens of blogs, visit a handful of Facebook groups, and skim through Twitter. The goal: find the most helpful resources, tools, and articles that I can share with my teacher friends (that's you!). Here are my favorite links for November 2021: Audio / Video lock for Google Meet New updates to the @ menu in Docs Better Citations in Google Docs   Photoshop on a Chromebook? Easy Student “podcasting”  Create your own “new tab” page  Funkify Video: Google Sites for Students Jamboard Gratefulness Wall Thanksgiving Booksnaps ----------------------------- Thanks for tuning into the Chromebook Classroom Podcast! If you enjoyed today's episode, I would appreciate your honest rating and review! You can connect with me, John Sowash, on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. I would love to hear your thoughts on the show!

Resourceful Designer
Tarnished Reputation - RD276

Resourceful Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 21:15


Be wary of your reputation. Let me tell you a story. It is a story that has nothing to do with graphic or web design, but it is relevant to running a business, and I'll tie that into running a design business if you stick around to the end. We built our house in 2005. Or, more accurately, we had someone build our home in 2005. If you've ever built your own home or know of someone who has, you know that it's a long and gruelling process. When you buy a pre-built house, you get what's there. Sure, you can renovate it. But until then, what you buy is what you get. But when you build a home, you're starting with a blank slate. Think of it as opening a new document in Photoshop, Illustrator or InDesign, or starting with a fresh installation of WordPress. What you do with it is entirely up to you. Building a home is like that. When you build a home, you get to choose how many rooms it has and the size of each room. You get to select floorings such as tile, wood, or carpet. You get to choose the light fixtures, the plumbing fixtures, the windows, the door, etc. You decide everything that goes into your house. My wife and I did that when we started the process for ours. One of the aspects we had to choose was the shingles for the roof. It sounds simple, but there are thousands of varieties and colours of shingles to select from. My wife and I took many drives around different neighbourhoods, looking at roofs then trying to match those we liked with samples our contractor supplied us. In the end, we chose a nice brown multi-hued asphalt shingle that gave our home character. We loved it. A couple of years ago, we started to notice these little grain-like substances appearing on our back deck. At first, we thought it was dirt. But we soon realized that it was debris falling from our shingles. There wasn't a lot of it, so we shrugged it off as peculiar. Then last summer, the debris pieces started getting bigger and fell more often. And when we looked at our roof, we noticed the shingles were starting to turn up at the corners. We weren't happy about this but didn't know what we could do about it. So we let it go as a nuisance. Well, this spring, when the snow melted, we were shocked to see a layer of dark brown debris on our deck, and our shingles curved and cracked much more than last summer. So I finally decided to take action. I started by calling the contractor who built our house. When I explained the situation, he immediately knew what I meant. He had dealt with several other people facing the same problem. It turns out the singles on our roof had a defect. A big enough one that there was a class-action lawsuit filed and won against the manufacturer. Our shingles have a 25-year warranty. According to the settlement, we're entitled to compensation for the unused portion of that warranty. The only specification is we have to replace them with a newer shingle by the same manufacturer. I'm upset that I hadn't looked into the issue when we first discovered it. I could have received a more considerable compensation. But I'm glad there's something we can do. Not knowing how to proceed, I asked my contractor for advice. He retired several years ago, but he gave me a name of a contractor he recommended who is familiar with the process. He suggested I contact him for a quote on redoing my roof, which I need for the claim process. He also recommended I talk to his old foreman, who oversaw most of the homes he built, including mine. I called the foreman for advice. It turns out he's also retired, although more recently. He told me he had handled many of these shingle claims on behalf of other clients. And although he no longer does that, he would help me however he could. He told me the first step was to get a quote from a qualified professional roofer. And the person he recommended was the same one my contractor had given me. The foreman had worked with him several times and was currently engaging him to build his new house. Having received the same name from two trusted sources, I called this new contractor and left a message for him to call me back. While waiting to hear back from him, I looked him up online. I read the Google and other reviews had nothing but good things to say about him, which boosted my confidence. I was eager to get the process started. But several days passed, and the new contractor didn't return my call. So I called and left another message, and then a few days later another. Finally, a week later, he called and apologized. He said the pandemic had taken a toll on his business. He lost several employees leaving him to juggle more than he usually did. This is understandable. The news is full of companies suffering due to staff shortages these days. I explained my situation and what I required, and he agreed to stop by the next day to look at my roof. But he never showed up. Two days later, I called him, and once again, he apologized, saying he would be here the next day. To his credit, he showed up. He spent almost an hour on my roof measuring and taking photos of all the problem areas for me to submit with the claim. Once done, he said he would send me the images and have a quote ready by the end of the week. My wife and I are also thinking about adding a screened-off area to our back deck next summer, so while he was there, I asked him for a quote on that as well. He said I would have both quotes by Friday. But the end of the week came, and I didn't hear from him. I waited until Wednesday the following week before calling. Once again, he apologized for the delay and said, once again, I would have the quotes by Friday. Do you see a pattern here? Friday came and went. On Monday, I called him, asking where my quotes were. He told me he couldn't send them because he didn't have my email address, which I had already provided him. I gave it to him again, and the following day I received the photos and the quote for my roof. The second quote for the screened-in porch was nowhere to be seen. With the roof quote and photos of the damaged areas in hand, I filled out all the information required to submit my claim, including the material list the contractor supplied me. Upon submission, I learned it could take up to 120 days before I get a response. In the meantime, no work was to be performed on my roof, in case they needed to send someone to inspect it. I called the contractor, and I told him we couldn't move forward for possibly up to 120 days. But I would still like to book him for the job when the time comes. He told me it was not a problem. He could pencil me onto his schedule for the fall. All I had to do was let him know when we could proceed. I also reminded him that he owed me another quote, to which he replied I would see it soon. Now you may be thinking. This guy doesn't seem too reliable. Why not get someone else? Well, during the process, I did get two other quotes from other roofers. One I found online, and the other I remembered seeing when a neighbour had his roof done. Both were more expensive, and their online reviews were not as good as the contractor I was already dealing with. My neighbour even told me he wouldn't hire the same guy again. Plus, given the time frame of a 120-day wait, neither of them would guarantee they could repair my roof before winter. Now true to form, it took exactly 120 days before I heard back that my claim was approved and I could move forward with the roof repair. I immediately called the contractor and left him a message saying we were good to go. And then I waited. Three days later, I called and left another message and waited some more. Now I'm starting to get worried. Winter is fast approaching Eastern Ontario, and no roofing will be done once the snow starts falling. And my roof has deteriorated significantly over the summer to the point where I don't think we could last the winter without possible water damage. Finally, a few days later, I heard from the contractor. He told me not to worry, he still has me on his schedule, and my roof will get done before winter. The next step is to choose what new shingles we want. He said he would drop off samples that afternoon. He never showed up. That was Tuesday. On Wednesday, I called him. He apologized and said he would drop them off on Thursday morning before heading to his current project. He never showed up. Today is Friday. I still don't have the shingle samples. And I no idea if or when he'll do my roof, even though he says not to worry, it'll be done before winter. At this point, there's nobody else I can call. I have no choice but to rely on this person that I've lost all faith in. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that my roof gets repaired before snowfall. So why did I share this with you? A story about my roof that has nothing to do with graphic or web design. It's because I wanted to share with you how NOT to run a business. I had two people I trust recommend this guy. And his online reviews were great. So I had no reason to suspect the frustrations I would experience dealing with him. But at this point, he could do the most fantastic job on my roof, and even if he offered me a discount because of the troubles, I would still never recommend him to anyone. His reputation is tarnished beyond repair. That's the message I want you to take away from this story. It doesn't matter what sort of work you do for your clients. What matters is how you treat them. You may be a great designer, an amazing designer, in fact. But never forget that you're not the only designer around. When a client calls or emails you, make sure you reply promptly. Even if it's only to say "thank you for the message." so they know you received it. That simple acknowledgement can go a long way in building trust. If a client asks you to do something or send them something, make sure you follow through. If you're afraid you might forget, set a reminder on your phone or add it to your calendar. You can even stick a Post-It note to your monitor. You want to build lasting relationships with your clients so they come back to you over and over again in the future. You'll never be able to do that if your reputation is tarnished. Because once you lose their trust. It's almost impossible to gain it back. --- You won't believe this. As I was wrapping this up, the contractor showed up at my door with the shingle samples. He didn't even apologize for being late this time. He did, however, assure me that he would do my roof in three weeks. It's on his schedule, and I shouldn't worry. But you know I'll worry anyway, at least until the work is complete. As for the quote for the screened porch for the deck? I still haven't seen it. But at this point, I don't care anymore. Once he's finished my roof, I never plan on hiring this guy again. I hope none of your clients ever feel that way about you.

The Scoot Show with Scoot
What message does it send kids to photoshop their yearbook pics?

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 35:10


Scoot talks to WWL listeners about a fracas over a school yearbook that photoshopped out freckles, hearing aids and more See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Stay Focused Podcast
#120 Simplifying the process of progress toward your photography goals

The Stay Focused Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 28:08


Ever feel like all having so many goals that you want to accomplish is actually getting you nowhere? You might want to start a business, take better pictures, master Photoshop...but all of those goals on your to-do list just never seem to get crossed off. Suzi B chats with Emily today on how you can create habits that will simplify this process to that you see progress! Show Links: cozyclicks.com/application Find more on Suzi www.livelifeconscious.com Grab Suzi's Freebies: https://www.subscribepage.com/freebielandingpage

NFT Rumors: The Podcast- NFT News & Interviews
#25- NFT NEWS UPDATES & JAMIL.BTC TALKS BITCOIN NFTS, STACKS, MIAMICOIN

NFT Rumors: The Podcast- NFT News & Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 40:31


On this week's episode of NFTRumors: The Podcast- stay up to date with what's going on around NFTs with our NFT NEWS UPDATES. We are discussing the $532M Cryptopunk transaction, Meta, Photoshop adding a "Prepare as NFT" button, Wolf of Wall Street, NFT Project of the week, Metaverse Index update, and more! We are then joined by Jamil who is a developer on the Stacks protocol and enables building on Bitcoin. Really insightful conversation where we learn what BTC NFTs look like, his take on different blockchains, Stacks NFTs, WEB3 developer languages, what is MiamiCoin, MiamiCoin NFTs, and more! Check out the projects that Jamil has built or is working on: STXnft.com MIAmining.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/jamilbtc Follow us here and let us know what you think: https://twitter.com/nftrumors Please share and leave us a rating or review...Please. Thanks for listening and catch ya next week!

Tech Talk Y'all
Getting punched in the face in the metaverse

Tech Talk Y'all

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 34:20


Brought to you by TogetherLetters! Taking a break next week In this episode: Five points for anger, one for a ‘like': How Facebook's formula fostered rage and misinformation Facebook is changing its name to Meta as it focuses on the virtual world FTC Study Confirms ISPs Collect a Scary Amount of Your Personal Data Amazon now delivers more US packages than FedEx Faze Clan to go public through $1 billion SPAC deal PayPal says it is currently not pursuing Pinterest acquisition AD BREAK Tesco opens first “just walk out” store to take on Amazon Paleontologist Jack Horner of Jurassic Park Fame Launches Dinosaur NFTs To Fund Scientific Research Amazon's Clubhouse competitor may let you DJ your own radio show Adobe brings Photoshop and Illustrator to the web Chipotle cancels in-restaurant Boorito deal for $1 million free burrito giveaway, $5 Halloween meals Weird and Wacky: China's Lipstick King sold an astonishing $1.7 billion in goods in 12 hours — and that was just in a promotion for the country's biggest shopping day Teen Girls Are Developing Tics. Doctors Say TikTok Could Be a Factor. BJ Novac's photo got put in the public domain, and great endorsements insued Tech Rec: Sanjay - This Sneaker Does Not Exist Adam - Castro Podcast Player --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/techtalkyall/message

ByteTrax
ByteTrax ▴ Tecnología y Música: Adobe • Microsoft • ROBOAT

ByteTrax

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 32:28


En la nueva emisión de ByteTrax:• Adobe anunció versiones de Photoshop e Illustrator para la Web.• Microsoft anunció planes para expandir la cantidad de centros de datos.• C-SAIL, está desplegando barcos de pasajeros autónomos en Ámsterdam. En la música:“Cry Little Sister” de Gerard McMann.“Gremlins Rag” de Jerry Goldsmith.“On Our Own” [...] El cargo ByteTrax ▴ Tecnología y Música: Adobe • Microsoft • ROBOAT apareció primero en Defrag.mx.

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi
EN :: Mastercard+Bakkt, Offline Digital Real, Photoshop NFT, and more

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 17:13


Drop 1: MC+Bakkt https://www.mastercard.com/news/press/2021/october/mastercard-and-bakkt-partner-to-offer-innovative-crypto-and-loyalty-solutions/ Drop 2: Real Digital https://www.blocknews.com.br/governos/real-digital-bc-escolhera-projetos-para-teste-e-conversa-com-visa-sobre-solucao-offline/ Drop 3: Photoshop NFT https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/26/22745506/adobe-nft-art-theft-content-credentials-opensea-rarible-photoshop .. More: Game Companies VS Valve https://www.coindesk.com/business/2021/10/27/29-blockchain-gaming-companies-pen-open-letter-to-valve-dont-ban-web3-games/ Binance Game NFT https://exame.com/future-of-money/binance-cria-plataforma-para-lancamento-de-nfts-de-jogos-em-blockchain/ Parallel NFT card game https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/21/nft-sci-fi-card-game-parallel-raises-at-500m-valuation-from-paradigm/ NFT by The Economist https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/the-market-for-non-fungible-tokens-is-evolving/21805856 Hot Wheels NFT https://www.ledgerinsights.com/hot-wheels-to-launch-nft-collection/ Timbaland NFTs https://decrypt.co/84531/timbaland-ethereum-music-nfts-you-can-remix Blockchain-based gaming https://cryptoslate.com/report-almost-half-of-all-crypto-wallets-are-connected-to-games/amp/ Facebook turns Meta https://about.facebook.com/meta/ 99 Cashback em Bitcoin https://livecoins-com-br.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/livecoins.com.br/99-tera-cashback-em-bitcoin-no-brasil/amp/ Liqi Porsche https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/brazilian-liqi-sells-tokens-backed-by-porshe-rentals/ MB + Fingerprints https://economia.estadao.com.br/blogs/coluna-do-broad/mercado-bitcoin-compra-fatia-em-uma-das-maiores-curadoras-de-arte-digital/ Decentralized cannabis streaming https://hedera.com/blog/canopyright-launches-decentralized-cannabis-herbarium-and-licensing-platform-built-on-hedera-network FDIC on crypto https://www.reuters.com/business/finance/us-regulators-exploring-how-banks-could-hold-crypto-assets-fdic-chairman-2021-10-26/ FATF on DeFi standards https://www.ft.com/content/126ecd7a-0b02-4d9f-97f7-ffa2b24894a2 Dubai token regulation https://cointelegraph.com/news/dubai-regulator-announces-new-regulations-for-investment-tokens/ .. Instagram.com/blockdropspodcast .. Twitter.com/blockdropspod .. blockdropspodcast@gmail.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/blockdropspodcast/message

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi
Mastercard+Bakkt, Real Digital Offline, Photoshop NFT, e mais

BlockDrops com Maurício Magaldi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 17:17


Drop 1: MC+Bakkt https://www.mastercard.com/news/press/2021/october/mastercard-and-bakkt-partner-to-offer-innovative-crypto-and-loyalty-solutions/ Drop 2: Real Digital https://www.blocknews.com.br/governos/real-digital-bc-escolhera-projetos-para-teste-e-conversa-com-visa-sobre-solucao-offline/ Drop 3: Photoshop NFT https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/26/22745506/adobe-nft-art-theft-content-credentials-opensea-rarible-photoshop .. More: Game Companies VS Valve https://www.coindesk.com/business/2021/10/27/29-blockchain-gaming-companies-pen-open-letter-to-valve-dont-ban-web3-games/ Binance Game NFT https://exame.com/future-of-money/binance-cria-plataforma-para-lancamento-de-nfts-de-jogos-em-blockchain/ Parallel NFT card game https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/21/nft-sci-fi-card-game-parallel-raises-at-500m-valuation-from-paradigm/ NFT by The Economist https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/the-market-for-non-fungible-tokens-is-evolving/21805856 Hot Wheels NFT https://www.ledgerinsights.com/hot-wheels-to-launch-nft-collection/ Timbaland NFTs https://decrypt.co/84531/timbaland-ethereum-music-nfts-you-can-remix Blockchain-based gaming https://cryptoslate.com/report-almost-half-of-all-crypto-wallets-are-connected-to-games/amp/ Facebook turns Meta https://about.facebook.com/meta/ 99 Cashback em Bitcoin https://livecoins-com-br.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/livecoins.com.br/99-tera-cashback-em-bitcoin-no-brasil/amp/ Liqi Porsche https://cointelegraph.com.br/news/brazilian-liqi-sells-tokens-backed-by-porshe-rentals/ MB + Fingerprints https://economia.estadao.com.br/blogs/coluna-do-broad/mercado-bitcoin-compra-fatia-em-uma-das-maiores-curadoras-de-arte-digital/ Decentralized cannabis streaming https://hedera.com/blog/canopyright-launches-decentralized-cannabis-herbarium-and-licensing-platform-built-on-hedera-network FDIC on crypto https://www.reuters.com/business/finance/us-regulators-exploring-how-banks-could-hold-crypto-assets-fdic-chairman-2021-10-26/ FATF on DeFi standards https://www.ft.com/content/126ecd7a-0b02-4d9f-97f7-ffa2b24894a2 Dubai token regulation https://cointelegraph.com/news/dubai-regulator-announces-new-regulations-for-investment-tokens/ .. Instagram.com/blockdropspodcast .. Twitter.com/blockdropspod .. blockdropspodcast@gmail.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/blockdropspodcast/message

The Vergecast
Facebook becomes Meta / Pixel 6 review / Macbook Pro review

The Vergecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 99:00


The Verge's Nilay Patel, Dieter Bohn, Alex Cranz, and Alex Heath discuss Facebook's new name. Dan Seifert joins to discuss the reviews for Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro as well as MacBook Pro. Mark Zuckerberg on why Facebook is rebranding to Meta Facebook's new name is Meta What is the metaverse, and do I have to care? Facebook's Oculus Quest will soon be called the Meta Quest Oculus users are getting a new metaverse home Facebook is adding a mixed reality platform to Oculus Quest Facebook teases ‘Project Cambria' high-end VR / AR headset Amid the fluff, Meta showed an impressive demo of its Codec Avatars Eight things we learned from the Facebook Papers  Facebook's lost generation Facebook says it's refocusing company on ‘serving young adults' Google Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro review: finally, more than just good cameras The Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro will arrive with a day-one update Intel's 12th Gen Alder Lake chips usher in a new generation of … Amazon Kindle Paperwhite (2021) review: a bigger and better ... Apple AirPods (third-gen) review: new design, same appeal  Adobe brings a simplified Photoshop to the web Sony Xperia Pro-I: A camera first, phone second  Samsung announces cloud gaming for Tizen TVs, offers no further details Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Boletim de Tecnologia
Meta Papers, digo, Facebook Papers / A invasão dos aplicativos web

Boletim de Tecnologia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 50:13


Neste programa, Jacqueline Lafloufa e Rodrigo Ghedin debatem o Facebook Papers e a mudança de nome do Facebook (da empresa), que agora se chama Meta, e aproveitando o gancho do Photoshop na web, conversam sobre aplicativos nativos, web, Electron, PWA e tudo mais. Indicações culturais: Ghedin: O livro Farenheit 451 [Amazon, Magalu, Americanas, editora]1, de Ray Bradbury, publicado no Brasil pela Biblioteca Azul. Jacque: O filme A lavanderia [Netflix], dirigido por Steven Soderbergh. Gosta do podcast? Toque aqui e torne-se um(a) apoiador(a). A partir do plano II (R$ 16/mês), você ganha o direito de acompanhar as gravações do podcast ao vivo, incluindo um animado bate-papo pós-gravação, além de outros mimos. O Guia Prático é editado pelo estúdio Tumpats. Links citados: Meta é o novo nome do Facebook. Curadoria de curadorias dos Facebook Papers. Adobe leva Photoshop e Illustrator à web. Dotz e dados: As surpresas e dificuldades para excluir um cadastro via internet. As coisas novas e as coisas boas do Facebook Papers. Ao comprar por estes links, o Manual do Usuário recebe uma pequena comissão das lojas. O preço final para você não muda. ↩

Principled
S6E11 | Is gamified learning really all fun and games?

