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Jonesing For Football
NFL Week 3 Preview & Predictions

Jonesing For Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 32:22


Week 3 of the NFL season has arrived. Bill Jones and Cody Winstead breakdown the biggest games, including what could be the final matchup between Aaron Rodgers and Tom Brady. Plus, two of the top teams in the AFC square off in South Beach; Bills at Dolphins.

The Come Up
Camila Victoriano — Founder of Sonoro on Building LA Times Studios, Latinx Podcast Innovation, and Following the Story VS the Medium

The Come Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 67:01


This interview features Camila Victoriano, Co-Founder and Head of Partnerships at Sonoro.  We discuss how fan fiction taught her to see nerds as heroes, being in the room when Dirty John was pitched to become a podcast, her crash course to figure out the business of podcasting, becoming a first time founder during COVID, why the Mexico audio market is like the US four years ago, Sonoro's growth to a global entertainment company, and why there are no limits to Latino stories.Subscribe to our newsletter. We explore the intersection of media, technology, and commerce: sign-up linkLearn more about our market research and executive advisory: RockWater websiteFollow us on LinkedIn: RockWater LinkedInEmail us: tcupod@wearerockwater.comInterview TranscriptThe interview was lightly edited for clarity.Chris Erwin:Hi, I'm Chris Erwin. Welcome to The Come Up, a podcast that interviews entrepreneurs and leaders.Camila Victoriano:So in 2017, we had a meeting with the editor in chief at the time, and he was like, let me sit you guys down and read you this out loud. And it was what would become Dirty John. That's when we realized there's something here that I think could be our first big swing in audio and in podcasting. And we got to talking and at that point we were like, I think we can do something here. And I think there's a story here to be told in audio. When it launched, it took us all by surprise with how well it did. Obviously we knew it was a good story, but I think you never know when something's going to be that much of a hit. Today, it probably has over 80 million downloads.Chris Erwin:This week's episode features Camila Victoriano, co-founder and head of partnerships at Sonoro. So Camila grew up in Miami as a self-described nerd with a passion for books and fan fiction. She then went to Harvard to study English, literature and history, which led to her early career, starting at the LA Times. While there, she became a founding member of their studios division and a “audio champion”. Then in 2020, she went on to co-found Sonoro, a global entertainment company focused on creating premium, culturally relevant content that starts in audio and comes alive in TV, film and beyond.Sonoro collaborates with leading and emerging Latinx storytellers from over a dozen countries to develop original franchises in English, Spanish, and Spanglish. Some highlights of our chat include how fan fiction taught her to see nerds as heroes being in the room when Dirty John was pitched to become a podcast, her crash course to figure out the business of podcasting, becoming a first time founder during COVID, why the Mexico audio market is like the US four years ago and why there are no limits to Latino stories. All right, let's get to it. Camila, thanks for being on the podcast.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here.Chris Erwin:For sure. So let's rewind a bit and I think it'd be helpful to hear about where you grew up in Miami and what your household was like. Tell us about that.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. So I grew up in Miami, Florida, very proud and loud Latino community, which I was very lucky to be a part of, in the Coral Gables Pinecrest area for those that know Miami and my household was great. My dad, he worked in shipping with South America. My mom was a stay at home mom. And so really as most kids of immigrants, I had obviously parents I loved and looked up to, but it was very different than folks that maybe have parents that grew up in America and knew the ins and outs of the job market and schools and things like that. But really great household, really always pushing me to be ambitious and to reach for the stars. So I was, yeah, just lucky to have parents always that were super supportive. Questioned a little bit, the English major, that path that I chose to go on, but we're generally really happy and really supportive with everything that I pursued.Chris Erwin:Yeah. And where did your parents immigrate from?Camila Victoriano:My mom is Peruvian and my dad was Chilean.Chris Erwin:I have been to both countries to surf. I was in Lobitos in I think Northern Peru and I was also in Pichilemu in Chile and yeah, just absolutely beautiful countries. Great food, great culture. So do you visit those countries often?Camila Victoriano:I visited Chile once, much to the chagrin of my father, but Peru, I visited so many times and yeah, they both have incredible food, incredible wine. So you can't really go wrong. I did Machu Picchu and Cusco, and that sort of trip with my mom once I graduated college, which is really great just to go back and be a tourist in our country, but they're both beautiful and yeah, I love going back.Chris Erwin:Oh, that's awesome. All right. So growing up in your household, what were some of your early passions and interests? I know yesterday we talked about that you had an early interest in storytelling, but in some more traditional forms dating back to the ‘90s, but yeah. Tell us about that. What were you into?Camila Victoriano:I was always a huge reader. It's funny because my parents read, but not super frequently. My grandparents were big readers, but I always, always gravitated towards books. I remember, like many people of my generation when I was six, I read the first Harry Potter book and that was just mind blowing for me and I think...Chris Erwin:At six years old? Because I think I learned to read at like five.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. I had help with my mom a little bit but I remember we read it together and we would just mark with a crayon every time where we ended on the page. But I remember that book was like, I think when I first really understood how detailed and how enveloping worlds could be. And I think starting from that point, I just went full on into fantasy, YA, all sorts of books. I was just reading obsessively. It also helped that I was a classic nerd in middle school and high school and all throughout childhood, really. So I think for me, books, literature stories were just a way to see the world, see people like me, a lot of times in fantasy books or in sci-fi books in particular, you have the nerds as heroes.And so I think for me, that was a big part of why I gravitated to those genres in particular. But yeah, I just read all the time and then I did light gaming. So I played the Sims, again, similar idea though. You're world building. You're living vicariously through these avatars, but that was really how I spent most of my time, I obviously played outside a little bit too, but I was a big indoor reader always.Chris Erwin:Got it. This is interesting because the last interview I just did was with Adam Reimer, the CEO of Optic Gaming, and we talked a lot, he was born in the late ‘70s. So he was like a 1980s self described internet nerd as he says, before being a nerd was cool. So he was going to web meetups at bowling alleys when he was just a young teenager. Over through line with you because he was in Fort Lauderdale and you grew up in Miami. So two Florida nerds.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. Nerds unite. I love it.Chris Erwin:Nerds unite. You also mentioned that you also got into fan fiction. Were you writing fan fiction? Were you consuming it? Was it a mix of both?Camila Victoriano:A mix of both. So that's really in middle school in particular, how I really bonded with my small group of friends. I remember my best friend and I, we connected, we were on the bus reading a Harry Potter fanfiction on at that point it was fanfiction.net. And that is also again, similarly because in person with people, it was just like, we weren't really connecting that much. And so that community online was huge for me and my friend. We read all the time, people had comments, you had editors that you worked with and we wrote them ourselves too. And I think, looking back in the retrospective for me, that's where I think I first started to realize the potential of world building really in storytelling and in media and entertainment. It's like, it didn't stop with the canon text. You could really expand beyond that.We loved telling stories about Harry Potter's parents and how they would go to Hogwarts, like super in the weeds, deep fandom. I don't know. I think for me that was just a real eye opener too, of like, oh, there's a whole online community. And I don't think at that point I was really thinking business. But I think for me, that's where I started to redirect my focus much more seriously too of, oh, this isn't just like, oh, I like books for fun. There's people all around the world that are incredibly passionate and spending hours upon hours of time, oftentimes after hours of school to just write and to really immerse themselves in these