Podcasts about british society

group behaviour of the English people

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Best podcasts about british society

Latest podcast episodes about british society

podDIVA
DIVA Debrief: December 2022

podDIVA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 31:49


The festive Golden one! With England's Lioness Beth Mead aka The Golden Boot on the cover.And many a tortured football metaphor between the sheets!Rachel Shelley (aka Helena in The L Word) discusses the latest issue of DIVA magazine with Her Royal DIVA-ness Roxy Bourdillon. Nominated for Editor of the Year 2022 by the British Society of Magazine Editors, Roxy is also a sparkly, self-proclaimed Lesbian Christmas Cliche. Hear her baubles bouncing.Roxy gives a personal account of the giggly highs of making your favourite LGBTQIA+ gorgeous glossy mag, from the inside looking out.Including an exclusive extract from Beth Mead's new book My Journey to Glory, celebrating the Queer Festive film line up of 2020 and demanding more for Christmas 2023! #QueermasPlus: Bristol Butch Bar, comedian Zoe Lyons and what's really happening in Qatar for the FIFA World Cup.Plus an exclusive Beyond Borders feature starring you, the DIVA listener. Wherever You Are in the World.This month: Jude from Etretat, in Normandy, France. Known as the "cradle of Impressionism".Jude writes Sapphic Fiction reviews - find out more here: Jude In The Stars and here: Lez Review BooksWant to hear more from Beth Mead and all things LGBTQIA? Grab your copy of DIVA's December issue here.Produced and edited by Rachel Shelley with love and support from #TeamDIVApodDIVA: Queers for your EarsGet in touch: editorial@diva-magazine.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Being Overwieght Can In Itself Actually Mean That We Have A Higher Hormone Exposure

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 10:33


Being Overwieght Can In Itself Actually Mean That We Have A Higher Hormone Exposure Dr Gemma Newman • http://www.GemmaNewman.com• Book - The Plant Power Doctor #GemmaNewman #PlantBased #WholeFood Dr Gemma Newman is a medical doctor and accomplished author of the Book The Plant Power Doctor. A simpler prescription for a healthier you. You can eat your way to a brighter future Just imagine if what you put on your plate could radically improve your health right now AND make you healthier in the future too... In this book, British family doctor Gemma Newman explores how a simple change in diet helps many common chronic illnesses - from diabetes and heart disease to obesity - and the science that explains why it works.Enjoy over 60 delicious meal ideas to kick-start your plant-powered eating, along with simple shopping lists and meal plans. This book contains everything you need to futureproof your body and mind. Dr Newman has worked in medicine for over 15 years and is the Senior Partner at a family medical practice for over a decade. She studied at the University of Wales College of Medicine and has worked in many specialties as a doctor including elderly care, endocrinology, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, general surgery, urology, vascular surgery, rehabilitation medicine and General Practice. She gained additional qualifications in gynecology and family planning. She is a founding member and ambassador for Plant Based Health Professionals – UKand a member of British Society of Lifestyle medicine.Dr Newman has a specialist interest in holistic health, plant-based nutrition, and lifestyle medicine. In her practice she has come to understand that body, mind and soul are not separate, and that it is only in addressing the root causes of stress and disconnection that we can truly heal, from the inside out. Dr Newman is regularly invited to teach other doctors and the general public via training programmes, podcasts and conferences about the benefits of plant-based nutrition.To Contact Dr Newman  go to GemmaNewman.com Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Barbell Shrugged
[Dementia and Alzheimer's] Evidence Based Strategies to Reduce Risk of Dementia and Alzheimers w/ Dr. Tommy Wood, Anders Varner, Doug Larson, and Dr. Andy Galpin Barbell Shrugged #668

Barbell Shrugged

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 74:00


Tommy Wood is a Senior Fellow in the Pediatrics Department at the University of Washington, and Chief Scientific Officer of Nourish Balance Thrive, an online-based company using advanced biochemical testing to optimize performance in athletes. Tommy was born in the US to Icelandic and British parents (which means he has three passports in two different names). He was predominantly raised in the UK, but also spent periods of time at school in Iceland, Germany, and France. Tommy received a bachelor's degree in Natural Sciences and Biochemistry from the University of Cambridge before studying medicine at the University of Oxford. He worked as a junior doctor in central London for two years after medical school, and then moved to Norway to complete a PhD in physiology and neuroscience at the University of Oslo. Tommy is currently President-elect of Physicians for Ancestral Health, he is a director of the British Society of Lifestyle Medicine and the Icelandic Health Symposium, and is on the scientific advisory board of Hintsa Performance. Tommy has also coached and competed in multiple sports including rowing, CrossFit, powerlifting, and ultra-endurance racing. Alongside his career in medicine and research, Tommy has published and spoken on multiple topics surrounding functional and ancestral approaches to health, including examining the root causes of multiple sclerosis and insulin resistance. In today's episode of Barbell Shrugged you will learn: Why brain health is not a fixed state and can be upgraded throughout life Why we are so good at the physical and struggle to understand brain health Early onset vs. late onset cognitive decline Why early onset Alzheimers is not modifiable Why late onset Alzheimers is 90% of cases and can see improvements  Differences between Alzheimers and Dementia Why physical fitness is so important to brain health   To learn more, please go to https://rapidhealthreport.com Connect with our guests: Dr. Tommy Wood on Instagram Anders Varner on Instagram Doug Larson on Instagram Coach Travis Mash on Instagram Dan Garner on Instagram

The Gracious Guest Show
Byzantine Coins with the Shroud Face?! | feat. Justin Robinson

The Gracious Guest Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 55:05


Justin Robinson of the Samlerhuset Group joins me to unpack an exciting new discovery–the Shroud of Turin's face on Byzantine coins?! If the Shroud is just a Medieval forgery this should be impossible. Justin is a rare coin historian working with the organization that strikes the Nobel Peace Prize medal, and his lifelong fascination with history, numismatics, and the Shroud have intersected in a profoundly intriguing way. Don't miss this one! LINKS/RESOURCES: - Justin's blog The Coins & History Foundation - https://coinsandhistoryfoundation.org/author/justinrobinsonlmo/ - British Society for the Turin Shroud's newsletter - http://www.bstsnewsletter.com/ - Shroud of Turin Education and Research Association, Inc.:  https://www.shroud.com/stera.htm - “Who Can He Be?” documentary and official website featuring lots of great information and links: https://www.whocanhebe.com - Coin News magazine: https://www.isubscribe.co.uk/Coin-News-Magazine-Subscription.cfm

Strange Stories UK
Strange stories: The Victorian Book of Ghosts.

Strange Stories UK

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 61:34


This is a Halloween podcasts for 2022. An attempt by the  British Society of Psychical research (SPR) to explain paranormal activity. Phantasms of the Living was to be the book published by the SPR that was to explain the reasons for people seeing ghosts. 700 case studies were given to try to prove that thought transference, called later telepathy was the reason for people seeing ghosts. Telepathy allowing one to communicate with others non-verbally through thought not to be confused with  ESP  (extra sensory perception) which refers to heightened senses and intuition.This podcast gives a brief background to the book, the personalities and politics of the SPR and a couple of case histories mentioned in the book and the reasons that the book was criticised. The book published in 1886 and recent copies are available today on internet sites. The book is interesting to dip into but I would think would be impossible to read it through. Warning , recorded in one take, Lip smacking out of control today, even though my microphone is supposed to prevent this and there is a dog in the room. Please do not listen if you are expecting a professional delivery. I am also known for mispronouncing words.  I am away for about six weeks, I will try to post a couple of podcasts over this time, I will be back in December. www.strangestoriesuk.gmail.com

A Need To Read
#181 Mental Health and Behaviour Change with Dr. Mike II

A Need To Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 49:36


Dr. Mike Banna is a GP in the South of England, a GP educator, and a Director of the British Society for Lifestyle Medicine. He also writes a weekly newsletter for Gymshark called The Doctors Note.   This podcast discusses mental health services in the UK, Instagram wellness advice, behaviour change journeys, shamelessly being bad at things, and a few of his favourite books.    Dr. Mike is on Instagram and Twitter as @DrMikethe2nd   Support for the podcast   I'm an independent podcaster, which is a fancy way of saying no one pays me a regular wage. And, to level with you, that is terrifying- all of the time. So, if you like what I do and want me to keep doing it please support the show in one of the following ways.   - Share the podcast with a friend, or review the podcast.    - Make a one-off donation with BuyMeACoffee   I work with a couple of great companies who have discounts arranged for A Need To Read listeners, they're listed below. The discounts (BH) + freebies (AG) will already be applied when you click the link.    - Go to Therapy and get 10% off your first month with BetterHelp, who sponsor the show   - Get your nutrition covered with the all-in-one AG1 shake from Athletic Greens, who also sponsor the show.    - You can also give me feedback/comments/validation by emailing me: hello (at) aneedtoread.co.uk      

Culturally Speaking
S5 E3 British Immigration, the Fabric of British Society Part 2

Culturally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 39:03


Continuing our conversation Immigration in British culture, this week's episode picks up where we left off in Part 1 with us sharing our families' experiences of immigration. In Part 2, Janice shares her experience of the handover in Hong Kong in 1997. The Windrush scandal made headlines a few years ago in Britain which saw hundreds of Caribbean immigrants working and living in the UK wrongly targeted by immigration enforcement. The impact post-war migration, like the Windrush generation, had on rebuilding Britain as we know it today is undeniable. However it got us thinking about our experience of racism in the UK,  whether we are desensitised to it and if we feel foreign. A hilarious sidebar into mispronunciations of our names ensued….Get in touch with us at theculturallyspeaking@gmail.com and follow us on Instagram @culturallyspeakingpodcast!

Culturally Speaking
S5 E2 British Immigration, the Fabric of British Society Part 1

Culturally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 33:16


Continuing Season 5 on British culture, this week's episode focuses on something that is intrinsic to making British society what it is today: immigration. In Part 1 we start off with the basics, what is immigration? We move on to discuss the difference between refugees and asylum seekers, the mosaic vs melting pot theory and some key stats from the last British census. Hilariously neither Janice nor Neha could pass the British citizenship test (check out the episode Instagram post for the answers!). The episode ends with Neha sharing how her grandparents came to move to the UK, tune in next week for Part 2.Get in touch with us at theculturallyspeaking@gmail.com and follow us on Instagram @culturallyspeakingpodcast!

Switch4Good
Your Hormones & Plant Power with Dr. Gemma Newman

Switch4Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 72:35


“In fact, there was a great study that showed that, in the long term, young children and adolescents who consumed minimally processed soy products had a lower breast cancer risk later on in life than those who did not consume soy products. And I thought that was a great thing to point out because this means that it's actually healthy throughout the lifecycle, not just when you're in those years around menopause, but even as children and adolescents it can help set you up for a healthier lifestyle.” - Dr. Gemma Newman Today we are really thrilled to have with us a wonderful soul who truly exemplifies practicing what you preach. A staunch advocate of a plant-based diet and plant-based nutrition, Dr. Gemma Newman, aka The Plant Power Doctor, is a British medical doctor, author of the book The Plant Power Doctor, and host of The Wellness Edit podcast. She has contributed to articles for magazines including Glamour, Zest, and Healthy Magazine. And if that weren't enough, Dr. Newman is the Senior Partner at a family medical practice, a member of the British Society of Lifestyle Medicine, and a certified Reiki practitioner. She has appeared in the powerful documentaries Vegan and Eating Our Way to Extinction. And since Breast Cancer Awareness Month is upon us, it couldn't be more opportune to have her with us today to talk about women's health and how a plant-based diet can be so very impactful! Join us to hear Dr. Newman share her incredible story and provide life-changing, applicable tips!   What we discuss in this episode: How health, compassion, and her husband, impelled Dr. Newman to become plant-based. How recommending a plant-based diet to her patients changed her medical practice for the better. An explanation of PCOS and its symptoms. The positive effects of fiber-rich foods on the digestive system. The inherent dangers of a low-carbohydrate diet. How not all carbohydrates lead to weight gain. How soy phytoestrogens aren't actually estrogens. How soy is beneficial for hormones and mitigates risks of many different kinds of cancers in both women and men. What inspired her to write her book?   Resources:  The Wellness Edit Podcast Dr. Gemma Newman's Website The Plant Power Doctor Book   Connect with Switch4Good SUPPORT SWITCH4GOOD https://switch4good.org/support-us/ ★☆★ JOIN OUR PRIVATE FACEBOOK GROUP ★☆★  https://www.facebook.com/groups/podcastchat ★☆★ SWITCH4GOOD WEBSITE ★☆★ https://switch4good.org/ ★☆★ ONLINE STORE ★☆★ https://shop.switch4good.org/shop/ ★☆★ FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM ★☆★ https://www.instagram.com/Switch4Good/ ★☆★ LIKE US ON FACEBOOK ★☆★ https://www.facebook.com/Switch4Good/ ★☆★ FOLLOW US ON TWITTER ★☆★ https://mobile.twitter.com/Switch4GoodNFT ★☆★ DOWNLOAD THE ABILLION APP ★☆★ https://app.abillion.com/users/switch4good

Newson Health Menopause Society Podcast
18 - Vulval and Vaginal Health with Dr Caroline Owen

Newson Health Menopause Society Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 29:37


On this episode of the Newson Health Menopause Society podcast, host Lauren Redfern is joined by Consultant Dermatologist with a special interest in vulval disease, Dr Caroline Owen. Along with clarifying when the terms ‘vulva' and ‘vagina' should be used, Caroline outlines what a healthy vulva should look like, providing advice and guidance on self-examination and how to spot markers of concern. Caroline takes time to outline the effects of a number of different conditions that can affect our vulval health. In particular, she discusses the impact of Lichen sclerosus – a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that can prove particularly disruptive during the perimenopause and menopause. Explaining the ways in which the condition can affect the lives of its sufferers, Caroline highlights the need for continued research into the condition. This episode asks us to get comfortable with our anatomy and provides important insight into how we can all be advocates of our own anatomy. Caroline is a member of the British Society for the Study of Vulval Disease and is also responsible for chairing the British Association of Dermatologists Education Group Vulval workstream. She has co-authored material for the postgraduate curriculum on vulval disease, the post-CCT fellowship in vulval disease and the recently updated national vulval service standards.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Hormone Health And Menopause - Gemma Newman, MD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 114:54


