Podcasts about Julia Child

American chef

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  • Nov 24, 2022LATEST
Julia Child

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Latest podcast episodes about Julia Child

Mike and Vonia Can't Not
S2 Ep36: Feelings Aren't Facts...

Mike and Vonia Can't Not

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 34:36


Vonia is home with the kids. Still. And Mike is studying up on the best way to prepare a turkey. Then it's a Julia Child related reality show, some returning comedies, a new film out in theaters, frustrations about being sick, recognition of the events in Colorado Springs, a disappeared eye clinic, a further discussion on mental health, and Mike makes an absolutely ridiculous claim (and, later in the day Mike immediately takes it back).  

The Book Case
Kate and Charlie Talk Turkey

The Book Case

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 34:45


Let's do the math. A human's average life span: 80 years. Years after Similac and Gerbers: say 75 years. At approximately 1000 meals per year, that's a lifetime of 75,000 meals. What if you had a different recipe for every one of those 75,000 meals? Celia Sack does. She is one of the owners of Omnivore Books in San Francisco. They sell nothing but cookbooks and books about food and drink. You don't go into her store asking, “What should I be reading?” but instead, “What should I be cooking or baking?" We ‘drop' this podcast on Thanksgiving Day when everyone is thinking about food. Celia thinks about it every day. And, of course, we're all thinking about things to be thankful for, including our listeners. We're thankful for our chance to talk with Celia. She is a delight. Books mentioned in this podcast: Small Victories by Julia Turshen Kitchen Simple: Essential Recipes for Everyday Cooking by James Peterson The Nutmeg Trail: Recipes and Stories Along the Ancient Spice Routines by Eleanor Ford The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer The New Basics Cookbook by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins The Food of Morocco by Paula Wolfert The Art of Mexican Cooking by Diana Kennedy Mourad: New Moroccan by Mourad Lahlou Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child, Simone Beck, and Louisette Bertholle The Way to Cook by Julia Child Julia's Kitchen Wisdom: Essential Techniques and Recipes from a Lifetime of Cooking by Julia Child The Pat Conroy Cookbook: Recipes and Stories of My Life by Pat Conroy The Escoffier Cookbook: and Guide to the Fine Art of Cookery for Connoisseurs, Chefs, Epicures by Auguste Escoffier Nothing Fancy by Alison Roman Dining In: Highly Cookable Recipes by Alison Roman The Zuni Cafe Cookbook by Judy Rogers

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Mahogany Gloss

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 161:20


Today on Boston Public Radio: We began the show by talking with Arlene Isaacson about the Respect for Marriage Act, before opening the phone lines to listeners. Michael Curry discussed Andrea Campbell making history as the first Black woman to be Attorney General-elect of Mass., and questions over the future of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers. He's also a member of the national NAACP Board of Directors, where he chairs the board's Advocacy and Policy Committee. Andrea Cabral talked about recently publicized text messages revealing the coordination behind and celebration of Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis flying migrants to Martha's Vineyard. Cabral is the former Suffolk County Sheriff and the former Secretary of Public Safety. Nick Quah shared some of his favorite podcasts this month, focusing on “Björk: Sonic Symbolism,” “Richard's Famous Food Podcast,” and “My Dad Wrote a Porno.” Quah is a podcast critic for Vulture and New York Magazine. Lidia Bastianich discussed the 25th anniversary of “Lidia's Kitchen” on PBS, and shared how Julia Child influenced her career as a chef. Bastianich is a chef, cookbook author, and restaurateur. “Lidia's Kitchen” is on CREATE TV and PBS. She'll be at Eataly Boston on Tuesday, December 6 to meet people and sign books. Jon Gruber explained why Democrats are pushing to raise the debt ceiling, and potential outcomes if Democrats fail in their efforts. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act. His latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream.” We ended the show by asking listeners how they're preparing for Thanksgiving.

Everything I Learned From Movies
Episode 363 - We're Back! A Dinosaur Story

Everything I Learned From Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 71:51


Steve & Izzy continue DINOvember, a celebration of 90s Dinosaur movies (but not that one), as they are joined by illustrator Katie Crumpton to discuss 1993's "We're back! A Dinosaur Story" starring John Goodman, Jay Leno, Rhea Perlman, Martin Short, Walter Kronkite & Julia Child!!! Was this Spielberg's OTHER 1993 Dinosaur movie? What kind of chew toys does Sushi enjoy? How is Don Bluth different from Disney? What exactly is Professor Neweyes? Is this movie promoting interspecies erotica?!? Let's find out!!! So kick back, grab a few brews, enjoy a Quaker Quisp, and enjoy!!! This episode is proudly sponsored by Untidy Venus, your one-stop shop for incredible art & gift ideas at UntidyVenus.Etsy.com and be sure to follow her on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram & Patreon at @UntidyVenus for all of her awesomeness!!! Try it today!!! Twitter - www.twitter.com/eilfmovies Facebook - www.facebook.com/eilfmovies Etsy - www.untidyvenus.etsy.com TeePublic - www.teepublic.com/user/untidyvenus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Italian American Podcast
IAP 255: Plant, Harvest, Cook! Mary Ann Esposito Takes Us from Dirt to Dinner

The Italian American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 63:19


This week's legendary guest is no stranger to our show, and this week she's here to celebrate the release of her latest book, “Ciao Italia: Plant, Harvest, Cook!” and celebrate her 30th season as TV's longest-running cooking show host! Chef, author, and Italian American icon Mary Ann Esposito is the creator and host of the nationally televised PBS series Ciao Italia with Mary Ann Esposito™ and is the author of 14 cookbooks. She has worked beside world-renowned chefs like Julia Child, Jacques Pepin, Martin Yan, Jasper White, and countless others. When she's not cooking, Mary Ann hosts culinary trips to Italy, where she works hands-on with her students to teach them regional dishes from up and down the peninsula. We talk to Mary Ann about the inspiration behind her latest collection, which fuses her husband's passion for gardening with her devotion to teaching the next generation the skills of a simpler time. Mary Ann shares her secrets of seasonal produce, seed saving, and her tips on growing kitchen staples such as eggplant, tomatoes, and more! We also talk about Italian regional produce, such as San Marzano Tomatoes and Tropea Onions, and what it means when these items are grown in areas outside of Italy. Not someone who would qualify as a green thumb? You'll certainly be closer than ever after this week's joyous episode!

Chefs Without Restaurants
Learn to Garden and Cook Italian Food with Ciao Italia Host Mary Ann Esposito

Chefs Without Restaurants

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 42:29


On this episode, we have chef, author, and TV personality Mary Ann Esposito. She's the creator and host of the nationally televised PBS series Ciao Italia with Mary Ann Esposito. The author of fourteen cookbooks, most recently, Ciao Italia: Plant, Harvest, Cook!, Mary Ann has worked beside world-renowned chefs Julia Child, Jacques Pepin, Martin Yan, and countless others. When not filming, Mary Ann can be found giving hands-on cooking classes.Her new book takes the reader on a seasonal home garden vegetable journey focusing on simple growing tips for anyone interested in growing their own vegetables and how to cook them Italian-style.MARY ANN ESPOSITOMary Ann's InstagramMary Ann's WebsiteBuy the bookCiao Italia: Plant, Harvest, Cook!CHEFS WITHOUT RESTAURANTSIf you enjoy the show and would like to support it financially, please check out our Sponsorship page (we get a commission when you use our links).  Get the Chefs Without Restaurants NewsletterPrivate Facebook groupChefs Without Restaurants InstagramSponsor- The United States Personal Chef AssociationOver the past 30 years, the world of the personal chef has grown in importance to fulfill dining needs. While the pandemic certainly upended the restaurant experience, it allowed personal chefs to close that dining gap.  Central to all of that is the United States Personal Chef Association. USPCA provides a strategic backbone for those chefs that includes liability insurance, training, communications, certification, and more. It's a reassurance to consumers that the chef coming into their home is prepared to offer them an experience with their meal.Call Angela today at 800-995-2138 ext 705 or email her at aprather@uspca.com for membership and partner info.Sponsor- Chemists in the KitchenChemists in the Kitchen by LabX, is a YouTube video series spotlighting the power of chemistry, and how science and food can bring people together.In each episode, real scientists walk you through things like making your own pickles, the chemistry behind ceviche, the formula for perfect homemade pretzels, and more.It's a love letter to science, cooking, and individuality, with some great tips on how you can apply real scientific principles to your everyday cooking. Season 2 is airing now, and you can catch up with every episode for free on YouTube by searching “Chemists in the Kitchen” or going to Youtube.com/LabXNASSponsor-meezStill keeping your recipes in docs? Doing your costing in spreadsheets? You should try meez—the recipe tool designed for chefs by chefs. Founded by professional chef Josh Sharkey, meez transforms your recipe content into a powerful digital format that lets you organize, scale, train, and cost like never before. See why meez is loved by over 12,000 culinary professionals. Sign up for a free account today at getmeez.com/cwr. 

On Mic Podcast
CHEF GIOVANNA HUYKE -320

On Mic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 33:12


Meet Master Chef Giovanna Huyke, currently  serving  the most delicious Latin and Puerto Rican cuisine at a Boston area restaurant known as La Fabrica Central. Giovanna , dubbed The Julia Child of Puerto Rico, blazed a trail as the first female chef to host and co-produce the first TV cooking show on the island.   She is helping us explore the wonders of Latin cuisine as she whest our appetites with endearing tales from the kitchen!

Books on Pod
#296 - Jacques Pépin on ART OF THE CHICKEN

Books on Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 21:55


James Beard- and Emmy-winning chef, tv personality, and author Jacques Pépin chats with Trey Elling about ART OF THE CHICKEN: A MASTER CHEF'S PAINTINGS, STORIES, AND RECIPES OF THE HUMBLE BIRD. Topics include: What he loves about chickens (1:32) Giving recipes in a narrative style (3:05) Cooking over live fire (5:28) Working at Hôtel Plaza Athénée, Paris (6:29) Moving from France to NYC in 1959 (7:43) Choosing Howard Johnson over the Kennedy White House (8:39) Making chicken cracklings (13:18) The value of a cooked chicken carcass (14:41) Deboning chickens, quickly and correctly (15:00) Why he & Julia Child were lampooned by SNL (15:47) Eggs, the MOST valuable ingredient (18:41) A love for painting AND painting chickens (19:19)

Inquisikids Daily
Who Was Julia Child?