universes. And I remember writing them and reading them, just realizing how badly I wanted to be a part of creating things that caused the same feeling. And so for me, that was huge in that respect too.Chris Erwin:Well, thinking about fanfiction, literally there are now companies and platforms that are worth hundreds of millions of dollars that foster fanfiction, the communities around them. I think of Wattpad where you have film studios and TV studios, and a lot of the streamers that are now optioning IP from these fanfiction communities to make into long form premium content. Pretty incredible to see. So you go to high school and then you end up going to Harvard. I think you end up becoming an English major at Harvard. Was that always the intent from when you were in high school, it's like, yes, I'm going to go and get an English degree? What were you thinking? How did you want to spend your time in college? And then how did that evolve after you went?Camila Victoriano:I was typical good student in high school, right, but I think the older I got, the more I realized, oh no, my passion really lies in my English classes, my history classes. Obviously, I think math, once I got to calculus, I was like, all right, this might not be for me. And then science never really gravitated towards, so for me, it was always very clear that even though I tended to be a generalist in many things, my passion and my heart really was in writing and reading and stories and in history too, in the real world and how they intersected and how they affected each other. And so I remember when I was applying to schools again, my parents were like, are you sure you want to do English?Because for them, it was in Latin America, many of the schools don't have that many practical degrees like that. You pick something a bit more technical. So I remember I would tell them, oh yeah, don't worry. I'm going to do English, but I'm going to minor in economics, which never happened. Once I got there, I was like, absolutely not, but that's what I would tell them because I was like, oh no, I'm going to be an English major, but I'm going to have some business acumen to go with it. And I think at that point when I was going into college and applying to schools, what I wanted to do was go into book publishing. And I really wanted to, I remember I had seen that Sandra Bullock movie, the proposal where she's an editor and I was like, that's what I want to do. And so at that point I was talking to, we have this really awesome local bookstore in Miami called Books and Books.And I went and met with the owner, Mitchell Kaplan had a conversation with him. And I remember I told him I wanted to get into books. I wanted to get into publishing. And he's like, look, you're young, you're getting into college. I run a bookstore, but I would tell you, don't worry so much about the medium, just follow the content where the content's going. And that was a huge eye opener. Even though it seems now obvious to, sitting here saying that, I think for me at that age where I was, so it's easy to get one track mind of like, this is what I want to do, and there's nothing else, to get that advice from someone who was running a place that I loved and went to so frequently growing up.And I think that for me, gave me a bit more flexibility going into college, just saying, okay, let's see where I gravitate towards. I know I want to do something creative. I know I want to still study English, but maybe he's right and I don't have to just stick to publishing. So when I got into Harvard I still, again, focused my classes, really liberal arts, right, like film classes, history classes. But I was a bit more, when I got there, unclear of what that would actually lead to in an exciting way, I think. But that was probably a really great piece of advice that affected how I thought about what would come next after Harvard.Chris Erwin:Yeah. So following that thread, I really love that advice of, don't worry about the medium, just follow the content. Clearly I think that really influenced a later decision that you made about doubling down on audio. But before we get there, in terms of following the content, at Harvard, it seems like you dabbled in a few different things where you did an internship with the LA Times, which is maybe news and journalistic reporting. You're also a staff writer for the Harvard political review. So what did following the content look like for you when you were at school?Camila Victoriano:So Harvard can be a really overwhelming place. My mom had gone to college, my dad hadn't finished. So it was a semi first gen college experience where I was like, whoa, once I got there. It was incredibly, the first semester and a half were really, really overwhelming. And I had to get my bearings a little bit, but I think once I got there I tried to dabble in a lot of things. And I think there was literary magazine, there was the Crimson, which is a classic. And then there was a few other organizations like the Harvard Political Review at the Institute of politics. And so I sat in a few things and it's crazy. For people that don't know, once you get there, you still have to apply to these things.You haven't gotten there and then you're done and you're good to go and everything's set up. There's a pretty rigorous application process for most of these clubs, which makes it overwhelming. And so for me, what I ended up finding a home in, in terms of just the community and the way they welcomed you in when you came into the club was the Harvard Political Review. And as one does in college, you get a bit more political, you get a bit more aware of what's going on around you, world politics. And so I think I was in that head space already and wanted to flex a little bit of my writing skills outside of class. And so there I was able to really pitch anything. So I would pitch, I remember like culture pieces about the politics of hipsters, of all things, and then would later do a piece on rhinos that are going extinct.So it was really varied and it allowed me to be free with the things I wanted to write about and explore outside of class and in a super non-judgmental space that was like, yeah, pursue it. And we had all these professors that we had access to, to interview and to talk about these things. So it was just a great place to flex the muscles. But I think mainly my focus in college was building relationships with my friends, if I'm totally honest. I think as someone that's super ambitious and super driven, I was very particular and followed step by step exactly what I needed to do in high school to get into the school I wanted to get to. And then once I was there, I was like, let me enjoy this for a second. Let me meet people and have fun and intermurals and just...Chris Erwin:Wander a bit.Camila Victoriano:Wander a bit, 100%. And I think especially freshman year and sophomore year was very much like let me just wander, take random classes. I took a computer science class, which was a horrible mistake, but just giving myself the opportunity to make mistakes. And I think then by junior, senior year is when I realized, okay, no, I still like this path that I'm going on. I like the storytelling. I like literature. I like writing. Maybe I'm leaning a bit more political. Again, that's why I applied junior year for the LA Times internship because was that through line of, I still want to be in storytelling. I still want to be in media, but now in this college experience and getting into young adulthood, I'm becoming much more aware of the political and socioeconomical world around me. Let me go into media, that's maybe pushing that forward a little bit and a bit more public service.Chris Erwin:Clearly it was a positive experience because I believe that after graduation, you decided to commit to the LA Times full time.Camila Victoriano:Yes.Chris Erwin:And just to go back on a couple of points you noted just about wandering. I think, when I review resumes for people that are applying to my firm, RockWater, my first internship was right before my senior year of college. The summer before senior year. I now look at resumes where people start doing internships literally in high school, and they have six years of working experience before they graduate. It's super impressive. My little brother took a gap year before Harvard and I think that wandering around and figuring out what he likes, what he doesn't like is really valuable. And I always tell people, like my own professional career, I did some things early on that I didn't love, but I learned a lot and it helped shape to where I want to point myself later on. So I think that's really good advice for the listeners here.Camila Victoriano:Absolutely.Chris Erwin:I'm curious, so was there any kind of gap period, or did you just get to work at the LA Times right after you graduated?Camila Victoriano:I went straight into it. I took the summer after college to travel a bit. That's when I went to Cusco with my mom, I went to Columbia. So I went a little bit around Latin America, but other than that, that fall went straight into it. But I think to your point, and again, taking a step back a little bit like freshman summer, I went to study abroad in Paris for the summer. So just again, I had traveled outside the country maybe once or twice, but not a lot. And so for me, that was a really, I was like, let me utilize some of these