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 32:31


Abstract: Gamification involves more than just shooting lasers and collecting gold coins. When done well, it has the power to enhance learning experiences and influence the way people make decisions. In this episode of the Principled Podcast, LRN Learning Director Kai Merriott speaks with Johnny McMonagle, one of LRN's lead Creative Designers, about how to leverage gamification effectively when developing E&C training. Listen in as Kai and Johnny discuss the process of identifying the right opportunities for gamified learning, the importance of telling the right story with training material, and their favorite gamified elements—including a 3D-printer of doughnuts.   Featured guest: Johnny McMonagle brings over 20 years of experience in e-learning and instructional design to LRN. As Lead Designer, he leverages his graphic design and animation skills to develop interactive elements for training software that create more engaging learning experiences and encourage ethical behavior. He also works collaboratively with clients and internal stakeholders to ensure these learning products deliver effectively on key business objectives. Johnny specializes in drawing, illustration, and character and concept design. Prior to joining LRN, Johnny was the Lead Designer at Interactive Services, where he developed interactive training elements using Flash and Photoshop. Before that, he worked as a graphic designer at the e-learning company MindLeaders. Johnny received his diploma in classical animation at Ballyfermot Senior College in Dublin, Ireland.   Featured Host:  Kai has worked in learning management and instructional design since 2001 and has worked at LRN (formerly Interactive Services) since 2013. As a Learning Director, he designs creative learning programs that focus on changing behavior, with a particular focus on pushing visual design and creating compelling animations and videos. He also leads and monitors his team's instructional design approaches. Kai has designed training on a variety of topics within compliance—including diversity, code of conduct, information security, anti-bribery, and money laundering. He's also created training on brand awareness, systems training, social media policies, food safety, sales, customer service, and marketing. He has created these programs for companies all over the world including Bloomberg, Amex, Finra, Facebook, Kraft-Heinz, AIB, Johnson & Johnson, Deloitte, Morgan Stanley, Intel, BlackRock, State Street, BNY Mellon, and Colgate. Several of Kai's training programs and videos have won awards from Brandon Hall and other training institutions. He earned his MA in creative writing and BA in English at University of Chichester in Sussex.   Transcript: Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast, brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change-makers. Kai Merriott: When you hear the word gamification, what comes to mind? Do you think of shooting lasers and collecting gold coins or about influencing the way people make decisions? Too often organizations lean on gamification for the sake of making their ethics compliance program look more tech-savvy. So how can you ensure you develop gamification in a way that enhances training? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast, I'm your host Kai Merriott a learning director at LRN. And today I'm joined by Johnny McMonagle one of our lead creative designers for LRN, we're going to be talking about gamification in learning. So, Johnny, is a real expert in this space with more than 20 years of experience designing interactive graphic elements for e-learning and training software. So Johnny, thanks for coming on the Principled Podcast. Johnny McMonagle: Hey Kai, thanks for having me, looking forward to this discussion. Kai Merriott: So Johnny we've obviously worked together on many gamified learning projects in the past but just for the purposes of this conversation, how would you describe gamification and meaning the way that we talk about it? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think our approach to gamification is to make our training a lot more engaging, it's going to stand out from your normal e-learning and normal training and that is going to look and feel very different. It's going to be engaging, it's going to be enjoyable and it'll be short to the point, but the experience will actually be a pleasurable one and that's where the element comes in, that it's not just education it's actually a fun thing to do. Kai Merriott: And these sort of gamified elements on top of that is in there so, well, it's fun and it's engaging but also it has game mechanics as well like I suppose scoring. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, we do that. Apart from the visuals, you will look at a screen and you will see things that you'll see on an arcade game, you'll see a score, you'll see a play button, you might hear the music and the sound effects that you're used to from games and you'll know the second you sit down to do it you're not just clicking next, you're seeing the elements that go into making a game. Kai Merriott: So when I think about all the projects we've done together which have those gaming mechanics and the gaming elements, I kind of think that every gamified course has really two distinct elements that make it really sort of compelling and engaging and the first is I think a really good story from beginning to end, you put that story element in there that kind of drives you from one part of the learning to the next, but also really good interactivity. Let's start from the beginning in terms of, what do we actually think about first usually? Do we actually start with the story or do we start with what gaming elements can we put into this training? Johnny McMonagle: Yes. And I've seen that where I think we always start with the story because the story will drive everything. How do we get from A to B on your learning journey? What is it we're trying to do? So we start with a story and we'll tell the story and everything will evolve from there. For example, a recent course I did was on global trade and we said, well, what is the story here? The global trade it tells itself, you're going to go around the world, you're trading with different countries so we said, how are we going to make that work? And I said to the learning manager, I said, well, how about this? I found an image, it was a little plain going around the globe, I said, well, that's you, you're the character, and we're going to go from A to B and we're going to learn things as you go. Every destination is going to have a consequence and at the end of it you have learned something. And it led to itself that it looked like a game board, it felt like a game and every step of the way it felt you were learning but it was very game-like, and that was the story that led all of those decisions that we put into it and it worked very well. Kai Merriott: And I think if you were to try and do it the other way around, you kind of start, oh, we know we've got 10 gaming elements to choose from and now let's try and build a story from that, that just never works, does it? Johnny McMonagle: No, it's kind of working backwards where you're shoehorning just for the sake of it and I've seen it never gels, there are too many different elements just they don't work. We've seen that in putting sound effects into a quiz, it doesn't make it a game, it's just window dressing. I think it has to be more cohesive and it has to have a strong narrative and all the different elements from the visuals, the style of writing, the sound effects, it all has to tie in. And with the idea of gamification in your mind you have to think, does this play, does it feel like a game? I think that's what you're striving to do. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And I think it's funny you said earlier about, you can't just put sound effects on a quiz and call it a game, I think that's absolutely right. I think you start with that really strong story but then I think we do layer it with sound effects and I think we shouldn't forget that either. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think sound effects are very important and they can really enhance the whole experience, it's just one of the many elements and it's a very rich element to have and it can add so much to the experience. We were saying before about sound effects in games, we hark back to the beginning of games, the arcade games again and we all respond to those. We know what a good sound sounds like and we know what losing a life sounds like just from our shared memories of arcade games and home video systems. These are common things that we all understand, we all can respond to and it really does enhance it but having it on its own you need to think of the other elements too and they all have to come together to make that cohesive game experience that feels like a game. Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. And I'm thinking about the sound effects, I think we slightly age ourselves, don't we? When we talk about arcade games. Johnny McMonagle: This is true. Yes. Like the coin slot in the arcade. Because it's funny in saying that though, I think to this day we still harp back to the early Nintendos and we know what that sounds like. And even for people who've never played a game of any age, we go, yeah, I am now playing a video game. It is kind of a universal and nearly a timeless thing that we can all relate to it in the same way. Kai Merriott: Yeah. There's something almost instinctive about, you said earlier, about the noise that means you've won and the noise that means you've lost a life. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think it's some sort of shared global experience that no matter where we're from we know what it sounds like. Even if it's a mobile game or a contemporary platform or whatever, we know that means you've just won something, that means you've lost something, it's kind of just a unit universal language. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And I think as well we're kind of lucky in the age we live in which is that mobile games are so popular because I think they also do the same thing. They're very arcade game-like, very bright and colorful and kind of a lot of sounds, lots of music to convey a particular emotion, what do you think about the use of music in games and how important is that? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. The use of music can really enhance it and it's a very important thing to consider and it sets the tone for the whole experience. And again, there is the universal thing of we know exciting music to suit the tone if that's what you're aiming for, we know cinematic, we know that if we want this to be dark and somber that's what we do, as you would if you were scoring a piece for a drama you speak the same sort of language. It's funny you mentioned mobile gaming and the target audience for mobile gaming wouldn't be what you would normally think of gamers. And today's gamers I think most people think of people sitting with five monitors, they have the best chairs, they've all the gear, that's what gaming is, but there's also the mobile thing. So it's every walk of life will have this experience, you wouldn't think of them as your typical gamer but they will engage with this kind of game and they do, they wouldn't call themselves a gamer but they do play these games. And I think that's what we aim for is to say, well, what is it that engages the non-gamer to play a game? It's something that is appealing to people who don't play games, it's something that'll engage them, it's something that they want to come back to and that they'll respond to it positively. Kai Merriott: So you mentioned gamers with their five monitors and I think you're right, I mean, there's a real important distinction I think to be drawn here between what we do when we talk about gamified learning and the people who are obsessively gamers, or even just casual gamers but more of the console type gamers. I think ours seems to be more like the mobile games. Johnny McMonagle: I think so. It has to be much more direct, it has to be for somebody who's never played a game, who's aware what a game is. They look at it, they can tell immediately how to play the game, they go, there's the start button. Once they start playing they don't want rule books, they don't want all that, they want to get in and start playing and so from the get-go it should be intuitive, and if it isn't intuitive, if it takes too much explaining, then it's not working. It has to be an immediate thing for people who are time-poor, for people who, as I said, aren't gamers, they want to look at it and go, I like the look of this, I want to press that play button and after I press that play button I want to keep clicking things, I know what I'm doing all the way to the end of the game. Kai Merriott: Yeah. Let's talk a little bit about that, making it intuitive. Because again, probably showing my age, I remember the old days of you take home a game and it comes with a sort of novel-like instruction manual, I mean, they still does this now, right? There's a picture of a controller and there's 1,000 things around it telling you what each button does, but, I mean, we can't really do that in gamified learning, can we? Johnny McMonagle: No and nor do we want to. It's like, we don't have the time, we're too busy in our lives, we have too many things going on. We have this training set aside we want to get there immediately and say like, if it's too complicated you're just going to disengage with it, if you don't automatically immediately know what you're going to do then I think we're failing, that's what we come into. The mobile version is a strip down to the bare element of, what is a game? And it is, does it look good? Does it look like something I want to play? Will I understand it? Am I daunted by it? Then it's not working, does it look like something I can dive into? Then it is work. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I was thinking of Tetris actually and how much we all never had to learn Tetris. Johnny McMonagle: That's it. From the second you saw it on screen you knew what to do and, yeah, no rule books, no help button, no nothing. You go, I know what to do, and within seconds you learn, oh, I didn't get that right, you hear the sound, we can all hear it in our memories, that sound, and you get the little endorphins when you get it right and there's the little positive thing. And you get that within moments of picking it up for the first time and that's the beauty of a game like Tetris. As you, I don't think that anyone ever read how to play Tetris, I'd say they are few and far between, so that's what we are aiming for is that immediacy. Kai Merriott: Also, I think the simplicity of the gamification options. So if you think about what that means, well, we named a few already so for instance, you lose a life, you have three lives and you lose three and then you're kind of kicked out of the game, you could have what we call internally power bars which is health bars that go up and down as you go, whether you answer a question right or wrong, I mean, there's lots, lots, and lots and lots of different options. We also have branching which is another kind of a popular gaming thing that we do where if you get a question right then the story changes and it's different than if you get the question wrong and you go down a different path. So, so many options but we shouldn't use them all, should we? Johnny McMonagle: No, because then I think we're overcomplicating. Use it if there's a reason for it, if it helps the narrative of that story we talked about then absolutely. And I like the branching one and it, again, harps back to the old adventure games even in the books, here's your choice, and whatever one you make you go off in a different direction and you're controlling that. You'll always come to the whatever conclusion, we make sure they come to the conclusion they have to, but having that choice is a great thing. But as you say, we don't have to throw all the whistles and bells there all the time but whatever helps the narrative is what we're aiming for. Kai Merriott: So it's back to story again, isn't it? You choose it as it is. Johnny McMonagle: I think it is always about the story. Kai Merriott: Yeah. Because I think back to the course we did together and obviously, we were not going to name any particular client names, but we did one for the cybersecurity course we did, which was seen as being a game, everyone calls it a game, but it only really I think had one gamified option in there, maybe two. And I'm thinking of the one we did, it was a cybersecurity where it was all based around a 3D printing donut machine and you had four donuts I think and then if you answer a question wrong then you lose a donut and that was number one, and then number two was, I think there was a very small amount of branching in there. But even then it was just to show you a little different animation depending on whether you got it right or wrong. Johnny McMonagle: And that was it, it was very multimedia-rich. It was music, it was bright engaging graphics, it was animation, it was sound effects. And they were all matching, the music suited the primary colors, even the sound effects of the good and bad results that all came together very well and it all sounded like it all belonged as part of the same product and that was a very successful one. And again, the story was you're starting at the start, I think you were getting parts or ingredients, and everywhere along the way there was somebody trying to foil you and your job was to make sure you foiled that hacker. It was about cybersecurity so we invented this character who was trying to stop you on your way and it had a little sound effect, little evil cackle, and stuff like that. And it was a very engaging little game, it was very short but it got the point across, it was all about cybersecurity and all that entails, and it feels very well received. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I think it had one of the biggest take-ups of any training, not just gamified training but any training for that particular organization. Johnny McMonagle: That's right. And a lot of that was just the fun of it and was immediately easy to play, you got immediately from the start you go, I like these graphics, I like that music, there's the play button. And I think we made a short intro animation to tell you this is what's going to happen, watch out for whatever we call the baddie and now go, learn this here, he'll try to trip you up on the way but go and answer these questions. And behind all that, it is just an e-learning quiz, but with all these things around it, it's so much more engaging. And it just showed there with the take-up as people were coming back to do it again and talking about it, comparing high scores would be the old way of doing it, but it worked just very well. Kai Merriott: And I remember even though it was our training every time I went back to test the course during the production process I found myself getting drawn into it every time, I just kept playing it. Johnny McMonagle: I think I've done that too. In the current one I'm working on we've come up with a new way if you win, a different little game piece for every successful thing. And as we're developing it I found myself playing the game because there's the little reward of the endorphins, the little positive sound, and something glows or sparkles every time you get it right. And then they're going, yeah, bear with me I'm just playing this game, and that shows that it's doing its job. Kai Merriott: We touched upon earlier about, I think, particularly the cybersecurity one being a short game, because if you think again of gamers back to the five monitor guy, the games they play last for, I say not in one go but sometimes it is, 10, 20, 30 hours of gaming just in one game. We obviously can't get away with that, can we? Johnny McMonagle: No. And I think no matter how good it is and how engaging it is, I think brevity is the key, I think less is more because the novelty will wear off. I think there's no set limit about how long it should be but I think if you have too much of a good thing too, yeah, kind of enthusiasm wins. And I think for us as contemporary workers we don't have that hour, so if we can do it in half an hour or 45 minutes and they've enjoyed that very much, that's better than dragging it out and turning it into a chore. Kai Merriott: I think the key time is actually 20 minutes, but whether we actually achieve that, I don't know, that's the kind of the dream, the 20-minute game. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think 20 minutes is a perfect round number, I think any longer than that then you are pushing it. I know it depends on the content, it depends on the partner, but ideally we'd be trying to say, no, trust us on this, keep it around to 20 minutes and everyone will enjoy that bit a whole lot more. Kai Merriott: And it's back to this - people being time poor, isn't it? Because games are seen as a bit of frivolity. And if we're saying to people, right, you're going to spend three hours on this game, well, I think you're right that they would get bored but also they just won't have the time. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. And touching on that, the gaming frivolity, is we have to sell this idea that gaming isn't a waste of time, it isn't a distraction, and maybe it goes back to teaching children that learn through play. And I think we never grow out of that, we do enjoy playing, we enjoy games, but it's not frivolous because actually, we are learning through this. And for employees, for staff and all that, it isn't a waste of time at all, it's like, you must do this training and you're going to enjoy it and that's a nice thing for everybody. If you're going to enjoy the training then everybody wins. Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. I think it seems to be not just in gamified learning but just in every kind of training that idea of people really not having much time trying to cut things down to the chase because this is not a university, they're not on three-year courses, they have 20 minutes to do a job and they need to learn how to do it quickly. Johnny McMonagle: Yes, absolutely. I think we can all find in our daily working lives we can put aside 20 minutes and we can justify that 20 minutes and we will learn something. I think it's looking at the modern workplace as well, we have to take in consideration that we just don't have the time. So I think we can all agree we can make time for 20 minutes and that would be our optimum amount of time. And if we're not achieving that in 20 minutes then maybe we're not doing it right. Kai Merriott: I think that's right. What I often do is when we look at the information that needs to be covered as part of this game, I try and sort of throw away everything that isn't related to the task in hand. I think that's true of e-learning in general, I think it's especially true of games that really should reflect the role that you're doing. So everything in that game should be practical knowledge that you can go away and do something with rather than something that's it's kind of just knowledge and awareness. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, that's right. I think it's always focused on what it is, is the goal of this game, what is the endpoint of the story we're telling, and don't try to be all things to all men, don't try and overload it and just keep it to a thing. If they need more information they can always go to different resources but for our games, we have to just focus on it, keep it very direct to the point, here's what you're taking away from this game, from this training. There are other ways of delivering information but with a game, we keep focused on what we need to tell, what we need to impart. Kai Merriott: Yeah. So I think you did touch upon earlier about the kind of visual side of the game. So we talked about the music, the sound effects, and what about the visuals, the way it looks, how important is that to the game? Johnny McMonagle: Well, I think that's extremely important obviously as a graphic designer. One thing it is again, it's the universal language off game, it is, what does game mean to you? What does it mean to me, to the seasoned gamer, to someone who never plays a game? I say, if you're walking through the office you look over your colleague's shoulder and there's something on that screen that looks engaging and fun and doesn't look like your stack e-learning, it doesn't look like there are two people in business suits shaking hands and a bit of text, next screen, here's two different people in business suits doing something. And that's the kind of thing, it has to look better than that, it has to look, I say fun without saying frivolous, it has to be a lot more engaging. There has to be something that separates it from your usually learning and I think that could be elements on the screen where you've done something with the graphics, there's something different about it and it can be anything but it has to stand apart or other elements on the screen too like scoring or a meter or something like that where you're immediately going, what is that? So you know from a glance that's a game. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I think having its own unique identity. I always think of games like Candy Crush which it's not a game I particularly play, I don't think it's really marketed to people like me, but it's got such an identity and the color scheme and the noises, going back to sound effects again, it all says, this is a game that even the sound effects and the colors are going to get you as high as the sugar from the candy. Johnny McMonagle: Those endorphins again, it's that thing of going, yeah, I'm going to have fun playing this, it's going to put a smile on their face, I'm going to enjoy doing it. And that's again if you saw a picture of it, it doesn't even have to be a live version just a picture of it, you know that's a fun looking game, I'm going to enjoy spending time with this. And I think that's, yeah, we try to do that with our games, we try immediately to go, is this training? Because this looks like something fun. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And again, I think the visuals go back to the story again and say, what is the story? The story is X or Y, and then from there, you can kind of come up with a brand identity. Because I was thinking about back to our cybersecurity game with the 3D printing donut which is a mad idea, and I think I seem to remember back in the early days, the brand that was suggested that was floated around was actually quite almost movie-like and a little bit subdued and probably wouldn't quite have fitted the idea. Do you remember it? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I remember the brand in particular. Many partners they're very aware of their own brand and they want to see their own brand back at them with that, we kind of threw that through book out. We said, well, for this game you're going to get your loco and that's about it, we kind of rewrote it and they agreed that this was the way to go. Is that what you're referencing? Kai Merriott: That's right. And I think it was what we decided because I think we both said that the original brand was quite subdued given that the idea was so mad. So we kind of went for a much more pastly almost and I think it was basically Simpsons inspired brand because of the donuts, I suppose. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, I think so. I think everyone now you see a donut with pink frosting on you think Homer Simpson, I think we all do. But that was a point, as we said, well, here's your color palette, blah, blah, blah, here and so on, but look at these visuals. And I think they came around very quickly and they said, no, this looks really nice, we get it, we're responding well to it so we don't need to stick with that. And they went for that mad idea, as you say, their brand palette didn't suit so it didn't take much convincing, it was a strong idea that worked. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And it really did and that's a project I'm very proud of as well. So I was thinking again of, going back to the gaming options, we touched upon those before, we talked about lives, we talk about scoring, but of course, when you're kind of coming up with this brand identity in this game, you don't really use terms like lives and percentages in scoring you again, presume do you want to tie that back to the story. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, that's right. Because yeah, the use of lives and all it is going back to our arcade games but that was literally you had your three little characters and you lose a life. And then it depends on your story, that doesn't make sense for the stuff we've done, well, you're not actually losing a life. When we think, what are you gaining? What are you losing? And in that way then I say in global trade, we had a thing we said, well, if you go to a certain jurisdiction and you get this question right then your project goes ahead and you've done well. If you get the question wrong in this particular jurisdiction, there's going to be consequences maybe that's your project is delayed or you've actually broken some global trade thing, you're going to face legal sanctions and we tie that into the real-life, that training, they need to know this but we've made it a game and we go, there is a big legal sign coming up going, you're in trouble, or we go, you've got this right, here's a little trophy, with a sound effect, a little glow, it all ties back to what you were saying. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And like the lives turned into donuts, and another one we did quite recently was on agile at the agile process. So the original gaming option, if you like, was a meter that goes down, if it goes down to zero then you get kicked out of the game. Now, we didn't want to just call it a meter so we actually made it a race between two companies who were developing a very similar product. And so if you answer the questions correctly then the meter goes towards you and then if you answer incorrectly the meter goes towards the other company, the rival company. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. And that was a clever use of a very standard functionality of your progress bar basically telling you, yeah, you've answered these right and every time you do it goes up and increments up to the right or vertically and that's standard. But we say, well, how does it tie into our story? And then we had one for alcoholic spur company and we got the same idea, on the left you have a glass with nothing in it, on the right you have a glass that gets full every time you get something right. It's the same principle of the progress meter but dressed up for gaming and for gamification and that's a simple little thing you can do to tie in the game and make it relevant, make it suit the context. And people will react to it a lot better than you boring zero to 100 that they're so used to seeing and it just doesn't feel like a game, it just feels like standard learning. Kai Merriott: It's that simplicity again. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. It's something that you can respond to immediately, you don't overthink it. You could see it a glance I know what's happening here and you want to get up to the right and you want to get up to the top of the screen, you know every time you're getting something right it's going up in increments and you're enjoying getting it there and it's your mission to get it there. And if you get it wrong, if it says retry, you're going, of course, I'll retry, I've enjoyed that, I really want to get that glassful or win that contract or whatever it is, that donut machine. It's an easy win but give it some thought, tie it into the design of the whole thing, and again, back to your story, how does this help sell the story? Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. Because we're not dealing with, going back to the five monitor guy, I like the five monitor guy that you came up with, going back to him, I mean, thousands and thousands of hours, millions of dollars spent on those sorts of games, it does not need to be complicated to be a game and I think we've proven that time and time again. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, I think it is. It just uses the fundamentals of what a game is that we can all respond to, that we can all relate to, we know immediately what it is, we recognize it when we see it, we know what it is when we are playing it, we respond to it, we know what we're doing and we enjoy it and we want to play it. We enjoy doing it so much that we'll play it again, we'll come back to it if we don't do well, we play until we win it. Kai Merriott: And I was thinking of, if we were to create a game that absolutely breaks all the rules, so we were talking about things like we have a great story, we have really interactivity that kind of tells the story, it's nice and short, it has a really nice visual identity and it uses sound effects and music and, I want to say, in an appropriate way because we've talked a lot about the fun side of it, but actually it doesn't need to be fun, it can also be dramatic as well. But what would the worst gamified course you can think of look like do you think? Johnny McMonagle: Well, yeah, getting all those things wrong or even that they don't match, that the visuals don't match the sound effects, that the sound effects sound like they're from a completely different product, that the music it sets completely the wrong tone, things like going, well, why I press something, something odd happens, why did that happen? What do I do next? If you get lost anywhere in the middle of it, if you have any doubt what you're doing, if you have to be reaching for the help button you're not doing it well, we haven't done our job well, if someone has to go, how do I play this again? Or I can't remember what I'm doing, what's the point of this? Then we haven't done our job, that's where the simplicity comes into. And all the elements have to work together or else it's jarring and it feels off and all those things would make it to me just a bad game experience, would be bad training but as a game it just wouldn't work. Kai Merriott: Yeah. It seems that games are particularly unsympathetic when you get one element wrong. It's almost not too grand a point and it's almost like poetry where every word is absolutely key versus a novel where it doesn't matter if there's a few dodgy sentences in this, it's absolutely you find, but with games, everything has just to be perfectly in place. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, no, absolutely. It all has to work together cohesively and the wheat from the chaff is just saying it just should work. And all these, we talked about all the different building blocks, say, that go into it, they all have to just keep it simple, does this element work with that element and all put together, is it doing what we plan to do? Well, somebody just comes and sits down beside you, will they be able to play this and will they enjoy it? Will they respond to it the way we want them to? And if we get all those things right anyone should be able to do that. Kai Merriott: Fabulous. I think we've basically covered everything that we need to cover today and I think we're running out of time anyway. So, Johnny, it's been great having you on the Principled Podcast, I hope you come back and speak with us again soon. Johnny McMonagle: Thanks Kai. Kai Merriott: Thank you all and thank you all for listening. My name is Kai Merriott, we'll see you on another episode of the Principled Podcast by LRN. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN, at LRN our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at lrn.com to learn more and if you enjoyed this episode subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen and don't forget to leave us a review.