Inquisikids Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 9:30


Who Was Julia Child? Join us today as we learn about the ordinary woman who was an extraordinary cook. Sources: Who Was Julia Child? Paw Prints, 2015. Send us listener mail! Send an audio message: anchor.fm/inquisikids-daily/message Send an email: podcast@inquisikids.com

Pink Chicken & The Lazy Man
C.W.J. Episode Review - Julia Child's Meatloaf

Pink Chicken & The Lazy Man

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 24:07


Pink Chicken and the Lazy Man (and the Pink Chickadee!) invite you to listen along as they review the Meatloaf episode from the Worst Cook on YouTube, Jack Scalfani, from earlier this year during his butter-drowned blasphemy to the memory of a cooking legend he dared to call, "Julia in June". Listen along as we mash up Jack's scatterbrained attempt at TV Cooking history, his utter and complete lack of Julia knowledge, and the worst cross-section of a recipe result in all of YouTube.   WATCH ALONG WITH US! CWJ "Julia Child Meatloaf (JULIA IN JUNE)" Episode: https://youtu.be/xTT59cBl_gM ====================================================== FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA Discord: https://discord.gg/byC4jPy2 (link expires in 7 days) Twitter: https://twitter.com/pcandtlm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pcandtlm Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/pcandtlm

This is Love
Episode 54: Grace and Julia

This is Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 40:13 Very Popular


Grace Young remembers her parents were obsessed with food growing up — they went shopping every day for groceries and every night they cooked traditional Cantonese dishes for dinner. She started to learn to cook when she was young, but not from her parents. She learned from Julia Child. “She was a little jolly. She was always in a good mood. I was fascinated by what she was cooking. None of it was familiar to me. I didn't know what a soufflé was or brioche or croissants, but she was just so appealing to me.” Today, Grace is known as the Stir Fry Guru, and she's written three cookbooks about Chinese cooking. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Follow the show and review us on Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2BmMZr5 We also make Criminal and Phoebe Reads a Mystery. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Check out our online shop.  Episode transcripts are posted on our website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Southern Shade with Liv and Jay

In this week's episode, the ladies discuss if kinks are hereditary. Liv tells a tail of a friend who turns into Julia Child during sex. Could you imagine what her mother/father likes? Jay would like to think her parents have only had sex the one time she was conceived. What kinks are you into that would have you cringing to know your parents like them too? Support the show

Creative Cravings
Craving Brazilian Brigadeiros, Cooking Like Everyone's Watching & Becoming Jaíne in Paris with Jaíne Mackievicz

Creative Cravings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 59:04


Welcome to Season 3! It's time for a taste of Brazil and France, through the eyes of our delightful guest, Jaíne Mackievicz. This is our foodiest episode yet so you're in for a treat! Tune in for lots of laughs, heartfelt life advice, Latin American food recs, and to learn about the secret ingredients for getting outside your comfort zone in order to chase your creative cravings. Jaíne embodies the spirit of Julia Child so well, it's no wonder she cooked her way to victory on The Food Network's first season of The Julia Child Challenge. Whether you love to cook or not, we hope this episode inspires you to stay tremendously interested in whatever lights you up.  Enter to be our 2nd annual Trick & Treat Challenge WINNER by October 27th! Hint: the best caramel apples are involved. Giveaway details below: Trick & Treat! Join Creative Cravings Newsletter by October 27, 2022 @11:59pm ET to enter our fun, email-only Kilwins Wrigleyville x Creative Cravings Halloween Challenge + Giveaway. Hint: the best caramel apples are involved. We will contact the WINNER on Halloween 10/31 You get 5 entries if you share on social media that you listen to the episode! Tag @creative.cravings and @mackievicz so we can say thank you! Thank you to Kilwins Wrigleyville in Chicago for sponsoring this episode. A big thank you to Dr. Carole and Landman Dental Associates for supporting Season 3! Got a craving to be one of our wonderful sponsors? Get in touch!  Thank you to all of our wonderful funders who participated in our crowdfunding campaign to make this a special season. Creative Cravings is fully created, produced, and edited by the two of us, Sari & Lauren. Stay tuned for details about our virtual holiday party! It's not too late to snag your ticket by selecting a funding reward.  Are you a creative entrepreneur with a craving to stand out from the crowd (and your competition?) Work with us at Creative Cravings Coaching & Consulting. Livin' Life to the Fullest! (by Creative Cravings Podcast Co-hosts + You) including Jaíne's recs! All things Jaíne:  Jaíne's Newsletter Brigadeiro Recipe  Julia Child Challenge on The Food Network Julia Child Challenge Ep 5 - Catch Jaíne's Brigadeiro Trifle Jacques Pépin Crêpes

The Herban Farmacy
Episode 80: Be A Plant Based Woman Warrior with Ann Crile Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn, R.N.

The Herban Farmacy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 47:20


Ann Crile Esselstyn has been called "the Julia Child of plant-based-cooking." She was an award-winning English teacher for twenty-seven years, all while juggling raising four children, coaching, and figuring out how to cook delicious and appealing plant-based, oil-free food (pre-internet!). Ann's singular focus is on creating recipes to prevent and reverse heart disease, and she collaborates with her husband, Dr. Caldwell B Esselstyn Jr., in counseling patients. Ann and her daughter, Jane, also feature heart-healthy recipes on their YouTube channel. Ann graduated from Smith College and received a master's in education from Wheelock College. She lives in Cleveland, Ohio, next door to Jane. Jane Esselstyn, R.N., is a fresh, charismatic voice in the plant-based movement. She brings her passion, energy, and can-do attitude to her presentations, cooking demonstrations, and cookbooks. As well as being a nurse, researcher, middle school sex ed teacher, and mother of three, Jane hosts a popular YouTube channel with her spitfire mother, Ann Crile Esselstyn. Jane created the recipes for the #1 New York Times bestseller Plant-Strong and The Engine 2 Seven-Day Rescue Diet. She is the coauthor of The Engine 2 Seven-Day Rescue Diet with her brother, Rip Esselstyn and of The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook with Ann, who is her next-door neighbor in Cleveland, Ohio.Show notesBe A Plant-Based Woman Warrior: Live Fierce, Stay Bold, Eat DeliciousWhat we talked about:7:20- Introduction to Jane and her journey to plant based living9:40- Being an example of a plant based eater15:15- Ann's transition to plant based eating19:50- Savory oats23:40- Gardening28:05- Cuva35:50- Their favorite health success stories39:10- Favorite exercise modalitiesConnect with Stacey:Stacey on InstagramStacey's WebsiteJoin The Herban Farmacy Facebook GroupShop BeautycounterSandyBoy Productions Shows:Why is Everyone Yelling?The Illuminate PodcastI'll Have Another with Lindsey HeinThe Ready to Run PodcastSponsors:Green Growers Organic Elderberry Syrup & Elderberry KitsUse code "Holistic" for 20% off and free shippingBecoming Whole - a masterclass for women ready to take control of their holistic wellness

Basic Snitches-A Harry Potter Podcast You Didn't Know You Needed

Chapter 5: An Excess of Phlegm - Here's a reminder that PrincessPickle69 hates French people...

The Princess and the B
(#178) 3-2-1 Formula for Predictable 6-Figure Business Growth with Deb Boulanger

The Princess and the B

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 55:18


How to use the right formula for predictable 6-figure business growth with Deb Boulanger? If you want your business to go from 0 to predictable 6-figure business growth, then this episode is for you. Are you looking for ways to stand out as a market leader? Want to learn how to position yourself in your market as an entrepreneur and gain a true entrepreneurship mindset? In this episode, Kimberly of Princess and the B delivers the right formula for predictable 6-figure business growth through this interview with Deb Boulanger.

Cookbook Love Podcast
Episode 215: All About Cookbook PR with Carrie Bachman

Cookbook Love Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 47:14


Hello and welcome to another episode of the podcast - today on the podcast I'm excited to share an interview with Carrie Bachman. Carrie is the owner of Carrie Bachman Public Relations a full-service, boutique public relations firm specializing in the cookbook and gourmet product industry. Carrie's firm takes pride in creating innovative nationwide publicity campaigns that result in maximum exposure for our clients. Over the last 30 years, Carrie has led New York Times bestselling campaigns for a diverse list of authors, including journalists, celebrities, award-winning chefs, and cookbook and lifestyle authors including Jacques Pepin, Julia Child, Marcella Hazan, Emeril Lagasse, Alice Waters, Patricia Wells, Ferran Adria, Dorie Greenspan, Rose Levy Beranbaum, Ina Garten, Tom Douglas, and more. Services provided by Carrie and her team includes book launches, brand strategy, event planning, influencer and blogger engagement, media tours, national and regional interviews, as well as social media strategy and satellite media tours. Today on the podcast Carrie and I talk about what's working with PR, what's not working, tips for debut cookbook writers and authors, as well as where the best times are spent for authors who handle their own PR.  Things We Mention In This Episode Connect with Carrie Bachman online How to Get Paid to Write a Cookbook Free Training

Paint The Medical Picture Podcast
Newsworthy OIG Work Plan for September 2022, Trusty Tip for Mammography, and Julia Child's Spark

Paint The Medical Picture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 25:12


Welcome to the Paint The Medical Picture Podcast, created and hosted by Sonal Patel, CPMA, CPC, CMC, ICD-10-CM. Thanks to all of you for making this a Top 15 Podcast for 2 Years: https://blog.feedspot.com/medical_billing_and_coding_podcasts/ Sonal's 7th Season has started and Episode 6 features a Newsworthy update on the OIG Work Plan for September 2022. Trusty Tip features Sonal's compliance recommendations for Mammography and Clinical Breast Examinations. Spark inspires us all to reflect on purpose and impact based on the inspirational words of Julia Child. Paint The Medical Picture Podcast now on: Anchor: https://anchor.fm/sonal-patel5 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6hcJAHHrqNLo9UmKtqRP3X Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/paint-the-medical-picture-podcast/id1530442177 Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8zMGYyMmZiYy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/bc6146d7-3d30-4b73-ae7f-d77d6046fe6a/paint-the-medical-picture-podcast Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/paint-the-medical-picture-podcast Pocket Casts: https://pca.st/tcwfkshx Radio Public: https://radiopublic.com/paint-the-medical-picture-podcast-WRZvAw Find Paint The Medical Picture Podcast on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzNUxmYdIU_U8I5hP91Kk7A Find Sonal on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sonapate/ And checkout the website: https://paintthemedicalpicturepodcast.com/ If you'd like to be a sponsor of the Paint The Medical Picture Podcast series, please contact Sonal directly for pricing: PaintTheMedicalPicturePodcast@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonal-patel5/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sonal-patel5/support

The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals
Whitney Scharer – Rapturous Bio-Fiction