resources that I have. And so it was, again, that wandering and then the sophomore summer I worked at a literary magazine. So again, going more deep into literature. So I did dabble in a couple things here and there before fully committing, but after graduating pretty much went straight into work.Chris Erwin:And so you get there and are you, again, working in the publisher's office?Camila Victoriano:Working more broadly, for the “business side” of the company, right. So I'm working on business development really broadly. What that started as was how do you diversify revenue streams? How do you develop new projects from the journalism? Basically, what are new ways to make money in a digital space? We pursued projects at this time, and I actually got to see through to fruition because I was there full time, an event series within what was called the festival of books. We developed a new zone focused on digital storytelling. So we brought on VR companies, audio storytelling companies, just thinking about how to expand what the company was putting forward as storytelling, which was cool to me.And also an interesting dynamic for me as someone that loved books to be like, let me throw VR into the mix and into the book festival, but it was really fulfilling, and after pursuing a few different things, developing a couple of platform pitches internally, what really stuck with our team and with me was in 2017, a year into that job, audio as a real business opportunity for the newsroom and for the media company. So in 2017, we had a meeting with the editor in chief at the time and he brought us this story and he was like, let me sit you guys down and read this aloud to you. It was very cinematic, but it was what would become Dirty John.Chris Erwin:The editor in chief read this story out loud to your team?Camila Victoriano:Yes. So just literally, it was a team of me and my boss and that was it. And he was like, let me sit you guys down and read you this out loud. And it was what then Christopher Goffard had the journalist had written as what was going to just be maybe a series online for the paper. And I think that's when we realized like, oh wait, there's something here that I think could be our first big swing in audio and in podcasting. And we got to talking and at that point, Wondery had just gotten started to another podcast company that obviously now sold to Amazon music. And so we met with [Hernan 00:17:57] and the early team there and we were like, I think we can do something here. And I think there's a story here to be told in audio.And so again, a year out of college, I'm there helping put together the production team that would create this massive story or what would become a massive story, we didn't know at the time. And what I was able to do was basically help primarily the launch strategy and help the marketing teams and the sales teams put together what's this actually going to look like when we got this out, there was the first time we had done anything like that. And so it was a pretty wild experience. And then of course when it launched, it took us all by surprise with how well it did. Obviously we knew it was a good story, but I think you never know when something's going to be that much of a hit. And I think today it probably has over 80 million downloads and it's been adapted both scripted and unscripted on Bravo and oxygen and had a season two ordered on Bravo.So it was a crazy experience. And I think for me, it was just like the ding ding ding of, oh, hey, remember what Mitchell told you in high school? Which was, follow the content, not necessarily the medium. And for me I had never really explored audio at that time. My parents were not people that listened to public radio in the car. That was not something I grew up with or that environment. So that was really my first entry point into audio and into podcasting. And as I started to dig into it more, I remember I was such a late listener to Serial and to S town. And I was like, oh my God, this is unreal and something that I've never heard of. I've never heard anything like this before. I probably never read anything like this before. And so I remember I asked my boss at the time, I was like, can I do this full time? I was like, can I just work on building out this audio division and this team? And I think at that point, luckily because Dirty John had been such a huge success, everyone was like, yeah, this is worth doing in a more serious way.Chris Erwin:Before we expand on that, this is a pretty incredible story. So you are in the room as your editor in chief is reading you the Dirty John story. So just remind me, with Dirty John, it was initially just a story. It wasn't like, oh, hey, we created this because we want to make this into an audio series or anything else. It was just, hey, Camila, you're looking at different ways to diversify revenue for the company, looking at different mediums for our content. Here seems to be a pretty incredible story. And was your editor in chief recommending that you make it into a podcast or is that something that came up in the room in real time?Camila Victoriano:No, I think he had already been thinking of it and that's to his credit. Right. And he was like, I think this might be it. And how do we get this done? And then I think Chris Goffard in particular is a great journalist. And he writes these amazing, more feature length pieces. And so his style of storytelling really lended itself to that as opposed to a breaking news reporter. And so he had already thought when he got the piece, this might be a good podcast or it might be our good first podcast. And I think he brought us in because we were the R&D crew of two that existed in the organization to really help make it happen. And so again, once we connected with the Wondery team and put the LA Times team together, it was a match made in heaven, I think. And it worked really, really well.Chris Erwin:It seems like you went right to Hernan and the Wondery team, were you like, hey, we should talk to some of the other audio and radio companies that are out there, or did you just go straight to Wondery?Camila Victoriano:We just went straight to them. And to be honest, I think that was something else our editors suggested. And I think to be honest, it did end up working really well because I think, we were coming from a very journalistic perspective and that's where I started to learn a bit more of the different ways to tell stories in audio, right. Start very character driven, really narrative as if you're making a movie. And so I think that it was a great match honestly, and I don't think we may have maybe looked at other things here and there, but it felt like a good fit right off the bat.Chris Erwin:You said you were working on the marketing strategy and the launch, right, of the series. Do you think there was any special things that you guys did? Obviously it's incredible story and it really resonated with audiences at scale, but were there any initial marketing tactics or buzz that really helped tip that into the mainstream?Camila Victoriano:I think what we decided to do, which was perhaps different than how some podcasts had been marketed before, because till then it had really been public radio driven, was I forget who said this, but it was basically like let's market this as if it was a movie or what would we do if we were launching a film? And so we really went all out in splashing our newspaper with these beautiful full page spreads. We were the LA paper, and so we had all this FYC, for your consideration advertising that would, you'd see those spreads for movies all the time. And so we were like, why don't we just make one of our own? And so it was a full team effort with the designers, the marketing team, me and my boss at the time and just putting together this plan where we really went all out.And I think that definitely caught the attention of our subscribers, which obviously were the first touch point to this story. And we did similar things online where we had, what's called a homepage takeover where basically everywhere you look online, you're seeing advertisements for Dirty John for this story. And so we had newsletters and I think a lot of that 360 approach to promoting it online, in print, although that's not as common, but on social newsletters and really just hitting all the touch points is something that definitely I have taken with me in my career. And I think is also just becoming much more common across podcasting as we launch and others launch more narrative nonfiction, fiction series, that sort of thing where they're becoming really entertainment franchises beyond just a really great maybe non-fiction or reported story. But I think absolutely the way we thought about marketing it helped to change the way that our subscribers and then the listeners that came in through more word of mouth, saw the show and understood it for, oh no, this is entertainment. It's journalism driven, but it's entertainment.Chris Erwin:It's a really good note because an increasing challenge for any content creators or content market is how do you stand out through the noise? There is more content across more mediums today than ever before. And so how do you really cut through the noise, drive mass awareness, but also be focused and really go after a niche community as well? It's not an easy formula. Sorry. I wanted to go a little bit back in