Hormone Health And Menopause - Gemma Newman, MD Dr Gemma Newman • http://www.GemmaNewman.com • Book - The Plant Power Doctor #GemmaNewman #PlantBased #WholeFood Dr Gemma Newman is a medical doctor and accomplished author of the Book The Plant Power Doctor. A simpler prescription for a healthier you. You can eat your way to a brighter future Just imagine if what you put on your plate could radically improve your health right now AND make you healthier in the future too... In this book, British family doctor Gemma Newman explores how a simple change in diet helps many common chronic illnesses - from diabetes and heart disease to obesity - and the science that explains why it works. Enjoy over 60 delicious meal ideas to kick-start your plant-powered eating, along with simple shopping lists and meal plans. This book contains everything you need to futureproof your body and mind. Dr Newman has worked in medicine for over 15 years and is the Senior Partner at a family medical practice for over a decade. She studied at the University of Wales College of Medicine and has worked in many specialties as a doctor including elderly care, endocrinology, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, general surgery, urology, vascular surgery, rehabilitation medicine and General Practice. She gained additional qualifications in gynecology and family planning. She is a founding member and ambassador for Plant Based Health Professionals – UK and a member of British Society of Lifestyle medicine. Dr Newman has a specialist interest in holistic health, plant-based nutrition, and lifestyle medicine. In her practice she has come to understand that body, mind and soul are not separate, and that it is only in addressing the root causes of stress and disconnection that we can truly heal, from the inside out. Dr Newman is regularly invited to teach other doctors and the general public via training programmes, podcasts and conferences about the benefits of plant-based nutrition.To Contact Dr Newmango to GemmaNewman.com CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com  • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Reason: https://reason.fm/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast • Other Video ChannelsYoutube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealth BitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

The Capital Stack
Jimmy Soni author of The Founders on Writing a Best-Selling Book on the Pioneers of Silicon Valley

The Capital Stack

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 45:30


Today, David is talking to Jimmy Soni. Jimmy Soni is an award-winning author. His newest book, The Founders: The Story of PayPal and the Entrepreneurs Who Shaped Silicon Valley, was a national bestseller and received critical acclaim from The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, New Yorker, The Economist, Financial Times, and more. His previous book, A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age, won the 2017 Neumann Prize, awarded by the British Society for the History of Mathematics for the best book on the history of mathematics for a general audience, and the 2019 Middleton Prize by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his daughter, Venice. What You'll Learn: Becoming a Writer Discovery Process when Writing a Book Interviews Listening Market Cycles Recession and its Consequences Being a Creator Favorite Quote: “How leadership teams can move very aggressively and turn the pressure on not having another round of financing into action.” -- The Capital Stack All Things Tech Investing and Value Creation Early growth investor David Paul interviews the world's most excellent ecosystem, learns how to start and scale your own business, and finds an edge in today's capital markets. To connect with David, visit: Twitter - https://twitter.com/davidpaulvc (CLICK HERE) Substack - http://davidpaul.substack.com/ (CLICK HERE) LinkedIn - http://linkedin.com/in/Davidpaulvc (CLICK HERE) IG - https://www.instagram.com/davidpaulvc/ (CLICK HERE) DISCLAIMER: David Paul is the founder and general partner at DWP Capital. All opinions expressed by David and podcast guests are solely their own opinions and do not reflect the opinions of DWP capital. This podcast is for formational purposes only and should not be relied upon for decisions. David and guests may maintain positions in the securities discussed on this podcast.

Más Noticias
Más de uno 19/09/2022

Más Noticias

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 381:22


Programa especial de 'Más de uno' por el funeral de Estado de la reina Isabel II, celebrado en la Abadía de Westminster. Desde primera hora de la mañana, Carlos Alsina informa de todos los detalles de esta jornada histórica, con la cobertura de Celia Maza, corresponsal en Londres, y Francisco Paniagua, enviado especial a la capital británica. Asimismo, actualizamos y comentamos el recorrido que realiza el féretro real desde el Palacio de Westminster hasta la Abadía de Westminster donde se oficia la ceremonia religiosa en honor a la reina de Inglaterra. En la tertulia con Pilar Velasco, Casimiro García Abadillo, Antonio Casado, Rubén Amón y Marta García Aller analizamos el cambio de era que supone el fin del reinado de Isabel II. Después, dedicamos el programa a indagar en la historia, detalles, protagonistas y protocolo a seguir en el funeral de la monarca. Para ello, contamos con la colaboración de Pablo Pérez López, catedrático de Historia Contemporánea, Dativo Salvia y Ocaña, experto en Realeza, Jimmy Burns Marañón, periodista y director de la British Society, Rosa Belmonte, Juan Carlos Vélez, Walter Oppenheimer, corresponsal en Londres, y Josemi Rodríguez-Sieiro.

Noticias de César Vidal y más
Más de uno 19/09/2022

Noticias de César Vidal y más

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 381:22


Programa especial de 'Más de uno' por el funeral de Estado de la reina Isabel II, celebrado en la Abadía de Westminster. Desde primera hora de la mañana, Carlos Alsina informa de todos los detalles de esta jornada histórica, con la cobertura de Celia Maza, corresponsal en Londres, y Francisco Paniagua, enviado especial a la capital británica. Asimismo, actualizamos y comentamos el recorrido que realiza el féretro real desde el Palacio de Westminster hasta la Abadía de Westminster donde se oficia la ceremonia religiosa en honor a la reina de Inglaterra. En la tertulia con Pilar Velasco, Casimiro García Abadillo, Antonio Casado, Rubén Amón y Marta García Aller analizamos el cambio de era que supone el fin del reinado de Isabel II. Después, dedicamos el programa a indagar en la historia, detalles, protagonistas y protocolo a seguir en el funeral de la monarca. Para ello, contamos con la colaboración de Pablo Pérez López, catedrático de Historia Contemporánea, Dativo Salvia y Ocaña, experto en Realeza, Jimmy Burns Marañón, periodista y director de la British Society, Rosa Belmonte, Juan Carlos Vélez, Walter Oppenheimer, corresponsal en Londres, y Josemi Rodríguez-Sieiro.

Noticias en Español
Más de uno 19/09/2022

Noticias en Español

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 381:22


Programa especial de 'Más de uno' por el funeral de Estado de la reina Isabel II, celebrado en la Abadía de Westminster. Desde primera hora de la mañana, Carlos Alsina informa de todos los detalles de esta jornada histórica, con la cobertura de Celia Maza, corresponsal en Londres, y Francisco Paniagua, enviado especial a la capital británica. Asimismo, actualizamos y comentamos el recorrido que realiza el féretro real desde el Palacio de Westminster hasta la Abadía de Westminster donde se oficia la ceremonia religiosa en honor a la reina de Inglaterra. En la tertulia con Pilar Velasco, Casimiro García Abadillo, Antonio Casado, Rubén Amón y Marta García Aller analizamos el cambio de era que supone el fin del reinado de Isabel II. Después, dedicamos el programa a indagar en la historia, detalles, protagonistas y protocolo a seguir en el funeral de la monarca. Para ello, contamos con la colaboración de Pablo Pérez López, catedrático de Historia Contemporánea, Dativo Salvia y Ocaña, experto en Realeza, Jimmy Burns Marañón, periodista y director de la British Society, Rosa Belmonte, Juan Carlos Vélez, Walter Oppenheimer, corresponsal en Londres, y Josemi Rodríguez-Sieiro.

Más de uno
Más de uno 19/09/2022

Más de uno

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 381:22


Programa especial de 'Más de uno' por el funeral de Estado de la reina Isabel II, celebrado en la Abadía de Westminster. Desde primera hora de la mañana, Carlos Alsina informa de todos los detalles de esta jornada histórica, con la cobertura de Celia Maza, corresponsal en Londres, y Francisco Paniagua, enviado especial a la capital británica. Asimismo, actualizamos y comentamos el recorrido que realiza el féretro real desde el Palacio de Westminster hasta la Abadía de Westminster donde se oficia la ceremonia religiosa en honor a la reina de Inglaterra. En la tertulia con Pilar Velasco, Casimiro García Abadillo, Antonio Casado, Rubén Amón y Marta García Aller analizamos el cambio de era que supone el fin del reinado de Isabel II. Después, dedicamos el programa a indagar en la historia, detalles, protagonistas y protocolo a seguir en el funeral de la monarca. Para ello, contamos con la colaboración de Pablo Pérez López, catedrático de Historia Contemporánea, Dativo Salvia y Ocaña, experto en Realeza, Jimmy Burns Marañón, periodista y director de la British Society, Rosa Belmonte, Juan Carlos Vélez, Walter Oppenheimer, corresponsal en Londres, y Josemi Rodríguez-Sieiro.

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Helen Whittaker: Intertwining Contemporary and Traditional Elements in Stained Glass

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 53:57


Renowned artist and designer Helen Whittaker is highly regarded for her new stained glass windows and architectural sculpture in glass and copper. With an aim to engage the viewer through good design and craftsmanship, the artist creates energy and movement intertwining contemporary and traditional elements. Her designs are inspired by the client, the brief and the building, whether housed in historic or modern buildings, in ecclesiastical or secular contexts. As Creative Director at the highly acclaimed Barley Studio in York, Whittaker heads a multi-skilled team alongside Managing Director Keith Barley MBE.  Whittaker earned her MA in Visual, Islamic and Traditional Arts from the University of Wales, from her studies at the Prince of Wales's Institute of Architecture. Her BA, with a specialism in three-dimensional design using glass and ceramics, is from the University of Sunderland, a Centre of Excellence and the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe.  With 25 years of experience in stained glass creation and restoration painting, Whittaker has completed at least 100 commissions across the UK. In the summer of 2018, one of her stained glass windows was displayed in Buckingham Palace. Recently Whittaker collaborated with David Hockney for his art work in Westminster Abbey, The Queen's Window and was featured in a BBC documentary about the window. One of her pieces of art, commemorating The Role of Women in the Royal Air Force was formally unveiled by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth.  A Craft Scholar of the Prince's Foundation, Whittaker has received the prestigious Hancock Medal for High Achievement. She has won several awards (including a commission) through the highly competitive Stevens Competition, and more recently has acted as judge and Chairman of the Judges. Whittaker is a Fellow of the British Society of Master Glass Painters and a Court Member (the executive body) of the Worshipful Company of Glaziers, a leading Livery Company of the City of London, whose existence was first recorded in 1328. She presented the Stained Glass Museum 2020 Annual Lecture, has given a Ted Talk and recently addressed the Art workers Guild in London. ToYG podcast was able to speak with Whittaker in between her work on current projects for All Saints Church, Wetheringsett cum Brockford, Suffolk, and Lily Chapel, Manila, Philippines.    

Cincinnati Edition
Examining the queen's role in British society and popular culture

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 22:43


Ahead of the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II, we look at how Britons and Americans will remember her.

Bowel Sounds: The Pediatric GI Podcast
Sue Protheroe - Enteral Nutrition in Intestinal Failure

Bowel Sounds: The Pediatric GI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 62:35


In another international episode, Drs. Jennifer Lee and Jason Silverman talk to Dr. Sue Protheroe about an approach to enteral feeding for infants and children with intestinal failure.  The discussion highlights important physiologic principles to consider and an overview of enteral feeding progression at different ages. Dr. Protheroe is a past president of the British Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (BSPGHAN) and leads the Home Parenteral Nutrition Service and Intestinal Failure program at Birmingham Women's and Children's Hospital in Birmingham, UK. This episode is eligible for CME credit!  Once you have listened to the episode, click this link to claim your credit.  Credit is available to NASPGHAN members (if you are not a member, you should probably sign up).  And thank you to the NASPGHAN Professional Education Committee for their review!Learning Objectives:Understand the factors that can influence enteral tolerance in infants with intestinal failure.Understand the approach to the introduction of enteral nutrition including route, rate and composition of feeding.Review strategies to balance quality of life and the nutritional needs of older children with intestinal failure.Links:BSPGHAN websiteAs always, the discussion, views, and recommendations in this podcast are the sole responsibility of the hosts and guests and are subject to change over time with advances in the field.Produced by: Jason SilvermanSupport the show

Pharmacist Diaries
072 Joanna Kippax: Why sleep is so valuable and how to get more of it!