Welcome to the Metaverse
The Metaverse News You Need To Know in 15 Minutes - Facebook Changing Their Name, Decentraland Metaverse Festival Review and More

Welcome to the Metaverse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 14:50


On this episode of the Welcome to the Metaverse podcast, I've put together 6 major news headlines from the metaverse in under 15 minutes. A way of you getting up to date quickly with what is happening in this space. We cover Facebook's continued plans to invest heavily in the metaverse and their upcoming name change, a review of the Decentraland Metaverse Festival, Adobe's new NFT authentication feature being built into Photoshop and more. If you enjoy this strand, do let me know at https://twitter.com/MetaverseLuke and it's something that can become a regular feature. ======================= This episode is sponsored by Republic Realm, who are a metaverse investment and innovation platform. Republic Realm are also one of the largest owners of digital real estate NFTs in Decentraland, The Sandbox and Axie Infinity. This week they opened registration to the Republic Realm Academy, a series of online courses about the metaverse and NFTs, which will be taught by educators from some of the most prestigious universities in the world alongside top industry professionals in web 3.0 technologies. Renowned metaverse expert Cathy Hackl is the dean of Republic Realm Academy. Right now you can get the early bird price (which in my opinion is a steal) - all the full information is on their website https://www.republicrealm.com To keep up with their latest updates head to their twitter here : https://www.twitter.com/joinrepublic_RE, Discord : discord.gg/ntSaG8b9sW & Substack : realmroundup.substack.com ======================= To join my weekly NFT drops newsletter, head to metaverseluke.substack.com, you can also reach out at metaversepod@gmail.com ======================= In this episode we talk about : - Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook's continued pivot towards becoming a metaverse company, including a possible name change and heavy investment in the space for the rest of this year. - A review and roundup of the recent Decentraland Metaverse Festival - A look ahead to the upcoming NFT NYC conference in New York and also the recently announced NFT LDN London conference - Adobe's announcement that they are integrating NFT credentials into Photoshop almost immediately, with major marketplaces onboard including OpenSea - Chipotle diving head first into the metaverse for Halloween inside Roblox - The future of kids toys in the from of interactive, playable NFT digital toys, which have just secured a funding round of $7.5 million from one of the most famous VC firms in the space ======================= News Sources quoted in this episode Facebook Metaverse Rebrand - https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/19/22735612/facebook-change-company-name-metaverse Decentraland Metaverse Festival - https://medium.com/@Metakey/metakey-vips-at-the-first-ever-metaverse-festival-1922db2bf801 NFT NYC - https://www.nft.nyc/ Adobe Photoshop Supporting NFT Verification - https://www.coindesk.com/business/2021/10/27/new-adobe-photoshop-feature-to-support-nft-verification-on-marketplaces/ Chipotle in Roblox - https://www.marketingdive.com/news/chipotle-hosts-virtual-restaurant-on-roblox-for-halloween-experience/608979/ Cryptoys Recent Funding Round and Story - https://twitter.com/willweinraub/status/1452682354162556940?s=20

Fotografía y Retoque Digital de Carretedigital
Testimonio de un fotógrafo frustrado y Últimas noticias

Fotografía y Retoque Digital de Carretedigital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 63:35


En el programa de hoy conoceremos las uítimas noticias interesantes del mundillo de la fotografía y las que tú nos has hecho llegar, además contestaremos todas tus preguntas que nos has enviado previamente o las que nos harás a través del directo. Enlaces de interés del programa: Participa en el NEXT IMAGE AWARDS 2021 de HUAWEI, el concurso de fotografía móvil con el que podrás ganar 10.000$ y muchos premios más. https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ Hazte con el libro de Fran Nieto "El arte de fotografiar paisaje" https://frannieto.es/libros/ Regístrate en el congreso PHOTO 2021 https://congreso.carretedigital.com/ Acción solidaria a favor damnificados del volcán de la Palma, Calendario Solidario https://www.verkami.com/projects/31555-calendario-solidario-todos-somos-la-palma Recomendaciones material Telescopio terrestre Vanguard HD 82A https://fotok.es/telescopios-terrestres/vanguard-endeavor-hd-82a?aff=y205 Sigma 18-200 DC MACRO F3.5-6.3 para Canon https://fotok.es/objetivos-sigma/sigma-18-200mm-f35-63-dc-macro-os-hsm-contemporary-para-nikon?aff=y205 SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS ART https://fotok.es/objetivos-sigma/sigma-24-70mm-f28-dg-os-art-para-nikon?aff=y205 Página recomendada https://www.instagram.com/magnumphotos/ La pregunta ¿En qué lugar has estado fotografiando y te ha enamorado? Festival Montphoto https://montphoto.com/website/index.asp Concurso AEFONA https://www.concursoaefona.com/   Descárgate de forma GRATUITA, la guía "21 claves para mejorar la composición de tus fotos", escrita por Fran Nieto, Javier Alonso Torre y Fran Palmero. https://carretedigital.com/contenido-... Entra en nuestra comunidad de fotógrafos amantes de la fotografía y disfruta de: -Encuentro Carretero, cada mes nos reunimos con vosotros para vernos las caras y para debatir sobre temas fotográficos. -1 NUEVO CURSO CADA MES de manos de Fran Nieto, Fran Palmero, Vicente Nadal o algún colaborador de Carrete. -Nuevos cursos de edición y revelado con Photoshop y Lightroom de Fran Nieto. -Todos nuestros cursos online, los que hay y los que iremos incorporando a la lista, al menos uno al mes, de formadores contrastados y experimentados -Soporte a los cursos por parte de los profesores -Forma parte de nuestro CARRETE FACE, una red social al estilo facebook exclusiva para CARRETEROS VIP -Grupo exclusivo en Telegram Suscríbete en www.carretedigital.com

Wassup Wit It Podcast
Happy Ending

Wassup Wit It Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 128:35


Took a week off but we back at it again. Topics this week include "Photoshop","Chicago Police" "Vacations", "Social Media rules  and a bunch more. We also make a special special announcement. So it back relax and enjoy the show. Remember to send your "Ask The Bro's Questions to WassupWitItPod@gmail.com Follow us on all social media platforms- @WassupWitItPod

Instigated Talk with JP JUSTICE
(LIVE) DESIGNING A FLYER w/#AdobePhotoShop

Instigated Talk with JP JUSTICE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 75:04


Help me design this flyer for cyber distribution. @GrownManIsh Tickets on Sale NOW at:https://grown-man-ish.eventbrite.comJoin @KennyWilliams and I as we record a comedy albumSunday Nov. 7th & Monday 8th at 7pm LIVE AT#ComedyInHarlem508 E. 117st New York NYTickets $20 / Vaccination Card Required OR COVID TEST within 48hrs of show CALL IN NOW AT 7184070893

The Nifty Show: Digital Collectibles and NFTs Podcast
Prepare NFTs with Photoshop - Nifty News #104 for Tuesday, Oct 26th

The Nifty Show: Digital Collectibles and NFTs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 59:51


Prepare NFTs with Photoshop - Nifty News #104 for Tuesday, Oct 26th Binance is going beyond an NFT marketplace to creating an Initial Game Offering platform. Decentraland has hosted its first official Metaverse festival. And more signs of mainstream adoption as the new edition of Photoshop will include a “prepare as NFT” option. It's a very WAXy week and many popular brands have announced their intent to mint on WAX. As for us, it's your favorite father-son duo, back for another edition of nifty news on episode #104 of The Nifty Show. Full show notes Nifty.Show/104 SUBSCRIBE, RATE, & REVIEW: iTunes: http://badco.in/itunes Spotify: http://badco.in/spotify Stitcher: http://badco.in/stitcher Google Play: http://badco.in/play Soundcloud: http://badco.in/soundcloud YouTube: http://badco.in/youtube FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: @BadCrypto - @joelcomm - @finallyaligned Facebook: /TheNiftyShow /BadCryptoPod /JoelComm LinkedIn: /in/joelcomm Instagram: @BadCryptoPodcast DISCLAIMER: Do your own due diligence and research. Neither Joel Comm nor Zach Comm are FINANCIAL ADVISORS. We are sharing our journey with you as we learn more about this crazy little thing called cryptocurrency. We make NO RECOMMENDATIONS. Don't take anything we say as gospel. Do not come to our homes with pitchforks because you lost money by listening to us. We only share with you what we are learning and what we are investing it. We will never "pump or dump" any cryptocurrencies. Take what we say with a grain of salt. You must research this stuff on your own! Just know that we will always strive for RADICAL TRANSPARENCY with any show associations.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Board Game Design Lab
Top 10 Photoshop Tips for Game Designerser with Nicolas Fournier

Board Game Design Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 33:51


Nicolas Fournier, designer of Megapulse, breaks down his top 10 Photoshop tips and tricks to help game designers. The post Top 10 Photoshop Tips for Game Designerser with Nicolas Fournier appeared first on Board Game Design Lab.

Engadget Morning Edition
US retailers stop selling security cameras made by several Chinese companies

Engadget Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 3:26


Today's headlines: US retailers stop selling security cameras made by several Chinese companies, Adobe brings Photoshop and Illustrator to the web, 'Dune: Part Two' arrives October 20th, 2023.

Engadget
US retailers stop selling security cameras made by several Chinese companies

Engadget

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 3:26


Today's headlines: US retailers stop selling security cameras made by several Chinese companies, Adobe brings Photoshop and Illustrator to the web, 'Dune: Part Two' arrives October 20th, 2023.

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
A la 4.844ª va la vencida

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 16:01


El primer exo-exo-planeta / Photoshop versión web / NFTs en Photoshop / Publicidad en Telegram / Baja la piratería en España / Samsung elimina la publi en sus móviles Patrocinador: BluaU de Sanitas http://bluau.es/ es el nuevo complemento digital del seguro médico de Sanitas que incorpora la más alta tecnología para ayudarte en el cuidado de tu salud y la de tu familia. — BluaU lanza Conecta con tu Salud http://bluau.es/, un nuevo servicio que te permite comunicar directamente tu actividad y estado físico con tus médicos, psicólogos, nutricionistas y entrenadores personales. El primer exo-exo-planeta / Photoshop versión web / NFTs en Photoshop / Publicidad en Telegram / Baja la piratería en España / Samsung elimina la publi en sus móviles

Le Mug Nowtech (Replay Officiel)
IPhoneSE+ et SE3, les rumeurs ! #iPhoneSE #AppleFitness #Honor50 etc.

Le Mug Nowtech (Replay Officiel)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 93:55


Le Guide de Survie sur Twitch : http://bit.ly/nowtechQG Sommaire Le Mug Nowtech : 00:00:00 Début du stream 00:01:22 Le Kawa 00:01:37 iPhone SE “Plus” sera (normalement) compatible 5G 00:13:02 Apple Fitness+ et Apple One Premier arrive en France 00:23:00 Honor fait son grand retour en France 00:34:42 Frances Haugen va être entendue à l'Assemblée nationale 00:49:30 Adobe Max : Camera RAW débarque dans Photoshop sur iPad 01:01:47 La cerise sur le croissant : le scénario de Dune a été écrit sous MS-DOS 01:16:52 Les corn FAQ #LeMugNowtech est une émission quotidienne qui parle de technologie. C'est une revue de presse des meilleurs articles que nous retenons pour nos Flipboards. Elle est enregistrée en Live à 08h00 (heure de Paris) tous les matins de la semaine. #LeMugNowtech c'est du lundi au vendredi sur la chaîne Twitch NowtechQG : https://www.twitch.tv/nowtechqg/ ●♦● ABONNEZ-VOUS à nos chaînes ●♦● ►Nowtech Replay : http://bit.ly/2weGg0f Replay des lives Twitch de NowtechQG ►Nowtech : http://bit.ly/19lUGZZ Tests vidéo d'applications mobiles et tech. ►Twitch NowtechQG : https://www.twitch.tv/nowtechqg/ Gaming, Revue de presse Tech, Unboxings, Q&A etc... ●♦● SOUTENEZ LA CHAÎNE ●♦● ►En contribuant financièrement : https://www.patreon.com/nowtech ►En devenant Sponsors de la chaîne principale : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVwG9JHqGLfEO-4TkF-lf2g/join ►Sub Twitch NowtechQG : https://www.twitch.tv/products/nowtechqg ►En devenant bénévole : benevoles.nowtech@gmail.com ►D'autres façons de nous soutenir : http://nowtech.news/soutenir-nowtechtv/ ►Lien de la boutique Nowtech sur Teespring : https://teespring.com/fr/stores/nowtech-2 ↓ PLUS D'INFOS ↓ ------------ Nos Flipboards --------------------------------------------------------- ►nowtech.tv : https://flipboard.com/@jkeinborg/nowtechtv-ogcbmgbby ►SHOOT : https://flipboard.com/@jkeinborg/nowtechtv-shoot-p3e5vba1y ------------ Suivez NowTech ---------------------------------------------------- ►Lien Instagram de Nowtech : https://www.instagram.com/nowtech_atelier/ ►Twitter : https://twitter.com/NowTechTV ►Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100073297687925 ►Site Web : http://nowtech.news ►Discord Nowtech : https://bit.ly/nowtechDiscord ►►► EN LIVE tous les matins sur la Chaîne ! Nowtech, chaîne indépendante de tests d'applications mobile et de Tech, est présentée par des passionnés qui partagent leurs avis, astuces et conseils. L'idée derrière Nowtech, c'est de vous offrir des tests soignés et divertissants, pas forcément liés à l'actualité et aux nouveautés, mais avec un vrai ton « homemade ». Nous pensons fondamentalement qu'il est important, en tant que consommateurs, qu'un maximum de personnes s'expriment sur les produits et nous avons voulu apporter notre pierre à l'édifice.