time, but that was really helpful context. But then to the point where you said, okay, you're talking to your boss, your leadership. And you're like, I think there's something really big here in audio. I want to focus my efforts here full time. I also think this is interesting Camila, because when we were talking yesterday, you said that you took an atypical path in some ways where you followed the content, you followed your passions.It wasn't like, I'm going to go to school. And then I'm also going to get a dual computer science degree or economics or some quantitative math. And then I'm going to go do two years at McKinsey or an investment bank. And I think you following your heart it then puts you into these serendipitous moments, like being in the room when your editor in chief comes with Dirty John, and then you're like, hey, I've been working on these passion projects. I think there's something to do here in audio, let's go forth together. And then you just happen to be in the room at these incredible moments and then you're raising your hand for where your heart is telling you to go. And it's obviously put you on an incredible path, which we're going to talk more about. That's something that I'm just taking away here from hearing your story.Camila Victoriano:Thanks. That's a great way to put it. It's following my gut a little bit, and I think it just goes back to again, how I was raised and I think my parents were always, there's this funny saying in Spanish, [foreign language 00:25:29], which is like, if you don't cry, you don't get fed, basically. And so I took that to heart and like, yeah, I have a passion. And I think that part of me, the inclination is like, oh, if I work really hard, it'll get noticed. But sometimes it is like, no, you have to really actively say it out loud. And I think sometimes for people that are younger, like I was the youngest by like 10 years in a lot of the spaces I've been in, it's hard sometimes to do that and to raise your hand and say, I want this. But I think when I really felt that I did it and I think it's something I've just been working on in general.Chris Erwin:So you raise your hand and you say that you want to focus on what you perceive as a big audio opportunity for the LA Times. What does that look like for next steps?Camila Victoriano:Really, what that meant was I was the only person working full time on the business side, on this project, which was daunting, but also great because I got to have different touchpoints with all the teams. And so for me, it really became, how do I build essentially a mini startup within this legacy organization and how do we make something that moves quickly and can be nimble and can be experimental in an organization that, as I said earlier is nearly 140 years old at this point? So it was really exciting and really daunting. And so what I did first and foremost was figure out a good cadence to meet with my colleagues in the newsroom. And what it allowed me to do was really focus on offering them insight into the content that was really working well in the space that perhaps is maybe a bit more data driven, I would say.I was really looking at what was working well and also working with our data and product teams to see what were the types of stories that listeners or in our case, readers were gravitating towards and offering that insight to the journalist and to the editors and really working hand in hand with them to figure out based on that, what were they excited about turning into audio or what were they excited about putting resources behind? And so I was focusing a lot on content strategy in the very beginning of how do we follow up this phenomenon, which was also, I think for everyone, you have this huge hit, you want the sequel to be just as good.Chris Erwin:And to be clear. So the data that you're looking at is both in terms of the content that the LA Times is putting out. Like your articles, I'm not sure if you were also doing video as well, looking at who's consuming that, how often are they consuming it, is that type of content performing well relative to other content? In addition, looking at metrics for just podcasting overall, what genres are performing well, what do the formats look like? Is it short form or long form audio? So you are taking that for your own understanding and then educating a lot of the writers and the journalists in the newsroom. Because then when you put that information together, better ideas can start to germinate within your business. Is that right?Camila Victoriano:Absolutely. Yeah. And then what they would be able to offer me was insight sometimes into maybe investigations they were conducting, or they would be able to tell me, yeah, that is a great story, but maybe the sources aren't going to speak on audio. So it was a really wonderful collaboration between the business side and the newsroom in a way that was really organic and really respected the work that they were doing, but also offered them a bit of insight into, hey, we're exploring this new thing together. Here's how we might do it in the best way. And so I was doing a lot of that in a lot of that more high level content strategy, basically to guide the editors into figuring out what might come next. And then also just doing everything else, basically that the journalists weren't doing, right, or that they couldn't do because they were busy reporting amazing stories, which was building on an actual business model for what this might look like, which was difficult, because it was very early days and our sales team had never sold a podcast before.They had sold digital, had sold print, had sold events. And also marketing is like, how do we replicate what we did with Dirty John in a way that was sustainable and in a way that, how do we replicate that by tracking what actually worked well from that experience? Right? Because we could always splash all of our pages and flash all of our online presence with images and with links to the show, but figuring out how to basically make a report of what actually worked to drive listeners. And so it was a lot of in the very beginning, trying to digest and figure out what are the things that we could replicate and what is the “formula” that worked in Dirty John and others. Some of the stuff is hard to quantify and you can't measure, but trying to measure as much as I could to be able to build out a plan for, okay, we think we can make this many more shows and they have to hit these particular metrics. And I was doing a little bit of everything. Literally, like I said, my sales team or the sales team at the LA Times, they had never sold podcasts before. So I was literally calling podcast agencies and selling ads.Chris Erwin:You were selling ads yourself?Camila Victoriano:Yeah, I was. I remember I called ad results. We were doing a show about Bill Cosby, which is not an easy subject to pitch to sales, but I was getting on the phone, calling people and selling ads into the show. So it was really scrappy.Chris Erwin:Yeah. So essentially a one person team where you're creating the vision and the business plan and then also executing against it as well. That's a lot. Did you have a mandate from your leadership, which is like, hey Camila, we believe in your vision here, but we want within one year we expect like X amount of revenue or within three months. Come with a clear business plan and how much capital you need to grow it and then we're going to green light it. What were the expectations from your boss?Camila Victoriano:Yeah. It wasn't anything that specific to be honest, I think mainly the main mandate very broadly was like, Hey, this needs to make money after a certain point. Right. And it can't go on for so long of just, because a lot of people while making podcasts is cheaper than making a pilot, it's also very resource intensive. So while maybe it's not a lot of cash out the door, it's a lot of time from a lot of people to make something that is high touch investigative, like a year of reporting sometimes. And so I was asking a lot of the newsroom and the journalists. And so I had to work with our finance team at the time to build out a model that basically showed at least break even for year one and then started to make some profit after that or some revenue.And so it wasn't as super strict thing, but I think obviously they wanted it to be revenue generating and relied on me and my counterparts on finance department to put that model together. And again, I was an English major. I had never made a spreadsheet. I had never made a model V lookup, it was very new to me. All of that was the first time I was doing any of that. So for me, those next three years or so were an incredible crash course into all of the practical skills that perhaps I hadn't learned in the English major was those were all learned in that time period of building a business model, putting together business plans, content strategy, and then executing marketing plans and sales plans at the same time.Chris Erwin:So I have to ask, clearly your love and your passion is for storytelling, right? So now you're figuring out the business plan for how can you actually create a new sustainable business that's going to tell stories in a different way on new mediums. Did you enjoy doing some of that business work or was it more of like, eh, I don't mind doing it because it allows me to execute towards this primary