Pharmacist Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 37:24


On this week's episode I enjoy a conversation with Joanna Kippax as part III of the sleep series. Joanna is a certified sleep practitioner, completing her training at Oxford University, Southampton University and the Children's sleep charity in Sheffield. She trained as a Registered General Nurse (RGN) at The Middlesex Hospital in London in 1986, and as a Registered Sick Children's Nurse (RSCN) at The Westminster Hospital, London in 1989. Most of Joanna's career has been spent working for the NHS in London and Hereford. She is also a member of The British Sleep Society, and a founder member of The British Society of Pharmacy Sleep Services (BSPSS). During these years, Joanna has seen the negative impact and frustration that sleep disorders such as insomnia brings to peoples' lives. She utilised this experience and knowledge to branch out from the NHS and develop her own practice called Wye Sleep where she provides specialist sleep health services to individuals and groups. Clients report having more energy, improved mood and concentration and no longer find themselves thinking about sleep during their day, after completing the programme. The tools learned bring about long term, sustainable change, without the use of sleeping medication. Sleep health is an emerging field and Joanna continues to keep up to date with the new research being published, passing this information onto her clients. She is passionate about her work and finds informing and supporting her clients to make alterations that can be life changing, so rewarding. We hear all about her passion for helping people with sleep disorders and she focuses part of our conversation on specific tips for improving your sleep and why these are valuable for you. Examples include: - waking up at the same time of day - expose yourself to morning light - building your sleep drive - wind down routine Joanna is also the founder and director of The Sleep Retreat. This is a two day luxury sleep retreat where you learn how to sleep better using practical tools, feel more energised and refreshed, and enjoy a boutique hotel in the process! She is currently in the process of organising a 2022/2023 retreat and details will be on her website linked above. Instagram: @Wyesleep Facebook: @Wyesleep Twitter: @WyeSleep LinkedIn: @Joanna Kippax Website: Wye Sleep Facebook: @BritishSleep BSPSS website

Catfish Cops
Episode 74: "Dr. Graham Hill"

Catfish Cops

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 66:02


Dr. Graham Hill is a British Criminologist and subject matter expert in relation to the behavior of adults who sexually abuse children and men who abduct and murder children. He is a former senior detective and Senior Investigating Officer (SIO) who specialized in the investigation of major crime. During his police service he led many high profile, complex investigations and was commended many times for his leadership and detective ability.​Dr. Hill is the founder and first head of behavioral analysis for the UK Child Exploitation Online Protection Centre (CEOP). During his time at CEOP he consulted on numerous cases in the UK and overseas working with law enforcement and child protection agencies across Europe, South East Asia, Canada and America.​Dr. Hill's unique perspective and expertise concerning adult perpetrators of child sexual abuse has been developed over the course of his policing career and the specialist roles he has held together with his academic research. Dr. Hill's research interests include the behavior of adult perpetrators of online and contact child sexual abuse, interviewing adult sex offenders and non-familial child abduction/murder. His work focuses on how research can inform and enhance investigative and child protection practice. Dr. Hill holds a PhD in Criminology and Applied Social Science and a PGC in Forensic Behavioral Psychology he speaks and lectures nationally and internationally in relation to the behavior of adult perpetrators of child sexual abuse. He is a Visiting Research Fellow at Leeds University and is a member of the British Society of Criminology.You won't want to miss a second of this interview that gives an intriguing, and eye opening glimpse into the mind of the offender. His website is here: www.grahamhillcriminologist.com

The Locked up Living Podcast
Home as a continuing site of conflict. Veterans' experiences of 21st century warfare and the return to post-conflict life, Hannah Wilkinson

The Locked up Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 64:55


Hannah Wilkinson recently joined the University of Nottingham as Assistant Professor of Criminology and is a member of the Criminal Justice Research Centre. Prior to that, she was a Lecturer in Criminology at Keele University. Hannah's research interests lie in the areas of war, state crime and social harm. In particular, she is interested in the complex implications of 21st century conflict for former military personnel. You can find her most recent publication here https://t.co/haB3aOapDJ and you can see her talking at the Argentine Ambassador's residence this summer here https://www.academia.edu/video/l8bW8j Hannah completed her doctoral research under the supervision of Professor Ronnie Lippens, Dr. Evi Girling, and Dr. Samantha Weston at Keele University. The PhD thesis is entitled: ‘No Man's Land? Veterans' experiences of 21st century warfare and the return to post-conflict life'. Hannah uses in-depth qualitative and visual methodology, drawing theoretical inspiration from the works of Pierre Bourdieu on the (re)production of power and inequality within society, and from Zygmunt Bauman on the fluidity and precariousness of modern life.  She has worked with Staffordshire and Birmingham based charities to support criminalised veterans. This has involved sharing research findings and developing a training programme for practitioners. In addition, Hannah has worked as a Research Associate alongside Dr. Samantha Weston on projects with Re-Solv – around early intervention and prevention of volatile substance abuse, and with Staffordshire Police, evaluating the child sexual exploitation (CSE) prevention programme.  Hannah is a member of the European Society of Criminology, the British Society of Criminology, the Defence Research Network, and the European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control. Her current work explores the embodied traces of the ‘war on terror' and lived experience of austerity for former British military personnel. She is also working on an article that draws attention to the warning signs of fascism amid the UK government's response to Covid-19.

Exposing Mold
Episode 83 - Building Forensics and Mold Investigation in the UK with Jeff Charlton

Exposing Mold

Play Episode Play 59 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 78:26 Transcription Available


Jeff Charlton has been providing 20 years of award winning mold inspection and remediation services worldwide. He is a certified member of the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health and a scientific member of the British Society of Environmental Medicine. As founder of Building Forensics: Building Related Illness, his company is at the forefront of technology in assessment and remediation and can assist in identifying or assessing building related illness or water damage issues. Jeff is also a member of two leading USA mold medical IEP panels and technical committees that write internationally recognized standards on investigation and remediation, now used as a basis for professional remediation worldwide.In this episode, Jeff converses with us on the topic of Indoor Environmental Professional's (IEP's), his work in mold inspection/remediation, how toxic mold has impacted his life. Transcript: https://bit.ly/3ygM8HVFind us on Linktree, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter,  TikTok and YoutubeNeed help navigating your mold injury without breaking the bank? Join our low cost education group: patreon.com/exposingmoldPartners:Michael Rubino, The Mold Medic and  Home Cleanse, formerly known as All American Restoration,  is the first and only mold remediation company in the country specializing in remediating mold for people with underlying health conditions or mold sensitivities. They've quickly become the most recommended remediation company  from doctors and mold inspectors nationwide. Pick up your copy of Michael Rubino's book, “The Mold Medic: An Expert's Guide on Mold Remediation, " here: https://amzn.to/3t7wtaUThe Mold Guy performs mold inspections specifically for individuals who require a much higher standard of care owing to complex health concerns like CIRS, Lyme, CFS, Autoimmune issues and more.  Their testing and inspection process supersedes all current industry standards, on purpose, making them thought leaders and disruptors in an industry unwilling to change old and outdated paradigms.  Book your complimentary phone consult here: themoldguyinc.com/connectTexas Mold Inspectors has helped establish over 150 mold cases resulting in millions of dollars of damages being awarded back to their clients. They are a true unbiased, third party, mold assessment company that specializes in forensic type mold assessments as well as standard mold assessments. Contact texasmoldinspectors.com to schedule your assessment today.Exposing Mold is officially a non-profit! Support the show

Pharmacist Diaries
071 Gareth Evans: The importance and value of developing enhanced services in community pharmacies to improve patient health

Pharmacist Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 53:03


On this week's episode, I am excited to launch Part II of the sleep series and introduce Gareth Evans to the podcast. Gareth is a dedicated and passionate pharmacist who genuinely values helping his community through accessible enhanced services that aim to improve patient health. He graduated from the University of Bradford in 1998. He completed the 5-year MPharm Course which still exists today. This course enables you to undertake your pre-registration training as part of the programme where students leave university as a qualified pharmacist pending successful completion of the GPhC registration exam. Gareth owned his first community pharmacy in 2002, less than 5 years after qualifying as a pharmacist. He set up a consultation room and initiated blood glucose testing and blood pressure monitoring which was relatively new at the time. Weight loss and weight management became part of the services Gareth provided and this was the start of his passion to combat the obesity epidemic. This passion inspired him to set up his own organisation called Waistaway. Waistaway is a complete weight loss and weight management programme that aims to help combat the obesity crisis by combining high quality products and professional, one to one support. They offer a range of weight loss and weight management solutions designed around the individual's requirements. From basic weight check and advice, portion control, partial food replacement, all the way up to total food replacement using the Lipotrim pharmacy programme. Gareth has provided this service for over 16 years and has collected data for over 1800 patients which is a phenomenal achievement! He has successfully published the data and results which is linked below. Adrian Zacher (see podcast episode 70) contacted Gareth via LinkedIn and sparked his interest in improving sleep disorder services within community pharmacies and supporting pharmacists to be better educated to help their own communities. Through this connection and his curiosity to enhance what services can be provided by community pharmacists, Gareth got involved with setting up the British Society of Pharmacy Sleep Services (BSPSS) and became President of the charity. Social Media: Linkedin: @Gareth Evans Linkedin: @BSPSS Linkedin: @Waistaway Twitter: @BritishSleep Facebook: @BritishSleep BSPSS website Waistaway website Publication - Long Term Evaluation of a UK Community Pharmacy-based Weight Management Service Follow me on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and/or Twitter. Feel free to subscribe to the podcast on your favourite podcast platform so you can be notified when a new episode is released or leave a review on apple podcasts. If you have any suggestions for guests you want me to talk to or if you'd like to come on yourself, please feel free to contact me via social media, or email at info@pharmacistdiaries.com.

Pharmacist Diaries
070 Adrian Zacher: Part I - How to dramatically improve the quality and accessibility of sleep expertise in community pharmacies

Pharmacist Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 31:49


On this week's episode I am proud to launch a 3-part series about SLEEP. Part I of this series is with Adrian Zacher. Adrian is a passionate advocate for tackling sleep disorders. Though he is not a pharmacist, he has over 25 years of experience in this specialist area and has experience working in several roles related to sleep. His most recent roles include: - CEO and co-founder of The British Society of Pharmacy Sleep Services (BSPSS) - Founder and Director of Snorer Pharmacy - Author of Killer in you bedroom: Actionable help for snoring and drowsiness BSPSS is a charity that aims to dramatically improve the quality and accessibility of sleep expertise in community pharmacies through bespoke professional training and patient education materials. Sleep issues span the generations and affect a large proportion of the population. Through accessible, earliest possible intervention, the charity aim to support people in need of sleep expertise and help them cope, adapt and prosper. These services will hopefully have a lasting impact upon the mental health and resilience of the entire community, as well as freeing up invaluable GP time. Membership to BSPSS is currently FREE. You can also access FREE online courses that will support your patients with sleep issues, create new revenue streams, and learn more about screening and signposting to different services. Snorer Pharmacy is a website that provides training and education to community pharmacists to help patients with suspected sleep disorders, such as snoring and sleep apnoea, at the earliest opportunity. Currently the course is FREE and you can utilise the tools as part of your Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Go and check out the website linked below! Adrian and I connected via Linkedin and I was immediately drawn towards his passion to helping people with sleep disorders and the drive to support community pharmacists to make a difference to their patients. He welcomes messages and emails so please feel free to contact him for further information. To find out more about his experience, please visit his LinkedIn profile below. Social Media: Linkedin: @Adrian Zacher Linkedin: @BSPSS Twitter: @BritishSleep Facebook: @BritishSleep BSPSS website Snorer Pharmacy Website Book: Killer in you bedroom: Actionable help for snoring and drowsiness Follow me on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and/or Twitter. Feel free to subscribe to the podcast on your favourite podcast platform so you can be notified when a new episode is released or leave a review on apple podcasts. If you have any suggestions for guests you want me to talk to or if you'd like to come on yourself, please feel free to contact me via social media, or email at info@pharmacistdiaries.com.

MeatRx
Carnivore Diet May Be The Best Thing For Your Mental Health | Dr. Shawn Baker & Dr. Rachel Brown

MeatRx

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 54:43 Very Popular


Dr Brown graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 2003. She is a UK based Consultant Psychiatrist as well as being a qualified Functional Medicine Practitioner. She is a member of The British Society for Ecological Medicine, The Institute for Functional Medicine and The Royal College of Psychiatrists.  Dr Brown specialises in working within General Adult Psychiatry and has an endorsement in Liaison Psychiatry as well as a Master degree in Medical Laws and Ethics. Dr Brown has specialist experience of working within Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment Teams. After completing Higher Specialist Training in 2011 she worked within community and inpatient psychiatric services before taking up her post with a Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment Team in 2016.  Dr Brown is an Educational Supervisor for core psychiatric trainees as well as being a Clinical Supervisor for both core and higher trainees in psychiatry. She has been involved in undergraduate teaching of medical students, service development with the introduction of skills training to her local NHS health board and has ongoing research involvement with a pilot study examining the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet on the symptoms of bipolar disorder. Dr Brown's main area of interest relates to the field of Metabolic Psychiatry. She is a Nutrition Network Advisor and recommends therapeutic carbohydrate restriction for the treatment of mental disorder. Other interests include food addiction and optimisation of gut health for the improvement of mental health. Dr Brown believes in holistic medical care and addressing root cause of illness. She believes there is a better way for the practice of psychiatry, that relies less on pharmaceuticals and more on addressing underlying metabolic and environmental causes of mental illness. Dr Brown has grown weary of the simplistic pharma-focussed standard psychiatric approach to patients and after improving her own health by implementing dietary strategies of paleo, then keto and ultimately a carnivore diet, Dr Brown is a passionate advocate for the beneficial impact of proper nutrition on overall health, with the aim of addressing the root cause of illness, not simply masking symptoms.  In July 2022 Dr Brown released her first book titled: “Metabolic Madness.” The subject of the book is the relationship between metabolic health and mental disorder and the book is designed to make the complex science behind this topic accessible to the everyday reader.  Find Dr. Brown on IG: @carnivoreshrink Timestamps: 00:00 Introduction 02:26 Mental health disorders on the rise 03:59 Nutrition's role in mental health 07:24 Mental crisis team 11:32 Foods problematic for mental health  12:38 Hospital food and mental health 14:15 Plant-based diet and mental health disorders 16:23 Physiology of mental health disorders; metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance; gut health 18:48 Screening for inflammation in mental health patients 20:18 Mental health improvements with diet 21:50 Having power to make change; metabolic psychiatry clinic 23:38 Having community support 25:04 Animal-based nutrition superior for mental health 27:45 Funding grassroots research for carnivore diet 28:19 Starting on the carnivore diet 31:49 Family and carnivore diet 35:01 Health benefits of carnivore diet 37:48 Restaurant scene in Edinburgh  39:10 Scottish guidelines 40:16 Low cholesterol, depression, violence 41:22 Insulin resistance contributing to chronic diseases 42:44 Medication side effects avoided with diet 44:04 How to wean off medications with improving diet 48:11 Financial incentive to change nutrition 50:19 Haggis 51:05 Book “Metabolic Madness” 53:16 Where to find Rachel  See open positions at Revero: https://jobs.lever.co/Revero/ Join Carnivore Diet for a free 30 day trial: https://carnivore.diet/join/ Book a Carnivore Coach: https://carnivore.diet/book-a-coach/ Carnivore Shirts: https://merch.carnivore.diet Subscribe to our Newsletter: https://carnivore.diet/subscribe/ . ‪#revero #shawnbaker #Carnivorediet #MeatHeals #HealthCreation   #humanfood #AnimalBased #ZeroCarb #DietCoach  #FatAdapted #Carnivore #sugarfree  ‪

The Sleep Forum Podcast
Podcast: Oral appliance as an alternative treatment for sleep apnea