Loop Matinal
Quarta-feira, 27/10/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 10:18


Apoio: Peduti Advogados Acelere a adequação da sua empresa à LGPD com quem sabe o que está fazendo. Acesse https://www.peduti.com.br/. -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Uber e Carrefour fazem parceria na França: 
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-25/uber-to-offer-15-minute-groceries-in-france-with-carrefour 99Pay ganhará cashback com bitcoin: 
https://tecnoblog.net/525799/99pay-anuncia-programa-de-cashback-em-bitcoin-para-novembro/ YouTube remove video de Bolsonaro: 
https://tecnoblog.net/525964/youtube-remove-live-de-bolsonaro-com-fake-news-sobre-covid-19-e-aids/ Twitch volta ao Xbox: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/26/22746330/twitch-xbox-dashboard-integration-streaming Amazon prepara cópia do Clubhouse com foco em DJs: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/26/22744585/amazon-project-mic-launch-live-audio-app?scrolla=5eb6d68b7fedc32c19ef33b4 Zoom libera legendas automáticas: https://www.b9.com.br/152617/zoom-libera-recurso-de-legendas-ao-vivo-para-todos-os-usuarios/ Photoshop exportará NFTs: 
https://www.theverge.com/22740442/adobe-scott-belsky-interview-nft-photoshop-blockchain-creator-economy Photoshop e Illustrator terão versão web: 
https://www.engadget.com/photoshop-and-illustrator-come-to-the-web-for-comments-basic-edits-and-more-130045329.html Facebook divulga resultados financeiros: 
https://www.zdnet.com/article/facebook-gives-light-q4-revenue-guidance-after-mixed-q3-results/ Facebook gastará US$ 10 B na divisão do metaverso: 
https://www.protocol.com/bulletins/facebook-metaverse-10-billion-dollars Facebook investirá em apelo para jovens adultos: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/25/22745622/facebook-young-adults-refocusing-teams Facebook contrata advogado de Britney Spears: 
https://www.b9.com.br/152644/facebook-contrata-advogado-de-britney-spears-para-evitar-mais-estragos-em-sua-reputacao/ Serif testa a GPU do M1 Max: 
https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/10/26/m1-max-tem-a-gpu-mais-rapida-ja-testada-pela-serif/ Próximo iPhone SE deve manter tela de 4,7 polegadas: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/10/26/iphone-se-3-2022/ iPhone SE Plus pode chegar só em 2024: 
https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/10/26/iphone-se-com-display-maior-chegara-so-em-2024-diz-analista/ Apple One Premier será lançado em novembro no Brasil e em Portugal: 
https://blogdoiphone.com/servicos/apple-one-premier-brasil/ Apple Fitness+ chega ao Brasil e Portugal em novembro: 
https://tecnoblog.net/510464/apple-fitness-chega-ao-brasil-em-novembro-com-treinos-e-meditacao/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

InDesign Secrets
InDesign Secrets Podcast 292

InDesign Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 44:01


In this episode… News Adobe InDesign 2022 (v17.0x) now available InDesign Magazine is evolving into CreativePro magazine, first issue out November 1 2021! Sign up for our expanded Design + Accessibility Summit, Nov. 16–19 Interview with Chad Chelius and Dax Castro, accessibility experts and hosts of The A11y Podcast Obscure InDesign Feature: Flip  Sponsors for this episode: > Santa Cruz Software has a solution for the "83% of respondents who have said they have to spend time finding a lost asset." The answer is LinkrUI, a plugin that enables direct searching, opening, placing, and syncing of assets stored in a DAM or other storage services such as Box and Dropbox from within Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Read about the freemium version here. Links mentioned in this podcast: David's session at MAX: Discovering the Best InDesign Tips and Tricks Anne-Marie's lab at MAX: InDesign Basics: From Newbie to Pro Photoshop Banana (easter egg): https://creativepro.com/photoshop-easter-eggs/ Adobe MAX 2021 Final issue of InDesign Magazine has 150 All-Star Tips (and our "Hidden" Features article) Should people upgrade right away? https://creativepro.com/should-adobe-fix-older-versions-of-programs/ InCopy Vulnerability patch: https://helpx.adobe.com/security/products/incopy/apsb21-05.html Dax Castro and Chad Chelius Accessibility (#a11y) podcast website: https://www.accessibilitychecklists.com (or http://www.chaxchat.com) Dax and Chad are the accessibility pros at AbleDocs: https://www.abledocs.com/en Obscure Feature: Flip (Text on a Path) https://creativepro.com/center-text-on-top-of-a-circular-path-quickly/

Daily Tech Headlines
YouTube rolls out a “New to you” discovery tab – DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021


YouTube rolls out a “New to you” discovery tab, Amazon is building a live audio app codenamed “Project Mic”, and Adobe builds a Content Credentials tool into Photoshop for NFTs. MP3 Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. You can get an ad-free feed of Daily Tech Headlines for $3 a month here. A special thanks to all ourContinue reading "YouTube rolls out a “New to you” discovery tab – DTH"

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Adobe's Scott Belsky on how NFTs will change creativity

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 65:32


Adobe is one of those companies that I don't think we pay enough attention to — it's been around since 1982, and the entire creative economy runs through its software. You don't just edit a photo, you Photoshop it. We spend a lot of time on Decoder talking about the creator economy, but creators themselves spend all their time working in Adobe's tools. On this episode, I'm talking to Scott Belsky, chief product officer at Adobe, about the new features coming to their products, many of which focus on collaboration, and about creativity broadly — who gets to be a creative, where they might work, and how they get paid. Transcript Links: NFTs Explained Adobe brings a simplified Photoshop to the web Adobe is adding a collaborative mood board to Creative Cloud Soon you can use Photoshop to prepare your art as an NFT The Dog Ramps Tweet The Furry Lisa, CryptoArt, & The New Economy Of Digital Creativity A $120,000 Banana Is Peeled From an Art Exhibition and Eaten Adobe and Twitter are designing a system for permanently attaching artists' names to pictures "I still own you" clip Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone, Alexander Charles Adams, and Andrew Marino and we are edited by Callie Wright. Our music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Nathan Barry Show
053: Kimberly Brooks - Taking Intentional Breaks To Reignite Creativity