goal or were you starting to see like, oh, I actually like using both sides of my brain, operating on both sides of the house. What did that feel like for you?Camila Victoriano:I think it was definitely the latter. I think I never expected to “business” as I had always thought of it. Right. I think there were certain things that I could really do without, I did not love sales calling and pitching. I was like, I could do without ever doing this again. But I think for me, what I realized during that time period and working with the folks on the finance team, our COO, our sales, I was like, these guys are all really creative and actually figuring out how this is going to work and how this is going to be sustainable is actually weirdly fun and interesting and challenges my brain. And it's funny to put it that way, but again, as an English major, as someone that didn't grow up with parents or in a community where people were doing really traditional jobs or working as high powered business executives, I had never been in that space.And so I think for me, the brainstorming of what are we going to do, what types of shows are we going to make? How is it going to make money? How are we going to make stuff that's meaningful and powerful and makes a difference, but also not go broke? That was actually really fun for me and really creative in a weird way. Business can be creative. And at the same time, I got a lot of joy from just sitting in newsroom meetings and hearing their stories that they wanted to tell and working with, call them creatives, but the journalists really.And I think that's when I realized, oh, I can be in this space. I can be in this creative space as a facilitator of all these people that maybe have the boots on the ground, making the stories. And I actually really enjoy the operational part weirdly. And I think my brain does like being in both sides where I can brainstorm stories and I can be a part of green light meetings and I can have my opinion based on obviously personal taste, but also what I understand about the market and at the same time, really enjoy putting spreadsheets together, which sounds so lame, but it was fun.Chris Erwin:Hey listeners, this is Chris Erwin, your host of The Come Up. I have a quick ask for you. If you dig what we're putting down, if you like the show, if you like our guest, it would really mean a lot if you can give us a rating wherever you listen to our show. It helps other people discover our work. And it also really supports what we do here. All right, that's it, everybody. Let's get back to the interview.I think you're hitting on a couple notes, which are important. So just one, I think I can just sense from our listeners, some tears of joy, we are calling finance professionals and the FP&A teams at these media businesses that they have creative aspects to their work. I think they really appreciate that, but I think it is true. And I think, look, I've seen this because I started after my banking career, I was very early in the YouTube MCN, digital video days. And there's all these incredible visions of how to build these new modern media businesses, but the actual business fundamentals of how do we make money? How do we have sustainable profit where we can keep doing this year over year? I feel like a lot of those big questions were not addressed. Now that's fundamentally changed 10 years later, but I think people with your mindset is there's a chance to bring great content to these new audiences that want to consume content in different ways.But we got to find a way where there's business sense here, right, where there's going to be money pouring in from partnerships and from brands or from investors or from the fans themselves. And that allows you to keep building, to keep iterating, to create something beautiful and great and different. So clearly you have a really sharp mind for this. This is a good transition to talk about how you ended up going over to Sonoro and meeting Josh and being a co-founder of that business. To tie a bow in your LA Times experience, where did you essentially eventually take the business before you decided to do something else?Camila Victoriano:By 2019 or so, we had launched about eight or nine different shows. They were true crime limited series, but also what was important to us was to have some more recurring community driven projects. We did a really wonderful show called Asian Enough with two of our reporters, Jen Yamato and Frank Shyong. And it was just about what it means to be Asian enough and how that question is something that they asked themselves a lot and other people in the community asked themselves a lot. And I think that's an in general question that I, as a Latina can relate to. So there was a lot of also really, I don't want to say public service, but really community driven projects as well that I was really proud of. And then also of course, we had Chasing Cosby men in the window, Detective Trap, all these really awesome, true crime series that were our bread and butter by the end.And luckily all of them did really well. They all would hit the top of their charts. A couple of them I believe are in development for TV. And I was just really excited to see more than anything too, that the process of brainstorming those ideas and of bringing them to life was so much smoother by the end. Our sales team was total pro that's selling podcasts by the end. Now they still have a podcast salesperson. I think what I was most proud of from year one to year three basically, was that it wasn't anymore a struggle to push these things through, it was very much LA Times studios as we called it was really embedded in the organization and podcasts were a real serious part of the business of the LA Times and still are.And we got to make some amazing shows. All of them had advertisers when they launched, which was again for us a huge success metric. We were able to sell things before they even came out because advertisers trusted us to make it successful. And I think that was a huge success point for me having been on those calls in the beginning. I feel like that's a little bit why too, again, making this jump into Sonoro, why after that point I felt good about leaving because I was like, I feel really great about what I've built and what I've helped set up here. And I feel okay that I can step away now.Chris Erwin:Okay. And so were you planning on transitioning out or did this opportunity to work with Sonoro come up and you're like, hey, this is hard to turn down?Camila Victoriano:It was a little bit of both in my head. I was itching for something bigger, a bigger challenge, how I mentioned LA Times studios was really this mini mini startup within a legacy organization. I had gotten the itch of building something from the ground up and feeling really excited about that. And so I think at that point, I had been at the LA Times total, including my internship probably for close to five years. And so it had been a really solid run. And I think I was ready to look for my next challenge and as I was in that head space, just so happens, got introduced to Josh through our mutual friend, Adam Sachs. And when I met him, I think our energies, just to jump right into it, but our energies really, really matched well. We met over zoom a couple times.Chris Erwin:And when was this Camila?Camila Victoriano:This was in early, early, early 2020. So gearing up for what was to come unbeknownst to me.Chris Erwin:It was right before COVID.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. Yeah. And so we had met a couple times and I'm a real detail oriented person. And I think what was exciting to me about working with someone like Josh was he came in and had a really inspirational vision for what he wanted to achieve. And I got very excited and felt very aligned with that vision and what I had been thinking about recently over the last few years, just being in the audio space and in media.And I thought, might as well go for it. I felt like it was the right time for me to do something from scratch, to take honestly a risk. And what seemed like a risk at the time, because I had been working in a very sort of traditional company that probably wasn't going anywhere. And in general, I think in my life had been pretty risk averse. I think I had just done everything the way I was supposed to do it. Right. And so I think that for me this was, okay, I'm going to take a risk. I feel like I've gained a lot of confidence over the last five years and a lot of skill sets and I'm ready for the challenge. So, yeah, chose to jump in it with him.Chris Erwin:Camila, what's the quick elevator pitch or overview of Sonoro?Camila Victoriano:So, Sonoro is a global entertainment company that creates audio content with the goal of developing it into TV, film, books, other audio derivatives, and our community focus is 500 million global Spanish speakers and US Latinos. So our entire shows are made by Latinos and our entire team is a hundred percent bilingual and bicultural.Chris Erwin:In terms of being inspired by the vision, were there things from the outset where you're like, hey, Josh, I love this idea, but here's what I would do a bit differently? Was there any of that in the beginning?Camila Victoriano:What I was able to offer was the experience being in the industry. Right. And so I think my eagerness really came from wanting to try shows that were