The Sleep Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 20:00


"Prosomnus is North America's largest manufacturer of oral appliances", says Dr. Mark T. Murphy, Chief Dental Officer at Prosumnus.  In this podcast, Dr. Murphy explains to our listeners HOW an oral appliance can be an alternative treatment for sleep apnea. Most physicians will prescribe CPAP therapy but that does not always work.  For various reasons, studies have found that many people diagnosed with sleep apnea do not use their CPAP machine.  An oral appliance could be the answer. Listen to this podcast to hear more about ProSomnus, a pioneer in precision medical devices for the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). IF YOU WANT TO MEET AND LEARN ABOUT ORAL APPLIANCES FOR OSA, CLICK HERE: ProSomnus is hosting a first, one of a kind symposium focused on the shift toward emerging therapies for people diagnosed with OSA. Leading sleep medicine clinicians will discuss their clinical, practical, and scientific perspectives on precision oral appliance therapy as an option for patients diagnosed with OSA who refuse or fail CPAP, cannot access CPAP due to the recall, or simply prefer alternative treatment. The two-day event will offer 12 continuing education credit hours and take place at the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco from August 18-20, 2022. ProSomnus has organized over a dozen lectures and expert panels featuring leading clinicians and researchers from around the world, including: Prof. Dr. Olivier M. Vanderveken, MD, PhD. – ENT, Head and Neck Surgeon, Antwerp University Hospital (Belgium) Dr. John E. Remmers, MD – A Renowned Clinician and Investor in the field of Sleep Medicine Dr. Phillip W. Neal II, DMD, ABGD – Co-author of the DoD/VA Clinical Practice Guideline on OSA, who as Chief Dental Surgeon, Operation Inherent Resolve was the first to provide Dental Sleep Medicine care to combat deployed US troops. Dr. Kent Smith, DDS, D.ABDSM, D.ASBA – Dentist, Founder of 21st Century Sleep, and Past-President of the American Sleep Breathing Academy Dr. Reza Radmand, DMD, FAAOM, D.ABDSM – Clinician, Lecturer + Researcher, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Prof. Dr. Marc Braem – University of Antwerp (Belgium) and Past-President of the European Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine Dr. Aditi Desai, DMD, FAAOM, D.ABDSM – President of the British Society of Dental Sleep Medicine (BSDSM) and British Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (BADSM) Dr. Mitchell Levine, DMD, D.ABDSM – Dentist and Professor, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Tennessee and Current President of the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine Dr. Michael Gelb, DDS, MS – Dentist, Author of the book GASP and co-founder of Foundation for Airway Health and the American Academy of Physiological Medicine and Dentistry George Nierenberg, Award-Winning Director/Producer, Out of Breath Key sponsors of this inaugural event include 21st Century Sleep Seminars, Awaken2Sleep, Brady Billing, The Clinical Foundation of Orthopedics & Orthodontics, CharkEducation, Dental Sleep Profits, Dental Sleep Solutions (DS3), General Sleep, Kettenbach Dental, Nierman Practice Management, Pristine Medical Billing, SleepTest.com, and ZOLL Itamar Medical. Persons interested in attending can learn more and register here: ProSomnus is the first manufacturer of precision, mass-customized oral appliance therapy devices to treat OSA, which affects over 74 million Americans and is associated with serious comorbidities, including heart failure, stroke, hypertension, morbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. ProSomnus's patented devices are a more comfortable and less invasive alternative to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy, and lead to more effective and patient-preferred outcomes. With more than 150,000 patients treated, ProSomnus's devices are the most prescribed oral appliance therapy in the U.S. To learn more, visit www.ProSomnus.com

The Other Realm
The Cheltenham Ghost

The Other Realm

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 24:45


When a haunting is recorded by a highly intelligent and thoughtful witness and is carefully investigated by a distinguished officer of the British Society for Psychical Research, we have an example of paranormal phenomena which gives even the most hardened skeptic cause to reconsider his beliefs.  Such is the case of the Cheltenham ghost.

The Physician Associate Podcast
Physician associates in haematology

The Physician Associate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 43:09


In this episode, I chat with Jamie Saunders who is a Physician Associate in Clinical Haematology and also a current member of the British Society for Haematology.Jamie tells us all about the PA role, its importance in the delivery of excellent patient care as well as his career so far in haematology.You can find out more about Jamie on the BSH website, or send him a tweet @jasaunders90You can connect with the Physician Associate PodcastTwitter - @PApodcastUKFacebook - @PApodcastUKInstagram - @PApodcastUK

Echocardiography Chat
Echo Assessment of Size of Aortic Root and Ascending Aorta

Echocardiography Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 12:24


This episode of Echocardiography Chat discusses how to use echo to assess the size of the aortic root and ascending aorta, including a discussion on the controversies in how to measure the aorta, how echo and CT compare and clinical correlations including the size at which aortic dissection becomes more likely. It includes references to ASE, EACVI, BSE, ESC and ACC guidelines.An echo education podcast.References:Mitchell, C. et al. Guidelines for performing a comprehensive transthoracic echocardiographic examination in adults: recommendations from the American Society of Echocardiography. 2018; 32(1): P1-64. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.echo.2018.06.004Lang, R. et al. Recommendations for Cardiac Chamber Quantification by Echocardiography in Adults: An Update from the American Society of Echocardiography and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging. EHJ. 2015; 16(3): 233-271. https://academic.oup.com/ehjcimaging/article/16/3/233/2400086Galderisi, M. et al. Standardization of adult transthoracic echocardiography reporting in agreement with recent chamber quantification, diastolic function, and heart valve disease recommendations: an expert consensus document of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging. 2017; 18(12): 1301-1310. https://doi.org/10.1093/ehjci/jex244Lancellotti, P. et al. Recommendations for the echocardiographic assessment of native valvular regurgitation: an executive summary from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging. European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging. 2013; 14(7): 611-644.Hiratzka, L. et al. 2010 2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease. JACC. 2010; 55(14): e27-e129. https://www.jacc.org/doi/10.1016/j.jacc.2010.02.015Harkness, A. et al. Normal reference intervals for cardiac dimensions and function for use in echocardiographic practice: a guideline from the British Society of Echocardiography. Echo Research and Practice. 2020; 7(1): G1-G18. https://doi.org/10.1530/ERP-19-0050Saura, D. et al. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiographic normal reference ranges for proximal aorta dimensions: results from the EACVI NORRE study. European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging. 2016; 18(2): 167-179. Muraru, D.  et al. Ascending aorta diameters measured by echocardiography using both leading edge to leading edge and inner edge to inner edge conventions in healthy volunteers. European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging 2013; 15(4): 415-422. Frazao, C. et al. Multimodality Assessment of Thoracic Aortic Dimensions: Comparison of Computed Tomography Angiography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Echocardiography Measurements. J Thorac Imaging. 2020; 35(6):399-406. Roman et al. Two dimensional echocardiographic aortic root dimensions in normal children and adults. The American Journal of Cardiology. 1989; 64(8): 507-512. Erbel, R. et al. 2014 ESC Guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases. European Heart Journal. 2014. 35: 2873-2926. https://www.escardio.org/Guidelines/Clinical-Practice-Guidelines/Aortic-Diseases 

The CopDoc Podcast: Aiming for Excellence in Leadership
The CopDoc Podcast Ep 77, Dr. Dominic Wood, Head of Law School - Canterbury Christ Church University

The CopDoc Podcast: Aiming for Excellence in Leadership

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 34:47 Transcription Available


Dr. Dominic Wood has been at CCCU since 1995.  He became Head of the Department of Law and Criminal Justice Studies in 2009.   He has led the development of many innovative academic programs in policing.  He was a key contributor to the Student Police Officer Handbook published by Oxford University Press (8th Edition currently at press) and has published around different political aspects of policing. He has a research interest focused on  the shifting philosophical underpinnings of policing from liberal to democratic principles. Dr. Wood helped to establish the Higher Education Forum for Learning and Development in Policing.  He is the Chair of the Higher Education Forum, which includes representatives from over 20 universities across the UK. He is a contributor to a collaborative MSc Policing program run in partnership between CCCU and the Police Academy in the Netherlands.  Dominic has participated in Skills for Justice working groups and as a member of the National Police Improvement Agency-led Higher Education Steering Group.His Ph.D. is in the field of philosophy of education.  He is a member of the British Society of Criminology and the Philosophy of Education Great Britain Society. We spoke of the ever-changing state of policing and the value of university/police partnerships.

Reddit Explains Conspiracy & the Unknown
r/UnresolvedMysteries; The English Sweating Sickness that Ravished 15th Century British Society | Detached Feet

Reddit Explains Conspiracy & the Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 10:51


The English sweating disease caused five devastating epidemics between 1485 and 1551, England was hit hardest, but on one occasion also mainland Europe, with mortality rates between 30% and 50%. The Picardy sweat emerged about 150 years after the English sweat disappeared, in 1718, in France.Submit your stories: popmediaagency@gmail.com Visit betterhelp.com/redditexplains to talk to a professional about stress, grief, and other mental health needs.Our Instagram page: @reddit_explains

BBC Countryfile Magazine
154. Exploring a marvellous wildlife haven on Dartmoor and discussing the marvels of soil

BBC Countryfile Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 59:59


Explore a magical wildlife haven tucked in a fold on the edge of Dartmoor. Meet Tony Bayliss of the Langaford Farm Charitable Trust who manages the site; soil scientist Tim Harrod (pictured) and Hannah Bowley of the British Society of Soils Science – and hear how the more we understand about soil, the better we can plan farming to be both profitable and sensitive to wildlife.Plus we hunt for the magical marsh fritillary butterfly and wander through meadows of stunning orchids. Back in the studio, the team celebrate their recent PPA Podcast of the Year award by testing English sparkling wine and French champagne.Image from Getty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Chrysalis with John Fiege
5. Heather Houser — Deluged by Data in the Climate Crisis