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 66:51


Kimberly Brooks is a contemporary American artist and author. Kimberly integrates landscape, figuration and abstraction to address subjects of history, memory and identity. Her work has been exhibited and featured internationality.Kimberly received her bachelor's degree in literature from U.C. Berkeley, and was Valedictorian. She has taught art as a lecturer and adjunct faculty instructor, and was a featured speaker at TEDx Fullerton.In this episode, I talk with Kimberly about her work as an artist, author, and editor. We talk about how she uses ConvertKit to reach and grow her audience. We talk about what people can learn from fine art, and apply it to their newsletters. We also cover the path to becoming a successful creator, and much more.In this episode, you'll learn: The secret to achieving your breakthrough moment A job most creators should charge for, but rarely do What you should be doing instead of blogging Should you be posting on Instagram? Links & Resources Huffington Post ConvertKit Craft and Commerce Steve Jobs John Baldessari Adobe Photoshop Adobe Leonard Shlain Milton Glaser Macworld Walt Disney's Imagineering Warner Music Group Seth Godin Leonardo da Vinci Arianna Huffington Huffington Post: Fine Art Later Anderson Ranch Arts Center Otis College of Art and Design Kimberly Brooks's Links Find Kimberly on Instagram Kimberly's website Kimberly's Ted Talk Huffington Post article, “The Gap Logo, New Coke and the Legendary Walter Landor” Kimberly's book, The New Oil Painting Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Kimberly:The fundamental way to learn is, you imitate, assimilate, and then you can improvise with anything. You're going to be thwarted in the beginning many times, and you can't give up. You have to say, “Okay, well, I don't care if it sucks. I don't care if I'm going to fail. If I'm gonna fail, I'm gonna fail big. Let's just go on.”[00:00:29] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Kimberly Brooks. She is a fine artist. So, painting, she has all of her art in galleries, that whole world, which is super fascinating to me. She also plays in the creative world. Newsletters, podcasts, and interviews.She built the whole art editorial section of the Huffington Post. She built that to millions of readers. She's done all kinds of things in the design community from the early days. So, we riff on that; Mad Men-style ad agencies in the ‘80s and ‘90s. Some great stuff.Then she brings it all the way through to talking about what she does with ConvertKit. How she sets up her sequences, and everything else, and things that people can learn from fine art, and apply to their email newsletters and sequences.So, it's a fun episode. We have to do a part two, because we filled up all the time we had, and I think I only got through half my questions.So, anyway, I'm going to get out of the way and dive in. So, here we go.Kimberly, welcome to the show.[00:01:37] Kimberly:Thank you for having me, Nathan.[00:01:39] Nathan:There's so many things I to talk about, because you come to the creator world from a different perspective than I do, though we both share a love for Photoshop.[00:01:50] Kimberly:Oh, yeah.[00:01:51] Nathan:We'll start with where we met. It was at Craft and Commerce, some number of years ago.I can't even think. Three years ago? Four?[00:02:01] Kimberly:I think it was three years ago, and it was such a random whim. I don't even know how I ended up finding it. I fell in rabbit hole. And then I came upon ConvertKit.I was actively looking for a better way to send art show announcements. Because I'm a painter, I'm an artist.I just felt after my previous experiences, I knew how important having a subscriber-based service was. I don't want to get too nerdy, but I didn't really like the competitor who shall remain unnamed. But, I found you guys, and I started getting the advertisement for the conference, and it was in Boise, Idaho.And so I thought, I'll just go. It was like a Ted conference for really creative nerdy people like me, but it was exactly what I was wanting. It was about marketing, which is really such a weird word because it's really about sharing, and I loved the title.I loved everything about it. I met some of the people that I'm really, really close with now. Then the next year it was canceled because of the pandemic, but it was amazing, and I met you, actually.[00:03:28] Nathan:And, and we had a really fun conversation. one thing that I want to talk about, for you is the intersection between fine art, right. And painting and that world. And then now you're also in this world of being a writer and a creator in the sense, right. You you've been a writer and creative for a long time, but, but it's, it's like a different world of the selling things to your audience.And. Earning money directly in that way. And so I want, like, I want to hear that as you like weave in and out of these two worlds and then just your experience there.[00:04:02] Kimberly:Yeah, it's interesting. I, when I was in elementary school, we had a really competitive game of tetherball constantly going on on the playground. And it was just sort of that pole with a ball attached to a rope we would, people would line up and we would get it, and it was, see how many times, and it was just sort of like, it was very intense and I always felt like being an artist.Being an art to me was it was the pole, you know? So like my pole is art is making art and everything about what I do. I write about it. I interview people about it. I interview other artists about their work. I make paintings 90% of the time in my studio. Like, it's all about art, you know? So that's like the beginning.So I do see myself sashaying between different worlds. And I think everybody kind of does that. And then as the bicycle of technology was being built to use kind of like a vague reference to like Steve jobs is, you know, what happens if you put a man on a bicycle and you know, like how fast can he, as the bicycle was kind of entering our world, I thought, what if you kind of mixed art with the bicycle?You know, what, what happens if you, you know, Make an artist's website. So I was like one of the first people I knew that made an artist's website. And I remember, it was, I had, was having lunch with my mentor. Who's, the late John Baldessari. He was a great, great, great artist. And, he's famous for, you know, he burned all this stuff and graduate school and then became a conceptual painter, you know, very, you know, Howard work in, you know, conceptual anyway.So I brought my laptop to this Mexican restaurant in Venice, and I said, I wanted to show you something. I made a website and our studios were really near each other. And he said, Oh, I, I don't know if I would do that. If I were you, I was like, why not? He said, because you're, you'll piss off the dealers, the galleries, the galleries, you shouldn't be selling directly.It's going to take away from what their job is. You know, when you hang a show and you have art in the gallery, the gallery is selling the artist and it's their job, you know, and artists are supposed to be kind of this, you know, semi mute, black turtleneck wearing, you know, mysterious, mystical ShawMan goddess.I call it goddess on the hill. Like you're not supposed to really get in the way of what your artists about. And so I thought, oh gosh, you know, this is, and I had put the paintings for a show was about to have. And so I started making, so my postcard for that show had the name of the show and it had the name of the website, cause no galleries had website.Then this is in like the two thousands, you know, this is a long time ago. And I remember meeting people when I handed them a postcard. If like I felt comfortable with them, I would like secretly write a password so that they could see the website,[00:07:20] Nathan:Oh was you were, you had the website, but it was[00:07:24] Kimberly:Yeah. So I password protected it. I password protected it because John Baldessari told me that it's probably not a good idea to have a website.This is again, no artists ad website.[00:07:35] Nathan:How did the galleries and the community[00:07:37] Kimberly:The galleries didn't have websites either. And the galleries, I remember. They started it. Like some of them had websites, but it was super janky. It was like sometimes most of the time they did an, and it was just sort of this mysterious world that 99.9, nine, 9% of the public didn't understand.Doesn't understand it's better now. And you'd have to be walking down the street or you'd have to know somebody who knows somebody, you know, it's, it was just a different world then.[00:08:08] Nathan:But did any of those negative things come about? Like, did anyone look down on you on it for having a website and for[00:08:14] Kimberly:No, no, no. Eventually I just said, screw it. And I took the password off.And, interestingly, I don't want to date myself, but I think I already have, but the at the time flash was very. sexy. And it was like, and so artists would have, if they did have website, firstly, they would be horribly designed and they would have like a flash animation of a curtain opening and a door.And it was very like CD rom mentality. Like, you know, it was pre-internet thinking, you know, anyway, like I said, the big nerd here.[00:08:48] Nathan:Flash was big until 2000, like the iPhone 2007.[00:08:52] Kimberly:Until Steve jobs killed it, just took a knife. He took a sword and he just, during a keynote, just, you know,[00:09:01] Nathan:Yeah. Oh, and the two biggest reasons were, that the bandwidth of the phones couldn't handle it. And then also the battery life on the phones couldn't handle it.[00:09:10] Kimberly:Wasn't there another reason there was another technical reason that had to do with plays well with others. I can't remember exactly what it was,[00:09:20] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, it was a restricted technology. Like it was owned Macromedia. And so probably that apple was trying to do to get to play. And Adobe was playing hardball and apple was probably like, okay,[00:09:31] Kimberly:Yeah,[00:09:32] Nathan:You know, we'll play this[00:09:33] Kimberly:Yeah. It was, was, it was, it was just the evolution of, you know, of Photoshop and Adobe products. And so I grew up with Adobe. I learned I was an early adopter, always, you know, I just sort of like analogy. Yeah.[00:09:49] Nathan:I want to dive into all kinds of things. I want to talk about, more in the financial world and the business of that and everything else. But back and maybe start earlier in your career.[00:10:01] Kimberly:Than elementary school.[00:10:04] Nathan:I guess we didn't go to elementary school a little bit after elementary school. What what did the early days of your career look like[00:10:12] Kimberly:I was a, you know, I'm a first, or I guess I'm a second generation American, so, and I'm Jewish. So of course I was supposed to be a doctor. So my, we used to get, you can be anything you want just as long as you're a surgeon first. So I got the makings of a woman's surgeon and, you know, it was just like, as a book that was a book that I received many times in my middle school years.And then, you know, it was like, that's great, you're so talented. But you know, you really, you know, after you get out of medical school, you can, it was just sort of what you did in my family. And, and my father he was a well-known surgeon and he became an, I don't want to say artist. He became a writer, so he's a well-known writer.And he started writing. So he kind of became an artist before my eyes, you know, so as I was getting out, as I was graduating college, he published his first bestselling. That was just, and I would like sit at the book, you know, when he gave a lecture at an art gallery, because it was called art and physics.His name is Leonard Shlain so I would like sell, watch him, sell the books, you know, like give a lecture and then I would check out and I would get, take people's cash and then give them a book, you know, at the end of the lecture. And he used to tell me, he used to say, honey, you have to be shameless.You have to be willing to just talk in front of four people. It doesn't matter. You just need to do it. If it's just, it was just a big, it did. It made an imprint on me because I was watching him grow out of his own discomfort zone, which I still struggle with of talking to people like instead of through your paintings or, you know, talking to an audience saying being on video, it took me six months to figure out how to be on video, but I'm getting ahead of it.So you asked me like my CR about my career. So I was an English major. I went to an English, major architecture, minor at UC Berkeley. And at the time that I was graduating, painting was considered dead. And I know that that for artists today, they don't quite appreciate that. But after abstract expressionism, there was sort of this mood in the art world that everything had been done and like, forget about figuration was the last thing people wanted to see, you know, and I wanted to paint people.So I just figured, okay, I'm going to just do that on my own, but I'm going to, I love reading. I love writing. So I became an English major and I was valedictorian of, of the UC Berkeley English department. And so my first job, I wanted to combine my love for art and literature. So my first job was.Design. So my, so I, was mentored by a gentleman named Walter Lander, who is the founder of landlord associates. And he was sort of the west coast, Milton Glaser, Milton Glaser from a design point of view, like he was, he just recently passed in the last five or so years, but he like did the, I love New York, you know, like he's this famous, famous graphic designer because the field of graphic design is, is relatively new.It's relatively, it's like a century old, you know, like th the serious field of it. And Walter was a pioneer in it. And he did, you know, my first job was like working cause I, cause I minored in architecture was, helping design the shell oil, gas station, you know,So I was doing like architecture design, and then he asked me to write speeches.And so they had, their company was kind of designed like a brain. So they had like a language division and they had like the design division, like they did the loose soon milk and they were so famous then such leaders. They had 1800 people in offices all over the world and it was like a big deal. And they had an office on a ferry boat.So that was my first job out of college. I was a speech writer for Walter and I was in the, I was in the word department. Like I think I designed, I helped name, a cigarette, you know, like was just a weird, but it was fascinating, you know? And it was meeting fascinating people. The grateful dead would like come over on the boat after it was, it was, it was a wild time at, in San Francisco in the late eighties, early nineties.Totally wild. So, So I was like, so all the designers are starting to learn Photoshop. So there was this thing called Photoshop because they were doing everything by hand, you know? And then I was like, oh, so I got Photoshop 1.0, you know, and then I had th there was no layers. So you had to do everything in alpha channels.And it's interesting just to be a big nerd. Cause you're a designer too, right? I mean that's yeah. Yeah. So if you can try to imagine there was Photoshop without layers, it meant that you had to do everything inside the masking tool that's built in that nobody really uses or knows about now called alpha channels.So I had to create everything using masks, but it was very oddly more similar to what you did with your Exacto knife and ruler, know, I still think one of the biggest, the saddest things about Photoshop. I mean, I think everybody should know it, but it has some feature bloat, but I think it kind of buries the power of alpha channels.And I think that if people knew how to use it, it would like, it's like a little thing to know that would hugely leap them out of the more artificial aspects of doing those filters on things.[00:16:00] Nathan:Right.[00:16:01] Kimberly:Anyway, like I you have to be careful with me because I can go into real. I can crawl real deep into these nerdy things.But anyway,[00:16:08] Nathan:Are there other things from those early days of, of the graphic design art agency, like that kind of world, that you still take with you today[00:16:19] Kimberly:Thousands of Gillian percent. One of them is the four DS that every project is discover, design develop, deploy. And I know I lost that. I also saw that, like, if you could name it, you could charge it.[00:16:32] Nathan:Is there a story behind that? If you could name it, you could charge for it.[00:16:35] Kimberly:You know, you'd see these hundreds of thousands of million dollar contracts going out to these major people. And I used to have to help write the proposals and I would see how they would divide they'd phase out, like a lot of designers. Again, I don't, I hope we're so not too off topic, but a lot of designers will not charge for discovery.You know what I mean? Because they haven't named it. They didn't name it They'd Just be like, oh, let me Research all about your company. And then you're going to pay me to give you some designs, and then I'll give you the designs and then hopefully they're smarter. Anyway, like I said, big, big topic.[00:17:10] Nathan:Yeah. But think there are a lot of people listening who are in the either freelance or agency space and they, provide services to newsletters or creators or they're growing their own on the side. And I think it's a really important point that, if you're if you're structuring your proposals and all your interactions with clients around the deliverable, then you're failing to talk about a substantial portion of the work And probably the part of the work that differentiates you from the other freelancers who are just like, oh, you need a logo. And they dive like right into Photoshop or whatever tool. Whereas if you're good at what you do, you're probably taking a step back and looking at the whole landscape and spending probably more than half of your time in that Research discovery and learning stage rather than the deliverable stage.[00:17:56] Kimberly:It's actually the most important time intensive stage of any project. And so not just design. I mean, I think you saw my Ted talk, the creative process in eight stages. And I think I talked about how as an artist, I don't want to give anybody whiplash, but like you, as an artist, you have, a period of time where it's like a rest in music where you don't, you're not making work.It doesn't look like you're doing anything on the outside, but that's the most important part. And it's when. Gathering, but you're doing it in a subconscious, like in many different ways when I'm, when I'm making a painting, I'm having to listen a lot, you know, you have to listen and look and just inhale before you can exhale.So anyway, that, but I mean, we could, I think, I think we could do a whole hour on Landour. Cause that was just a, such an interesting, you know? And, and I was actually, I was actually there, I dunno. Well, you're, you probably weren't born, but there was a, Coke released a new design and they, they, and Landour was the leader of this new design.And I was like in the boardroom, in my. In pantyhose. Cause that's what we that's what, like you had aware that it was very far, it was like mad men. It was like mad men where like everybody smoked and the women were gorgeous and the men would like have these glass offices on the side of the boat. And they would like go in and light up a cigarette and call London, you know, like they were like, or Japan and, and they had, it was just extreme, chic, crazy environment, very male dominated.And I was like, I'll often the lone woman in a room, you know, but anyway, that's a separate side conversation and they were introducing the new Coke and it was a flop. It was like, it was like, there was a backlash against the new design because it had like big fat. It was like, whereas the old Coke kind of has that Victorian, which they still use now that, that very Sarah fee or Nate almost like your create above your head, but more, you know, whereas.Where the new version they were doing was super kind of chunky. It was like new Coke, you know, anyway. But, it was a wild experience. I wrote an essay about it and I'll, I'll give it to you if you, if[00:20:35] Nathan:Yeah, we'll put it the Shona[00:20:36] Kimberly:Yeah,[00:20:38] Nathan:On time on that.[00:20:39] Kimberly:Yeah, no, the whole, here's the thing. I wanted to be an artist, and a lot of times I believe a lot of, and I believe there's a lot of people who have an artist inside them and a lot of times they will, work in a field that brings them near art decisions to make themselves feel better.That they're not being an actual artist. And I was one of those people.[00:21:08] Nathan:Okay. So how did that play out for you of your you're close to the design and that sort of[00:21:14] Kimberly:I was like, yeah, it was, I couldn't be closer. I was like, I was like in, I was behind the curtain of Oz doing the, with the, with the best people and everything. Again, this is so long ago, but, but I felt like technology at the time, again, Photoshop was just starting. There was no whatever. I was like, you know, I needed, I need a break.I need to like push the table over. So I quit. I moved to Paris to paint for a year. I played piano in bars at night. That was like a whole other wild. We could do a whole show on that, but, you know, then I was like, well, I can't, I'm not going to be able to make a living doing this. Like I was painting, I was sitting at the sore bone and I was like, I had this little gig in this bar, but it was a couple of Franks and I wasn't legal in Paris.And I just had this big because of my literature background I have does such a, you know, I love you. I was so somewhat of afraid.[00:22:11] Nathan:So how old were you when you[00:22:14] Kimberly:I was in my early twenties.[00:22:16] Nathan:Okay. When you, quit and said it's time to do painting.[00:22:20] Kimberly:Yeah. I was like, it wasn't a straight line. And that's another thing. Like most artists don't like some artists grow up and everybody goes, oh, you're so talented.Which by the way, like hate that expression. I must like tell people, like don't ever tell people they're talented. Say you have great raw material, you know, just say, you know, just like great mom material, but like, you have to like do it for eight hours a day in order to like express something. Great. And then, then we'll talk about talent, but in any case, so some people have parents that say, you're honey, you're so talented.I want to send you to art school. I want to spend a couple hundred grand and I'm going to send you to art school. Undergrad, let's say a good, let's say a typical artist, a college education is this amount. And then I want you to get an MFA from Yale or the best school and have that checked off. And then I want you to go get in galleries and be an artist there's 0.01% of artists have that route.They have parents that say, we support this. This is good. This is a good plan. I would say that's like a very rarefied small group. Cause you have to have, well, there's so many things that need to happen in order to have that setup. Most people, most artists, even artists that I know, like one of my good friends Enrique he was a PA getting his PhD in physics read my dad's book, art and physics and decided he wanted to be a painter[00:23:49] Nathan:Okay,[00:23:50] Kimberly:So like, there's a whole bunch of artists that were doctors that were lawyer, you know, that, that, that they, they were catching the train of you know, the I'm a good student, I'm a diligent worker and they, they, you get routed onto a track and then you're on that track. And then suddenly you wake up at at 30 or whatever, and you say, you know, I'm here and I'm super successful, but this isn't necessarily really how I want to be spending my time.You know? I mean, th this is the conversation, right? You know, how do you, how do you decide and what you can want changes in your life? You know, but if you know what you're pull, the tether poll is like, if you know what, your deep inner core desires. are And, you know, and you, you have, you're remotely in touch with that and you, you need to go, you need to go towards that light.You need to go towards that center then everything will radiate out from you afterwards.[00:24:58] Nathan:Was there a catalyst that pushed you, you know, you were thinking about it, you're feeling this, but what was the thing that made you go like, all right, I'm[00:25:06] Kimberly:Well, okay. Like I said, we don't have enough time to get into all of this, but there were, I made three huge dramatic, you know what? I don't know. Maybe it's a Monty Python movie, I don't know. But like when you push the table over and you throw all the plates and you break everything, like you just come, it's not a reboot, it's way more violent than that.Just kind of like you take the tablecloth out and you just say I'm out of here. You know, I think I did that three times before I got closer to. You know what it is. And one of them was moving to LA after moving to Paris, I moved to New York and then, then I moved to LA and I was like, okay, this time is going to be it I'm being artist.Like, and you know, it's a couple of years later, it's after Paris. Like, you know, cause you have to get, you have to, I had to make money. You know, I had to make a, I had to have a job. And so I had to kind of like do, do design work and stuff like that. So when I moved to LA, my first, I went to a Mac conference, like it was like 60 booths.It was so small, like Mac was seen a teeny little thing and, and Microsoft was the big thing windows and,[00:26:18] Nathan:Yeah.[00:26:19] Kimberly:And I made a business cards and I said, it said artist. And then when I, I walked, went to this conference and I was practically like often the only woman, you know, and I would say, yeah, I'm an artist.And I know. And so the first job I got was making the first CD rom for apple computer that they said distributed to every single apple. So they distributed over 2 million copies worldwide, and my name was on it. And that kind of, that was a huge breakthrough because suddenly I was being offered insane jobs.And next thing you know, I was anyway, like, I don't want to dwell on this because we haven't talked about newsletters yet.[00:27:01] Nathan:That is okay. that is okay. So you just made a leap from, I went to this conference to,[00:27:08] Kimberly:Yeah, by the way speaking, we started with going to a conference.Yeah.[00:27:12] Nathan:A big deal. We are we talking about that as well, but this leap from going to the conference to your work, being on the CD,[00:27:19] Kimberly:Well, so they were, it was like, again, I was on the bleeding edge. I could not explain to my father Who would come down and visit me. In the warehouse. I, it was, it was an artist and a coder who, but they had both met in art school and they brought me on to be the creative director.And it was like, it was almost no money at first. And then it became like a bigger thing and apple, the more that apple saw it, the more they were like, wow, this is really good. so then the next conference I went to was in San Francisco was Macworld and my art was everywhere, everywhere, and I got job offers from Imagineering. They wanted me to design why the Disney, they wanted to be the head. Of Warner music was doing a new interactive division and digital don't digital.I can't remember the names, but it was very, it was a very heady time. It was very, it was very fun. I felt like, wow, I found this place that has it's the intersection of art design, narrative and technology. And it was exactly where I want it to be. And that was just, that was sort of, and I set up an easel in my office, I had a lot of people working for me and it was just, it got very, it got very fancy, you know, and I, and I took a lot of, I took a lot of like what I knew at Landour to attach in this before email this before the internet.[00:28:45] Nathan:You're talking early nineties at this point,[00:28:48] Kimberly:Yeah. Like you no, like a mid yeah. Mid nineties, you know, 96, maybe. So, yeah. So I took a lot of my, knowledge that I gleaned from working at land or like the discover design develop, deploy to whip these engineers and designers into shape, you know? And anyway, I was still stalking what I really wanted to do, you know?[00:29:10] Nathan:Okay. So tell me more about the difference between what you wanted to do and what you were doing, because you just described your art being on everything.[00:29:17] Kimberly:No, no, no, actually, honestly, honestly like I would listen to like Liz fairs, exile in Guyville, as I drove downtown by the toy factory in downtown Los Angeles back and forth, like every day, like at these, I was a big album listener.And when I was designing, I would listen to full albums and I was just like, wow, this is it. I am so excited and energized and everything. then I started studying painting again. So I started so like I had taken a hiatus. And then I got into the, Otis, which is the art school here, You know, when you get professional, when you become a professional in anything, even being an artist, there's a, single-minded rigor focus and clarity. one brings their whole self to what they're doing, you know? And if you know that if If you've been successful in anything else or anything like that, you can, if you bring that to your art, there's literally nothing that can stop.You. You become a wire cutter. It's like, you're going to munch through like, I, you know, really understanding, painting in the deepest way possible. Like I was thinking if I can understand alpha channels, I can figure out how to tone a canvas. You know, just like I just, because painting is a technology, honestly.I took everything in my being to it. And that was like a third moment. Like that was like another moment I skipped some moments, but there was like where I was knocking at the door, knocking at the door. And then I knew that in my art would become the, that I had when I started painting in full force.Like not just having it in my office, but saying this is what I'm going to do. And I'm going to do it as so ferociously, like stand back, everybody, nothing is going to get in my way.[00:31:13] Nathan:So you were painting, I mean, you had is this like painting a few hours a week, a few hours a day, and then you dove into doing that, just like.[00:31:22] Kimberly:This is like 40 hours. I mean, I basically gave myself an assignment and my assignment was I was going to paint a hundred new. Because that's the hardest thing to do as a body. Cause you have to deal with the translucency of skin. And I could literally talk about painting all day, but you have to deal with light form and shadow and thinking in three dimensions and it creates it's.I don't want to knock marketing and technology and the stuff that you do, but painting is that most people do, but painting is a true, like you have to really, it's a very intellectual as well as mindful and spiritual, but it's a very, it's a very deep, deep, deep way to approach the world. And when you become a painter or you actually like listen to the little voice inside you that says that they want to learn this.It's a skill, it's a skill. And when you do that, your brain expands and your world expands and you see things differently. So it's a very transformative thing and it takes years. It takes years and years. So my assignment was I'm going to paint a hundred nudes and, and if I have like 10 good ones, I can have a show.[00:32:41] Nathan:So I want to tie that to maybe the experience that other creators listening would have, or anyone who's on the fence about getting started. Right. It might not be painting that they're trying to do, but they've had these fits and starts of like, I'm going to, learn to code, start a podcast, start a newsletter, any of these things, you know, learning to play an instrument, whatever it is.And then like start and it goes, maybe it goes well for a week or a month, or like what, what advice would you[00:33:11] Kimberly:Isn't there, isn't there like a guru isn't there like a guru in the subject that calls it, the. Who's that guy. Do you know what I'm talking about? Yeah. Somebody told me that, cause I was saying this to somebody and they were like, oh yeah, that's somebody's Seth, Godin's the dip. But yes. You know, when I was younger and all through all through my, you know, middle school and high school and college, I played piano quite seriously.I was a classical pianist and whenever I would learn a difficult piece, I would play it over and over and over again. And I would have to, like, I would start to suck. I would get better, but then I would start to suck and I'd have to walk away and then come back at it the next day before I would be able to play it perfectly.Like, I mean, you know,[00:34:01] Nathan:Yeah.[00:34:04] Kimberly:Learning an instrument actually teaches you this better than anything, because if you make a painting at first and it sucks, you can be easily thwarted, like a, you know, a drawing or whatever. But, but in order to like worry the bone of like how to get that legato, right. And that Greek piano concerto or something like you got to just sort of do it again and again, and again and again, you know, like it's, the fundamental way to learn is you, you imitate, assimilate, and then you can improvise.So you have to like, you play these pieces. And so with anything, you're going to be thwarted in the beginning many times and you can't give up, you have to say, okay, well, I don't care if it even sucks. I don't care if I'm going to fail. If I'm gonna fail, I'm gonna fail big. Like I'm[00:34:52] Nathan:Right[00:34:52] Kimberly:Go all out.Let's just go on.[00:34:54] Nathan:But that specific assignment that you gave yourself of painting 100 nudes, do you think that an assignment like that is a good way to go as a creator of saying this is the commitment that I'm going to make, I'm going to get to a hundred podcast episodes or I'm going to, I don't know, write a hundred blog posts, and then I can decide if this is something I actually want to pursue.[00:35:13] Kimberly:Absolutely. I think that when you make a commitment like that, to devote your energy into building a body of work of any kind in any media, you, your life will change everything. You are going to gain skills that involve every facet of that media. So like, if you're a podcaster and let's say you record in iMovie you're going to learn iMovie or whatever they, whatever they edit podcasts.In And, and I think if, you know, if Leonardo DaVinci were alive today, trusts me. He would know Photoshop He would know he would be all over this stuff, you know, he would love, he would love it in this nether world space, because there's, I'm, I'm going off topic a little bit because there's a little bit of a prejudice in the art world where people were thinking they were resisting the newer technological versions of artwork.But back to process, what you were saying is that if you do something in a committed way and you basically measure it and say, I'm going to do it until I get to this point, I think a hundred might be excessive, but you're going to get the hang of it.[00:36:28] Nathan:Yeah[00:36:28] Kimberly:I mean, I haven't mixed feelings though, about blogging cause I started a blog again, when I was, really getting into.Consuming. I mean, consuming isn't the right word. When I was throwing my entire body into the art world, one of the things that I did to expand my own knowledge was to write about other artists. And I think that's also something that's super unspoken, especially in the art world, because a lot of artists are just saying Me me me I want attention.I want to get people to focus on my show and my work, and I want a gallery and I want this and that. And I think one of the most important, aspects of breaking through to any next level of anything is generosity. Generosity of your attention to other people who are doing the same thing. And that for me, that general, I mean, I didn't think of this.This is red, this is a in retrospect, but at the time when I look back on it, I was airlifting artists that nobody had heard of and writing about them along with other big art, you know? And so I had a successful weekly column where I was keeping a blog again, this was before social media and that's how, and then the Huffington post came along and then I started publishing it, the, having a post.And that's how I said, I was asked by Arianna Huffington to be the, to found an art section. And so I was like, I was perfectly positioned because I was, I was a big nerd. I had had these other experiences. I was a full-on painter. I was having shows galleries the whole thing. And then she was building this incredible Site to celebrate bloggers. And I was one of the bloggers So I had to build an audience from zero to 10 million people within two years. I didn't have to that's what happened.[00:38:26] Nathan:Right.I have so many things that I want to ask about in this, one thing that I want to highlight that you talked about is as you're doing the painting, there's the side of it, of, Research where you're researching other painters, learning from them and all that. Most people keep that Research to themselves, right?That is not a public thing that happens. And I think a lot of the most successful creators that I see are the ones who do that recent. And, and share their notes and share that and work in public and do the interviews and all of that that you were doing. because it does a couple things. One people follow you, not only for your own work, but then also for your notes on other people.And then too, it's incredible for meeting people. Like when you do a profile, either if they're a, say an upcoming artist or someone who's established either way, they're going to be like, when you, you know, when you send them an email, they'll like respond and be interested and engaged. And, you know, I mean, that's a reason that I do this podcast is so that I can meet and hang out with people that I want to more aboutIt's amazing for network.[00:39:30] Kimberly:Yes. I think you're exactly spot on. This is no different than what I did with artists, this, except for I wasn't involving video, I was writing about it and interviewing them. You're right. You're absolutely right. I also think that you can get too carried away with that though. Like you have to be careful, you have to make sure that you're, you know, I can become easily like Clydesdale the horse.I'm like, well, that's another month and I have to do another,[00:39:57] Nathan:It becomes more important than the art, which was the[00:40:00] Kimberly:Well, yeah,[00:40:01] Nathan:It feels more time than[00:40:02] Kimberly:Yeah, yeah. Like, so eventually I had to leave, because it was just sort of eclipsing. It became so much bigger than everything else I was doing that I had to like go, okay, this isn't, you know, I've got a show coming up. I can't devote all this time and energy. And then of course, social media kind of made it all really different.[00:40:24] Nathan:Like in what way?[00:40:25] Kimberly:Well, because not only we could, you know, writing a really thoughtful piece about an artist and looking at their work and, you know, relating it with art history. And I also found that if I could relate it to like a contemporary event, like there was this one painter who painted battle scenes and we were just going to war with Iraq, I think, anyway, we were going to war somewhere.You know, it was a horrible time, but like, I would talk about going, you know, this contemporary news event. And I would link it with the artist who was painting these battle scenes. And then seeing that it went, go.[00:41:04] Nathan:Right.[00:41:04] Kimberly:Was another, that was another big learning lesson is like, if you put a number in a headline, like 10 things, you, you should tell, you know, 10 rules for your kids and screens, you know, then people would read that more.So I could see the analytics of what people clicked on. You know, that was like a interesting learning experience. But when social media happened, then suddenly you also had to tweet it. You had to post it on Facebook and then you had to tweet about it and then it just got to be social media. here's my take, if I could just say one thing, because I want to get it out there.I think social media is great for first impressions so that when people see you for the first time they're going to go that person's like a real artist or they're a real whatever, and they're legit. And they don't just have like three things that they've said about the subject. They've actually like, I trust that they've done some deep things.Like me painting a hundred nudes, you know, like this person knows how to paint.So I think social media, it's just so easy to get carried away. I hope one day it goes away. Is that terrible to say? I think emails should be everything. It should just go away.[00:42:14] Nathan:I don't think it's terrible to say at all. You have something in your Ted talk. you talked about like the compulsion to paint being taken away by your smartphone and these distractions, And I'd love for you to talk about that because I think there's so many things of like, if I'm on Twitter or checking my email, or even interacting with the ConvertKit team 2,700 times a day, you know, it makes it so much harder as a creator.And so I like, I just want to hear more of your experience there.[00:42:45] Kimberly:Well, I mean, in order to even get into my zone mentally to paint, I have to like have at least 90 minutes where I haven't spoken with anybody. Like I just need to kind of like clear it. Like I need to, I mean, I can be in it and I've got all these, you know, because people everybody's different. Some people like beginnings, some people like middles, other people's like ends.So you have to get in touch with which person you are, you know? So I, I love middles and beginning. I actually like all of them, but like, I'm better at certain things. So whenever I go into the studio, I have to start in paintings that are in the middle, that many going on at once. so you have to get in touch with like what time of day you're best at.And I always begin things at the end of the day when I'm already like nice and a well-oiled machine, well-oiled creating Machine.I never begin things in the morning. I always begin. at the end of the day, I never begin paintings in the morning. I was beginning, you know, I mean, I, I'm not, I know I'm not answering your question.Your question is, compartmentalizing your time to protect it away from social media. I teach a master class and I teach a Masterclass with artists who are building their first body of work, or they, they want to build a body of work in the masterclass.I make them take an oath an Instagram oath Instagram is it's so draining psychologically, emotionally, mentally, and the effort that you put into it that you really have to like commit and, and, and artists feel pressure to post their progress and post once a day and stuff like that.And the truth is, that algorithm, the algorithm is so fraught right now because you really only see the last 20 people that you liked more often than not. And you're not, it it's just, it's not healthy. It's not healthy for a visual artist Because you'll be on it. You check it like a diabetic checking their insulin level.It's just like, oh, did it get enough? Likes all that. It's like, Ugh. So I use, later to post once a week because I don't really want to deal with it. So I'll do like four months at a time. But if like I have a museum show opening up on Saturday, so I have to make a post this week. And so that that's like in my brain, oh God, I got to make a post this week.And when my book was coming out, like that's a whole other topic about promote, you know, how to tell people and that a book is coming out. yeah. So I just kind of look at it like, you know, kind of like a creative sinkhole,[00:45:15] Nathan:Yeah. And so it[00:45:15] Kimberly:So it[00:45:15] Nathan:Makes sense to avoid it. I think we hear that advice from a lot of talented creators and it's easy to be like, yeah. Yeah. But I can, I'm the person who can sit down and write with a moment's notice, you know? And then you you get totally stuck on writer's block or whatever thing, because you're like, you actually didn't create that space.And, like you talked about in the Ted talk of that time to like daydream and to actually be there, present with yourself and your thoughts.[00:45:42] Kimberly:Yeah, it's true. I mean, there's this thing in neuroscience called empathetic mirroring. Do you know about[00:45:48] Nathan:I don't know.[00:45:49] Kimberly:It's this, it's like when you see somebody, for example, write on a chalkboard, the neurons in your brain, I'm not going to say this. Right? So if a neuroscientist says I'm like slightly wrong, but like, it, it, it has this effect where you feel like you're doing it, you know, like, and it's, that's why people love to watch people write things.That's why a chalkboard is an excellent device for, I actually have a chalkboard in my office because I started to. Take videos of me make with my talking points of me writing it on a chalkboard, because even though it's considered like, you know, yesteryear technology, it actually helps people receive the information better to see it written[00:46:34] Nathan:Rather than being next[00:46:36] Kimberly:Rather than just show a PowerPoint slide.Yeah. And so this, the act of seeing it rhythm, but so if, if you think about the power of empathetic mirroring, that's going on in your brain, when you look at something happening, think about how much it can pollute your brain. If you're watching a stream of all these things happening in your Instagram feed or your Facebook feed, it's like dangerous.Like you have to be protective of what is going inside your mind. It's that they say like garbage in, garbage out, you know,[00:47:04] Nathan:I want to hear about you getting into the world of, of like teaching classes and that side of it, and then you have a book as well. There's a lot.[00:47:12] Kimberly:Oh yes. So I have this book,[00:47:15] Nathan:There[00:47:15] Kimberly:So, you know, around a decade into, you know, being a serious painter, I started to feel bad from the fumes because painting isn't really taught the way other things are taught. Painting is sort of like, there's, there's been this somewhat mystical, you know, here's a bunch of art supplies go to the art store and then let's see what you come up with.And then the, the, the classes tend to be more about critiques, about what you've done versus about,[00:47:45] Nathan:How do something.[00:47:46] Kimberly:About the, the true, true granular house, you know, the, how, like the basics, like things that you should know. And, so I started to get sick and I happened to be the arts editor at the time of the Huffington post.And I reached out to, and blogging was a very interesting, it was around 2004 or five, I think. Maybe, maybe it was a little bit later, but it was an interesting time because other people were thinking what I was thinking and I could see it in search for it. Whereas I couldn't, I couldn't have done that a decade earlier.And so I would reach out to leaders in the field, scientists, whatnot, to write about this topic of safety, you know, like that. And, but then when I read and I had, by the way, been consuming, Disneyland books, everything about painting, and I just saw this huge gaping hole of knowledge of how. Communicated. So I started writing this book all about painting and the book that I ended up publishing with Chronicle books is just one small piece of it because it was kind of too big.It was like James Joyce's Ulysses, you know, it was like a tone. It was like a Magnum Opus. and it's one of the key things that people don't realize is that you don't need to use solvent's P many people believe that you need to have like an open can of turpentine or some kind of solvent to dip your brush and defend the oil paint.So it's like super basic and most people when they go to the art store, and this is just my short, my short, skinny on the book. As most people, when they go to the art store, it would be like only buying canned or prepackaged. They don't know what's in it, you know, they don't know like that you don't need all those things.Like, but if you were like learning how to cook, you would know the difference between a garlic and a shallot and when to use canola oil or olive oil extra-virgin, you know, so I wanted to create, to start a book called the Y that was like Strunk and White's elements of style, but for oil paintings. So that's like the famous book that most writers use and just sort of shows you.And it's funny, actually, it's like a great book. So I wrote that book and that's called the new oil painting and it's published by Chronicle and it came out in June and it's like staying at the top, like five books of oil painting, which is great, you know? So I'm very excited about that. But in any way, in that journey of writing the book, the book, the book deal I got was two years ago.It was like a while ago. And so Susan. Did that I thought, you know, I would be a fool to not have a class that went with the book. So to the summer of 2019, I had, I had like four solo exhibitions in a row and I thought, okay, I'm going to devote six months and I'm going to record videos and I'm going to do that.You know? So I created this class that I wish that I had, and it was way bigger than the book. It was like everything I've ever thought about oil painting and that's called oil painting, fluency and flow. And, so yeah, so I launched a class, so the classes are out there[00:50:52] Nathan:Are the classes something that, you know, you're teaching in an online course? Are you there in person or through a partnership with.[00:50:58] Kimberly:So once I, once I learned about. That you can oil paint anywhere like you, Nathan tomorrow could decide, you know what? I w I've got an artist in me. I want to, I want to learn how to paint and you could set it up next year, you know, like in a little side table next to your computer, and there would be no fumes, no nothing.And it's much better for the environment it's not made out of plastic. It's like, you know, you could do it. So I wanted to get the word out. And, so my first class is, and so I was started teaching at major institutions. So the Anderson ranch in Colorado and the Otis where I actually took lessons, I taught there.And then, I just thought to myself, you know, this is highly inefficient because I have to like schlep over there and go there for, you know, hours at a time. And I could reach so many more people if I recorded. Instruction. And so I made these recordings, that's a hybrid of recordings and live sessions and critiques.And I have, you know, I have about 78 students right now. They're from all over the world and it's like the boast enriching wonderful, fabulous thing I've ever done[00:52:08] Nathan:Yeah.[00:52:09] Kimberly:To being an artist, you know,[00:52:11] Nathan:And so how does that interact with the newsletter that you have?[00:52:14] Kimberly:Well, I mean, so all of my experience, just as an artist has taught me that you, your value that you bring to any situation is the people that you can tell about what you do. It's like a tree falls in the forest. Nobody knows you're having a show. You know, you can't just rely on your art dealer.And the The dynamic has changed where. People don't have one, rarely do people have one gallery that represents them. And then they've got a bunch of satellite galleries. So you kind of have to be a little bit more entrepreneurial as an artist. And so you need to gather an email list. And so I stopped blogging and instead I have a newsletter because I want, you know, and I I have a narrative of stories that I tell about creativity about, about like I'll crawl deeply inside the making of a single painting of mine, or maybe another one.And I, and each email I send out, I spend a lot of time on, and it's like a work of art by itself because it's, again, it may be a different thing. a newsletter may be slightly different than a blog, but it's still words and image and it's just how. It's like another work of art, it's another work of art.And I love, using ConvertKit. I mean, I really, really do I tell people about it. I tell people about it all the time, because I think it's, it's the first software I've encountered that, allows you to very easily create a sequence. And, you know, you can I tell people, I say like, if you want to think about it, you could unspool Tolstoy's war and peace.If you wanted, like you could, every week you could give like a little section and you can start at the beginning and it takes the pressure off needing to constantly have every email be a first impression. So you can really get, let people to get, to know you in a much deeper, more personal way, because you create a sequence of letters to them that[00:54:23] Nathan:Right[00:54:24] Kimberly:Over time.[00:54:24] Nathan:Well, I think that's a really important point about starting at the beginning, because when you're sending these one-off emails to your newsletter, you don't know where people are joining. Some people for years and other people that is the very first thing. And so every time I find myself adding these caveats are like, Hey, if you're new here, you know, any of those things and with a, an email sequence, you know, the automated series, it starts at the beginning every time and it works people through it.And so I've had that. I've had so much fun creating those because you can chip away at them. Like I have one that I'm kind of writing now on, I guess it's on personal finance, you know? And it's just things that I wish that I had known as like, Moderately successful creator. Like, Hey, you're now earning a full-time living, what what's next?And so I can just write about that when I feel like it and add to this, that's now like 10 or 12 emails long.[00:55:20] Kimberly:And what's your frequent.[00:55:22] Nathan:That one I said to every week, but if I don't write for it, everyone just kind of pulls up at the end and weights, you know, for the next email. So it's 10 emails And then I add to it. And so like last week I didn't add a new one. And so now there's like a hundred people that are all the way at the end and they didn't get an email last week,[00:55:41] Kimberly:Yeah, no, I have that situation. I have a two year sequence[00:55:45] Nathan:Oh, wow.[00:55:45] Kimberly:I mean, I know like I sound, I probably seem super extroverted and voluble and everything like that, but like, I, I, it's very difficult for me to sell. It's very, it's very not. It's not cool for an artist to be. So like, I mean, it's just hard.It's also just hard for me. It's my personality. Like I even posting on Instagram is like a stressful thing for me. It's like, did I get everything that, you know, like I just, it's just not, I'm not one of those people that just casually throw stuff out there. I just, I'm very thoughtful and I want it, you know, it to be meaningful.And, but anyway, I was having trouble announcing that a workshop was over. Like serious trouble. Like I would put it off and I'd say, I can't do it. I can't press the send button. Like I just, even though you have the schedule feature on the broadcast, I was like, I can't do it. I can't do it. And you know, I, I can't remember the name of the marketing guru who was, have the five day sequence or, you know, basically a launch sequence is a series of emails where you first email is all about it.The second email might address one's reservations about it. The third Emile email might be testimonials. And then the fourth and fifth email are like last chance to get it. Like that to me is like, I would rather have needle eyes surgery than do that, you know, so I built it in, so I basically have the sequence where every quarter there's a launch sequence.Is that crazy[00:57:13] Nathan:No, it's fantastic[00:57:14] Kimberly:Because then, so, so that way, like I can just set it and forget it, like back to the Crock-Pot thinking like, you know, like, you know, just set it and forget it. You're going to sign up. You're going to get an announcement for a walk shop, a workshop a couple months after you've gotten to know me.[00:57:30] Nathan:Do you think that, well actually I guess really quick, the thing that I love about that is you can be completely immersed in your painting, right? And there you are selling a workshop and you're like, you don't, you have to think about it or know about it. Cause you did that work once and now you've finished a whole day of, of painting.Start something new at the end of the day. Cause that's the way that you roll. And then also you can say like finish up and check those sales and check that engagement. See, oh, people.[00:57:58] Kimberly:Yyeah, yeah. I mean, it's, it's just, it's I think people before they're going to buy anything, need to feel. Most people need to feel, you know, a level of comfort about what that person is about. so, you know, I haven't touched you tube. I haven't really, I honestly, I haven't made, I haven't made a huge effort because I've had the book coming out and I F I ha I had a big exhibition in June because, I designed a series of, excuse me.I designed, I painted a series of abstract paintings, for the cover of the book, because I wanted the cover, the book to be stellar and represent like a specified stroke, like hanging in air, like, to just convey the idea of painting and not be like a landscape, because for some crazy reason, if you, if you look up oil, painting, all the books, About oil painting are so poorly designed.It's like, it's strange because you would think people who are artists would care about design, but it's like pink pallet, Tino, bold 14 point font over like a green sunset. it's[00:59:07] Nathan:Yeah, well, design and painting are not necessarily the same thing you happen to come from a world where you have a lot of this. Even those two worlds have intertwined for you a lot over your career. So it makes sense to[00:59:18] Kimberly:Yes, but, but when, when, but if you get, but the painting books, like if you see a PA a painting book that has like a landscape on it, what if you don't like the landscape or they all have a landscape, or it has like the, the, you know, a face that's loosely drawn with, you know, painted with turbine, you know, Alla prima anyway.I've had so many exhibitions and like, I have a, I have a show coming up on Saturday and I've got to tell people about it. So like, I have to be, I'm already out there as an artist. So I have two different sequences and newsletters. I've got like a workshops for people who express interest in a workshop within the main newsletter.Like if, if, like, I'll say like I have this one great newsletter where the subject line is, who is this gorgeous woman? And then I show a picture cause they used to paint these beautiful renditions of the faces of the Egyptian mummies inside the sarcophagus, like beyond gorgeous. Like if you looked it up, you'd say, oh my God, this most beautiful painting I've ever seen.And it looks a lot like Francesco Clemente, which is an artist that like paint uses the same aspect ratio. It's like, you sort of go, oh, that's where that guy got that idea, you know? But. I'll talk about the pigments and that they used to, like, they used to burn mummies and then take the ashes and make a pigment called mummy brown.I know that sounds really kind of gross, but like, but, but they that's what they did. And I I'll say like, if this interests you, you might be interested in like a workshop. then if they say yes, then they'll go into my workshop sequence and they'll get notified when I open them.[01:01:00] Nathan:Are there other things that you do with email and with your newsletter[01:01:04] Kimberly:Yeah. Like I, like, I really want, I really want people to easily update their preferences. So I created a jot form like that simple select, you know, check box check if you're no longer interested in, workshops. No problem. Let me know. And I don't get enough work. Ominous, but hopefully, hopefully you'll put that feature in soon.[01:01:30] Nathan:We're actually working on building that feature now. So,[01:01:33] Kimberly:Are you kidding? When does it come out[01:01:34] Nathan:It's one of those asking where the paintings are done. It'll be done when it's done.[01:01:40] Kimberly:The other thing that I do is I really think gifts are important. And I think the marketer, the marketing community is really cheesy about it. Like they always do like outtakes from friends for reaction shots.And it's just so horrible, but I mean, it's just corny and you know who I'm talking about, but, you know, anyway, a gift is a beautiful thing because it's a movie that plays automatically and it doesn't have sound and. it can be so beautiful and subtle, you know, so every time I make a news that I usually have like an, it's like a work of art to me, you know?And sometimes if I want to emphasize a word, I'll paint a picture of that word and I'll integrate it in it. So like I really spend, I really love making them special. Yeah. I have one about the creative process and about not, not the Ted talk that you saw, but like I have one that's on the lead up to talking about the masterclass.Where it's called the curse of perfection. And I show, I talk about how, when I was a kid, my mother used to always like, she would sometimes wear like super smudge makeup and it was psych, it was called the smoky eye. I mean, they still do it now, but now the beauty people make it super specific, but then it was not that it was a little bit more like, woo.And I found a beautiful GIF of like a smokey eye, like slowly opening and closing. And I then go off on this whole subject about how, you know, it's as a painter, you have to let go of that, of the chains of perfection. You have to let it go in order to.[01:03:22] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I love that you're taking a medium that you know, of email or gifts or any of these things that a lot of people use in one way. And you're bringing those styles in that like class and sophistication and really just the level of effort. I think a lot of people are like hearing. Oh, I'm supposed to have, images or gifts.I'm supposed to be funny. And so they just look for something and slap it in there. And there's a level of effort that's not happening there, but because you're doing these automated sequences and you know that if you put this effort into it, it will last and work for you for years, then it's worth it.You can do a custom painted, you know, word or something like that to illustrate a point.[01:04:04] Kimberly:I mean, I have the luxury of having hundreds of paintings, and pieces of paintings, and video of—there's nothing sexier and more beautiful than watching somebody mix paint. There's literally nothing more gorgeous than that—So, I'm lucky.And I understand that other creators have to find other things, but there's a way to do things that have like a metaphorical—I here's what I would say. I would recommend that people seek to enhance their ability to think in metaphor when they write.So if they're gonna talk about a subject, and they're talking about a roadblock, instead of drawing a boulder on a road, find some other image or GIF. I use a lot of GIFs from ballet. You can find beautiful GIFs just by searching “Swan Lake” GIF, and it implies a physical movement.It goes back into that empathetic mirroring, where you feel that your own body is doing these movements that are surrounding this idea. It's not directly about what you're talking about, but it's like a little bit to the left, or it's just kind of a metaphorical version of it. It creates the space in between what you're literally saying, and what you're actually seeing that ignites the imagination and the view.[01:05:35] Nathan:Yeah. I love that. Just putting that extra bit of effort into defining the thing that's adjacent, rather than blatantly the first thing that came to mind. I think that makes a huge difference.[01:05:46] Kimberly:Yeah,[01:05:46] Nathan:We need to do a part two, because I have like 25 more questions to ask you, and we're out of time.[01:05:52] Kimberly:I'm in. I'm in.[01:05:54] Nathan:This has been amazing. Where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter?[01:05:58] Kimberly:They should go to KimberlyBrooks.com. The newsletter's right there in the footer and on the top. I really love communicating this way, and it's been an honor to be on this podcast, because I really love the product you've created. I really couldn't do it without you—without ConvertKit.So, I just, I'm such a fan, and I'm an evangelist, so kudos to you.[01:06:19] Nathan:Wow, thank you.Well, we're exci