outside the podcast norm "a little bit". We had done a lot of true crime at the LA Times, but I was really excited to try stuff that would resonate. For Sonoro, it's really our core consumer are the 500 million global Spanish speakers and the US Latinos. Again, I came from Miami. I'm a Latina. What was exciting to me in general about creating stories that were empowering Latino creators was let's not set a boundary about what the narrative that they have to tell is. Let's let them tell sci-fi stories, fantasy stories, horror, thrillers, that maybe don't have anything to do with being Latino, but are just feature Latino characters in it like they would any other sci-fi.And so I think for me, what was really exciting was pushing those boundaries a little bit and leaving that creative flexibility to the creators and trusting them and their experiences, knowing that if we really relied on the specifics of their experience and their story, inherently, that would have a universal impact. What we Josh and I talked a lot about in the beginning was the success of shows like Money Heist, and those that hadn't come out yet reaffirmed our point later in the year, like Squid Game and Lupin, that more and more people were consuming global content.That was, if you're a French person watching Lupin, there's probably so many inside jokes that I totally missed, but I still really enjoyed it. But they're going to enjoy it even more because it's culturally specific to them. And so I think that's what a little bit what I was really trying to push forward in the early shows that we made and still today of we can be really culturally specific, so that if we're making a show set in Mexico, Mexicans, they're like, oh yeah, this is really made for me, and I get this, and this sounds like where I'm from and who I am. But someone that is listening in the Bronx can still really enjoy it and have a sense of cultural community with the story, but it's more universal in that sense.Chris Erwin:Got it. Very well said. So, you align on visions with Josh, but you also have your distinct point of view. And then is it like, hey, within one to two months of meeting, you joined the Sonoro, and you helped co-found the company and build it to what it is today, or was there a longer [courting 00:43:24] period?Camila Victoriano:I think we literally talked on Zoom twice.Chris Erwin:And then it was like, all right, Camila's on board.Camila Victoriano:Yeah. I don't know. We just, we really got along really well and we clicked really easily. And I was like, I think this can work. I think we have a good rapport. We always joke, we're both Capricorns, so I think that that helps.Chris Erwin:What are the attributes of a Capricorn?Camila Victoriano:Very driven, very type A, very low BS. So I was like, okay, I think we can understand each other. So I don't know. It just felt right. It felt like everything was aligning. I was getting that edge to go and build something and start with... In general, I was just saying, I want to start with a really young team. That's what I wanted to do. That's as far as I had gotten in my head space about it, and then to get this connection from Adam, literally as that was happening, it just felt way too serendipitous to pass up.And also then to have honestly such an immediate connection with Josh of like, oh, okay, I think we can work well together, and I think we understand each other and how we like to do things and how we like to work, that still to this day nearly three years in is true. I think it checks so many boxes that I was like, I just have to, again, it was the first big risk I've taken, honestly; career wise or school wise, if I'm looking that far back. But it felt right, and it felt like the right time to do it. So I just went for it.Chris Erwin:Well, so it's funny that you say all this. I've known Josh for a few years now. And in terms of how you describe him of like he's very ambitious, very driven, very direct, no BS. Camila Victoriano:Yeah.Chris Erwin:And as I'm getting to know you, I get that sense as well. And literally just, I think we spoke for the first time yesterday, but I'm also seeing just how complimentary the both of you are in working together. So I think that explains a lot of the recent success that we've seen with Sonoro over the past few years, not surprised. After a couple Zoom meetings, you guys partner up and then what do you first start working on?Camila Victoriano:So the first year that we really started, and we really formally kicked things off, kid you not, March 2020. So it was weird timing. But really what we were first trying to do is test out if we could actually make things that people loved. That is all we cared about. We were like, can we make shows that people love, that people binge into the deeps in the middle of the night? And can we do it well? And can we do it at a high quality? Because I think that was important to both of us is in general when you're seeing, especially in Latin America and the US, content for Latinos, like traditional telenovelas, the production value just isn't there. And so that was really important to us. And so the first year we launched a lot of traditional bread and butter podcast, chat shows that really quickly climbed up the charts.Personal interviews, comedy, wellness, your traditional categories in Mexico specifically, and started to build out our network there really quickly, because I think a lot of the creators that were more independent there saw us as a reliable resource to help them grow their shows and to really be; for us, it was like, we want to be the partner of choice for any creator podcast or media company, executive director that wants to work and make really great content that just so happens to be created by Latinos.And so that along with let's make stuff people love were our two big mandates in the beginning, and it worked really well. Our first original scripted series launch that we did was a show called Crónicas Obscuras. It was a horror franchise that we launched in October. And that came off of a similar premise, which was Latinos over index and horror. We love horror movies, horror shows, anything. But most of the horror shows or movies that do really well are either based on European legends and European horror stories or feature zero to no Latino characters that, and if they're there, do they make it towards the end? Maybe not. And so-Chris Erwin:They get killed off early.Camila Victoriano:Yeah, definitely not the final character left. So for us, it was like, this is one genre that we know already has a huge gap in terms of how Latinos consume it and how it's being made. And so we said, this is going to be our franchise where we're going to tell Latin American legends, set in Latin America with Latin American characters. And so our first season of Crónicas was about these things called Los Nahuales, which are basically werewolves, but they also turn into other characters like snakes and things like that. And the show, we did it super high production value. We recorded with this thing called binaural audio where you literally have a mic that looks like a head and people can walk around it. And so if you're wearing headphones, the show, you can feel things coming up from behind you, but it's just because of the way that we recorded it with this special mic.And we had the voice actor who's done Homer Simpson in Mexico for 20 years. That was our big celebrity for that season star in the show. And the show ricochet up to number one podcast in general in Mexico. And it did really, really well. And that was our first success of this is an original show that Sonoro produced fully in-house, wrote, direct, production, casting, marketing. And we were able to launch it and people really, really loved it. Next few months after that, we launched a few similar series. The big one, of course, is a show called Toxicomanía, which launched in April of '21, which was, again, similarly mission driven, but always entertaining. It was based on a true story. A Mexican doctor in the 1940s that convinced the president of Mexico to legalize all drugs for six months, which no one knows happened.For six months in Mexico, all drugs were legal and you could get them in government mandated dispensaries. And it was this doctor's way of saying, hey, this is how we build a progressive society. This was an obvious one. Again, it's like the combination of our mission, which is, this is a story about Latinos, in particular Mexicans and drugs that you haven't seen before because when you think Mexico or drugs in media, you think Narcos, but this was actually something very different. But then what we did is we turned it into a really entertaining dramatic thriller. We were inspired by movies like The Big Short and things like that, where it was like it was teaching you something about history, but in a way that was really, really entertaining.And then we partnered with the actor, Luis Gerardo Mendez, who's an amazing Mexican star and really starting to come into his own in the US to executive produce and star in the project. And that show did insanely well. We launched it on 4/20. So again, it was the combination of mission, entertainment, production value, the right partner, and also a really strategic marketing launch of this is obviously a story that people are going to love and it's about drugs, so we're going to launch it on 4/20. And