Chrysalis with John Fiege

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 85:53


Here's something we hear all the time: if only more people knew more about environmental problems, then they would certainly act in some ecologically beneficial way. But the problem is, it's not true. We're now deluged with data about the climate crisis; and yet, this abundance of available environmental information has not led to an abundance of environmental action.This deficit model of climate communication is flawed, even though scientists, environmentalists, and other proponents of climate action continue to speak and act as if people would do more if they just knew more about the climate crisis and understood the science of climate change.Heather Houser writes about environmental ideas and themes in art, literature, culture, and the humanities. Her work blossoms with keen insights about the importance of culture in confronting ecological crisis.Heather is Professor of English at The University of Texas at Austin. I met her many years ago in Austin, when I was developing a film about dance and environmental justice. She is both a dancer and an environmental humanities scholar.Our conversation explores climate information overload, the idea of what she calls eco-sickness in literature, the thorny topic of human population size, and whether artists should reject or rework artistic tools of the past that might be tainted by colonialism, racism, or other forms of oppression.You can listen on Substack, Apple Podcasts, and other podcast platforms.Please rate, review, and share to help us spread the word!Heather HouserHeather Houser, Ph.D, is Professor of English at The University of Texas at Austin, and the author of two brilliant books: Infowhelm: Environmental Art & Literature in an Age of Data (2020), and Ecosickness in Contemporary U.S. Fiction: Environment and Affect (2014), which won the 2015 Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present Book Prize and was shortlisted for the 2014 British Society for Literature and Science Book Prize. She is also a co-founder of Planet Texas 2050, UT Austin's climate resilience-focused research challenge, and has led the following initiatives for the environmental humanities: 2015-16 Texas Institute for Literary & Textual Studies, Environmental Humanities at the University of Texas at Austin, and Texas Ecocritics Network.Quotation Read by Heather Houser“It's astounding the first time you realize that a stranger has a body - the realization that he has a body makes him a stranger. It means that you have a body, too. You will live with this forever, and it will spell out the language of your life.”- James Baldwin, If Beale Street Could TalkRecommended Readings & MediaIntroJohn FiegeHere's something we hear all the time: if only more people knew more about environmental problems, then they would certainly act in some ecologically beneficial way. But the problem is, it's not true. We're now deluged with data about the climate crisis; and yet, this abundance of available environmental information has not led to an abundance of environmental action.This deficit model of climate communication is flawed, even though scientists, environmentalists, and other proponents of climate action continue to speak and act as if people would do more if they just knew more about the climate crisis and understood the science of climate change.Heather Houser writes about environmental ideas and themes in art, literature, culture, and the humanities. Her work blossoms with keen insights about the importance of culture in confronting ecological crisis.Heather HouserI mean, especially if you are an environmentalist, you pay attention to these issues. But really, even if you're, you know, you're not, there's a lot just so much like information coming at us about, say, the percentage of extinct mammals, right, how many mammal species are extinct, or bird species are extinct? All the data about climate crisis, whether it's like warming temperatures, ocean acidification, you know, how much of the ice sheet has melted? You know, it's all all this data is like, how do you make sense of that? Yeah. What do you do with that? I mean, what do you do with that, not only as a way to understand the phenomena at maybe, you know, objective or straightforward level. But what do you do with that emotionally if you're an artist or communicator.John FiegeI'm John Fiege, and this is Chrysalis.Heather Houser is Professor of English at The University of Texas at Austin. I met her many years ago in Austin, when I was developing a film about dance and environmental justice. Heather is both a dancer and an environmental humanities scholar.Our conversation explores climate information overload, the idea of what she calls eco-sickness in literature, the thorny topic of human population size, and whether artists should reject or rework artistic tools of the past that might be tainted by colonialism, racism, or other forms of oppression.Here is Heather Houser.---ConversationJohn FiegeSo, I'd like to start with an essay you're working on about your childhood, which you shared with me. In this piece, you talk about the instability of your upbringing - from your parents' rocky marriage to their financial woes. And the constant moves that resulted. You moved about thirteen times in your childhood, largely around the Poconos region in Pennsylvania, I think, and to other states as well. In the midst of that instability and constant "shifting ground" as you call it, you found a sense of stability, grounding and joy in dance. You write:“At this age I hadn't yet met the idea of the plateau or of the precipitous fall. This was the time for the joy of movement, the satisfactions of devotion, and a belief that the alchemy of body, space, music and time can make you other than who you are and where you came from.”I love this idea of seeing your childhood and who you became through this lens of dance. Can you talk more about where you come from and maybe what your relationship to the rest of nature was as a child? And how this, this alchemy of body, space, music, and time led to your interests in the environment?Heather HouserYeah, thank you. So I was born in the Poconos region of Pennsylvania, which is in the North East part of the state right along the New Jersey border. And if you know it at all, you likely know it as a tourist destination for urbanites, you know. When - this was, I should say I was born there in 1979 and grew up there with one one gap when I lived in Massachusetts, but I lived there from 1979 to 1997.I think things have changed, but back then, it was - certainly there were a lot of resorts, honeymoon destinations, summer camps, so a large tourist influx from New York and New Jersey and Philadelphia. But then there were the locals like myself, so it was a place of abundant nature, I would say. You know, the Appalachian Trail ended and started there. Lots of lakes. It's a hardwood forest area, lots of ponds and creeks, or, as I say, in that essay, "cricks" my grammy and pappy said. I didn't pick that up, but that's what parts of my family called creeks.But that was actually not my family's orientation. So I lived in this place with so many things I now wish were right outside my door. And, of course, Austin, TX has its own beautiful environments, but, I honestly did none of that. There was one swimming hole we would go to called the 40-foot. It was a 40-foot jump, which I did not do because I was afraid of heights, but I don't remember swimming in the lakes or the "cricks" aside from that. We never went on hikes, except for maybe, you know, walks in the woods near our house (or houses, since there were many of them).So that relationship that I now have, like the appreciation and really the need to be outside is, is something that developed really in my college years when I lived in Portland, Oregon.  When I think about dance and the environment, personally - and my relationship to it - is about movement. Being able to move in space, I think is one of the continuites from my dance persona to my like, environmental appreciation. And even though those are completely divorced - or separate, just didn't really exist when I was a kid - I feel that continuity now for sure.John FiegeAnd you know when you were in the Poconos area as a child. Did you have a, did you have a sense of people from the cities coming there as like a location of nature and looking for this kind of pristine wilderness experience, did you have a sense of that?Heather HouserOh absolutely, and you know, I mean, this is - I was very hard on the place when I lived there. I mean, I really wanted out. I went almost as far as you could go within the continental United States when I went to college. Kind of foolishly to go to a private liberal arts college across the country. But it worked out OK. But I did not - I mean, I definitely knew that people were coming to the Poconos for that experience of nature, and wilderness. And you would, quite honestly - I interacted a lot with tourists because I worked at an ice cream shop - one of those time-honored things you do on the summer vacation is going to the ice-cream shop.John FiegeHow iconic.Heather HouserBut you know, I was there - not stuck there, I wouldn't say that. Because I did like that job and my bosses and coworkers so I didn't feel stuck, but certainly different experience. And so I had a lot of contact with tourists that way, but really never befriended any tourists or had deep interactions with them, but it was clear that was a big part of the experience, was something so drastically different from, say, NYC or Philadelphia. And I mean we used to kind of, you know, make fun of or just roll our eyes at tourists, sort of fascinated by the so-called "wildlife" that for us was much more domesticated.You know, like, certainly we had wildlife, we had bears that would come up. We lived in pretty remote - even within the Poconos - pretty remote parts, 'cause there is like a downtown area that's a little bit denser. But we always lived outside of that. And we had bears that would walk up our driveway, and we had, we had turkeys like a turkey mound that they just hung out on, and these sorts of things. So there was some, there were some animals that were, maybe even felt a little bit wilder even to us.But yeah, so we would just find it amusing that tourists would find things like foxes or you know, deer, like really, fascinating, and even frightening, right? Like these things that you're not used to seeing are often scary. Even if there isn't much reason to be afraid of them.You know, I wasn't taking as much advantage of what surrounded me as I would at this point in my life, and so in some sense, I think the people who are coming in maybe appreciated it more than I did because it was such a stark difference from their day-to-day reality. But of course, like most tourist destinations, it had it's very - pretty detrimental effects, right? All that tourism.John FiegeRight, the development and the trash and the traffic.Heather HouserYeah, traffic and all of that, yeah.John FiegeWell, let's fast forward to what you're doing now. So, what are the environmental humanities, and how did you come to focus your work within that field?Heather HouserYeah, so the environmental humanities. I mean, it really encompasses a cluster of academic disciplines - like history and literary studies and religious studies and anthropology. Often it can capture the arts too, creative arts, but really (that academic cluster aside), it's it's really the - the impetus behind the environmental humanities is, a recognition that we can't understand human relationships to the more-than-human (or "nature," as we you know, typically call it), we really can't understand that through scientific or policy or economic approaches alone. That we need to also understand the cultural aspects of that. We need to understand the artistic aspects of human relationships to nature.So, that's one dimension of that. Like, if we're going to understand human relationships to nature, which vary over time and across cultures, we really can't just rely on some quantitative analyses. But another dimension, I think, looking forward, is if - thinking especially of environmental issues, challenges disasters. We also need those cultural, historical, and artistic understandings if we are going to really address these challenges, especially in an equitable manner. That - you know thinking about the history of, for example, climate policy you know? Or thinking about the history of colonialism when we're thinking about how to respond to climate crisis today, you know, we need those historical dimensions if we're going to move people.And this "we" is variable, right? Like it's not that there's a uniform across the environmental humanities, there's certainly not a uniform outcome that people have in mind. But if you're thinking about responses to say climate crisis or extinction, whatever it might be, that you need to also marshal all that cultural representation, all that artistic expression, bring to the conversation. Because that's really what moves people, it's what helps people imagine other futures, and also to reflect on what brought us to the present. So it's really, you know, historical, cultural, and artistic and expressive - and within the cultural I also think of, you know, spiritual and religious dimensions of environmental relation and responses.John FiegeRight.Heather HouserYou asked me how I came to this - I was an English major as an undergraduate, and then took some time not in school. But when I went back to graduate school, I didn't know that that would be a focus. I actually thought, I had lived in Portland Oregon, and living there had become much more attuned to environmentalism, largely of an urban nature, but not necessarily exclusively. And also just had become - became much more of an outdoors person, camping, backpacking, hiking. All of those things.But I thought that was a part of my personal and political life and not part of my academic or intellectual life, right? But midway or so through my graduate - time in Graduate School - you know, you need to define your dissertation. And I really had two paths I was considering. And one was just was finding a way to merge my personal interest in commitments to environmentalism with my academic life, and I wasn't sure I wanted to do that. Actually, I didn't have coursework in that area, but there was my advisor in a professor, Ursula Heiser, she's really a one of the most prominent people in the field of environmental humanities. So she was she was at Stanford, where I went to grad school. So I certainly had someone to guide me, which she did, amazingly. But yeah, it was, it was a question for me of whether to keep certain spheres of my life separate or to try to bring them together, and I decided to bring them together.John FiegeAnd was that a good decision, in retrospect?Heather HouserI made that decision because I thought that could carry me through some of those hard and dark times of being a graduate student, like to sort of think about my commitments beyond the academic sphere. But it has - it is challenging, in that it can feel like everything is a part of everything, and you know, activism or serving on advisory groups or whatever it might be outside of the academic world, and suddenly it's not at all separate, right? So, I don't know. I think it served me well. But there are weeks and days where it can feel, yeah, like there is no "outside".John FiegeWell, I can feel the passion of it in how you write, and what you write, so I think that's, you know, that's definitely the positive side of it. So, your first book is called Ecosickness in Contemporary U.S. Fiction, so can you tell me - what is "ecosickness"?Heather HouserSo that idea is - it's really capturing how often, environmental degradation or change and bodily damage, or change - how often those things go together. There were a number of writers I was noticing, and I talk about - Leslie Marmon Silko and Richard Powers, David Foster Wallace, among others - in their writing, you know, they are taking stock of environmental damage, in most cases in the literature that I was examining. And at the same time, they're taking account of all of the transformations to bodies that are happening in the 21st century.And you know, I think in a more scientific register or even a more maybe environmental justice register, we often think of these as "causal relationships," right? So there's a toxin that a polluting industry is releasing into the water, and people consume that. And then they experience maybe cancer or neurological change or, you know, infertility or reproductive changes. I think that causal relationship between the environment and the body is pretty prominent in our thinking of environmental health, but a lot of these authors weren't thinking so directly causally. It was more - they're interested in how we actually can conceptualize the environment, and what's happening to it, in terms of the body  - and a body that's sick rather than a healthy body.Now back in the 19th century in the US, with some of the white male proto- or early environmentalists like John Muir, Henry David Thoreau. You know, that relationship between the environment and the body was also often one of health, and robustness, and, you know, getting out into nature and climbing mountains - and you know, sort of overcoming some of the challenges.But in the 21st century, or late 20th century and 21st century, certainly that still exists, but we often have an understanding of the relationship between the body and the environment through, through sickness or damage or some kind. So the book is like tracking how really, that phenomenon, that it exists, and also then how it manifests very formally, artistically in a set of novels and memoirs.John FiegeYeah, and you mentioned you mentioned Rachel Carson as well, who is one of my favorite writers. And she's known as a non-fiction writer but, it made me think of the opening of Silent Spring, which is kind of written like fiction. I think even referred to it that way. And so I wanted to read just a quick section of that, 'cause I thought maybe - I would be curious to hear how you relate this to this idea of ecosickness. So this is from the opening chapter in Silent Spring called the Fable of Tomorrow. So Rachel Carson writes:“There was a strange stillness. The birds, for example, where had they gone? Many people spoke of them, puzzled and disturbed. The feeding stations in the backyards were deserted. The few birds seen anywhere where moribund. They trembled violently and could not fly. It was a spring without voices.”So how does this, how does this passage in this book relate to this larger body of ecosickness literature? You know, in in this example, there's there's sickness in the body of the bird, not body of human, but later in the book she talks about it in the body of humans.Heather HouserWell, Rachel Carson is just an amazing writer. I mean, she's certainly probably most popularly known for Silent Spring, but her writings on the ocean are just amazing. And she calls that the fable for reason, so she's already marking it as some you know, somewhat fictional. But of course, fables always point us to deeper truths.John FiegeRight.Heather HouserSo, and there's been - I mean, there's been billions of words written about that opening, I don't really write about that opening, but Carson is really inspirational to me in that project of Ecosickness, but also she's really inspirational for thinking about this relationship between the environment, and the body, through through illness, through rapid transformations that were unforeseen. But that - I mean, there's no causality in that opening, right? The rest of the book is explaining the mechanisms of that, and the sources of the death and disruption of bird populations, among other animals, including humans. But in that opening, right, it's this more evocative feeling of, of the consequences, like there's something out of joint here, right? There's no more birdsong. We don't, maybe yet know why, but we know that that's a problem.And I mean, I think one of the reasons that so important for thinking about Ecosickness, or you know, environmental health outside of strict causalities. That is, like something that you can conclusively prove through empirical studies, scientific research data, all of that. I think it's important to think outside of those, because it takes a long time - and sometimes it's even impossible - to pin down causalities and that feels really comforting like, especially when you want redress, you want blame, you want compensation, you want quick solutions.But even before you get there, like to feel that something is wrong and not to ignore it, like that's something that that opening I think really does powerfully, as, as an entree to the rest of the book. And like certainly does for my project of Ecosickness. Like these authors aren't trying to directly explain how, say, depression results from a toxin. It's more thinking about, you know, a toxic environment more broadly and how they coexist and have similar mechanisms and manifestations.John FiegeYeah, well, you know Rachel Carson fits into the next thing I want to talk to you about as well. You know, I think one thing that makes her so powerful is she's, she's a scientist who really - who's been trained as a scientist, really knows the science, and she's a brilliant writer - which is a really rare combination. And I love what you say in the opening of your book about the importance of literary and humanistic knowledge. You