Stefanie and Joan's Beauty Bar
Ep. #5 | Photoshop, Filters, and Fails, oh no!

Stefanie and Joan's Beauty Bar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 49:47


There's nothing wrong with documenting your life and putting it up on social media to share with the world. But it gets a little dicey when the image we portray online doesn't quite reflect our reality. How do Stefanie and Joan feel about when the digital whirlwind of photoshop and filters go a little too far? And how do they achieve that ~aesthetic~ feed with easy steps? If you enjoyed this episode, make sure to subscribe to @thedivestudios (IT'S FREE) and leave a comment, rating and/or review on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, and YouTube. To find out more about MINDSET by DIVE Studios, visit here: https://www.getmindset.com/ Download the MINDSET by DIVE Studios app at https://bit.ly/3xjGFin   Episodes are presented by @thedivestudios Connect with us on all social media platforms and at http://www.divestudios.io/! SUPPORT & JOIN DIVE Studios' Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/divestudios JOIN DIVE Studios' Discord Channel: https://discord.gg/nnYX2E4 Connect with Stefanie: https://www.instagram.com/stefaniemichova/ Connect with Joan: https://www.instagram.com/joanday/ #BeautyBar #DIVEStudios #Kbeauty #Kpop #ElleMills #JoanDay #JoanKim #StefanieMichova #스테파니미초바 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cooking Is the New Healthy
The Truth Isn't Always Polished with Marietta Gentles Crawford

Cooking Is the New Healthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 2:59


In this short three minute Podcast Snack episode, I read the quote above by Marietta Gentles Crawford and I ask your apply this to your life.Marietta Gentles Crawford is a personal brand strategist and LinkedIn expert. She helps business owners, consultants, and experts leverage LinkedIn with personality and credibility.FULL SHOW NOTES: https://www.carlacontreras.com/podcast/marietta-gentles-crawfordI am excited to hear your thoughts! Let's continue the conversation on IG @chefcarla_c & @maribrandsforyou +BONUS: Find us on LinkedIn: Chef Carla Contreras & Marietta Gentles Crawford.Eat Well,xo Chef Carla

CG Garage
Episode 346 - Jack Evans - Lighting Lead, Image Engine Design

CG Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:02


Jack Evans' illustrious VFX career has taken him to some of the biggest studios in LA and Vancouver, including Digital Domain, ILM, Disney, and Image Engine Design. His impressive roster of credits includes lighting on Speed Racer, TRON: Legacy, X-Men: Days of Future Past, Fast & Furious 8, Solo: A Star Wars Story, The Mandalorian, and Aquaman.  In this entertaining podcast, Jack talks about his career so far, from his early days of creating TV graphics with Photoshop and 3ds Max to learning Nuke, V-Ray, and Gaffer. He also discusses working from home in the pandemic, goes into depth on shots for TRON: Legacy and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and gives insight into different cultures at visual effects houses.