The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 27:44


Whitney Scharer's historical novel The Age of Light takes us from the glamor of Paris in the 1920s to the horror of World War II battlefields in a startlingly modern love story based on the true life of fashion model and gifted photographer. Lee Miller. Hi there. I'm your host, Jenny Wheeler. And today we have a treat. Whitney Scharer's debut novel. I know we usually do series, but this is a little bit special. It's a great mesmerizing portrait of a true woman, Lee Miller as she transforms from muse to artist. She's the girl who in her twenties, the former Vogue cover girl, who said, ‘I'd rather take a photograph than be in one.' Author Paula McLain called it "rapturous and razor sharp." As usual we've got free book treats for you. this week it's historical freebies, which we can down load here: DOWNLOAD HISTORIC FREEBIES And don't forget, you can encourage my endeavors on the show. We reaching nearly 250 episodes now, and it does cost time and money for me to put these on every week. By becoming a Patreon supporter for less than a cup of coffee a month, you'll receive exclusive bonus content like here in Whitney, answer the, getting to know you. Five quickfire questions. That's. Part of the exclusive content on Patrion that's P a T R E O n.com. Forward slash the joys have been dreading. If you can't see your way there to doing that, then how about just supporting one episode@buymeacoffee.com/jennywheel/X BUY ME A COFFEE Links to points discussed in the show: The Age of Light: https://www.littlebrown.com/titles/whitney-scharer/the-age-of-light/9780316524094/ Lee Miller: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Miller Man Ray: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man_Ray Lee Miller's famous picture of herself in Hitler's bathtub: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK1KUYTluTU Man Ray, Solarization: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QITcY3W0mto The Lee Miller Archive:  https://www.leemiller.co.uk/ Anthony Penrose:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antony_Penrose# Lee Miller's cookbook: https://www.farleyshouseandgallery.co.uk/product/lee-miller-a-life-with-food-friends-recipes-2/ Books Whitney is reading: Emily St John  Mandel, Sea Of Tranquility:      https://www.amazon.com/Sea-Tranquility-Emily-John-Mandel/dp/0593321448 Jennifer Egan, The Candy House:  https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Candy-House/Jennifer-Egan/9781476716763 Jennifer Egan, A Visit From The Goon Squad: https://www.amazon.com/Visit-Goon-Squad-Jennifer-Egan/dp/0307477479 Ann Leary, The Foundling; https://annleary.com/ Where to find Whitney online: Where to find Whitney Scharer online: Website: http://www.whitneyscharer.com Twitter: @wscharer Instagram: @wscharer Facebook: facebook.com/whitneyscharerwriter/ Things you will learn in Whitney and The Age of Light How and why Whitney came to write the book How Lee Miller and May Ray met. Their innovative photographic collaboration in Paris The love affair that turned toxic Lee Miller's wartime career. Parisian art world of the 20s and 30s What historical fiction authors choose to leave in or leave out of their story Lee Miller's son's work in maintaining her artistic legacy Lee Miller's later role as the ‘Julia Child of Southern England' If you like Whitney you might also like... Gill Paul on Lady Eve Herbert and the opening of Tutankhamun's tomb.. another bio- fictional story where truth was almost stranger than fiction... https://thejoysofbingereading.com/gill-paul-on-encore/ LISTEN TO GILL ON ENCORE Next Week: Encore On Binge Reading

La Vie Creative
EP 256: MasterChef Andrew Prior in Paris

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 32:35


Food has always been a passion. MasterChef Australia in 2013 though helped me start a new chapter in my life, a fabulous one of course! Andrew Prior since 2016 has been living, travelling, breathing, cooking and eating all things French in France of course. After the experience of MasterChef he realised that his passion was food and travel. So he started a successful walking food tours business in Melbourne called Queenie's Food Tours. But France was always calling. So with his partner and two golden retrievers we took the bold step of moving permanently. Since moving to France he's followed his food dream and hero's Julia Childs and Rachel Khoo and completed a Le Cordon Bleu Patisserie course, had successful food tours of regional France and the Cote D'Azur and set up a YouTube channel devoted to Paris, France and other European cities called Travelling Fabulously. Now Andrew's moved to the wonderful town of Montmorillon in the Nouvelle-Acquaitaine region of France. And is devoting more time to French food. This means for you food lovers more fabulous recipes on YouTube and fabulous cooking experiences in Montmorillon.But his newest passion is the podcast Fabulously Delicious The French Food Podcast which is all about French food and the people make it, cook it, write and photograph it but above all love it.  Each week Andrew interviews a special guest about their life in and/or love of France and then discuss a specific topic be it a French dish, cooking technique or ingredient.Fabulously Delicious Podcast Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/1f51gFvNCpkCRLlGN6t1O4?si=353e5f438c164edeFabulously Delicious Podcast Apple - https://podcasts.apple.com/fr/podcast/fabulously-delicious-the-french-food-podcast/id1572650298Website - https://www.andrewpriorfabulously.comCooking Experiences - https://www.andrewpriorfabulously.com/in-person-cooking-french-cooking-experiencesYoutube - https://www.youtube.com/andrewpriorInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/andrewpriorfabulouslySupport the show

Good Food
Two Buck Chuck, Vishwesh Bhatt, White House Food Conference

Good Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 57:11 Very Popular


Wine critic Esther Mobley looks back at the legacy of Fred Franzia, who championed inexpensive wine and brought Two Buck Chuck to the masses. Chef Vishwesh Bhatt reflects on his childhood in India and how his cooking took shape in the American South. Dr. Nancy Rawson provides an update on her research on the loss of smell and taste as a symptom of COVID. As a child, Grace Young stood in line to meet Julia Child. Now she's being honored with an award named after her culinary icon. Political reporter Ximena Bustillo explains the agenda of the White House Food Conference. Chef Spencer Bezaire is roasting squash in a 600-degree oven at his Silver Lake restaurant Eszett.

Partizán
Úgy esszük az ételt, ahogy a szenet lapátolják a mozdonyban | Semmi kóla #2

Partizán

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 69:39


Miért fakanállal a kezükben udvarolnak a politikusok? Az étkezés az utolsó közös pont, ami összehozhat minket? Amíg mindenki azt és úgy eszi, amit és ahogyan illik – a rendszer nem mozog. Az étel jelkép volt, az maradt a vásznon is. A Forráspont, az Olasz módra, a Julia, na meg az Ízek, imák, szerelmek szintén arról beszél: hogyan landol egy világkép a tányérunkon? Tartsatok velünk! És amikor filmet néztek, mindig figyeljétek, ki mit és hogyan eszik! Ez itt a Semmi kóla, a Partizán kultúrtörténeti podcastje.Kövessétek a Semmi kólát az Instagramon!https://www.instagram.com/semmikolapodcast/ Ha az adással kapcsolatban bármiféle észrevételetek van, írjatok bátran a semmikolapodcast@gmail.com címre.Hivatkozott tartalmakHosszan tárgyalt filmek/sorozatok:Forráspont (Boiling Point, 2021), Ízek, imák szerelmek (Eat Pray Love, 2010), Julia (2022), Julie & Julia – Két nő egy recept (Julie & Julia, 2009), Olasz módra (Big Night, 1996)Röviden említett filmek/sorozatok:Az alapító (The Founder, 2016), Az oroszlánkirály (The Lion King, 1994), Chihiro szellemországban (Spirited away, 2001), Fargo (2014-), Mechanikus narancs (A Clockwork Orange, 1971), Még egy kört mindenkinek (Another Round, 2020), L'ecsó (Ratatuille, 2007) Ajánlott irodalom:Massimo Montanari: Éhség és bőség. A táplálkozás európai kultúrtörténete (1999)Roy Strong: Lakoma. A dúsan terített asztal története (2006) Cikkek, egyebek:A Jó, a Rossz és a Nézhetetlen #29 - Ízek, imák, szerelmek Matt Gross: How Stanley Tucci's Big Night helped kick off an American dining revolution (Guardian) Slawomir Mrozek: Mulatság (1965) Móricz Zsigmond: Tragédia (Nyugat) Sarkadi Zsolt: Rosszabbul eszünk, mint 12 ezer éve (444) Miért mentél el? Bartis Attila (Litera)Önkényes Mérvadó #299 – A gasztronómia szerepe Érkezik Julia Child kihívása (Magyar Konyha Online) Egy slampos gasztrokirálynő öröksége (Múltkor) Egyes munkakörökben nagyobb lehet az erős alkoholfogyasztás kockázata (Népszava)

Yahweh’s Money: The Crossroads of Religion & Money
#13 Feelings of Failures in Finances Part 3

Yahweh’s Money: The Crossroads of Religion & Money

Play Episode Play 28 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 30:32 Transcription Available


Good Day! Episode 13 is the 3rd and last of the 3-part series titled, Feelings of Failure in Finance. Facing your finances and/or YOURSELF, after a financial loss can be tough. In this episode, we discuss how to regain your confidence after a financial loss. Plus, we discuss changing the conversation around financial fears. Knowing feelings of shame and embarrassment can be attached to ALL of this, we discuss knowing when it is the right time to reach out for help.

I am Northwest Arkansas
With the Opening of Northwest Arkansas' Bauhaus Biergarten We Can Now Celebrate Oktoberfest Properly

I am Northwest Arkansas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 36:05


About the Show: In this podcast episode, we sit down with Chef Jennifer Hill Booker, Co-Owner of the Bauhaus Biergarten in Downtown Springdale.  Chef Jennifer shared her origin story from birth in Ann Arbor to living in NYC and ending up in Tulsa, OK, with her parents. From an early age, Chef Jennifer was encouraged to cook and experiment in the kitchen.  She grew up watching Julia Child and finding comfort and a home in the kitchen creating good food.  Several years later, while her husband was stationed in Germany, Chef Jennifer attended Le Cordone Bleu, where she honed her culinary skills. If her name sounds familiar, that is because Chef Jennifer was initially invited to Northwest Arkansas by the Roots Festival team to showcase her culinary skills.  We also ran into Chef Jennifer at the Cureate program in Northwest Arkansas. Cureate works with Food Entrepreneurs looking to expand their brand and learn and fine-tune the business side of things.  https://iamnorthwestarkansas.com/captivate-podcast/conversation-with-kim-bryden-from-cureate-2/ (You can learn more about Cureate on episode 150 of the podcast when we sat down with Cureate founder Kim Bryden.)  The https://bauhausbiergarten.com/ (Bauhaus Biergarten) is the only authentic Beer Garden in Northwest Arkansas. The Biergarten will feature some of the best beers from Germany and an assortment of Schnitzels, Wurst, Pretzels, Sauerkraut, and fresh whole grain mustard.  They even have a Stein club for those who want their own Beer Stein to use when you visit Bauhaus Biergarten.   The address for https://bauhausbiergarten.com/ (Bauhaus Biergarten) is 326 Holcomb St, Springdale, AR 72764 Also, check out Chef Jennifer's book https://amzn.to/3RsqWpP (Field Peas to Foie Gras: Southern Recipes with a French Accent). All this and so much more are on this episode of the I am Northwest Arkansas podcast. Important Links and Mentions on the Show*: https://bauhausbiergarten.com/ (Bauhaus Biergarten Website) https://www.instagram.com/bauhausbiergarten/ (Bauhaus Biergarten Instagram) https://www.chefjenniferhillbooker.com/ (Chef Jennifer Hill Booker Website) Chef Jennifer Hill Booker Email https://www.facebook.com/chefjenniferbooker (Chef Jennifer Hill Booker Facebook) https://twitter.com/chefjennbooker (Chef Jennifer Hill Booker Twitter) https://www.youtube.com/ChefJenniferBooker (Chef Jennifer Hill Booker YouTube) https://iamnorthwestarkansas.com/arts-culture-entertainment-and-food-its-all-happening-in-downtown-springdale/ (Jill Dabs and Downtown Springdale Podcast) https://iamnorthwestarkansas.com/episode-6-daniel-hintz-from-fayetteville-to-bentonville-and-everything-in-between-2/ (Daniel Hintz Podcast Episode) https://www.thejonescenter.net/ (Jones Center) https://www.downtownspringdale.org/ (Downtown Springdale Alliance) https://www.nwaonline.com/news/2021/aug/06/lets-eat-persephone-on-wheels-couple-opens-pizza/ (Pizzeria Ruby and Chef Michael Robert Shaw)   This episode is sponsored by*: https://www.signature.bank/ (Signature Bank of Arkansas) -   https://www.signature.bank/ (Signature Bank) was founded here in Northwest Arkansas in 2005 and focuses on personal and community banking. When you bank with a community bank, you're investing in local businesses, local entrepreneurs, local charities, and the causes close to home. They have worked hard to earn their tagline, “Community Banking at its Best.” You may ask why bank at Signature?  Because they focus on the customer instead of having a branch on every corner, you can have your questions answered by a real person, whether you're reaching out to the call center or your banker's cell phone. You can access any ATM in the country without fear of a fee.  They will refund all of those fees at the end of every month. Finally, they are constantly improving their digital offerings to ensure you can access the best financial tools from your...