talk about how science illiteracy is no longer an option for humanists. But at the same time, you flip that to argue that narrative illiteracy is no longer an option for scientists, or anyone who wants to confront environmental issues. Can you talk about what you mean here?Heather HouserYeah, so um - and that's where that that idea of complementarity comes in, right. Like meeting and sort of both sides coming to a middle more than anyone abandoning a side that is science or art and narrative. There's this amazing book that I write about in my second book, Infowhelm, called Objectivity by Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison, who are historians of science. But they talk about epistemic values - which I know epistemic is a jargon-y term, but basically, the values that are privileged in a knowledge enterprise, like science. And so you know, things like objectivity, things like quantification, causality, universality, things like that.So also understanding those aspects of science are, I think, part of scientific literacy. But then on the other - you know, the compliment there is when I say that narrative literacy is so important is, I think, goes back to earlier in our conversation. That - I've said this a million times, so I kind of  chuckle when I say it, like, data and facts alone are not going to, as you said earlier, "move the needle." It's really through storytelling, understanding the stories and all dimensions of the stories that move people - or don't move people - to think about and act on an issue. And that can often be thought of as science communication. But it's so much more than that, because-John FiegeIt's not a very exciting term, right?Heather HouserAnd there are people doing great work with that and using the arts for that, so I don't want to dismiss that way of thinking about things, but there's so much - communication, and the way it can be understood, I guess in in “laypersons terms” can seem like unidirectional. Like, we have this bit of information, we need to find the best way to get it out into people's ears and eyes, right.But really, I think narrative just introduces so much more complexity that - there really isn't anything unidirectional or predictable about the way stories affect people, right? So, narrative literacy is not only - it's similar to scientific literacy. It's like, “well, what are the stories already out there, and how can those be understood as providing a foundation for environmental relations?” And also, I'm also thinking about environmental futures. But then it also means understanding how narratives work, and they aren't often so predictable or-John FiegeRight.Heather HouserAs some - as one might think.John FiegeYeah, and you say you write in your book that particular tropes, metaphors, and narrative patterns carry an “affective charge” that can activate environmental care, when empirical studies alone cannot. And so if I'm reading this correctly, you're not saying that any kind of storytelling can activate environmental care, but that particular kinds of storytelling can. And I just wonder if you could talk a bit more about that, and maybe even describe some of these tropes, metaphors, and narrative patterns more specifically that you're thinking about.Heather HouserYeah, in Ecosickness, one of the things I was interested in, as I said, their affect or emotion, the way that narratives generate and represent emotions, and how that does a lot of work on its own to, to affect how people are understanding an environmental problem and reacting to it. So for example, the emotion of anxiety. This is a really powerful emotion, in environmental representation of disasters, or future disasters, or, you know, climate change in general. You know, cultivating, generating anxiety is something that a lot of you know, dystopian or apocalyptic environmental narratives will do. It makes us anxious, makes us uncomfortable, makes us uncertain. You know, anxiety is much more amorphous. Like, there might be sources for it, but it becomes this like pervasive, nebulous thing that's very hard to like, solve, or surmount.So anxiety is this emotion that I think is quite familiar from representations of environmental damage or crisis. And I look at Leslie Marmon Silko's novel Almanac of the Dead, which is a very, very large, sprawling and challenging novel. 'cause it does depict a lot of the horrors of colonialism, and oppression, and violence against indigenous peoples throughout the Americas. But this, it's a novel that really cultivates anxiety. And so I was interested in that as certainly a powerful way to help people think about problems, right? And to recognize them as problems.But then what happens to that emotion, right? Like is this an emotion - it might lead to care or to awareness, but is it an emotion you can act on? Or is it an emotion that actually shuts you down, because it is so powerful, pervasive, but also overwhelming. So I think about, you know, those. And I also think about an emotion like wonder. You know, very different. Like has a lot of positive associations with it. But you know what, what are some of the environmental understandings and actions that an emotion like wonder can produce?John FiegeAnd another emotion you discuss is optimism. And you have this wonderful discussion of the split between environmental writers and activists on this question of optimism. So does hope fuel our ability to address ecological crisis, or does hope hinder our ability to confront very daunting realities? Or do these contradictory thoughts happen all at the same time? So here's one of my favorite lines from your conclusion:“Smart grid, smart phones and smart cars won't alone won't deliver us from our dumb ways of living, so much as perpetuate them.”So can you talk a bit about this complicated, contradictory idea of optimism?Heather HouserI think we often hear it with more through the - and you said this a moment ago - through the idea of “hope” because I mean, often we conflate hope and optimism. But some people like to keep them separate. Like that optimism can be taken as an even more, like a stronger expectation that things will just work out okay no matter what. Whereas, hope is often, I think, a little more mixed. At least within environmentalist circles. But hope is this emotion that I think drives you, even if you don't know, or even if you think things will not work out okay.There's a - I think it's, well, it's an anticipatory emotion as they say, much like anxiety. Like you're sort of looking out into the future, and imagining what that future might hold. And you - I think what's, what's useful about the reason - at least I remain hopeful, even though I do not remain optimistic, I guess - is that it's something that can drive you in the present, right, even if what you look at on the other side in the future, you're not really sure that it will all work out okay, sort of in the day-to-day reminds you that there's something you care about, that you want to preserve or improve.And so I think that for me, hope is about care, regardless of the outcome. And just how it motivates people to stay engaged, to form communities around issues and to act, even if they're not certain that action is going to make any any great changes.John FiegeRight. Yeah, well within the environmental film world I hear funders and others talk all the time about the importance of hopeful narratives, and they want, they want films to go in positive directions and make people feel empowered to act, rather than hopeless or solely produce anxiety like what you were saying before.But you know, I, I don't disagree with that, but I question it. You know, I think of a book like David Wallace Wells The Uninhabitable Earth. You know, that is a very anxiety producing book that came out, what, last year? Um, but it maybe had some of the biggest impact on the environmental conversation last year. Broadly, I'd say. I, I feel like that - those modes of anxiety and fear and danger you know can be very motivating also. So you know, it makes me think. Do we need to hunt for a particular emotion or do we need to cover the range of emotions?Heather HouserYeah, yeah, and I want to - like, I think in some comments earlier, it might sound like I was saying there's something conclusive, or definite. Like “oh, we'll just find the right narrative, find the right emotion and that will do XY or Z, whatever your XY or Z are.” But I don't think that. Yeah, it's not - one of the, I think important, aspects of emotional and narrative literacy is that the trajectories are not so certain. You might think you're writing a hopeful ending, or you might think you're cultivating concern, actionable concern, when in fact you're deadening people, or overwhelming. You know, just nothing is so predictable in how people respond to a story.There's often a desire to have a hopeful ending without a recognition of what has come before, as if you end on a certain note, and that - that that is a teleology, or an end point that the whole narrative is driving toward. But actually we have responses to the, you know, everything that came before, that an ending can't necessarily compensate for, or redirect. So I think there's also that tendency to think like, if you end on hope something is accomplished.And that's where, I mean, I often use the phrase “cocktail of emotions” in my writing. Because it is. It is this blend of things that you know, just like when you're making cocktail. If you are - if you don't drink, your baking. Like you wouldn't know from those ingredients, you know, what necessarily will result, and often not the same thing does result. Even if the ingredients are, you know, you start from the same recipe and it's not right.John FiegeSo the title of your second book is Infowhelm, that's one of those words that I never heard before. But as soon as I heard it, I instantly thought I knew what it meant.Heather HouserGood! So when I was shopping around that title, like most people would say that, but some people would say, “oh, but why these this wonky, weird word?” But -John FiegeRight, right. So does it mean what we think it means? And how does it - you know, and specifically, why it was related to our ecological state of being. So I was wondering if you could talk about that a bit.Heather HouserYes. And I should say, I did not coin the word, though I think I came up with it, and then looked to see if other people had used it. And you know, you never know how words worm their way into your brain, and you don't even know they're there. But yes, that word has been out there, but not, not so prominent as words like info-fatigue, or whatever it might be. But it is what you think it means, which is like being overwhelmed by a lot of information.And the way I saw that pertaining to environmental issues, and actually, the conclusion to Ecosickness, is a bridge, somewhat of a bridge, into Infowhelm. In thinking about, how does data feel when we consume it? Especially those of us in, you know, more privileged or wealthy media consumers in the West, in America, where you can be deluged by news, Twitter, post-feeds, whatever, all the time. And what does it feel like to have all of that data, all of that information coming at you, when it's not even really bidden? It's not like you're always even looking for it.And so, Infowhelm sort of acknowledges that phenomenon that so much is coming at us. And in the environmental sphere, I think, I mean, especially if you are an environmentalist, you pay attention to these issues but really, even if you're, you know, you're not, there's a lot - just so much like information coming at us about, say, the percentage of extinct mammals, right? How many mammal species are extinct, or bird species are extinct? All the data about climate crisis, whether it's like warming temperatures, ocean acidification, you know, how much of a, of the ice sheet has melted? You know, it's all, all this data, especially that just can stream at us?John FiegeLike, how do you make sense of that?Heather HouserYeah. What do you do with that? I mean, what do you do with that, not only as a way to understand the phenomena at maybe, you know, objective or straightforward level. But what do you do with that, emotionally, if you're an artist, or communicator? I don't just write about artworks in that book. Like, what do you do as a way to convey that information? And what are you also evoking when you when you do that? And that's where the sort of like history and traditions of science piece comes in.John FiegeRight. And you talk about, you talk about a deficit model of climate communication, which you say, holds that the public's lack of information and comprehension is the primary obstacle to environmental action. So, what's wrong with this deficit model, and why has an abundance of available environmental information not led to an abundance of environmental Action?Heather HouserThat deficit model, you know, sociologists, psychologist, science communications people, communications people have, have really talked about this a lot. And it's an idea that the problem is just that people don't have all of the facts. And if they just saw the complete picture of what's happening, say, with climate change - or if it's something like toxic environments, and public health - if they just had all the information, then surely, you know, we would collectively act to make changes. Or individually, like, you know, well, surely you would choose to drive less or fly less, or whatever it might be. And you know, that model of like, “people are vessels, and you just fill them with information, and the outcome will be predictable,” or maybe a factory model, right, you like, input some ingredients, and then there would be this output.That just doesn't work. As you said, I think at the beginning of this conversation, you know, the so much -  there's a lot more to know, of course but - so much of the scientific phenomena of climate change, like changes to our geophysical processes resulting from carbon or methane in the atmosphere, a lot of that is known, or it's known enough. And yet here, here we are in America, but really globally, here we are too.And so we need to account for all of the other factors that come into play, when people are making decisions at individual and communal, governmental levels, when they're making - when they're responding to that information. I mean, there's certainly an element. And I don't even get into this too much. Because I think there's been a lot of work about like, denialism. There are books like and studies like Merchants of Doubt that just show like, there's right there's people denying the information and clouding it.But that aside, it's still not a direct, like, give people information, and they respond this way. So we need to understand the emotional factors, issues of race and class and, economics and geography and sex, sexuality, gender. All of these things that really play, play such an important role when people are responding to that information. And I think that's where, where the arts and different forms of cultural representation are so important.John FiegeYeah, and I love in this book, how, you know, you're looking at these writers and artists who incorporate scientific information into their work. But the way they do it addresses both the limits, and the necessity of knowledge derived from science. And one thing you write is, “artists are key players, not only in making sense of climate crisis, but in making meaning from it.” I was wondering if you could talk about how making sense and making meaning are related, but different?Heather Houser The sense part might be more like that picture, that maybe a science teacher or someone wants to paint, of just what are the, what are the processes at play here? So, what does happen when we put so many greenhouse gases into the atmosphere? What does get affected? That's maybe, you know, making sense of it. Because it is, I mean, it's not as if climate crisis is like, straightforward, right. It's like, terribly complex. So there's that sense making, just like what is this thing? And how did it happen? And what is happening to, to the natural world, and the social world in response?But then the meaning is, okay, so what do people do with that, that knowledge? How does it become relevant to their daily lives? How does it not become relevant to their daily lives? How does it become - even if it feels irrelevant to their lives - how does it become a matter of concern about other people's lives, and other beings' lives that might be affected? That, yeah, the meaning is just what we think what we do with that, or different groups do with that information. And how we respond to it.John FiegeRight, right. And let's talk about the God's eye view from aerial photographs and satellite imagery for a minute. In Infowhelm, you say, “in the 21st century that air is the space from which millions access new places and perspectives on the planet.” And this connects back to the first photographs taken of Earth from space, which emerged as the modern environmental movement was gaining momentum. And many people argue that these photographs themselves helped catalyze the environmental movement. Most famously, “Earthrise” in 1968, and “The Blue Marble” in 1972. When astronauts, rather than satellites, were actually taking the pictures.And for the first time, many people saw the earth not as vast and limitless, but as finite and fragile floating, and vast emptiness. And they wanted to protect it from harm. And you explore how literary and visual artists use aerial techniques to point out some of the problematic histories of the aerial perspective, and at the same time show how it can be used to reorient our relationship to the earth and ecological crisis. Can you talk a little bit about, about this tension that emerges in these works?Heather Houser Yes, certainly. So I mean, the view from space has been analyzed quite extensively in environmental studies. And so this, you know, my thinking about it is extending off of that work. And it is often thought of as this catalyst environmentalism but, then there's also this thought of how it is a position of mastery or control, right. Like, even if you see the fragility of the earth, it can also instigate a feeling of, “well, this is something I can take care of.” Which is a good sentiment, but also, “this is something I have some control or some mastery over.” So that's where that God's eye view.I mean, Donna Haraway is a very famous thinker about what that view, that God's eye perspective entails. This idea of mastery, objectivity, as well, authority, those sorts of sentiments that are, you know - can be quite problematic for, you know, not only what one does to the environment, but the, you know, how it impacts different communities as well. And so the artists, I, I was looking at - not just artists, also activists that I was looking at - they absolutely acknowledge the affordances, you know, of the aerial. Like how important, how powerful it is, how much it moves people and grabs people's attention.I mean, one of the activist groups I talked about is this group called Sky Truth, which uses aerial imagery to sort of like to get purchase on illegal forms of extraction or the damages of extraction, they were really important during the Deepwater Horizon spill. And in seeing how the government was - and BP were - under reporting, the extent of the spill. So there are all these things that the aerial vantage point can really do to, you know, hold people to account to see what's really, what is happening on the ground. So these artists and activists, they acknowledge that. They don't want to say like, well, the aerial is - I think a term I use is like, they don't want to, they know they can't “purify” the aerial of its problems. But they want to still use it at the same time.And so they deploy it in this way that's very, I talked about as being very self-referential. So instead of thinking of the aerial as like a clear window on to the world. They show what the smudges are, I guess, on that window. So how the aerial perspectives are deeply tied to military histories, they're often a privileged perspective that's owned or controlled by government and corporate partnerships. It's also - the technologies that give one purchase on from the air, or from space, have their own histories of militarization, corporate control, colonial control. And they use these tools and at the same time, recognize those histories.And those histories are sort of like reminders that this is not an objective perspective, right? That there's so many interested parties, or forms of oppression and manipulation that go along with those perspectives. So, the aerial, it's really important to talk about it. Because it's not something we want to get rid of, or not use if we are environmentalists, or environmental artists. But it's certainly something you want to be aware of, just what its histories are, what its uses have been and how those really travel with the technology whenever you're using them.John FiegeYeah, definitely. And I love this idea of co-opting the tools for beneficial reasons. But at the same time, it makes me think of that famous Audre Lorde declaration that “the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house.”Heather HouserI mean, that term “master,” right, evokes slavery, it evokes patriarchy, it evokes a lot of a lot of things, I think, for Lorde. And for my study certainly evokes, especially colonial histories. But it also - just this general desire for mastery that often is - comes along with the scientific enterprise or thinking about solutions to