CREATIV SPORTS PODCAST
67: Primetime Olympics with Zack Millican • Freelance

CREATIV SPORTS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 56:20


Would you like to work in prime time with the whole world watching? Zack Millican has worked his way up to the Olympics with NBC. He builds graphics packages, and we learn how he got his foot in the door and took advantage of opportunities he was presented.   We talk process of pulling ideas out of an executives head, getting a project from Photoshop to live broadcast, and the differences between building a package from start to finish versus taking creative and building out the thousands of elements to become broadcast ready. Zack's work: https://www.leaguesandteams.com/ IG: @zackdm

This Week in Tech (MP3)
TWiT 845: They'll Still Be Your Neighbors Tomorrow - Hardware event preview, HTC Vive Flow, Squid Game success

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 164:12


Hardware event preview, HTC Vive Flow, Squid Game success Unleashed Apple Event Focusing on New Macs to Take Place on October 18. MacBook Pro Display With Notch Shown in Alleged Photo Leak. Errol Morris Interrotron. In-person versus remote conversations online. Pixel Fall Launch: Everything to expect at the Pixel 6 keynote. 'Pixel Pass' allegedly bundles Pixel 6, Google Fi, YouTube Premium, and more under one bill. Samsung announces Unpacked 2 event for Wednesday, Oct 20th, right after Apple and Google. Back on Earth, Shatner and Bezos have a Kirk-Spock moment. The Vive Flow Is VR for Downtime; Facebook Wants AR For Your Every Waking Moment. I have a hard time believing your wearable is good if you had to Photoshop it onto a model. Teen Girls Are Developing Tics. Doctors Say TikTok Could Be a Factor. Instagram Struggles With Fears of Losing Its 'Pipeline': Young Users. Canon sued for disabling scanner when printers run out of ink. Squid Game Season 2? Series Worth $900 Million to Netflix So Far. Fraudsters Cloned Company Director's Voice In $35 Million Bank Heist, Police Find. Governor Wants to Prosecute Journalist Who Clicked 'View Source' on Government Site. Doctor set for £100k pay-out after judge ruled neighbour's Ring doorbell cameras breached privacy. Apple's privacy changes create a windfall for its own advertising business. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Georgia Dow, Alex Lindsay, and Bill Detwiler Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: stripe.com banknovo.com/twit ZipRecruiter.com/Twit nureva.com/twit

This Week in Tech (Video HI)
TWiT 845: They'll Still Be Your Neighbors Tomorrow - Hardware event preview, HTC Vive Flow, Squid Game success

This Week in Tech (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 164:58


Hardware event preview, HTC Vive Flow, Squid Game success Unleashed Apple Event Focusing on New Macs to Take Place on October 18. MacBook Pro Display With Notch Shown in Alleged Photo Leak. Errol Morris Interrotron. In-person versus remote conversations online. Pixel Fall Launch: Everything to expect at the Pixel 6 keynote. 'Pixel Pass' allegedly bundles Pixel 6, Google Fi, YouTube Premium, and more under one bill. Samsung announces Unpacked 2 event for Wednesday, Oct 20th, right after Apple and Google. Back on Earth, Shatner and Bezos have a Kirk-Spock moment. The Vive Flow Is VR for Downtime; Facebook Wants AR For Your Every Waking Moment. I have a hard time believing your wearable is good if you had to Photoshop it onto a model. Teen Girls Are Developing Tics. Doctors Say TikTok Could Be a Factor. Instagram Struggles With Fears of Losing Its 'Pipeline': Young Users. Canon sued for disabling scanner when printers run out of ink. Squid Game Season 2? Series Worth $900 Million to Netflix So Far. Fraudsters Cloned Company Director's Voice In $35 Million Bank Heist, Police Find. Governor Wants to Prosecute Journalist Who Clicked 'View Source' on Government Site. Doctor set for £100k pay-out after judge ruled neighbour's Ring doorbell cameras breached privacy. Apple's privacy changes create a windfall for its own advertising business. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Georgia Dow, Alex Lindsay, and Bill Detwiler Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: stripe.com banknovo.com/twit ZipRecruiter.com/Twit nureva.com/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Tech 845: They'll Still Be Your Neighbors Tomorrow

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 164:59


Hardware event preview, HTC Vive Flow, Squid Game success Unleashed Apple Event Focusing on New Macs to Take Place on October 18. MacBook Pro Display With Notch Shown in Alleged Photo Leak. Errol Morris Interrotron. In-person versus remote conversations online. Pixel Fall Launch: Everything to expect at the Pixel 6 keynote. 'Pixel Pass' allegedly bundles Pixel 6, Google Fi, YouTube Premium, and more under one bill. Samsung announces Unpacked 2 event for Wednesday, Oct 20th, right after Apple and Google. Back on Earth, Shatner and Bezos have a Kirk-Spock moment. The Vive Flow Is VR for Downtime; Facebook Wants AR For Your Every Waking Moment. I have a hard time believing your wearable is good if you had to Photoshop it onto a model. Teen Girls Are Developing Tics. Doctors Say TikTok Could Be a Factor. Instagram Struggles With Fears of Losing Its 'Pipeline': Young Users. Canon sued for disabling scanner when printers run out of ink. Squid Game Season 2? Series Worth $900 Million to Netflix So Far. Fraudsters Cloned Company Director's Voice In $35 Million Bank Heist, Police Find. Governor Wants to Prosecute Journalist Who Clicked 'View Source' on Government Site. Doctor set for £100k pay-out after judge ruled neighbour's Ring doorbell cameras breached privacy. Apple's privacy changes create a windfall for its own advertising business. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Georgia Dow, Alex Lindsay, and Bill Detwiler Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: stripe.com banknovo.com/twit ZipRecruiter.com/Twit nureva.com/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Tech 845: They'll Still Be Your Neighbors Tomorrow

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 164:12


Hardware event preview, HTC Vive Flow, Squid Game success Unleashed Apple Event Focusing on New Macs to Take Place on October 18. MacBook Pro Display With Notch Shown in Alleged Photo Leak. Errol Morris Interrotron. In-person versus remote conversations online. Pixel Fall Launch: Everything to expect at the Pixel 6 keynote. 'Pixel Pass' allegedly bundles Pixel 6, Google Fi, YouTube Premium, and more under one bill. Samsung announces Unpacked 2 event for Wednesday, Oct 20th, right after Apple and Google. Back on Earth, Shatner and Bezos have a Kirk-Spock moment. The Vive Flow Is VR for Downtime; Facebook Wants AR For Your Every Waking Moment. I have a hard time believing your wearable is good if you had to Photoshop it onto a model. Teen Girls Are Developing Tics. Doctors Say TikTok Could Be a Factor. Instagram Struggles With Fears of Losing Its 'Pipeline': Young Users. Canon sued for disabling scanner when printers run out of ink. Squid Game Season 2? Series Worth $900 Million to Netflix So Far. Fraudsters Cloned Company Director's Voice In $35 Million Bank Heist, Police Find. Governor Wants to Prosecute Journalist Who Clicked 'View Source' on Government Site. Doctor set for £100k pay-out after judge ruled neighbour's Ring doorbell cameras breached privacy. Apple's privacy changes create a windfall for its own advertising business. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Georgia Dow, Alex Lindsay, and Bill Detwiler Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: stripe.com banknovo.com/twit ZipRecruiter.com/Twit nureva.com/twit

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Tech 845: They'll Still Be Your Neighbors Tomorrow

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 164:12


Hardware event preview, HTC Vive Flow, Squid Game success Unleashed Apple Event Focusing on New Macs to Take Place on October 18. MacBook Pro Display With Notch Shown in Alleged Photo Leak. Errol Morris Interrotron. In-person versus remote conversations online. Pixel Fall Launch: Everything to expect at the Pixel 6 keynote. 'Pixel Pass' allegedly bundles Pixel 6, Google Fi, YouTube Premium, and more under one bill. Samsung announces Unpacked 2 event for Wednesday, Oct 20th, right after Apple and Google. Back on Earth, Shatner and Bezos have a Kirk-Spock moment. The Vive Flow Is VR for Downtime; Facebook Wants AR For Your Every Waking Moment. I have a hard time believing your wearable is good if you had to Photoshop it onto a model. Teen Girls Are Developing Tics. Doctors Say TikTok Could Be a Factor. Instagram Struggles With Fears of Losing Its 'Pipeline': Young Users. Canon sued for disabling scanner when printers run out of ink. Squid Game Season 2? Series Worth $900 Million to Netflix So Far. Fraudsters Cloned Company Director's Voice In $35 Million Bank Heist, Police Find. Governor Wants to Prosecute Journalist Who Clicked 'View Source' on Government Site. Doctor set for £100k pay-out after judge ruled neighbour's Ring doorbell cameras breached privacy. Apple's privacy changes create a windfall for its own advertising business. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Georgia Dow, Alex Lindsay, and Bill Detwiler Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: stripe.com banknovo.com/twit ZipRecruiter.com/Twit nureva.com/twit

FounderQuest
Hook Relay Launched! Was it Fireworks or Crickets?

FounderQuest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:29


Show notes:Links:Hook RelaySSL Server TestSecond brand marketing tips Twitter thread XhtmlchopHook Relay Twitter announcementHook Relay blog announcementDerrick Reimer & Corey Haines Product Hunt launch Startup Director List Indie Hackers launch repeatedly Not very accurate auto-generated transcript:Ben - you know, last week I recorded a quick little message talking about why we weren't recording our podcast. That was in the middle of the let's encrypt ssl certificate fiasco that swept across the internet and you know, at the time it really didn't feel like a huge problem. Uh like from our perspective there wasn't much of an impact, but there was some impact, but then later on that day and the next day I was reading some articles and like apparently it was a pretty big deal for a lot of people. So uh yeah, wasn't wasn't just us, it's one Josh - of those things like I could just kept seeing it more and more like just pop up in random places though to like, not, not necessarily in our world, but it was just like affected all kinds of different things. Ben - Yeah, yeah, so shout out to ssL labs for their ssl testing tool to put a link to that in the show notes. Whenever you have a question about your ssl you should check that first because it does tell you when, when things are bad. Josh - Yeah, I hadn't used that tool before and it was very very helpful on customer support. Especially like sending to people and we needed to like prove that we were, we were not at fault like you know, it gave us like a smoking gun that we could. Yeah. Yeah. Really great. Starr - That's always a weird thing to do in customer services and it's like um it's like no, actually like I found the line in the library you mentioned. That's actually the problem. It does everything to do with this. Yeah. Yeah. And then um and then facebook goes down so I'm thinking I'm thinking we are like, like spooky Tober is starting up like things are starting to get witchy. Josh - I kind of like I I was like checked out the day facebook went down so I like missed most of like the fun on whatever online and I guess on what the other social networks that didn't go down, twitter mostly. But yeah, that's kind of wild. The story that I at least what I picked up. Yeah, I'm not on facebook. So Starr - my favorite part is how they house since everything was tied together, they couldn't get access to the building. They have the servers to do the like you know, manual physical reset then you had to do Josh - because of that security. Starr - Yeah. Like that's like I don't know that. It seems like it's out of some sort of movie or something. Yeah. It's just like a comedy. Josh - They like accidentally deleted their private keys to the building or something. Starr - Yeah. Or maybe like in oceans  type movie where um like they like the crew does that like the cruise like well if we mess with their DNS records and they'll be locked out of the hotel for six hours, let's give us time to like airlift the loot out. Josh - Yeah. Or what about like just like mission impossible. But with nerds. Uh huh. You know like trying to break into the building. Starr - I mean that's what we are here at found requests aren't right. Mission impossible with. Starr - Okay. Um So in addition to all that um just terrible stuff happening, there was um some good stuff happened. We had our, you know we have the hook relay, we did a little launch to our user base or honey badger user base. Um Do you wanna talk about that a little bit? Ben - Yeah that was that was the day before the ssl problem. So Josh - that was it. Yeah that's maybe that's why I was like the details. I was like trying to like remember what I did last week or whatever and I was like I could and then I remembered I'm like how did I forget about the hook really launch. But yeah, maybe that's I spent the next day, like on support. Ben - Yeah, yeah. Unfortunately, who really was impacted by the ssl thing. And so like, the day after our launch day, we had to deal with the on fire kind of situation. But you know, props to kevin very quickly finding that issue and fixing it. And uh, it's nice to have, you know, the service, uh, deployment that we have, pushing it out was quick. That was that was nice. But yeah, we, we were able Josh - to help some people on twitter because we, uh, we did some crowd sourced troubleshooting and yeah, we're able to share our fix with a few friends. So that was heroes. Hopefully we Starr - were, hopefully we think people like you for everyone. Ben - Yeah, but I think think the launch went well. We had an email out to our, to leveling up mailing list and got a pretty good response right on that. We had put a banner up and on the, on the website and put a banner up on the app. And those had some pretty good click throughs as well. I'm just looking at the stats from Fathom this morning and yeah, it's a good good share of traffic from those sources. So it's nice to see that people care enough to click through and zero working on that was pretty cool. Josh - Yeah, because I think, I think like the, uh, it was, I felt pretty encouraged by just the, you know, the level of engagement that we got from, from everything, like it seems like, I mean the worst that could happen is like you put out the, you know, you put out everything that's just crickets, like, you know, and so yeah, I mean people signed up, we got some sign ups and we started, I mean like we've our support and feature request throughput has increased for sure on like from almost zero to something. So, you know, we got, we got some feature requests coming in, that's that's all good. Starr - Alright. I suppose we should mention what hook really is and why people should be interested in it. Um since, yeah, that's some people might want to know, Ben - are you gonna tell the star what it is? Oh, I, I mean, I'm trying to find out Starr - your, well, uh, I'm on the edge of my Ben - seat over here. Starr - There you go. I don't know. Hook relay is an enterprise level Blockchain analysis tool. It's not love it, look really uh, lets you have um, web hooks that are, you know, as high quality of stripes. Web looks like very high quality, very fully featured and just like a couple of minutes without much code or work. And um yeah, and honey badger. We have a lot of, you know, web hooks that go out and stuff and we use that for all of ours, I think right now for some of them at least. And yeah, so so that's what it is. Ben - Yeah, great for debugging and in the past week I've been doing a little side project that has inbound web books and so uh since I don't have it's launched yet, it's been handling my inbound web books for me and just storing them so I can go back and you play the we play the payloads against my uh my test instance. And uh there's a there's a button in hickory. They that I think I think kevin added, which I'm totally in love with now it's the copy as curl button. And so I can just click that button and dropping my terminal and boom, now I have a curl payload that I can send to my my dove, you know, server great. Starr - So you can be so so the the thing you're working on the like you can just like go do other things and will collect your inbound web hooks like just like your Jeffrey Bezos or something like you could be on the beach um doing whatever you want and then just um yeah, then just copy the curl Ben - you got it. Yeah. And then and then even better once I do launch, I would just add my production U. R. L. As the hook relay in point and then we'll actually start delivering them. So I want to change anything with that web provider that's sitting in the stuff right? Josh - Doesn't have as replay to right, Like if you if you have a bunch, can we do we do that add or? Yeah there Ben - is a re send button so you can okay you can send it again. Josh - So like for local development you could also like pointed out like an end rock like to your local host or something and replacing my books or something if you wanted to do if you wanted to do it in real time. Right? Yeah, Starr - that's cool. Yeah, pretty heavy. Josh - Maybe we should make like a like a hook relay native End Rock. They just like, you know, you can spin up your hook directly to your local host or something. That would be kind of cool. Ben - I had the same thought this morning. Yeah like stripe provides you a cli tool that will listen to their web hooks and then relate it to your local instance while you're developing. I'm like oh yeah, we should have the same thing really. So they can just listen to your endpoint and suck it down and replay it for you with it on the feature list. Josh - Yeah I do. Starr - I mean what's there? There is a danger here though that like if you make it too easy for people like they might not feel like they're being productive or like they really bring much value. Like if you make it also turnkey for developers and so easy. Like the developer just might be like what what am I even here for What's my job? Josh - You wouldn't feel like a hacker anymore. Starr - No, no, like that's something we've got to watch out for as we move forward boldly. Josh - Well how do you like write some like assembly code for a capture or something? Mhm. Josh - So yeah, we got a lot of the ideas for the uh hook relay uh launched a honey badger customers through a tweet that I had sent out a few weeks before just asking like like what's the best way to um launch for, you know, for what company with one product to launch another product and let their existing customers. No, and ah asking twitter is always, I mean it's usually helpful at least in our indie hacker space, everyone's always got ideas so we got a lot of good ideas from people there um including I think one of, one of the ideas was like depending how far along we are, like, you know, do you make a separate brand or like how do you like, like how does it change the, like the parent company, you know, if you're moving from, Josh - You know, a one product company to multiple products. That's all, that's all interesting. We opted just, you know, we're kind of like honey badger is the company and then it's hook relay by honey badger, I think it's kind of our our approach there but there's a lot of different ways you can do it. Ben - Yeah the one the one snag on that has been the other day. I was poking around in stripe and I was looking at the email setting options. They have, you can, you know, have stripes and emails when a payment fails for example and then it points them back to a payment collection page. I was like, yeah, we should have that, it's like click the button to turn it on and I preview the email and the, it's based on the business name. So uh it says oh honey badger industries LLC, you know, payment page or whatever. And I was like, well people who are hungry customers aren't really going to recognize that name necessarily. Uh so I Ben - can't have that. And so I went dug around the stripe settings and it's like, well you can't really do anything but the actual business name on that particular page, even though on the end of stripe settings you can set the credit card like, you know, that shows up on the actual payment thing, you can change that and uh so that's set in our case to hook dot gov but you can't change the the email header from to be something different from the business name and well we haven't registered cookery they as a business name because it's like yeah, it's just a, it's just a product, right? So I didn't feel comfortable changing that in stripe because like, well it's really not our business name so I think what can you Josh - do like a D. B. A. Or something? Yeah. Ben - Yeah that's what I thought it's like, well I guess perhaps it's time to register that? D be a for every day so I can actually change the business name and blah blah. Josh - Yeah. It's kind of exciting though, like all the all these, you know, new problems come up, but it's because we have this new product that has to become more official. So um we're like we were also talking about like like now that we actually have some people using it, we're gonna need a way to like notify them of changes to the product or improvements or you know, all the all the little infrastructure things that we have for honey badger that we haven't quite gotten around to yet on hook relay. Mm Ben - Yeah, these are nice, nice things to deal with as opposed to like crickets. Josh - Yeah. Ben - So glad that somebody showed up to actually use the app. Nice. Josh - So next up for hook relay is this quarter, we've decided to do some uh spend some additional time on product development and implement some of those feature requests. I think that should be uh should be a good time. Ben - Yeah, I think I think we have a backlog of like  or so items and in good health, so I think we have plenty of stuff that we could keep us busy for the next few months on a greeting. It's cool. Starr - Yeah and you were talking about taking a, um, and sort of multi lunch approach, right? We just got out of always been watching. Yeah, always be launching. So we're going to just have from now on every episode of this podcast, we're just gonna launch really, I'm gonna make people explain what it is. Uh, Josh - next week is show hacker news. Starr - Yeah. Yeah. So I guess at some point like you have to just call these things campaigns and instead of launches, but it feels very dynamic to call them launches. Josh - Yeah. Well you got to call him a launch. Like for the sake of the whatever platform you're your campaign is speaking to because you know, you got to make them feel special first. It's the launch for them. It's, you know, it's, it's for them. It's, it's a, you know, it's the first launch ever. I've never heard of us before, I'm sure. Starr - Oh, that makes sense. It's like you're launching the campaign, Josh - right? Yes, you're launching the campaign. So I think we'll probably be doing, I will do a show H N. And we'll do a, we'll probably do something with indie hackers at some point. I imagine. Um, there's a list, I, I saw a list somewhere, I'll take it if I can find it, but just a list of like all those little, like all those, like a big list of platforms basically like that that you can, you know, forearms basically. But Ben - yeah, you know, we should go, we should go old school and we should do regional launches. Like I used to work for a company where it was very much local and so like every, every few months would be a new city. We're gonna send the crew, we're gonna set up stuff and we're gonna launch in this city. So we should totally do that. Like we should start and of course here in the Seattle area and then branch out to California and then you move across the country and you're saying Josh - we're gonna do a national tour. Starr - Does that mean you like, can we get a bus, you lock access based on geo location? A very p Ben - it's like, yeah, sorry, we're not in your area yet. Please check Josh - back. Mhm. Ben - Please sign up to be notified when we're in your area. Starr - Nice. Josh - Well if we do regional launches, we might have to have regional managers. Oh, you know, I gotta think about your chart. Mhm. Josh - Yeah. So I think like the launch, you know, there's a lot of small places you can kind of launch to. Um, I think the big one that is on our um, on our radar is product cut. But I think we're quite, you know, based on the advice, we've heard about doing an effective like initial product launch. It sounds like maybe it would be better to polish polish the product hops and feedback feedback about it. Maybe like be a little bit more established or something. Um it just seems like the, the products lately that have been really had really successful product launches have been, have had like um they put were like a lot of work into the actual like launch campaign Josh - before products like had a video and some of them almost seem like Kickstarter quality type campaigns or something, I don't know how over the top we're going to go, but I think that the current plan is to uh you know, kind of do some of the smaller things and implement some feedback and start to, you know, we might we're planning on doing like a redesign of the website eventually um with what we learn, so um then you have a designer in progress I think Ben - Yeah, three years. Yeah, yeah, first I guess it's the first time we've had an external designer working on one of our products, so we have a we have Josh - someone do, we had someone do the honey badger website at one point started, I think you did yeah, yeah, way back, I thought that was all star Starr - um now I built it, I built the html but I built it based off of uh like pds or something. Ben - Yeah, well this time it's being built so it's even more hands off, that's nice uh someone reached out to me on twitter and uh we mentioned a few episodes ago that we were getting this design done and I didn't know at the time what kind of built was option we had, whether it's going to be a tailwind, which is what our new hotness these days that we love or is going to be something else and it's going to be something else going to bootstrap, but even bootstraps as long as as long as we can modify it, that's that's my thing. Like, I remember back and way, way back in the day before a bootstrap when we were doing, you know, freelancing for people, we would get those designs from the designers and it would be a PSD Ben - right? And then I had no, no way to really deal with that. And so I would send it off to this chop chop shot. Yeah. X. Html shop I think was the name of the business, I think they're still around even and and they would they would take the PSD and convert it into html and CSS, which was, you know, of questionable quality I guess. I mean it worked, but it's like, oh, it's ugly, like just like I don't ever want to touch that and uh and being able to actually have like a designer give you html CSS and it's actually going to be, you know, structured like in the same way because it's based on a framework like Duceppe like that's that's awesome. That's much as Josh - an alternate, like tabs and spaces. Mhm Ben - Yeah, the good old days Starr - they just wanted to keep you on your toes josh. Josh - I remember, yeah, I used to do why I didn't do, I wasn't a chop shop, but I used to, you know, implement my own Photoshop, um, yeah, designs and html and stuff and yeah, that was, that was fun. Like getting all the pixel dimensions and the, you know, in your overall Photoshop layout, piecing it all together. Kind of like, it's kind of like a puzzle. Like you're putting a puzzle together. Starr - Yeah. I mean they called it a chop shop because like it was, they made a lot of, they made big use of the slice tool in Photoshop. Josh - Yeah. Starr - Where you basically, you basically went in and you know, you couldn't do CSS borders or drop shadows or anything like that. I mean, I guess you could do borders but not like nice. They didn't have rounded corners. They didn't drop shadows, anything like that. And so, um, you basically had to go and like tell Photoshop like, okay, like, like you could you tell it to split up the image in these parts and then like, you know, leave make this middle sort of a place for you to put some html so you can put stuff in the middle of your box and then, I don't know, it was just, it was not the best and so a lot of that bad. Html and CSS was, I mean, I imagine a lot of it was auto generated. Yeah. Josh - Yeah. Yeah. There were even some, some tools just to like that, you know, you kind of like dry your borders and stuff and fill out, I don't know, like fill out some stuff in the app and then it just like generates the html page for you. And that was always like the worst, like the absolute worst thing you could go with. But you know, it, I guess the people's standards weren't as high in those days either. So you could get away with a lot, Starr - I guess not. Josh - But yeah, we'll, uh, we'll get to product hunt eventually. And uh, yeah, I guess if if you as a listener have a tip for us on how to get a good product launch, go and let us know. Um, and also we will hopefully involve, um, we're gonna want to like bring in our networks to this, I think eventually. So, uh, yeah, I hope that all of our listeners will, um, will help us when the time comes to, uh, to have a good product launch with lots of up votes and, you know, telling your friends and whatnot. Ben - And, and maybe we could even get one of our listeners who might be interested in a half a particular talent for doing a product promotion. Like we could even just hand out to someone and say, hey, go go do that for us. Josh - Yeah, that would be, that would be nice too. Because then we wouldn't have to do it ourselves. Yeah, like a product consultant. Ben - Exactly, there's gotta be some out there, I mean product has been around long enough now, there's got to be specialists. Right? Josh - Yeah. Well isn't that kind of uh Cory Haynes helped derek with for the cow? Right. Yeah. Yeah, Ben - I'm sure Corey is really busy, so if someone wants to be like Corey do that for us, that would be totally awesome. Josh - We just need a we just need a guru. Ben - I was surprised on the day I signed up for the uh product hunt rss feed, I put that in my news reader and I was I mean I've seen you know probably things on twitter from time to time and I click through and I look at stuff but I never really followed closely, I was surprised how many launches there are products on every day, There's a lot there, so I think you really got to stand out in some way to be able to mix them, get some head space because there's just a lot of competition for things on the products on, Josh - I gotta say like just the Indy hacker space, like not indie hackers dot com but like just the overall in the hacker community is just like wild lately, like I don't know about you but I feel like a total just like dinosaur. Um Like I feel like I've like like I'm becoming out of touch so I need to like I need to I probably need to pay a little more attention to like, you know what the what the new uh what the latest is? Starr - I think it's inevitable that you get out of touch, right? I mean that's that's why Josh - Yeah, but like people I don't I don't think there yet, like I don't I don't want to be there yet, I'm not ready for it start. Josh - Uh huh Ben - Yeah geriatric highly valued developers there we are Josh - now we're we're you know, we're getting back out there. We did our we did our Emma or any hackers Emma. Starr - Uh that's right Josh - yeah, we'll have to do it, we'll have to do some Amas for uh for relay to like all that sort of stuff. I just like that. I love that. Like it just think it seems like the ecosystem is just much, it's so much more developed than when we launched honey badger. There's so many more places to go, especially if you have a tool that appeals to like the, you know, developer, you know, I guess just developers and yeah Ben - and it feels like there's so many people in the community now who are, you know, identify in that group. Uh you know like there were three micro conferences in the past three weeks or four weeks right? There was to locals and then one in europe. So Uh that's just one indicator that there are a lot of people out there like us, you know definitely more than there were  years ago who are enjoying this life of building things and sell them to people. It's nice Josh - love. It's awesome. We should talk about um the Q one  marketing campaign that we have in the works for Hook really? Because I thought that was an interesting idea. The I guess I'll just say it the the idea, I think this was been your idea uh to basically we want we want to like try some marketing like you know, putting some dollars behind Hook really and see if we can actually generate some, you know new customers that way. And um we already have like a marketing budget and um like a bunch of you know ongoing relationships and campaigns and stuff that we run for honey badger. So the idea was to basically just like have a swap. Josh - Not I think we're gonna go with a quarter, not a month, like just basically try swapping out some of our advertisements for honey badger which are typically like um more like just kind of general awareness brand style. I'm like, you know, keep us top of mind sort of advertisements. Um you know like we do a lot of podcast ads and that sort of thing, newsletter sponsorships. So swap them out for a little while and just replace them with hook relay and uh you know, see how that goes um at this, you know, I guess a side benefit of that approach is that we we get to see what happens when we stop putting money into the honey badger advertising, which is always, I mean like that's a good experiment in its own like, Josh - you know, so I'm interested to see how that how that turns out both on both sides. Like you know, do we, do we lose any momentum with honey badger? Do we gain a lot of, you know, how much momentum do we gain with hook? Really? Ben - It feels like kind of like the pricing experiments that you're always nervous about doing because you don't know if you're going to like royally hose your business, you know, you won't and in our case you don't know for a while you have to let it play for a few months before you find out. Right. And so uh yeah, so switching the marketing like that feels like one of those experiments like well this could be really bad or it could be like there's no impact. And so it's like, oh well then maybe it's we re evaluate how we spend our marketing dollars for honey badger at that point, you know? So yeah, I'm pretty exciting, nervous and excited about trying that. Experiment Josh - my prediction. I'll make a prediction is that I don't I don't really think it's I don't I don't imagine it's going to uh have a huge impact on honey badger, like conversions and sign ups and all that at least not if we do, if we do like a quarter, I would all kind of be surprised if we see any difference if we, you know, as long as we resume at some point. Um Just because like a lot of our advertising and we just we really don't have like clear, you know, like clear objectives necessarily. It's more just like brand advertising. Like and we see we do see a lot of sign ups like Josh - of people coming to us because they heard us heard about us on a podcast, or they saw us in a newsletter, but it's not like click click through, it's not like a like pay per click or something or like click through this and you're gonna convert and we're going to track that. So I think like the it would be bad if we stopped advertising entirely for like a year or two because people forget about you. Like I think that's why we do advertising for the most part at this point, it's just like so people remember that we're here. Um and so that's my prediction is that I don't think we'll see a huge impact on honey badger. Um but I think that because no one knows about hook relay, it could potentially have a big impact for hook relay Starr - uh side now. Um you know, just all of it, all of our listeners, you all should really um you know, enable tracking on your browser's disable your ad blocks and that will make life a lot easier for us because we will be able to um, you know, track funnels a lot easier. So Josh - we can do, we can do marketing, do real marketing on the internet. Um we are using uh, we're using fathom on hook relay and they're like the privacy, whatever privacy first um analytics tool that a lot of people use these days and they're also indie hackers and I don't know, maybe twitter friends for some of us, but they're pretty cool. And uh, they have a feature that um, you can set up like a custom, like domain that like hosts, they're tracking scripts like, because it's all like GDR and like privacy compliant like by default. But even so like if they're added to like a ad blocker, you know, like tracking prevention thing, um you can't host on your own domain so that, you know, it's, it's, you're guaranteed to have accurate accurate results Ben - except for those people who are still using links as their browser, Josh - right? If they're using or Yeah, they're like if they're browsing from their terminal that or if they have javascript disabled. Um Yeah. You know, I mean, I guess if you're, if your audience, your Starr - richard Stallman, if your Josh - if your audience is Lennox, it's like arch Linux users, you're, you're kind of out a lot. Like no matter no matter what. Ben - Just, just put ads on on slash dot and call it a day. Yeah Starr - slash hot. That's that's a tragedy in that they really went downhill. Ben - They're still around though. Like one of the cockroaches of the internet last time is still there. I don't know. I haven't looked at it for years, but you know, but back when I was posting my code to source forge, I was reading slash out everyday Josh - source forage Starr - source for it for ages Josh - still there, isn't it? It's Starr - really hard to use. Ben - It's probably still there. I don't even know. Yeah. Josh - And that was two cows Ben - subversion instead of get we're just this this is the way back episode. We're going back to P. S. D. S. And S. V. N. And slash talk. Josh - Every episode is kind of the way back episode. I mean, yeah, we're way back founders. So Ben - I mean our our company name is now a vintage meme. So it's gotta be a way back. Yeah. Josh - All right, okay. I just got like we had a marketing meeting earlier and Ben Finley, our marketing manager was like looking at R. S. E. O. Performance. He's like, Like we we could improve our website if we if we like if we optimize the three MB Jeff on the home page. I'm like wait we have like a three, we have like a chip on the home page and I remembered I had like this easter egg that if you click like the resolve button in the, in like the screenshot of our, of honey badger on honey badger. Yo it well you can go and do it and you can see what happens. Um We'll make sure we leave it in even if we optimize it. But yeah, that's how we roll is like, we just like kill our search engine optimization. Because Josh - we had to have uh like, yeah, for the walls, we had to have this easter egg. Starr - That's awesome. Ben - Uh The the main thing reminded me that I have an interview being published tomorrow. I believe in Saas Mag at a link that in the show notes but had a great chat. Uh And it was funny because I was like, we were talking about humor and that's like one of our core values of the honey badger our business. And I was like, well, yeah, because like, I mean, we named our company after me, right? So like, you got to have fun in that kind of business, right? Josh - For sure. We should, we should like send out a leveling up email that just is designed to rick roll our customers. I don't know if they'd appreciate that. Starr - We should rename hook related berries and cream. Josh - Uh huh. Yeah, that's a that's creative. You can do that. I mean hook really is kind of like, very like business business formal descriptive. So we could, we could definitely get weirder Ben - for sure. Yeah, that was, that was not one of my more creative days when I picked that name. Josh - I mean the other, you know the upside is that it actually tells people what it does. It's instead of, it is not just named after a, after an animal joke on the internet. Ben - Yeah. Josh - Yeah. Um also it has a proper casing. Ben - Yeah, yeah, yeah, that's you know, one of the things that's funny, I have this I now for whenever we write anything, like we're doing any kind of copy or a blog post or whatever and if we ever reference get hub without the capital agent. And I always catch it now because because of how many people miss capitalized honey badger, like so I knowing how much that like I catch that. I was like, I bet they get how people really appreciate what people actually capitalize their name properly. So yeah, it's like six out to me all the time. Starr - Just for the listeners. The proper capitalization is one capital at the front because it's one word. It's not two words Ben - and go, Josh - yep. For honey badger. Starr - Yeah, yeah, sorry, not get up Josh - as uh two capital letters to capitals. Get lab. But I also now notice the companies that are like us where they have just, they have opted for the lower case in the second word as well. There's a few of those out there. I'm not remembering them off the top of my head, but they always stick out. I mean, I usually remember those now too if I'm familiar with them or I I know that I need to go check and I always go and like check when I'm writing their name at least usually. Starr - And then if you just want to, oh I'm sorry. And then just like if you just want to like just set the world on fire, you can be stripe and have your logo, your name of the logo, low, all lower case. But then in your body text capitalize it. Like they just want to watch the world burn. Uh huh. Ben - Oh, Ben - they're probably trying to punk the new york times editors, you know? Starr - Yeah, probably. Starr - Well, um we're getting a little quiet. Are we reaching the end? Ben - I think we are Josh - depends how far you want to go because I mean like we've got a whole list of topics here, but we are already into this episode of ways. And uh I think like this has been a pretty good episode, you know, it's it's for once. We've actually like managed to stay on topic for the most part. Like this has been mostly a hook really episode. So I think we should probably quit while we're ahead. All right now. And you better you better wrap this up quick start because I'm like, I'm ready to like Starr - dive in the rest of this. So you're about to explain this episode of founder class has been brought to you by hook relay a striped quality web hooks in minutes. That's awesome. Thank you. Uh, if you want to give us a review on Apple podcast, whatever they call it now, I don't know itunes, music to itunes. Um, please do that. If you want to. If you're just in writing for our blog, we are, you know, currently looking for um, ruby python, PHP writers. Um, go to our blog, honey badger to I.  slash blog and look for the request page. And yeah. All right. So I will talk to you guys next week. 