SKRAPS of Science & Innovation
It's time for Dynamic ANC (Active "nerve" cancellation)

SKRAPS of Science & Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 70:37


Julia Child was a master. She was not a classically trained chef, but pursued cooking as a hobby. Her super power? Passion. A passion for making gastronomy accessible, to deliver an honest and attainable presentation, and she possessed a pure, unadulterated joy for her craft. While https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelackermann/ (Michael Ackermann) isn't a neurotechnolgy hobbyist, he does share other qualities with the inimitable Child. He brings a passion for neurotechnology, mixes it with technical expertise picked up at https://engineering.case.edu/ebme/ (Case Western Reserve University), panache earned through his time at Stanford BioDesign, and pairs it with an excellent vintage of management style.  Hungry yet? We thought you might be. Ackermann was actually one of our early targets for an interview on Skraps. Perhaps it was his humility and desire to keep the focus on the science instead of the personalities that caused him to decline our first plea invitation to record with us, but maybe as we grew in our professionalism and track record, Michael became just a tiny bit more comfortable with the idea. But he did it. We did it. We finally got him on the podcast. I promise, it's worth the wait.  Listen on for the behind the science peek at Ackermann's time in the BioDesign Program, check in as he deftly maneuvers Oculeve to success, and check out what's happening now at Presidio Medical and beyond. Who knows what's next? Perhaps a chocolate soufflé for his wife's recent birthday (I know this because he was unable to join the Cleveland NeuroDesign faculty in person.) Bon appétit! Papers of interest: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34433642/ (Presidio's published research ) Michael Ackermann's https://patents.google.com/?inventor=Michael+Ackermann (Patents on Nerve Block) SKRAPS is your podcast, where we on your behalf explores unsaid, underappreciated and sometimes, untold stories of sparks of brilliance in science, technology and innovation. Show Credits Created & Produced by: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arun11sridhar/ (Arun Sridhar) & https://www.linkedin.com/in/jojoplatt/ (JoJo Platt) Editing: Arun Sridhar Sound design: Arun Sridhar & Swaminathan ThiruGnanaSambandam Sound mixing and mastering: Swaminathan ThiruGnanaSambandam Social Media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/PodcastSkraps (@PodcastSkraps) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/skrapspodcast (SKRAPS) https://twitter.com/skrappyscience (Arun's Twitter Feed) https://twitter.com/RockinRedSF (JoJo's Twitter Feed) You can help us fund the production costs by donating as little as $5 or £5 or in any currency of your choice as a one time or a recurring payment HERE