environmental problems. So that that phrase, or you know, that quote, was certainly evocative and sort of traveling with me. And I do think I mean, there are some who would say absolutely, like, she's, she's right, right, you do not use the thing. Like, if you're an artist, for example, you do not use a form, you don't use a medium, you don't use a tool or an instrument that is so tainted by, you know, the very thing that you want to fight against. But I think that's quite hard.John FiegeI think it also taps into this, this plague of purity. I think that infects a lot of progressive movements, where you know, this assessment of any particular thing or object or perspective - “Is it pure? Is it not pure?” And if it's not pure, we have to stay away from it. And that's a really complicated and difficult way to assess the world. And it's self-delusional in a lot of ways.Heather HouserYeah. And I think of what, at what scale are we talking of the tool? Like, for example, the novel, right? I mean, you have something like, the novel, or poetry, or documentary film. But then, you know, you get more granular, and you might say, like, the sonnet, or the realist novel, or - I know less about documentary film, so I'm not gonna have as good examples here - but so, sort of like an interview based or-John FiegeObservational.Heather HouserRight. So you know, you also when you're thinking about tools, I think they're - and now like maybe deviating a bit from what Lorde was talking about, but thinking about the representational and the aesthetic sphere, you know, there's, I think, a lot of different levels at which you can think about that. That, you know, do you want to say like the tool of the novel or the tool of poetry, the tool of documentary or photography is sort of tainted for some reason. So you avoid it entirely? Or do you think about some of the more particular forms that you want to avoid or in fact, like, manipulate and call attention to, be really self-reflexive about the problems with them as you try to reorient them? And that was what you know, I argue, activists and artists.So, I mentioned Sky Truth as an activist group using the satellite imagery, in a very self-reflexive way that calls attention to the limits of the technology itself. But then I also look at a photographer named Fazal Shaikh, who takes aerial, so not satellite, but aerial photography of the Negev desert in Israel, thinking about the colonial oppression and manipulation of the environment in that region. I mean, he's actually interested in the displacement of Bedouin peoples. And, that I mean, he is certainly using aerial photography. He's using photography itself and acknowledges, through his use of angle - he takes an oblique angle.And the way he uses texture, and shows texture, and the layering of these pieces, as a way to sort of thwart our sense of visibility and transparency. You know, if we think of the, often the aerial and the satellite image as offering this window, or like offering an objective or transparent direct view of something, he's sort of using that tool of the aerial, to show how it is incomplete, but certainly shows us a lot of things at the same time. And then going back to your point about knowledge versus feeling, like evoking a lot of feeling in that practice too.John FiegeRight, right. And back to this idea of Sky Truth versus ground truth, you know, Fazal Shaikh's, a vast majority of his work is his portrait photography, of, you know, refugees and displaced people. So, yes, he's bringing in that element ofSky Truth. But, you know, the vast majority of the work he's doing is ground truth. So there's something about contextualizing all these tools with other tools that can make them, I think, more meaningful, less problematic, less tied to an oppressive history.Heather HouserYes. And he writes that, his work for it's called The Erasure Trilogy, this photographic project that does have, yeah, portraiture as well as aerial photography. He then collaborated with Eyal Weizman, who's an architectural theorist and known for what's called forensic architecture in the human rights domain. And they collaborated on this book called Conflict Shoreline, which incorporates the photographs.But then they talk about how they are constantly moving between the ground and the air. So you know, the aerial leads back to the ground, the ground leads to the aerial or even the subterranean and so that it is this constant moving between positions and that's something I also argue for and demonstrate and that part of the book that it's an argument for a multiplicity of perspectives, rather than sort of the “perfect” or the “objective” perspective.John FiegeRight, right. So, in Infowhelm, you talk about the new natural history. These are artworks, as you say, that speak the same tongue as Western natural history, but tell a story of ecological deficit. Can you talk about why these works interest you?Heather Houser Yeah, so that was a section of the book that really arose from just being a reader and a watcher or looker-at-er of, of environmental, art and literature. So I started to notice that a lot of contemporary writers - so those writing, and artists producing work, in the last 20 to 30 years - were harking back to these traditions of natural history. And so those traditions, I mean, we know often, many of us probably know, or have been to natural history museums. And it's this practice of classifying the natural world, naming it, putting it into categories, displaying it.And so things like if you've heard of Linnaeus - very famous person, naturalist who created the system of binomial nomenclature for naming plants and animals. All of these practices of basically ordering and classifying the natural world that arose during the Enlightenment period in Europe, and then in America. And these were like responses to like, greater access to the variety of things on the planet because of colonial expeditions and endeavors. So it's like, oh, you know, you're in Latin America, for example, and suddenly, there are all these new plants, animals, and of course, peoples, because the naturalist enterprise applies to peoples as well in this period. And so it's, it's a way of responding to that abundance by ordering it. A way of understanding it and sort of containing it.Now, there's always slippage out of that container that are really fascinating, as well. So artists today, were like, referring back to and reproducing those practices. So for example, you might have a poet who - I write about this poet, Juliana Spahr, who has a poem in which, interspersed within the lines, are the names of species that are on the endangered and threatened list of species for New York. And so they are, these artists are using those techniques of representation, and classification or ordering, but as a way to think through a loss of environmental abundance. So whether it's extinction, or deforestation or radical change, changes to the land through mining or dams, things like that.So they use those techniques, but as a way to get purchase on what is happening today. And to really think through the histories of enlightenment thought and colonialism that have produced the environmental degradation happening today.John Fiege You wrote an article for Yes magazine that explores the question of population control, and limiting the number of children we have as an approach to addressing the climate crisis. And you discuss how readily calls for reproductive limits touch what you call “the third rails of modern environmentalism: racism, eugenics, xenophobia, and even death dealing.” For you, what does it look like to deal appropriately with the question of population control outside of the racist and xenophobic history of those things in the environmental movement? Or maybe, how can we acknowledge or address the racist and xenophobic elements, past or present, of the environmental movement while still confronting the difficult question of reducing our global population?Heather HouserSo, that piece is actually part of a new thing I'm starting, but actually one where I don't know the answer to that question, and don't even know how to bring these two conversations together - if they should be. Because I mean, one of the things is not to say “population control.” So you know, controlling population has, at least in the environmental context, in the context of global development, colonialism, it's always been about controlling certain populations, it's been about advancing white supremacy and often, it's been about reducing the fertility, or - of people who have disabilities.So really, like the whole, and I'm not the first to say this, there are a lot of people have talked about, like the very phrase “population control” can't but evoke all of that. And so I say, a lot of people have talked about it, but I think that is not something like we all talk about. And so it's important to, to acknowledge that and, and that history is very tied up in environmentalism, both past like reaching back to the 19th century and further, and more present. Thinking that, you know, the earth has limits, or certain ecosystems have limits, and therefore, we need to prevent people from coming into those spaces or limit the number of people reproducing in those spaces to preserve them. But again, that is always about some people, some communities, some races, some types of people being preserved at the expense of others. And so that whole, like, “population control” is just like tainted.John FiegeRight.Heather HouserSo the question though, is, there are a lot of people who think about the relationship between their own reproduction, and the fate of the environment. And this can be everything from “I look around me, and things don't look good, so why should I bring another being into a world that is so shattered? And whose future I don't know.” But then there are some people who think about, again, going back to causality like, “well, if I put another person on this planet, will they be, you know, consuming more resources, emitting more carbon dioxide, will I just be contributing even more to the problems that we're facing?”And then there's certainly like other, other ways people think about this relationship between the environment and reproduction. And that can include actually, you know, populations who have experienced genocide, or near-genocide, or whose ability to thrive on an environment and ability to reproduce have been significantly harmed. And so, in that case, like having children can be a response to that in the affirmative. You know, sort of creating, shoring up those traditions, creating that sense of connection between place, and community.So I think, for me, if I continue to think about this, that framing of reproductive justice is, is how I would think about it. And so that's not about you know, deciding there's a limited capacity on the earth, and we need to stick to those limits by curtailing reproduction, but really thinking about the varieties of responses to having children. But also forming different kinds of family or kinship relationships in response to environmental degradation, and particularly climate crisis. Because that reproductive justice framework is much more about thinking about people's bodily self-determination. Thinking about that there is no one “right family,” there is no one “right'' (so called) number of people that we're seeking, but really curating the conditions for thriving for the widest variety of people and families.John FiegeYeah, well, I see how connected it is to your other work in this sense of looking at something that is very tainted from the past, you know, whether it be aerial photography, or classification, you know, natural history and classification and, and interrogating that. Do we need to reject that because it's tainted? Or do we need to, to, you know, reorient it and, and use it in a different way, with an awareness of, you know, how problematic it's been in the past?And one element of your essay that jumps out at me, is your note about Project Drawdown, where they say, you know, two of the most effective things we can do to deal with the climate crisis globally are to provide family planning universally, and to increase education of girls. And those two things, you know, shift much more towards the rights of women rather than the control of women, which is so much of what the history of population control has been. Have you thought about it in those terms?Heather HouserThe way I thought of the continuity of this work from past work was, or one way, was actually probably more at a sort of, like, methodological level - to be nerdy about it - which is, you know, my work in Ecosickness, really venturing into medical discourse, the medical humanities, as it's called, and then also my, my interest in environmental issues. So I sort of saw it as like a return to some of those confluences of like, the medical and the environmental, the bodily.But I can see like, I like, I like this continuity you're finding between like, what are, you know, these legacies of colonialism, of the enlightenment, of racism, enslavement, like, they, how they really travel in environmental, scientific and environmentalist discourse in ways that don't, some of us can to easily forget, or like think that it's a part of the past or, or just discard entirely. So yeah, yeah. I like how you're drawing that connection. It's often other people who see connections that you cannot see.John FiegeYeah, well, it's actually it's through our conversation today that I connected that actually, which is interesting. And I'm going to step back to Infowhelm for one second. But I wanted to ask you just to see what your first thought was. So I love this term, you use the ‘coming of mind plot', which is a play off of the ‘coming of age plot'. Can you tell me what is a ‘coming of mind plot' and how does it relate to climate Infowhelm?Heather HouserYeah, the coming of age novel or movie is something quite familiar, right? Like, you have a young person, usually someone at the cusp of adolescence or in adolescence, like coming, coming of age, entering into maturity and all of the struggles there. And, you know, often it's about like integrating into society or not. Or resisting that. And so that is kind of a familiar trope or genre and so many different narratives.And I was interested in how there were some climate narratives where - often adults - who is having to, like come to what sort of an environmental maturation or not, you know, like, suddenly comes to have to confront the, the facts, the data of climate crisis. And one of the examples of that, like, the reason, the texts that made me come up with this idea was Barbara Kingsolver's Flight Behavior, her novel.And in that case, it's a woman, the protagonist, is not versed in any real environmental or climate knowledge. But there's this migration of butterflies that erroneously lands in her part of Tennessee. And suddenly, she's starting to think about the facts, the existence of climate crisis. But this information comes into conflict with many aspects of her social life, religion, her socio-economic position, her gender, all of these things. And so yeah, it's this confrontation and integration into a different, like, knowledge reality, and the conflicts that happen, and what results from that.John FiegeSo I wanted to go back to where we started, with you delving into dance as a child in order to make you “other” than who you are and where you come from. I wonder what that project to remake yourself has led to, and how it informs your view of your relationship to the rest of nature in our collective environmental predicament now. I know that's a huge question. But I just wanted you to kind of think through that, that broad sweep of time to see if you had any thoughts about it.Heather HouserI think one, well, I guess starting from the more personal side of things. Well, I was a good student as a kid, but nothing like exceptional. So, like the intellectual part of myself, I think I developed more after I was kind of forced to see dance as not my future in terms of a profession. And there was a certain, I think, just mean, that was a sad moment for me. And sometimes I still question that choice, even though, despite what I wrote or said. But there's, there was a certain opening up I think, like there was something also scary about thinking about being a dancer and how it takes up - it takes so much, it takes so much out of you. And it does that in the very young years of your life where you're committing to something.John FiegeIt can easily destroy you.Heather HouserAnd yeah, it destroys most, you know, especially ballet and some of these intense - well, really all of it. But like, it does have its damages for sure. And letting go of that was also sort of like, well, things can develop over time, right? Like, I don't have to know at fourteen what I want to do and commit to it so wholeheartedly, and that sort of like, I mean, I say this to people and that they're like, that's bananas, because like, how much commitment does it take to become, you know, get your PhD and become a professor? And like, yeah, absolutely.But there was a lot of, like, I didn't know what I wanted to really study when I got to grad school, and I, I discovered it along the way. And I think that receptivity is really important to me and thinking about not only like my relationship to the world around me, like being out there and being receptive to smells, and sights and sounds and tastes, sometimes I guess. But just also being receptive to, you know, different positions on environmental issues. Not being dogmatic, not seeking purity. Like, listening and, and learning a lot rather than, you know, being so fixed in one's understanding. I don't know. I feel like, that's very important for environmental conversations today, even though I have strong opinions and you know, fall on an ideological side and political side.John FiegeAnd do you still dance?Heather HouserI do. I come into and out of it a lot more than I used to. And so I really, I stopped in college, more or less. And then I came back to it really wholeheartedly for about, you know, 10 years, and had this amazing teacher and, and community when I lived in San Francisco. And one of the upsides of the pandemic - which I know, like, we're sick of that phrase just as much as all others - is, I'm able to take ballet classes with my most beloved teacher from my San Francisco days. And, you know, granted from my living room, which is not the way I would prefer to dance. It's not a very big living room. But it's sort of clicked in my brain like, oh, well, they're probably offering classes I could take from my living room.John FiegeWell, the other thing that clicks in your mind is “this isn't ending anytime soon.”Heather HouserWell, that's true. Like, I did think about the virtual dance class way at the beginning. And then I was like, “I don't want to do that. I love to move. Like I love to take up space, like this is going to be pathetic and confining.” But then, as the months wore on, I was like, well.John FiegeSo, almost to the end here. I've one more kind of big question for you. Why does our struggle to create a more just and ecologically sustainable society need the environmental humanities?Heather HouserWell take the environmental humanities broadly, which is like thinking about those cultural, emotional, historical relationships to the environment. I mean, I don't see how you could think otherwise. Right? Like, it's just there's no way. I mean, I'll take an example of like, you know, conversations about climate reparations, that is like, do certain countries or community you know, states even - do they owe other nations or communities compensation for the damage that those communities are facing? That question, I mean, there's an economic way of thinking about it. There's a sort of quantitative, empirical way of thinking about it like, well, what are the actual harms to those people? Whether it be health or loss of land or livelihood. Certainly there are those perspectives on it.But so much of this is going to be thinking about the history of those relationships between countries or communities, thinking about just what the whole idea of reparations signifies for people. Like in the US, certainly means something different with the legacy of enslavement than it might in another country that doesn't have that same legacy. Those are all things that you just can't really approach without - whether you call it the environmental humanities, like that's what us professors call ourselves, right. But, you know, you might not have that label for yourself, but those kinds of perspectives are just so essential for really any environmental decision or or relationship that we're thinking about today.John FiegeRight, right. I feel like, you know, it's, it's this complicated thing sometimes to hold where we hear these calls for following the science, which I totally agree with. But I think a lot of what your work is pointing out is: yes, we need to follow the science, but it also needs to be in the context of, of all this other stuff, so that we can make meaning of it, and that we can understand what to do with it.Heather HouserAbsolutely. In the very early days of the Infowhelm project, I had, you know, wrote, wrote an early chapter, and someone said, like, you know, this could sound like you're questioning science, you know, fueling a denialist position, or a skeptical position. And that's why I say at many points in the book, like, this is about finding those complementarities; finding, you know, I borrow from a science studies scholar, S