The Vergecast
Apple's Oct 18th event preview / HTC Vive Flow announced / Apple Watch Series 7 review

The Vergecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 82:50


The Verge's Nilay Patel, Dieter Bohn, Alex Cranz, and Adi Robertson discuss HTC's new VR headset the Vive Flow. Also: Apple, Google, and Samsung all have events next week. The crew discuss what to expect. Further reading: The $499 HTC Vive Flow is VR for people who don't like VR I have a hard time believing your wearable is good if you had to Photoshop it onto a model Magic Leap somehow raised $500 million to make another AR headset Facebook execs tease VR prototype hardware with new photos Apple Watch Series 7 review: time and time again  Apple announces October 18th event after months of Mac rumors Apple exploring AirPods that take your temperature and monitor posture: report Google announced its Pixel 6 event on October 19th Watch the Pixel 6 Pro get put together and taken apart in leaked videos Google Pixel 6 leak teases Magic Eraser feature, plus five years of Android security updates Google says it's dropping Material Design components on iOS in favor of Apple's UIKit ‘Pixel Pass' is Google's rumored response to Apple One Samsung announces Unpacked 2 event for Wednesday Oct 20th, right after Apple and Google Samsung tries to prove its foldable phones are tough in a new test video VanMoof's new V e-bike is its fastest ever  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Comic Book Workshop
Erica Henderson on DRACULA, MOTHERF**KER, ASSASSIN NATION, and Working on the iPad

Comic Book Workshop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 107:39


Erica Henderson (Squirrel Girl, Jughead) joins the show to talk about her recent work on Assassin Nation and Dracula, Motherfucker. We dive deep on process, the benefits of working on the iPad, writing for yourself, and much more.Follow Erica @EricafailsThis episode is sponsored by GARM! Visit www.garmcompany.com/tmbc for 20% OFF textures, brushes, typefaces and more for ProCreate and Photoshop.Subscribe via: Apple | Google | Stitcher | Spotify | RSSFollow the Show: Twitter | Instagram @TMBCworkshopContact: Letters@TMBCWorkshop.comFollow Jason: Twitter | Instagram @JasonHalftones

Binge-Watchers Podcast
Horror Movies To Watch: Horror Movie Double Feature. The Thing From Another World 1951. The Thing 1982.

Binge-Watchers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 35:20


Horror Movies To Watch: Horror Movie Double Feature. The Thing From Another World 1951. The Thing 1982Let's Talk A Couple Of Popular Horror Movie Franchises And My Definition Of Their Original Continuity. Mini-discussion of the continuity issues and road map to watch A Nightmare On Elm Street and Halloween movies. Star Trek alum William Shatner is making his way to space, and at 90 years old, he will set the record for the oldest person to do so.On Monday, Jeff Bezos' aerospace company Blue Origin announced the Emmy Award-winning actor will travel on the New Shepard rocket for the NS-18 mission.Here is what Shatner had to say: "I've heard about space for a long time now, I'm taking the opportunity to see it for myself. What a miracle."More than a fad, K dramas, especially the dark and twisted ones like Netflix's Squid Game are here to stay as a phenomenon. If you guys haven't seen this it reminds me a little like that movie Battle Royale, but this is not students, it is lower class citizens set up in a rigged game and competing for money. But the whole world and young people seem fascinated by it.Venom 2, which is actually called Venom: Let There Be Carnage, is crushing the box office with 90 M so far. I am hearing mixed things about the plot and quality of the monster fights but it is Venom. I am sure if you liked Part 1, you will like this one. My major issue is with the CGI of the Symbiotes. They all look and act the same like they just went into After Effects, Motion or PhotoShop and changed the color hue and that's it. Funny too because they have Andy Serkis who is like the best motion capture director too. Anyway, I am about to drop a potential spoiler or maybe just a cheeky rumor but viewers have gone online and said Venom gets blasted into the MCU by some energy burst at the end of the movie and he arrives when the news breaks that Peter Parker is Spider-Man, which happens during the Spider-Man movie Far From Home.Which horror movie original and its remake are we talking about tonight? Tonight's movies are THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD followed by THE THING.THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD 1951 -When scientist Dr. Carrington  reports a UFO near his North Pole research base, the Air Force sends in a team under Capt. Patrick Hendry to investigate. What they find is a wrecked spaceship and a humanoid creature (James Arness) frozen in the ice. They bring their discovery back to the base, but Carrington and Hendry disagree over what to do with it. Meanwhile, the creature is accidentally thawed and begins wreaking havoc.THE THING - In remote Antarctica, a group of American research scientists are disturbed at their base camp by a helicopter shooting at a sled dog. When they take in the dog, it brutally attacks both human beings and canines in the camp and they discover that the beast can assume the shape of its victims. A resourceful helicopter pilot (Kurt Russell) and the camp doctor (Richard Dysart) lead the camp crew in a desperate, gory battle against the vicious creature before it picks them all off, one by one.Nick likes the jump scare in the 1951 original, David liked the scientists trying to reason with the Thing to comical effect, and John liked the ambiguous ending of the 1982 version.Dave also recommends Midnight Mass on Netflix.Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/bingewatcherspodcast)

Binge-Watchers Podcast
Horror Movies To Watch: Horror Movie Double Feature. The Thing From Another World 1951. The Thing 1982.

Binge-Watchers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 35:21


Horror Movies To Watch: Horror Movie Double Feature. The Thing From Another World 1951. The Thing 1982Let's Talk A Couple Of Popular Horror Movie Franchises And My Definition Of Their Original Continuity. Mini-discussion of the continuity issues and road map to watch A Nightmare On Elm Street and Halloween movies. Star Trek alum William Shatner is making his way to space, and at 90 years old, he will set the record for the oldest person to do so.On Monday, Jeff Bezos' aerospace company Blue Origin announced the Emmy Award-winning actor will travel on the New Shepard rocket for the NS-18 mission.Here is what Shatner had to say: "I've heard about space for a long time now, I'm taking the opportunity to see it for myself. What a miracle."More than a fad, K dramas, especially the dark and twisted ones like Netflix's Squid Game are here to stay as a phenomenon. If you guys haven't seen this it reminds me a little like that movie Battle Royale, but this is not students, it is lower class citizens set up in a rigged game and competing for money. But the whole world and young people seem fascinated by it.Venom 2, which is actually called Venom: Let There Be Carnage, is crushing the box office with 90 M so far. I am hearing mixed things about the plot and quality of the monster fights but it is Venom. I am sure if you liked Part 1, you will like this one. My major issue is with the CGI of the Symbiotes. They all look and act the same like they just went into After Effects, Motion or PhotoShop and changed the color hue and that's it. Funny too because they have Andy Serkis who is like the best motion capture director too. Anyway, I am about to drop a potential spoiler or maybe just a cheeky rumor but viewers have gone online and said Venom gets blasted into the MCU by some energy burst at the end of the movie and he arrives when the news breaks that Peter Parker is Spider-Man, which happens during the Spider-Man movie Far From Home.Which horror movie original and its remake are we talking about tonight? Tonight's movies are THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD followed by THE THING.THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD 1951 -When scientist Dr. Carrington  reports a UFO near his North Pole research base, the Air Force sends in a team under Capt. Patrick Hendry to investigate. What they find is a wrecked spaceship and a humanoid creature (James Arness) frozen in the ice. They bring their discovery back to the base, but Carrington and Hendry disagree over what to do with it. Meanwhile, the creature is accidentally thawed and begins wreaking havoc.THE THING - In remote Antarctica, a group of American research scientists are disturbed at their base camp by a helicopter shooting at a sled dog. When they take in the dog, it brutally attacks both human beings and canines in the camp and they discover that the beast can assume the shape of its victims. A resourceful helicopter pilot (Kurt Russell) and the camp doctor (Richard Dysart) lead the camp crew in a desperate, gory battle against the vicious creature before it picks them all off, one by one.Nick likes the jump scare in the 1951 original, David liked the scientists trying to reason with the Thing to comical effect, and John liked the ambiguous ending of the 1982 version.Dave also recommends Midnight Mass on Netflix. 

Lick The Rapper
Ep 91: Photoshop That Waist!

Lick The Rapper

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 63:53


In this episode Me and Aaliyah discuss photoshopping! Do you think it's wrong to photoshop your photos? Why or why not? She gives us tips on anal and tells us about her first anal experience . We also discuss beards and I talk about how I judge young men with heavy beards lol... Of course, I give an update on my crazy life and what ended up happening with my ex-boss! Enjoyyyyy www.imaniblair.com