The Leading Voices in Food
E182: Memoir and Marion Nestle – Slow Cooked

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 29:43


Pioneer, path breaker, field builder. These are all descriptions that apply to our guest today, Dr. Marion Nestle. Marion Nestle is the Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health emerita at New York University. She has been a major force in food policy for decades, partly because she is a brilliant communicator and a prolific author. Her groundbreaking book, "Food Politics," has been published in several editions. Another book, "Unsavory Truth: How The Food Companies Skew The Science of What We Eat," is a classic. And this just begins the list. But today we're talking about Marion's newest book, which is a memoir called, "Slow Cooked: An Unexpected Life in Food Politics". It offers an unprecedented look into the life, the thinking, and the passions of one of the top figures in the field. Interview Summary   You've had an amazing journey to get to where you are. People know a lot about what you've done at the point where you became an academic started publishing, and things started showing up in the field, but an awful lot happened before that that led up to the academic part of your life. I'd like to have you tell us a little bit about that, if you would.   I called the book "Slow Cooked," because it took me forever to develop a career. In looking back on it and in writing this book, I realized that I was a woman of my time. I grew up in the 1950s when expectations for women were extremely low. Women weren't expected to do anything except get married and have children, which I did. I was fulfilling societal expectations. I worked very hard and was pretty unhappy about all of that because doors seemed so closed. I grew up in New York, and my family moved to Los Angeles when I was 12. I went to an academic high school where everybody went to college, but you were not expected to do anything or to use your college education to create a career. You were expected to find a husband, get married, and have children, and that is what I did.   So then what led you from that to the academic world?   Well, I wasn't very good at being a housewife, and I found it hard to be home with young children all the time. I had a lot of growing up to do, and my poor kids and I grew up together. But I stayed home with the children for a couple of years and it was not a happy experience. I think that was the time in my life when I was close to being clinically depressed. I had friends who said, "You have just got to go back to school." Well, I didn't know what else to do. I thought that was probably good advice, I had very good grades as an undergraduate. So, I was able to get into a graduate program and went back to school when my children were six months and two years old and somehow survived that. Looking back on it, I don't know how I did. That was the beginning of a long, slow progress towards a career. I went to graduate school because I wanted to make sure I had a job at the end of it. I trained to be a laboratory technician and got a job when I finished college. But even in graduate school, I didn't take what I was doing very seriously. I wasn't treated as if I was a serious student. I was told that the only reason they were giving me a fellowship was because no men had applied that year. I thought, "Well, nobody's going to take me seriously, I'm not going to take myself seriously either. I'm just going to do this." And at the end of it, I knew I would have a job.   So what happened that got you interested in academic life, and food issues in particular?   The transition was on my first teaching job. I went to Brandeis University as a postdoctoral fellow. By that time I was divorced and remarried. My husband had a job in Boston. I got a job as a postdoctoral fellow with Brandeis. That led to what I call the swimming pool epiphany, which was a realization in a moment that I could not have an academic career as a bench scientist and handle two young children at the same time. There were women who could do that, but I was not one of them. I was a bench scientist, and working in a developmental biology laboratory. My kids had swimming lessons at Brandeis on Saturday morning. I stayed home with them, because my husband had his own job. He was an assistant professor at Harvard, and he had to work on weekends to keep up with his work. One day there was a much longer swimming lesson for some reason, so much longer that I thought, "Well, I'll just go to my lab. And there won't be anybody there, and I might actually be able to get a little work done." I walked into my lab on a Saturday morning and everybody was there, everybody! The lab director, his wife, the lab technician, the graduate students, the other postdocs, everybody was there except me. I didn't even know that people were there on Saturday morning. I thought, "Oh, okay, this is why everybody treats me like I'm not getting any work done." And, "Oh, okay, THIS IS WHY I'm not getting any work done." That was the end of my lab career. I started looking for a teaching job right away. I knew I couldn't do it. So I took a teaching job at Brandeis, and learned how to learn, which was very useful. On my last year at Brandeis, I got handed a nutrition course to teach. As I like to describe it, it was like falling in love and I've never looked back.   That is so interesting. And What happened after Brandeis?   Well, after Brandeis, my husband got a job at UCSF in San Francisco. I went along as an accompanying spouse, not really realizing the terrible political position that I was in - because I had gotten a job because I was my husband's wife. The job seemed fantastic, I was a halftime associate dean for human biology programs, and then the other part of my time I was teaching nutrition to medical students. I was able to keep that going for eight years, until it and the marriage fell apart at the same time. Then I went to public health school, and actually got credentialed in nutrition. I did a master's in public health nutrition at the University of California, Berkeley. And then, when the UCSF job ended, I went to Washington for two years with a very fancy title: Senior Nutrition Policy Advisor in the Department of Health and Human Services. There I edited the 1988 Surgeon General's report on nutrition and health.   That was a landmark report. But there's a question I'm dying to ask, what was it about nutrition that made you fall in love with the field?   Oh, it was so much fun! It was so much more fun than molecular biology and cell biology. For one thing, the papers were so much easier to read. When I first started teaching undergraduate nutrition, I could give undergraduate students original research papers in nutrition and they could critically evaluate those papers - almost without knowing very much about science. They could see that the number of study subjects was very small, that the studies weren't very well controlled, that there were all kinds of other factors that could've influenced the outcome of those studies. I thought this is just the best way of teaching undergraduate biology I could think of, because everybody could relate to it in a very personal way. It was really fun to teach. Still is.   You're a very gifted communicator. So I can imagine how you would enjoy teaching. You've had an interesting journey through the nutrition field itself, having started at kind of the basic level, with a biological background, teaching about research papers in the field, and then transitioning to having this major focus on the policy side of things. I'm imagining that time in Washington you just discussed was pretty influential in that. Is that right?   Oh, it certainly was. You know, I took the job because I was told, "If you're interested in nutrition policy, this is the place to be." I was in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, which is responsible for a large number of very important public health initiatives. And I thought the Surgeon General's report was really worth two years of my time. I ended up writing most of it, and certainly editing a great deal of it. It was an education in how politics works. I had come from Berkeley, where we didn't really understand the difference between Republicans and Democrats. We thought both of them were mainstream, and didn't really get it. Oh, I learned the difference very quickly. It was an education in how Washington works; what you can say and what you can't say; how you get things done politically; how you try to work across bipartisan lines, but how difficult that can be. Also, I met people in agencies who ended up being extremely helpful in later stages of my career. If I had a question, I knew who to ask. I was on committees, I was just really involved in a great deal of nutrition-policy activities in Washington during that two-year period. It was a very steep learning curve, and one that I consider immensely valuable.   And was it during that period where you came to develop a richer view of the influence of food industry on the way food policy decisions are made?   On the first day of my job in Washington, I had just arrived from California. The director of the office I was in explained that even if the research showed that eating less meat would be better for health, the Surgeon General's report could never say "Eat less meat." Because that was a politically impossible statement. The Department of Agriculture would complain to Congress, and the report would never be able to come out. That was, as I am fond of saying, no paranoid fantasy. It was absolutely true. An enormous part of my job in Washington was to fend off the Department of Agriculture official who was most interested in making sure that the Surgeon General's report did not say one negative word about red meat. And of course, it didn't. It said, "Eat less saturated fat," and you were supposed to know that saturated fat is a euphemism for meat.   The role you played was really phenomenally important, and that document that you worked two years on was really very important at the time. So what did you do after that?   Well, I discovered quite early in my time in Washington DC that I was not suited for a Washington DC career. I tend to be outspoken and say what I think, and that's really not acceptable in those circumstances. I was constantly getting my boss in trouble for things that I said. I discovered quite quickly that in addition to the Republican and Democrat split in Washington, there was a split between people who liked New York better than Washington, and those who liked Washington better than New York. I quickly discovered that going to New York would be going home, in a sense. I started looking for jobs in New York right away. After a year or so, the job chairing the Home Economics Department at NYU came up. I applied for it, and happily got it.   Boy, that term - home economics - really brings you back, doesn't it?   It does, and I thought it was hilarious, because here I was with a degree in molecular biology, and another one in public health nutrition. I was coming to chair a Department of Home Economics. Couldn't believe they still existed. I had been hired to change the department into something more appropriate for the 20th, if not the 21st century. And I didn't realize how hard that was going to be. But it was actually the only job I got, so I was happy to do it. It was in New York; it was in The Village; it was at NYU. Which was, at the time, kind of a third-rate institution, but with a commitment to improve dramatically. Which it did very, very quickly, over the next several years. It was very exciting to be part of that development. And of course, eventually the department shifted from home economics to food studies and nutrition, which is what it is now.   When you bring up home economics, it reminds me of being in high school in South Bend, Indiana, where the girls went to home economics classes and the boys went to shop class and learned to do woodworking and things. What a difference there is today.   I was happy to learn how to cook. I think they should bring cooking back. It's a great thing to know how to do, and it certainly improves the quality of food that you eat at home. That's where I learned to cook - in home economics, in junior high school. But the home economics department that I inherited had 25 different home economics programs run by five faculty. It was so absolutely amazing, and there was much work to be done to kind of clean up some of that. Fortunately, I had a lot of administrative help, because the university was improving rapidly, and it wanted that department to improve too.   You're so right about cooking and how important the skill it is. I do a lot more cooking these days than I do woodworking or using a drill press. I wish I could have gone with the girls into that home economics class back then.   Well, I wish I could've gone to the shop, I would've loved to know how to fix cars.   Ahh, there you go. So at NYU, you created, I think, what was the first university program in food studies, is that right?   The first one called "Food Studies." There was a program at Boston University in gastronomy that had been kicked off by Julia Child and Jacque Pepin, but I knew that gastronomy would not work at a rapidly-improving university that took its academics very seriously. But there were, at NYU, a great many programs with "Studies" in their title. And I thought if we had food studies, we could get away with it. And we did. We were very, very fortunate in being able to do that, because a program in hotel management that the department ran was being taken away from us and transferred into another school. And it was an extremely lucrative program, and everybody felt very sorry for losing the income from that program. And so, when we came up with the idea of food studies, once people got over the initial question, "What's that?" And we were able to explain to them that food is a multi-trillion-dollar-a-year industry; the major public health problems in the world are connected to food; agriculture is connected to food; climate change is connected to food - in fact, practically any problem you can think of is connected to food in some way. Then we were permitted to go ahead and do that. We were very, very fortunate in creating a new field, because the "New York Times" wrote about the program the week after New York State approved it. The most amazing thing happened! We had people in our offices that afternoon holding up copies of the clipping and saying, "I've waited all my life for this program." In a sense, we created the program that many of us wish we could've taken when we went to school, because it's a program about food and culture. It now has agricultural components in it, although it didn't at the beginning, but it does now. It's kind of food and everything. Our students love it, they all come into the program wanting to change the world through food, and I'm greatly in favor of encouraging them to try to make the world better through food. I think it's a great way to do it.   I found the same thing in my teaching. The students are so keen on these issues, they get more sophisticated and knowledgeable every year. Interest in food and climate change, like you said, is just booming. And boy, it's really heartening to know that there are so many young people interested in taking on this issue. And thanks to you and others who started those early programs that really paved the path for everything that exists today. Let me ask you about your book "Food Politics", which is really a classic. What inspired you to write that?   I had gone to a meeting at the National Cancer Institute in the early 1990s, and it was about behavioral causes of cancer, mostly cigarettes. This was my first meeting with the main anti-smoking physicians and scientists who were taking extremely activist positions against smoking. They did slideshows, and the slides showed cigarette-company marketing in remote areas of the world: the jungles of Africa, and the high Himalayan mountains. One of the presentations was about marketing to children, and showed pictures of the Joe Camel ad everyplace where kids hang out. I was kind of stunned by it. Not because I didn't know that cigarette companies marketed everywhere, and marketed to children. I did know those things, but I had never paid any attention to it. I had never systematically thought about it. Cigarette advertisements and advertising was so much a part of the landscape at that time that it was unnoticeable. It just kind of disappeared into the woodwork. I walked out of those presentations thinking, "We should be doing this for Coca-Cola!" We nutritionists should be looking at the companies that are marketing products that are not particularly healthful, and looking at how they're doing it. So, I started paying attention. I started looking at food-industry marketing, fast-food marketing, soda marketing everyplace I went. And I started writing articles about it. In the late 1990s, I had a sabbatical coming up, I needed a sabbatical project, and by that time I had figured out that NYU valued books. I had been trained in molecular biology, where the only thing that's valued is original research in very prestigious journals. But NYU values books, it's very humanities-based. So, I thought I could take those articles and put them together into a book. That's where "Food Politics" came about. It was a little bit more complicated than that, but that was basically the origin of "Food Politics".   It is one amazing book, and it had so much influence on generations of students, and researchers, and advocates. And I thank you for writing it. It really has had a big impact.   Well, thank you for that. I have to say, I thought I was just stating the obvious.   Well, obvious to you, maybe, because you had the insight to look into these things before other people did. You really were a pioneer there. A lot of people believe that the job of an academic is to do their research, do their scholarly work, do their teaching, and then that's it. Not to go out and try to change the way the public thinks about things, talk to the press, try to change policies, and do things like that. The thought is, once you stray into that territory, you're biased toward a certain point of view and you lose your objectivity as a scientist. Now, I certainly don't believe that's the case, and boy, if anybody epitomizes that sort of philosophy, it's you. How did you sort that through in those early days, as your work was moving into the advocacy arena?   Well, I think there were two things that happened. One was that I went into a department that did not have laboratories. So laboratory science was out of the question. I had to find something to do as an academic where I could publish in scholarly journals. And yet, I wasn't doing original kinds of research, so I had to solve that problem. But the other was the miracle of NYU: they hired me as a full professor with tenure. I had tenure! I could do anything I wanted without fear of reprisals, or without fear of being fired because I was saying something that would offend someone. I have to say, never in my 30 years at NYU did anybody ever suggest that I keep my mouth shut. So it was absolutely the right place for me, and, I guess, the right time. But I had, I guess, they are biases. I had them for the beginning. I think it would be better if people ate more healthfully. I think it would be better if we had a food system that was better for climate change. I think it would be better if people ate diets that reduced hunger, and reduced their risk of chronic disease. I think those are values that are really important. To be able to do work that promotes those values made perfect sense to me. You know, I realize that I'm looked at as incredibly biased. I never get appointed to federal committees, and I have not been invited to the forthcoming White House conference, because I'm considered much too controversial. I've always found it ironic that people who work for food companies or who think that food-company marketing is perfectly appropriate are not considered biased. That's the world we live in.   You know, it's interesting how the academic world construes the concept of impact, and journal articles, and how many times people cite your articles. The outside world might look in on that definition of impact and just think it's ludicrous. You think of impact in a different way, and I do as well. If you're able to harness the work that occurs in the academic world in order to create the kind of social changes that you're talking about you really are kind of maximizing the potential of what exists inside the academic world. Do you agree with that?   Oh, absolutely, it's publish or perish, and I quickly discovered that food studies was a wonderful umbrella for the kind of work that I wanted to do. And it valued books, it values articles, opinion pieces. I mean, the way I describe my work is I write heavily-footnoted editorials. These're opinion pieces that're backed up by large amounts of science. I think that's a valuable contribution. I'm not able to measure the kind of impact that I have. I have no idea what it is, and I don't know how to measure it. But I'm doing the kind of work that feels good to me. I'm doing work that I feel good about and I feel is worthwhile. I hope that other people will pick it up, and that students will follow in footsteps. And one of the reasons for writing the memoir was to encourage students, no matter what field they're in, to get some idea that they can do these kinds of things, it's okay. You can get paid for it!   That's not to mention changing public opinion or putting pressure on political leaders to do things outside of industry influence, and things. You know, it reminds me of an op-ed you and I wrote together in the "New York Times" some years ago, on the World Health Organization and the stance it was taking on sugar. Those things need to be made public, people need to know about those. And sometimes academics are in a pretty good position to highlight some of those really important issues.   Oh, absolutely, and all of that research skill that we have, all of those references and citations give a credibility to the kind of work that we do that is pretty unimpeachable. You know, I'm often attacked for my opinions. But never on the research that backs them up, which is kind of interesting. You may not like what I say, but I've got evidence to back it up.   Yes! Speaking of attacks, over the years, I've had so many of these sort of things. Some really nasty and threatening and some a little more humorous. I remember somebody once sent me a letter that said they wished a pox on my house. I wasn't sure what I was to do with that. Like, I mean, should I go to Home Depot and buy a pox detector? I didn't really know what to do. Heck, you must've had a ton of that kind of stuff. Has that ever bothered you?   Well, you would be amazed at how little of it I've gotten. I mean, there was one right at the beginning when "Food Politics" came out, there were a lot of attacks. "Doesn't she know anything about personal responsibility," and "Who is she to tell people what to eat," and that kind of thing. And then the famous letter from a lawyer saying I maligned sugar by saying that soft drinks contain sugar, when I, of all people, should've known that they don't contain sugar, they contain high-fructose corn syrup. Which I thought was hilariously funny, because high-fructose corn syrup is a form of sugar. But nothing ever came of it. I've heard remarkably little overt criticism or that kind of thing. What I have heard from people is I talked to one person who said he was hired by a soda company to track every single thing I was writing and then develop positions that the soda industry could use to refute what I had said. But I didn't know anything about that until that confession later on. I was kind of amazed. He got paid to do that! Yeah, I thought that was pretty good.   That's so interesting, so you're creating jobs. Back to that time you were in government, working on the Surgeon General's report, you were noting a lot of influence by the food industry on nutrition guidelines, nutrition policies, etc. If we fast-forward to today, do you think nutrition guidelines, nutrition policies, are less influenced by the food industry?   Absolutely not. Of course they're still influenced. You can look at it in the dietary guidelines. They still talk about salt, sugar, and fat. They don't talk about the foods that those substances come from. They're still very cautious about advising less of any particular agricultural product, because the pushback is enormous. The meat industry is enormously influential over government policy. I mean, we have government agencies that are captured by corporations. We see this in many, many fields, but it's certainly true in food. Everybody is worried about the FDA these days because of its cozy relationships with food companies. I just did a blog post this week on user fees. I don't think the FDA should be getting its money for doing inspections of food corporations from the corporations it's inspecting. They can't possibly do that in an independent way. The Department of Agriculture has long been infamous for working for the meat and dairy industries. The food industry likes the perks it gets, doesn't want them changing, and it uses the political system in the way that all corporations use the political system. I think there's more recognition of food-industry influence over what we eat and how we eat, and that's very gratifying.   Are there things you think could be done to lessen this influence, if you could wave the magic wand?   Yes, get rid of Citizens United to start with, so that corporations can't buy elections. I think there's a lot we could do. I think we need an agricultural system that is focused on public health, not on growing commodities that feed animals and fuel automobiles. I think one of the greatest travesties in the food system is that 30 or 40% of United States corn is used to make ethanol. That's just shocking. In a world in which food is a really big issue, we should be growing food for people, not for automobiles, and not nearly as much for animals. You know, and I think there're all kinds of policies that would promote public health in a way that we really need promoting. We need universal school meals; we need a healthcare system, that would be nice; and we need an agricultural and food system that is focused on reducing hunger and reducing chronic disease, particularly obesity-related chronic disease, which the government doesn't want to touch. Because touching it means putting some limits on what food companies can do. I don't think that food companies should be permitted to market junk food, especially to children.     Bio   Marion Nestle is Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, Emerita, at New York University, in the department she chaired from 1988-2003 and from which she retired in September 2017. She is also Visiting Professor of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell. She holds honorary degrees from Transylvania University in Kentucky and the Macaulay Honors College of the City University of New York. She earned a Ph.D. in molecular biology and an M.P.H. in public health nutrition from the University of California, Berkeley. Previous faculty positions were at Brandeis University and the UCSF School of Medicine. From 1986-88, she was senior nutrition policy advisor in the Department of Health and Human Services and editor of the 1988 Surgeon General's Report on Nutrition and Health. Her research and writing examine scientific and socioeconomic influences on food choice and its consequences, emphasizing the role of food industry marketing. She is the author, co-author, or co-editor of fourteen books, several of them prize-winning, most notably Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (2002); Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety (2003); What to Eat (2006); Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics, with Dr. Malden Nesheim (2012); Eat, Drink Vote: An Illustrated Guide to Food Politics (2013); and Soda Politics: Taking on Big Soda (and Winning) in 2015. She also has written two books about pet food, Pet Food Politics: The Chihuahua in the Coal Mine (2008) and Feed Your Pet Right in 2010 (also with Dr. Nesheim). She published Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat, in 2018.  Her most recent book, with Kerry Trueman, Let's Ask Marion: What You Need to Know about the Politics of Food, Nutrition, and Health, was published in September 2020.  Her forthcoming book with University of California Press is a memoir to be published in 2022.