The Radiology Review Podcast
Bonus Episode: Interview with Dr. Michael R. Jackson, author of Imagining Imaging

The Radiology Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 40:46


Welcome to this bonus episode of The Radiology Review Podcast. In this episode, I interview Dr. Michael R Jackson who is a consultant pediatric radiologist at the Royal Hospital for Children and Young People in Edinburgh, Scotland. Dr. Jackson's many accomplishments include being the Trustee of the British Society for the History of Radiology and Archivist to the Scottish Radiological Society. I interview Dr. Jackson to discuss his book, Imagining Imaging which is published by CRC Press. Topics we discuss include how medical imaging and art often intersect in the way they portray the human body, the history of radiology, the potential future of radiology, and, of course, Dr. Jackson himself, and how he came to write this fascinating book. Want to read this book? Get your copy from the publisher at this link and use discount code II25 to get 25% off. (Note: discount code active at time of posting, may expire in the future per publisher; Dr. Covington receives no commissions from these purchases nor compensation to provide this interview or link). If you want to check out this book on Amazon, an affiliate link for The Radiology Review is available. You can follow Dr. Jackson on Twitter @ii_art_book.

Health Coach Conversations
EP192: KETO with Dr. Sarah Myhill

Health Coach Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 33:05


Consuming too many sugars and carbohydrates can have long term negative consequences to your health. Dr. Sarah Myhill sheds light on chronic fatigue syndrome management and how a ketogenic diet supports good health for life.    In this episode, Cathy and Sarah discuss:  Diagnosing chronic fatigue syndrome based on a patient's overall clinical picture  Managing chronic fatigue by addressing 4 control mechanisms: diet and gut function, mitochondria, thyroid, adrenal    Finding root causes and setting people up with good health for life Understanding how ketosis helps preserve energy and improve gut health  Examples of daily meals and eating habits on a ketogenic diet  How a ketogenic diet is based on high calories and creates high energy  Acknowledging the impact of a lifestyle addicted to sugars and carbohydrates  Advice for measuring and testing to know if you're in ketosis  Simplifying blood sugar control with a ketogenic diet  Benefits of unprocessed foods and sticking to primitive principles of eating          Memorable Quotes: “The problem with most prescription medications is most are symptom suppression. And that is not the way to cure somebody.” “The single largest problem that we face is that we are not eating an evolutionarily correct diet.” “We spend an awful lot of energy detoxing a toxic gut. We spend an awful lot of raw materials on that same process, and that is an enormous waste of energy.”  “We should all be eating foods which are as unprocessed as possible.”   Dr. Sarah Myhill qualified from the Middlesex Hospital Medical School, London, honours viva, 1981, since when she has been working continuously in NHS general and private practice. This was part time work when her daughters Ruth and Claire were born in 1982 and 1984. She has a special interest in treating chronic fatigue syndrome and estimates she has seen over 9,000 patients with CFS and/or ME. This includes patients with post viral fatigue, occupational exposure to organophosphates, Gulf War Veterans, aerotoxic pilots, vaccination, 9/11 syndrome, sick building syndrome etc. In 1997, she gave evidence to two government working parties, one of which looked into this problem, and one into the health problems of silicone breast implants.  She is affiliated to the Association of Naturopathic Physicians and the General Naturopathic Council. Dr. Sarah Myhill has been helping sufferers from debilitating chronic conditions for over 30 years with an approach that combines all the benefits of current scientific knowledge and medical testing and treatments with an expanding appreciation of the importance of nutrition and lifestyle. She is currently a Naturopathic Physician, Member of the British Society for Ecological Medicine and was formerly an active member of the General Medical Council. She's written many books and has won several awards including the Peoples Book Prize Winner and was a British Medical Association Short-listed author. She has also co-authored three medical papers on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and mitochondrial dysfunction and is highly regarded for her expertise in this area.   Author/co-author of seven books: Diagnosis of CFS and ME Ecological Medicine The PK Cookbook Prevent and Cure Diabetes The Infection Game The Energy Equation NEW RELEASE: Green Mother - Families Fit for the Future     Mentioned In This Episode: Books: https://www.amazon.com/Diagnosis-Treatment-Chronic-Syndrome-Encephalitis/dp/160358787X   https://www.amazon.com/Green-Mother-Families-Fit-Future/dp/1781612048/   Website: https://www.drmyhill.co.uk/     Links to resources: Health Coach Group Website https://www.thehealthcoachgroup.com/

Walk-Ins Welcome
Ep. 28: Interview with Dr. Mboh Elango and Catherine Clark from MEDICI Urgent Care and Wellness Center

Walk-Ins Welcome

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 27:42


We're bringing you another interview this week! In this episode, Nick and Michael are sitting down with Dr. Mboh Elango and Catherine Clark from MEDICI Urgent Care and Wellness Center in Atlanta, GA. With over 15 years of experience in the emergency medicine industry, Dr. Elango started MEDICI in 2021 with the goal to provide holistic and integrative health and wellness options for its patients. Their biggest focus is their integrative approach to medicine, acupuncture, massage therapy, IV vitamin therapy, and even infrared sauna. Dr. Elango is passionate about a holistic and integrative approach to health and wellness. He has been named 100 Most Influential Atlantans in Medicine in 2020 and 2021 as well as a Power Player in Medicine in 2021. He has also been recognized as one of Atlanta's Leading Health and Beauty Experts in 2019 as well as Premier Medical Experts in 2021. Dr. Elango is certified in Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS). Additionally, he is a fellow and member of the American College of Emergency Physicians, Georgia College of Emergency Physicians, the Royal Institute of International Affairs, the British Society of Lifestyle Medicine, and the European Lifestyle Medicine Organization. Aside from operating MEDICI, he also serves as a consultant with a special interest in improving health delivery and Emergency response systems. Catherine Clark is the Clinical Director for MEDICI Urgent Care and Wellness Center. She is a family nurse practitioner who is board certified by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. She earned her nursing degree from Gordon State College in 2012 and enjoyed six fulfilling years of emergency medicine and hospice nursing. She obtained her Master of Science in Nursing degree from Maryville University in 2018 with induction into Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society. She has worked as a nurse practitioner with focus on emergency medicine since then and, as a result, she brings extensive experience in the treatment and management of medical urgencies. Learn more about Dr. Elango, Catherine, and MEDICI by listening to this episode of Walk-Ins Welcome and visiting their website at https://www.mdmedici.com/ Intro/Outro Music by Devin Smith https://open.spotify.com/artist/4UdQjNXnACFE2VpkEoP8v2?si=pDx5jsgtRFOtwrpMOKOkuQ Stay connected with Urgent Care Marketing Pros! https://urgentcaremarketingpros.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/urgentcaremarketers Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/urgentcaremarketingpros/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/urgent-care-marketing-pros YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9nwkAwIyiVvsLTWGoeRbWA

WEMcast
Safeguarding in the Humanitarian Arena with Zoe Clift

WEMcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 53:31


Zoe Clift is a physiotherapist, who works for Humanity & Inclusion, a charity that works along side vulnerable and disabled people in areas of poverty, disaster and conflict. Zoe is the UK Medical Team's Rehab Project Manager and spoke to World Extreme Medicine independently about her knowledge and experience about safeguarding in the humanitarian arena. Join Deb Swann as Zoe explores her pathway into her career, and her experience of this topic in our latest podcast. ReSurge Africa https://resurgeafrica.org/ The British Society for Surgery of the Hand (BSSH) https://www.bssh.ac.uk/overseas.aspx British Foundation for International Reconstructive Surgery and Training (BFIRST) https://www.bssh.ac.uk/overseas.aspx Here are the links to the learning sites and podcasts I mentioned: Kaya learning platform https://kayaconnect.org/ Disaster Ready learning platform https://www.disasterready.org/ Global Protection Cluster https://www.globalprotectioncluster.org/ Harvard Humanitarian Initiative https://hhi.harvard.edu/knowledge-hub The New Humanitarian https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/podcast

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
472: Jimmy Soni - An Indispensable Guide To Innovation, Curiosity, & Leadership (The Founders)

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 70:40 Very Popular


Text Hawk to 66866 for Mindful Monday... A carefully curated email sent to you every Monday to help you start your week right... Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12      https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12 Jimmy Soni is an award-winning author. His book, A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age, won the 2017 Neumann Prize, awarded by the British Society for the History of Mathematics for the best book on the history of mathematics for a general audience, and the Middleton Prize by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. His book, Jane's Carousel, completed with the late Jane Walentas, captured one woman's remarkable twenty-five-year journey to restore a beloved carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Jimmy's most recent book is called, The Founders - The Story of PayPal and the Entrepreneurs Who Shaped Silicon Valley.  Notes: “Your life will be shaped by the things you create, and the people you make them with. We tend to sweat the former. We don't worry enough about the latter." The founders and earliest employees of PayPal pushed and prodded and demanded better of one another. Instead of "Acknowledgements" to end his book, Jimmy titled the section "Debts" "A debt is deeper than an Acknowledgement." Envy the optimist, not the genius. There's real power in optimism. The world is built by optimists. Look for the silver things. Have belief. Be the type of person that believes in themselves and others… Optimism builds confidence in yourself and others. Be an optimist. Phil Jackson and Michael Jordan – The fact that Phil told the best player in the world… “We aren't going to win a championship if you keep playing that way. You have to buy into the triangle offense.” It shows the value of a friend (or a coach) telling you the truth in order to help you (and the team) get better. "Walter Isaacson made me believe in its (the book) importance and potential. At the very end, he provided the kind of advice that can only come from someone who has spent years laboring in the same fields. Peter Thiel refined Max Levchin's thinking... He made him better. Ask, "Have you thought about it this way?" Watch Jiro Dreams of Sushi Kobe Bryant was an incredible learning machine. His insatiable curiosity made him better. You can become curious about anything. Mr. Beast spent hours every day on Skype with his friends talking about how to grow a YouTube channel. We live in a moment were you can connect with others who are passionate about the same topics you are. With the internet, you can connect with anyone. Qualities of the leaders who created PayPal: It was so hard. They all experienced failure and bounced back. Highly intelligent. Hard-working. They worked 7 days a week. There was no work-life balance. They weren't just resilient, they were fast-moving. Life Advice: What looks like expertise on the outside is generally messiness on the inside. Leadership in Solitude. There are benefits to spending some time by yourself. Ask – The people who make things happen are willing to ASK. Steve Jobs to Bill Hewlitt. Elon Musk to Dr. Peter Nicholson. Those "asks" changed the trajectory of their lives. Who knows, maybe your next ASK will change yours… Claude Shannon, Bell Laboratories, renowned as an incredible hub of innovation…  whose work in the 1930s and '40s earned him the title of “father of the information age.” Geniuses have a unique way of engaging with the world, and if you spend enough time examining their habits, you discover the behaviors behind their brilliance.

The Happy Pear Podcast
Weight Management Myths with Dr Sue Kenneally

The Happy Pear Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 71:03


This week we have the wonderful Dr Sue Kenneally with us, the weight management specialist!A General Practitioner, nutritionist and co-founder of the British Society of Lifestyle Medicine. Dr Sue sits on the board of Plant Based Health Professionals UK and is SCOPE certified in obesity management, working with the University of South Wales in the study of weight management.We have known Sue for years, having first met her at The Plant-based Doctor Conference in London where we connected immediately. Aside from her qualifications, Sue's deep understanding of the difficulties of weight management comes from her own personal experience as well as her empathetic nature, “I am not naturally slim myself, I have to work hard to maintain my own weight, and I know that the challenge is real!”After our first encounter in London, we kept up our friendship which eventually blossomed into The Happy Shape Course! A 4 week course where along with Dietician, Rosie Martin, and PT, Zanna Van Dijk, the five of us take on what it truly means to have a happy shape, through education, movement, sleep, food, nutrition, community and most importantly having fun! We debunk the myths, ensure you are never hungry or lacking in delicious food and connect you with a group of like minded people so you forever feel supported.“Getting someone to change their relationship with food is like getting someone to change their relationship with any addictive substance. The only difference is, if I am dealing with a heroin addict I can tell them to stop taking heroin and support them to do that, but I can't tell someone who is addicted to food to stop eating…”In this episode, Dr Sue takes us through the most common mistakes people make for weight management, the differences between men and women, why calorie counting is pointless, and practical tips you can apply now.A great episode! Enjoy!Lots of Love,Dave & Steve xThis May 30th join us on The Happy Shape Challenge! One month, where we all begin together, guided by Dave, Steve, Dr Sue and Rosie through constant live Q&A's. Come join us and find out more on how you can feel healthier and happier while maintaining your happy shape! Follow this link for more information: thehappypear./thehappyshapeProduced by Sean Cahill and Sara Fawsitt See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Converging Dialogues
#134 - Origins of The Human Brain: A Dialogue with William A. Harris

Converging Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 97:41


In this episode, Xavier Bonilla has a dialogue with William Harris about the origins of the human brain. They discuss the evolutionary history of the brain, rise of the neuron, and genesis of the neural tube and neuroepithelium. They talk about the phylotypic stage, neural stem cells to neurons, and four cycles of the cell. They discuss the important neuron theory, contributions of Ramon y Cajal, and how neurons "wire up." They talk about growth cones, Sperry's theory of neural connections, cell death, neural plasticity, and many other topics.  William A. Harris is professor emeritus of anatomy at the University of Cambridge. He is also a fellow of the Royal Society, Academy of Medical Sciences, and was awarded the Waddington Medal by the British Society for Developmental Biology for his specialization on the visual system in the human brain. He is widely published within the scientific literature and author of many books including his most recent book, Zero to Birth: How the Human Brain is Built.