it did really, really well. It was number one in Mexico across Latin America. Number two in the United States in fiction, even though it was only in Spanish.And now we just announced earlier this year that it's going to be developed into a film at Paramount+. And so that to me is a perfect case study of what we really tried to do that first year is let's partner with the best creators. Let's make the best content and see if people love it. And I think we proved that to ourselves that first year, year and a half.Chris Erwin:When you entered the, call, the Mexican creator and audio landscape, was it competitive? Were there a lot of other production companies that were either Latin America based, Mexico based, or from the US that were trying to operate in that market? And two, follow up question, was there a sense of with the creators that were there, did a lot of them want to create in audio and to expand their creator ambitions, or was it something like, oh, we didn't even know that we can do this, but then after talking with you Camilla and your team, they're like, oh yeah, typically, I just create a bunch of videos on YouTube or whatever else, but I'd love to do something in a more scripted or [premium 00:50:55] or narrative form in podcasting. Let's figure out what that looks like together?Camila Victoriano:Yeah. I think in terms of the landscape, there were very few to none established. There were a lot of independent creators. So we actually are head of production; Andrés Vargas. He is this great heart of the Mexican podcast creator network. He was really a first mover there for sure. And I think we worked together really to bring on a lot of these early chat show podcasts into our network to kickstart that, but there wasn't a lot of established companies there. There weren't any. And so for us really, it was a mainly an education challenge, not so much the creators. I think there were, like I said, independent comedians or wellness experts that had already started to realize, oh, this podcasting thing is makes a lot of sense for me to expand into. And we focused on working with them, but really more so for the talent.So for our scripted projects is explaining that, hey, you don't have to have hair and makeup. You can just go into the studio for literally four hours and you make a whole series. And I think for us, that was how, especially when we were early on unknown, reaching out to these huge stars like Luis, being able to pitch it as this is still a really... And this is what I love about audio, right? Is like it's still, even though it's been around for a good chunk of time and you could argue all the way back to radio dramas and radio plays, it still feels like such a creative and experimental space. And I think that's what got a lot of the talent in particular that we were speaking to for our scripted projects excited, that they could try something different. This wasn't your traditional production, where you had to go in with a 5:00 AM call time.It was very much, especially in early COVID days. It's like you could do it from your house. We'll send you a kit. No worries. We'll do it over Zoom. But it was a lot of education really for them, for their managers, but people were excited. I think they thought this is a chance for me to play and for me to have fun and for me to do something different and which made the whole experience, especially of those early recordings, just really special.Chris Erwin:So going back to a point that we talked about with your experience at the LA Times, it was follow the content, but then figure out the business model. How do we make this sustainable? So what did that look like for you working with Josh and the team of like, okay, we found this incredible creator community. We have these shows that are becoming number one in their local markets and they're crossing international borders into the US and more. But how do we actually generate sustainable revenue for this? And what are the right revenue streams beyond what everyone just talks about for podcast ad sales, et cetera? So what was some of the initial work? What did that look like for you guys? And where does that look like going forward as you think about the medium and monetization differently?Camila Victoriano:Yeah, absolutely. I think in Mexico, in particular, again, it was all about education, education, education. And I think for us, since we focused that first year really on just launching great shows and making sure that they were hits, then our counterparts in Mexico were able to go to brands and say, hey, look, we already know this works and explain a little bit the medium and how to interact with consumers and how to write an audio ad. So it's still early days in that market, but we've been able to work with really amazing brands like McDonald's, like Netflix. A lot of CPG brands in particular are really excited about this space. And so I think we're really, the more we talk to brands every month, it gets easier. And I think where the podcast market in the US was maybe four years ago is where they're at right now.And I think we're reaching those innovators in the brand space that are excited to try something new and it's working really well for them. And we're getting a lot of people that come back, come back again because the audience for podcasting is the traditional ones that you see here in the US. They are younger, they have more disposable income typically. And so I think a lot of the brands are really excited about that. And then the US, of course, it's a totally different game. You have your direct response advertisers, which are the bread and butter of podcast advertising, but what we're really excited about is bigger brand presenting sponsorships, especially in our fiction series. That is where we're really looking to double down on in this year. For example, we had a show called Princess of South Beach, which was a 36 episode telenovela in English and in Spanish, and [Lincoln 00:55:02] came on as a presenting sponsor. And we produced this really incredible integrated piece into the content itself.So it was a funny telenovela set in Miami, and we created a chat show or a TV show basically like an Enews called Tea with Tatianna, where she was talking to people around the family that the show was about while integrating Lincoln in a really seamless way. So for us, it's always about thinking a few steps ahead of what's the market going to look like in a year or two, and how can we get ahead of that? And how can we be really, really creative about the way that we integrate brands, so that it doesn't disrupt the content; number one, but also it gives them better value and it gives them much more seamless integration with the content that we already know listeners are loving. And so that's really what we're focused on in the US in particular is those bigger integrations into, in particular, our scripted content.Chris Erwin:Camila, as a young rising leader, where you raised your hand and essentially got to be at the helm of what is the new LA Times studio division, where you're helping to tell stories in different ways. And now you're a co-founder at Sonoro. Looking back on your young career, what are some of your leadership learnings to date, upon reflecting of you as a leader earlier on, maybe a few years back to the leader you are today? What have you learned and what do you want to keep working on?Camila Victoriano:The main thing I've learned has probably been more about human interaction, how you work with people and how you build a team. I think at the LA Times in particular, newsrooms are tough, because it's the business side traditionally and over the years has never... hasn't always been super friendly. And so what I learned really well there and also building a team over Zoom these last few years is communication is critical. And over communicating and making sure everyone knows what they're supposed to be doing, why, and just offering up the opportunity to answer questions and to be there as a leader that listens to people and to listens to maybe questions they have about work, about their life. I think for me, that's always really important and something that I've valued from mentors in my life of they're there to listen and they're not going to... I was a very precocious early career person.I was always like, why is this happening, or what's going on? And I wanted to know as much as possible. And so communication, I think, is something that I always valued as a younger employee or as an early career. And so that's always what I'm trying to communicate or to convey to our employees now and to back then the newsroom is like, I want to be someone that they have a lot of FaceTime with and that communicates a lot with them about strategy and about what we're doing, what we're doing and gets them really excited.Chris Erwin:I like that. I run a lean team, but I realize, I can never overcommunicate. So things that I just assume that the team knows, the reality is that they don't. These things are in my head. And so every day it's important to just remind the team, what is our mission? What are we focused on? What were wins from yesterday? What are learnings and what are we maybe changing? That is literally a daily conversation. And I would much rather over-communicate than under-communicate. So I think that's very well said. Another point here is you now have investors. Yo