One Real Good Thing with Ellie Krieger
Cook with the Seasons with Jacques Pepin

One Real Good Thing with Ellie Krieger

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 24:21 Very Popular


Jacques Pepin, with his renowned warmth and wisdom, shares why cooking with the seasons is such a game changer for a healthy life full of flavor. He is the author of 30+ cookbooks, and has received 16 James Beard Foundation Awards, including the Lifetime Achievement Award. A longtime close friend of Julia Child, he starred with her in a PBS series called Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home, which won both an Emmy Award and a James Beard Foundation Award. Ellie considers him one of the best culinary teachers, and biggest inspirations in the culinary world.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BHA Podcast & Blast with Hal Herring
Ep. 141 - Nate Schweber - Public Lands Journalist

BHA Podcast & Blast with Hal Herring

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 112:49


BHA Podcast & Blast, Ep. 141: Public Lands Journalist Nate Schweber A flamboyant Western politician, yelling hatred for the federal government, accusing anyone who questioned him of being a “communist,” secretly planning a takeover and selloff of 230 million acres of public land to his cronies. Sounds like today, yes? Well, it was 1947, and it almost worked. Montana-born, New York City-seasoned reporter and writer Nate Schweber uncovers the whole sordid, instructive history in his wild ride of a book, This America of Ours: Bernard and Avis DeVoto and the Forgotten Fight to Save the Wild, a chronicle of the life of one man, DeVoto, the greatest Western historian who ever lived, and his wife, Avis,  genius editor, publisher, devoted friend and promoter of the chef Julia Child, who stood up against some of the most powerful and corrupt forces of their time. And, with the help of the American people, they won. 

Kitchen Prescription with Kelsey Nixon
My Favorite Last Minute Dinner from Costco | 031

Kitchen Prescription with Kelsey Nixon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 18:51 Very Popular


This week is all about my favorites from Costco. I've been a member for years, nearly decades, and I can't wait to share with you the secret to making a quick and easy weeknight dinner for my family using 5 or 6 Costco staples. Although I usually get our order through delivery, you can't beat the samples and the occasional Hot Dog... even Julia Child was a fan! What are your go-to Kirkland products? For more about the recipes and items that I mentioned in this week's episode, follow me over on Instagram @kelseynixon

The Ultimate Dish
Runner Kelly Newlon Makes Delicious Food for Ultra-Endurance Athletes

The Ultimate Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 52:16 Transcription Available


In today's episode, we speak with Kelly Newlon, co-owner of Real Athlete Diets (RAD), a catering company based in Boulder, CO that focuses on feeding ultra-endurance athletes and outdoor enthusiasts with delicious, performance-oriented food.Kelly is an avid runner and has also cooked in professional kitchens since she was a teenager. She combined her love for sport and culinary arts to create RAD with her husband Morgan. Listen as we chat with Kelly about her passion for ultra trail running, making cakes for Julia Child, attending culinary school, and how she fuels endurance athletes with food. 

Comedy
Family Sues Funeral Home Because of Wrong Body in Casket by Disturbingly Pragmatic with Dave and Paul

Comedy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 54:36


This Episode has EVERYTHING!Subscribe to Disturbingly Pragmatic on iHeartRadio https://ihr.fm/3f0Tr0cSubscribe on Apple Podcasts - https://apple.co/3Sf4GAISubscribe Everywhere Else - https://bit.ly/3Sf4OAcIt's got:Dave Misses Candy!Doug and Dave are Kicking Their Coke Habits Together!Pepsi is Disgusting!Bubbles On My Tongue!We Love Our Female Fans!A One-Stop Shop for Streaming?! What a Great Idea!Nerdy Paul!Cable 2.0!Paul's Random Tangent Thoughts!It's Amy Sedaris Night!Dave was a Funeral Director?!?!THAT AIN'T MY MEEMAW!A Full Set of Teeth? MEEMAW DIDN'T HAVE TEETH!!Who's That Girl?!Negotiating Pleats!We Love LADbible!Alan/Allan Sure is a Dumbass!Do Better, Paul!Would You Like Bread with Your Weed? Yes Please!The Munchies!Paul Loves a Girthy Cut!LEONARD!Need a Weapon? Use an Urn!Nude Florida Man was 'ARRASTED'!Grandma Full Brick of Glass!Grandma's Bitch Slap from Beyond the Grave!Ivana Trump - Buried on the Back 9!The Gold Plated Promethean Casket!We're Minuscule in the Universe!"The Good Place" Was Great!D'Arcy Carden's Janet Rocked!Florida Man Is 31...Yet Looks 50! Drugs Are a Hell of a Drug!Florida Man Charged with DUI in Walmart!Kendra Krinklesac!Drunk Uncle!Paul is a Fun Drunk!Instant Asshole - Just Add Alcohol!Penis Questions! Growers, Not Showers!Paul's TikTok Addiction Loophole!Cockroaches!Eating Nasty Things to Survive!Julia Child's Cum Cakes!Lots of Dead Animals!Boner Pills!World's Oldest Porn Star!Filthy, Mouldy Berries!Fear the Bears!Paul Loves to Read Questions Twice!The North American House Hippo!Brazen Bulls!Eating Boogers!Fuck You, Mr. Gilliland!Itchy Balls!Wafting Farts!~~~~~~~~~~~Indie Drop-InAll content legally licensed from the original creator. Thank you to Disturbingly Pragmatic with Dave and Paul for the great episode. You can find Indie Drop-In at https://indiedropin.comCheck out Indie Drop-In Networks other showsTrue Crime - http://www.dummies.fan/truecrimeScary Time - http://www.dummies.fan/scarytimeHelp Indie Drop-In support indie creators by buying us a coffee!https://buymeacoffee.com/indiedropinBrands can advertise on Indie Drop-In using Patreonhttps://patreon.com/indiedropinTwitter: https://twitter.com/indiedropinInstagram: https://instagram.com/indiedropinFacebook: https://facebook.com/indiedropinAny advertising found in this episode is inserted by Indie Drop-In and not endorsed by the Creator.If you would like to have your show featured go to http://indiedropin.com/creators~~~~~~~~~~~

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Story Prompt Friday: What Ruckus Might You Accomplish With Your Very Own Blowtorch?

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 2:56


Hello to you listening in Whitefish, Montana!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is Stories From Women Who Walk with 60 Seconds for Story Prompt Friday and your host, Diane Wyzga.Julia Child charmed the icing right off my cake with her singular voice and culinary life story. Julia said, “Every woman should have a blowtorch.” I imagine she meant a kitchen blowtorch for caramelizing sugar, blistering peppers or melting cheese.Julia came to mind some years ago when I was working as a shepherd at Juniper Moon Fiber Farm. One summer day it fell to me to clean out the elevated chicken coop. With my bandit-style kerchief in place I scrubbed the floors and walls with a wire brush before flooding the coop with a hose to wash out all that dust and debris. Now, how to get it dry? Blowtorch!We happened to have a professional grade propane blow torch on the farm. I fired it up, aimed it inside the coop, and using a sweeping back and forth motion it was soon dry as a bone. What I remember is the sense of accomplishment I had.Story Prompt: Imagine you got your hands on your very own blowtorch? What ruckus might you accomplish, metaphorically speaking, of course? Write that story!Practical Tip: The magic of stories is also in the sharing. If you wish share your story with someone or something.   All that matters is you have a story.You're invited: “Come for the stories - stay for the magic!” Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, and join us next time! Remember to stop by the website, check out the Services, arrange a Discovery Call, and Opt In to stay current with Diane and Quarter Moon Story Arts and on LinkedIn.  Stories From Women Who Walk Production TeamPodcaster: Diane F Wyzga & Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 to Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts

Krisha & Frank Show
Frank & Friends Show 0083

Krisha & Frank Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 42:53


Frank Murphy is joined by opera singer and executive Kathryn Frady. Kathryn says she remembered how to sit up straight on camera and was complimented for it when doing another video interview.  Frank made a YouTube short of Kathryn singing at Moonshine Mountain Coaster. His friend Bean used the audio during the intro of an episode of the podcast A Cup of Tea and a Chat. He also made shorts with video clips of Jeff Detrow and Nate Evans.  Kathryn was mentioned on the podcast Quitters Never Give Up. They played a clip of Kathryn's story about the man who showed up at her office to tell her that he wrote her an angry email but didn't send it.  One of Kathryn's employees at Opéra Louisiane admitted to “stalking” her online before Kathryn was hired. She discovered that Kathryn was “fabulous.”  Kathryn staged an opera performance of Bon Appetit paired with Leonard Bernstein's The Four Recipes in Baton Rouge last week. The libretto comes from an episode of The French Chef, starring Julia Child.  Frank used to watch The French Chef when he was young. His sister once baked a Bacardi Rum Cake that was photographed for magazine ads and a recipe card. Frank met Julia Child when he booked her for an interview on KLOS-FM. Frank and his wife saw Julia Child's kitchen in a museum.  Kathryn Frady, Whitney Wells, and Kayla Beard will sing in a concert called Stalactites, Sopranos, and Stilettos on Sunday, September 18, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. inside Historic Cherokee Caverns. They will sing some opera arias and some musical theater songs. Tickets are $15 and are on sale at https://www.marblecityopera.com/tickets  Frank points out that Kathryn is half-British and has dual citizenship. King Charles III declared September 19 to be a bank holiday because of Queen Elizabeth's funeral. Since banks are closed and school is canceled in England, Frank thinks Kathryn should be obligated to cancel the Marble City Opera board meeting that day.  Kathryn has an apartment in downtown Baton Rouge. The building has a rooftop pool. Her dog Sasha is becoming a city dog when living in Baton Rouge.  Kathryn enjoys eating gulf fish like yellowtail and redfish. Her new favorite restaurant is Cecelia Creole Bistro, which serves boudin balls. The restaurant also serves Sazerac Rye. Frank texted Kathryn when he had a Sazerac in Michigan last week.  Kathryn has a full schedule of performances and events in Knoxville, Santa Fe, Baton Rouge, and Huntsville.  Sign up for a 30-day trial of Audible Premium Plus and get a free premium selection that's yours to keep. Go to http://AudibleTrial.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  Come to the Secret City Improv Festival on September 30 and October 1, 2022 at the Historic Grove Theater in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Use the discount code FRANK at checkout for 25% off when purchasing tickets at https://secretcityimprovfest.com/tickets  Find us online https://www.FrankAndFriendsShow.com/  Please subscribe to our YouTube channel at https://YouTube.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  and hit the bell for notifications.  Find the audio of the show on major podcast apps including Spotify, Apple, Google, iHeart, and Audible.  Support the Frank & Friends Show by purchasing some of our high-quality merchandise at https://frank-friends-show.creator-spring.com  Find us on social media:  https://www.facebook.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.instagram.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.twitter.com/FrankNFriendsSh  Thanks!

Women at Halftime Podcast
176.Roundabout Perspective -Self Perspective

Women at Halftime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 21:31


This article discusses the importance of self-perspective in achieving our goals. This is my third of three articles on how perspectives enable us to stop circling the roundabout and exit toward our summit. This article will focus on how our self-perspective can impact our success. Most of us care a lot - and maybe even too much - about what others think. We worry if others like us. We worry about fitting in. We worry about wearing, saying and doing the “right” things. Don't waste your precious time and energy in this space! We need to embrace the relationship that we have with ourselves - and honor our perspectives. When we learn to find validation from within ourselves, we can let go of worrying about what others think - and focus on what we think. We discuss how self-perspective can boost or derail your forward movement and how to stay on track toward your point B. Full article here: https://goalsforyourlife.com/blog/self-perspective

The Gardenangelists
Save Some Seeds and Send Birthday Greetings!

The Gardenangelists

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 46:05 Very Popular


Dee and Carol talk about self-sowing flowers, green bean success, saving seeds and homesteading.Link to our Substack newsletter with more information about this week's episode. Be sure and subscribe to get the newsletter directly in your email inbox!Links:   The Okies for Monarchs Central Oklahoma wildflower seed from Johnston Seed Company Celosia seeds from Floret Flowers Dee's zinnia video on InstagramZinnias Oklahoma series from Johnny's Selected SeedsProvider green beans from Botanical Interests (affiliate link) Carol's Green Bean story   On the Bookshelf:   The First-Time Homesteader: A Complete Beginner's Guide to Starting and Loving Your New Homestead by Jessica Soward.  (Amazon Link) and check out her other book: The First-Time Gardener: Growing Vegetables.  (Amazon Link)Funk Farm Miniature Herefords on Facebook and InstagramRabbit Holes:  Christopher Kimball's Milk Street, and their podcast,  Milk Street Radio with an  episode on Julia Child.  The Mayfair Bookshop: A Novel of Nancy Mitford and the Pursuit of Happiness by Eliza Knight and Heywood Hill Bookshop (a real place!) plus two more books:  Garden Stories, edited by  Diane Secker Tesdell and  Stories of Trees, Woods, and the Forest, edited by Fiona Stafford.   Flylady, to tame the chaos.Central Oklahoma Daylily Society, plant sale September 10th! If you live in the area, Dee will have some of her daylilies in the sale.Happy Birthday, Dee!Affiliate link to Botanical Interest Seeds. (If you buy something from them after using this link, we earn a small commission at no cost to you. This helps us continue to bring this podcast to you ad-free!)  Book links are also affiliate links.Email us anytime at TheGardenangelists@gmail.com  For more info on Carol and her books, visit her website.  Visit her blog May Dreams Gardens.For more info on Dee and her book, visit her website.  Visit her blog Red Dirt Ramblings.Don't forget to sign up for our newsletters, via our websites!

CONSUMED with Jaime Lewis
Julia Child Foundation chair Eric Spivey, Montecito, CA

CONSUMED with Jaime Lewis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 63:28


Julia Child, the godmother of American cuisine, spent the final years of her life in Montecito, California, just up Highway 101 from where I live in San Luis Obispo. She was a big fan of Santa Barbara and the Central Coast, and she invested her energy here until her death in 2004. Since then, her longtime friend Eric Spivey has grown the Julia Child Foundation for Gastronomy and the Culinary Arts into a purposeful organization that consults with media like the recent documentary “Julia” and the HBO Max series, also called “Julia.” The foundation also presents the Julia Child Award in Washington DC, in association with the Smithsonian Museum, and makes grants to those who influence the way America cooks, eats and drinks. I visited Eric in his Montecito home and indulged in a bit of Julia lore. I also learned about ongoing events like Taste of Santa Barbara and the Santa Barbara Culinary Experience.    Websites: juliachildfoundation.org, sbce.events Instagram: @juliachildfoundation, @sbculinaryexperience

Cooking with Bruce and Mark
In Celebration Of Julia Child, Our One-Minute Cooking Tip, An Interview with Anna Voloshyna, Fresh Summer Corn & More!

Cooking with Bruce and Mark

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 30:08


Welcome! We're Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough, the authors of almost three dozen cookbooks under our own names (plus two knitting books from Bruce and a memoir from Mark)--and that's not counting the books we've ghost-written for celebrities. This is our food and cooking podcast. In each episode, we explore something we're thinking about in food, offer a cooking tip, interview a chef or an author, and tell you what's making us happy in food this week. We're so pleased you're along on the journey with us. Thank you. Here are the segments of this episode of COOKING WITH BRUCE AND MARK: [00:58] In celebration of Julia Child, who would have had her 110th birthday a couple of weeks ago. Here are some things about this U. S. culinary icon you might not have known. [08:25] Our one-minute cooking tip: how to ripen bananas fast. [09:16] Bruce's interview with Anna Voloshyna, the author of the new Ukranian cookbook BUDMO. [27:25] What's making us happy in food this week: fresh summer corn in salads.

Inside Julia's Kitchen
Meet Fabian Bravo

Inside Julia's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 56:20 Very Popular


This week on Inside Julia's Kitchen, host Todd Schulkin welcomes winemaker Fabian Bravo of The Brander Vineyard in Los Olivos in the Santa Ynez Valley. They discuss Santa Barbara Sauvignon Blanc and wine produced in the region's seven AVAs, Fabian's path to becoming a winemaker, and Casita de Bravo, the wine label he runs with his wife, Megan. As always, Fabian shares his Julia Moment.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Inside Julia's Kitchen by becoming a member!Inside Julia's Kitchen is Powered by Simplecast.

Plant-Strong
Ep. 158: Jane and Ann Esselstyn - Be a Plant Based Woman Warrior

Plant-Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 85:43


It's time to live fierce, stay bold, and eat deliciously with my Mom, Ann, and sister, Jane Esselstyn!  That's right, we're celebrating the release of their new book, Be a Plant-Based Woman Warrior, which is out and available now. It's always a party with these two and I'm fortunate to have had the opportunity to be with them in person just a few weeks ago when we were all together at the Esselstyn Family Farm. You know what that means – it can get a little nutty when the three of us are together because that Esselstyn feistiness is ALIVE and WELL! Be a Plant-Based Woman Warrior isn't your typical cookbook. Truly, it's a peek into our family history with stories, photos, quotes, and recipes from three generations of Esselstyns. Mostly, this book pays homage to the people who started it all - my parents - for forging and navigating that undiscovered path of plant-based nutrition at a time when no one understood how vital it was (including me and my siblings). Here we all are decades later and I'm so proud to sit with Jane and Ann and share some of the inspiration and recipes with you today. My Mother has been called the “Julia Child of Plant-Based cooking” and you'll see why after you dig through some of the recipes and photos in this gorgeous book. This truly is a fun and inspiring message of hope for all women to improve their own health so that they remain strong, bold, and fierce in body and mind! (and let's face it – there aren't many people MORE fierce than Jane and Ann!) More About Be a Plant-Based Woman Warrior At eighty-six and fifty-six, respectively, Ann and Jane are pictures of ageless health and vibrancy and spend their days hiking, doing yoga, gardening, cooking, and spreading the message that diet is the key to living a happy, strong, and disease-free life. Be a Plant-Based Woman Warrior explains how women everywhere can pass on this important legacy in their own families through the generations, and illuminates how plants powerfully support a woman's body and mind. This cookbook is a call to action and a message of hope for any and all to be Plant-Based Women Warriors filled with vitality and in control of their own health. Episode Resources Order Be a Plant-Based Woman Warrior Watch the Episode on YouTube Episode Website Jane Esselstyn's Website Jane and Ann's YouTube Channel 11th Annual Plant-Stock - Reserve Your Ticket Now! To stock up on the best-tasting, most convenient, 100% PLANTSTRONG foods, check out all of our PLANTSTRONG products HERE. Give us a like on the PLANTSTRONG Facebook Page and check out what being PLANSTRONG is all about. We always keep it stocked full of new content and updates, tips for healthy living, delicious recipes, and you can even catch me LIVE on there! We've also got an Instagram! Check us out and share your favorite PLANTSTRONG products and why you love it! Don't forget to tag us using #goplantstrong

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
39 - Julia Child: WW2 Spy Who Created Shark Repellent Cakes

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 15:40


The Fantastic History Of Food Podcast Notes Intro Julia Child was an American cooking teacher, author, television personality, and apparently, a WW2 spy that invented shark repellent cake—follow along as Nick Charlie Key tells the strange but true storyHost: Nick Charlie Key (@nickcharliekey)Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgEven the most famous and lauded among us still have a few tasty secrets up their sleeves, and today we're going to dive into this fascinating side of one of modern cookings most famous gourmands: Julia Child.-------------------Thank you to Athletic Greens for being a sponsor for this episode.To make it easy, Athletic Greens will give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit www.athleticgreens.com/EMERGING to take ownership of your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance! -------------------Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/foodhistorypodFind transcripts and sources on the website: www.foodhistorypodcast.com-------------------References:https://allthatsinteresting.com/julia-child-spyhttps://www.cia.gov/stories/story/julia-child-and-the-oss-recipe-for-shark-repellent/https://www.cia.gov/stories/story/julia-child-cooking-up-spy-ops-for-oss/https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2022/05/02/julia-child-hbo-oss-sharks/https://www.history.com/news/julia-child-oss-spy-wwii-shark-repellent

The Fantastic History Of Food
39 - Julia Child: WW2 Spy Who Created Shark Repellent Cakes

The Fantastic History Of Food

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 15:40


Even the most famous and lauded among us still have a few tasty secrets up their sleeves, and today we're going to dive into this fascinating side of one of modern cookings most famous gourmands: Julia Child.-------------------Thank you to Athletic Greens for being a sponsor for this episode.To make it easy, Athletic Greens will give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit www.athleticgreens.com/EMERGING to take ownership of your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance! -------------------Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/foodhistorypodFind transcripts and sources on the website: www.foodhistorypodcast.com-------------------References:https://allthatsinteresting.com/julia-child-spyhttps://www.cia.gov/stories/story/julia-child-and-the-oss-recipe-for-shark-repellent/https://www.cia.gov/stories/story/julia-child-cooking-up-spy-ops-for-oss/https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2022/05/02/julia-child-hbo-oss-sharks/https://www.history.com/news/julia-child-oss-spy-wwii-shark-repellent

Inside Julia's Kitchen
Meet Kevin Morse

Inside Julia's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 46:33 Very Popular


This week on Inside Julia's Kitchen, host Todd Schulkin welcomes Kevin Morse, the founder of Cairnspring Mills in Western Washington State. They discuss how Cairnspring is rebuilding our food system through milling, why we need more mills to thrive, and how he sees local mills as a tool for revitalizing rural communities. As always, Kevin shares a Julia Moment.  You can purchase flour directly from the Cairnspring Mills website, Cairnspring.com.The Julia Child audio clip from The French Chef comes courtesy of the WGBH Media Library & Archives Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Inside Julia's Kitchen by becoming a member!Inside Julia's Kitchen is Powered by Simplecast. 

This Week in Business History
This Week in Business History for August 16th: Julia Child- "Only a Businesswoman"

This Week in Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 15:10


In this episode of This Week in Business History, Kelly Barner shares the story of Julia Child's life, from military service to the first cooking show to be hosted by a woman. Most of us know so much about her show, The French Chef, that we don't know anything else about her life's journey – but it was as unpredictable as the rise of a novice's souffle. She discovered cooking late in life and didn't even graduate from cooking school until age 40, but her desire for adventure served her well. Additional Links & Resources: Learn more about This Week in Business History: https://supplychainnow.com/program/business-history/ Subscribe to This Week in Business History and other Supply Chain Now programs: https://supplychainnow.com/subscribe This episode was hosted by Kelly Barner. For additional information, please visit our dedicated show page at: https://supplychainnow.com/julia-child-businesswoman-bh111

The Plant Centered and Thriving Podcast: Plant-Based Inspiration
Mother-Daughter Duo, Ann & Jane Esselstyn, discuss their new cookbook that teaches us how to "Be a Plant-Based Woman Warrior"

The Plant Centered and Thriving Podcast: Plant-Based Inspiration

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 37:54 Very Popular


"Our spouses, 4 children and 10 grandchildren are all plant-based"These two powerful women tell me their amazing story including: what it's like to collaborate with family, where beginners should start, the incredible benefits women in particular will benefit from a plant-based diet, and most importantly, what sets their amazing cookbook apart.  Ann Crile Esselstyn graduated from Smith College and received a master's in education from Wheelock College. She taught English and history for twenty-seven years, receiving the Hostatler Award for Outstanding Teaching, and was a field hockey coach for fifteen years. She juggled raising four children, teaching, and figuring out plant-based, oil-free ways to cook that are delicious and appealing. Since 2000, she has focused on creating recipes to prevent and reverse heart disease and counseling patients on how to prepare and eat plant-based foods. She has frequently been referred to as “the Julia Child of plant-based cooking.” Jane Esselstyn, R.N., is a wellness instructor and a plant-strong presenter and cook, as well as a married mother of three. She loves presenting about disease prevention through nutrition and, like the rest of her family, has been plant-strong for more than twenty-five years. She has been a sex education teacher to middle school boys and high school girls for more than two decades, and helps them learn about the amazing benefits of plant-based foods.Resources from this Episode: Pre-order "How to Be a Plant-Based Woman Warrior" If you want to connect with Ann & Jane, visit the following:Instagram: @jane_esselstyn_rn Website: https://janeesselstyn.com/YouTube: Jane EsselstynHow can I work with Plant Centered Nutrition? One on One Coaching"Positively Plant-Based": the Online CourseIf you want to connect with Ashley, visit the following:Instagram: @plantcenterednutritionWebsite: plantcenterednutrition.usFacebook: Plant Centered NutritionIf you want to connect with Katie, visit the following: Instagram: @plantcenteredkatieWebsite: plantcenterednutrition.usFacebook: Plant Centered Nutrition

Inside Julia's Kitchen
Happy Birthday, Julia: Part II

Inside Julia's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 33:14 Very Popular


In part II of our special Julia Moment double episode, we're celebrating Julia's birthday by highlighting Julia's impact as a teacher, as well as memories of her unforgettable warmth and hospitality. This week's Julia Moments come from chef, cooking teacher and restaurateur, Lidia Bastianich, New York Times food writer Eric Kim, 2021 Julia Child Award Recipient Toni Tipton Martin, chef Claudette Zepeda, food writer Karen Stabiner, chef Antonia Lofaso, who was the head judge on Food Network's The Julia Child Challenge, and the creator of the show, Blake Davis. Photo Courtesy of Schlesinger Library.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Inside Julia's Kitchen by becoming a member!Inside Julia's Kitchen is Powered by Simplecast.

Soul Food Priest
Q&A Session: Patron Saints, Macarons & Julia Child!

Soul Food Priest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 30:56


Fr. Ben sits down with Silvia Vega and Khira Rotty to discuss patron saints, eat some macaroons, and talk about his love for Julia Child and St. Edith Stein. Enjoy! Fr. Ben's recipe for French Macarons (yield: 110) *8.25 cups of ground almond flour *19 egg whites (room temperature) *6 cups plus 3 TBSP of powdered sugar *3 cups of granulated sugar 1.) Puree the almond flour and the powdered sugar in a food processor until the mixture is very fine, then sift at least once. 2.) Whip the egg white in a mixer on medium-high speed, gradually adding the granulated sugar… repeat: GRADUALLY! Beat on high until firm peaks form.  3.) Now begins what is sometimes called “macaronage,” or the process whereby the whites and the almond flour are folded together.  Add 1/3 of the almond flour mixture into the whites, folding it in slowly.  Once all of the almond flour is added, the mixture should look somewhat like lava and form a figure-8 without the ribbon breaking as it falls off the rubber spatula.  4.) Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F. 5.) Pipe onto a sheet pan with parchment paper or silpat (I prefer parchment), spacing about an inch apart.  6.) Pick up the sheet pan and drop it in the counter about 3 times to force out any excess air bubbles in the macaroons.   7.) Let the piped macaroons sit at room temperature, to form a skin, for no less than 30 minutes before baking.  You should be able to touch one without batter sticking to your finger. Bake for 15 minutes. 8.) I suggest making the macaroons and the filling the day before use.  They are better when they stale a bit.  Leave uncovered overnight.  There are thousands of variations, though I prefer the following: rose petal (made with rosewater), pistachio, Nutella ganache, salted raspberry, lavender-lemon, or dulce de leche. 

Empowered Artist Collective Podcast
Starting a Theater Company with Lily Narbonne

Empowered Artist Collective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 56:08


In this episode, Jennifer talks to Lily Narbonne about what drove her to to co-found a theater company, Lanes Coven Theater Co. They talk about the actual logistics in doing so, as well as what it means to have a vision, create a mission statement, write grants, accept assistance from others, curate work, & embrace one's artistic ideals. If you have been thinking about starting your own theater company, this episode is for you! About Lily: Lily Narbonne is an actor, Producing Artistic Director, and Dialect Coach. She splits time between Gloucester, MA and NYC. She firmly believes in Abundance and cultivates a practice of this mindset. Lily appears in the new HBOMax series, “Julia” about the life of Julia Child. Recently, she dialect coached Translations by Brian Friel. She formed Lanes Coven Theater Co with her fiance Justin Genna in Fall 2020, to create beauty out of painful isolation. She produced a sold-out “Taming of the Shrew” (and played Kate) in addition to 3 other works of theater for the Gloucester, MA area and virtual communities. Lily is gearing up for Lanes Coven's current season: Macbeth, at Windhover Center for the Performing Arts, and a contemporary comedy TBA, at Gloucester Stage.   Lily's IG: @lilynarbonne Lane's Coven IG: @lanescoventheaterco Lily's Website: www.lilynarbonne.com Lane's Coven Website: www.lanescoven.com  Want to coach with Jennifer? Schedule a session here! https://appt.link/jenniferapple Monologue Sourcing Promo Link! https://empoweredartistcollective.com/podcastpromo Learn more: https://www.empoweredartistcollective.com/podcast EAC IG: @EmpoweredArtistCollective  EAC TikTok: @EmpowerArtistCollective EAC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/empoweredartistcollective/ Check Out Our Merch! https://www.empoweredartistcollective.threadless.com/ Any thoughts you'd like to share? Email us at EmpoweredArtistCollective@gmail.com

Loving Later Life
Nicole Aloni: Re-inventing and Dealing with Loss in Later Life

Loving Later Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 52:38


Nicole Aloni has had many lives and many losses. She is a French-trained chef (she cooked for Julia Child and Queen Elizabeth to name a few), was the director of catering of the Music Center in Los Angeles, founded a restaurant, catering company, food manufacturing business and photography studio. She was married to the love of her life, Ami Aloni, a prominent personality in the Jewish musical life of L.A., most especially revered in the synagogue world as a composer, arranger, pianist, and conductor. After Ami's tragic passing, Nicole reinvented herself several more times. She authored articles and books about food and entertaining. She also wrote, produced, and performed her autobiographical one-woman show, Le Grand Fromage, which you can watch on YouTube! In this funny and poignant show, she cooks French food on stage as she tells the riveting stories of her life. It will have you laughing and keep you on the edge of your seat. Nicole is also a certified coach specializing in collaborating with creative risk-takers, entrepreneurs, performers, public speakers and those re-inventing. You are going to be glued to her every word!

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz
Hour 2: John Skipper's College Sports Insight

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 42:31 Very Popular


John Skipper joins us to share his expertise on the current state of collegiate sports: teams shifting from conference-to-conference, the TV contracts he helped create, why we should be paying more attention to the states teams are in, and why we're potentially headed toward a Super League in college sports. Plus, Greg is too excited to discuss Julia Child, Ms. Pac-Man is headed to the videogame HOF, and Aaron Rodgers has a new tattoo. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street Radio
Milk Street Special: Memories of Julia Child

Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 29:08 Very Popular


We look back with Julia Child's friends, protégés and fans at their favorite moments and the legacy of the French Chef. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.