Fishcasting with Captain Tim and Fish Facts TV
Episode 72: Snapper on South Beach, and Snook on Tampa Beaches

Fishcasting with Captain Tim and Fish Facts TV

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 19:58


We both took to the beach on our respective Coasts... Tanner with Snapper and Tim With Snook.  Tanner also got a nice snook in the neightborhood canals

The Wharf Radio
Riverside Happy Hour, Vol. 23 - EDM Mix

The Wharf Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 59:01


An EDM mix featuring old-school, new school, and everything in between, with Riverside Happy Hour sounds by Wharf resident DJ Kid Nemesis!All episodes available at wharfradio.com

Steve Somers
An Aaron Hicks Nightmare and the Mets drop one in South Beach

Steve Somers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 35:10


On a night meant to honor Derek Jeter, the Yankees have a horrifying night on the field with Aaron Hicks getting the worst of it. Meanwhile, the Mets take a loss to the Marlins down in Miami.

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
Devin McCourty mulls over the idea of Jules in a Pats uniform again

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 47:53


Hour 1 Jules is hoping on podcasts and making his rounds ahead of the new football season, and this sound bite has Courtney optimistic about an Edelman return. The Bills beat up on the reigning Super Bowl Champs out in LA proving that the boys up in Buffalo are serious about the AFC East this season.  Additionally, Devin McCourty calls into the show to chat about the Patriots' upcoming game with the fish on South Beach. 

Checkdown Charlies Football Podcast
Miami Dolphins - Ep 1: Dolphins Take Their Talents to South Beach

Checkdown Charlies Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 29:11


Welcome to Season 2 of the Checkdown Charlies Podcast! This season will cover the Miami Dolphins!   Episode 1 details the humble beginnings of the franchise; from defunct AAFC squad to Joe Robbie's greatest investment. The guys detail the initial growing pains of George Wilson and the burgeoning Dolphins franchise

Heaters Gonna Heat
The Whale Hunt in South Beach is Over... For Now

Heaters Gonna Heat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 28:51


With Kevin Durant rescinding his trade request from the Nets, and Donovan Mitchell getting traded from the Jazz to the Cavaliers, Miami and Riley have to call it quits on the whale hunt for the moment. We go over the Durant trade saga (1:00) and the Mitchell trade saga (9:01) before assessing what we can learn from this latest summer and how superstar trades will be conducted going forward (19:20). Next week, we talk power forwards. Heaters Gonna Heat: https://twitter.com/HeatersHeating Kyle Russell: https://twitter.com/kbrheatnation OTG Basketball: https://twitter.com/OTGbasketball

ESPN Richmond Podcasts
The Sports King with Jamie King | September 7, 2022

ESPN Richmond Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 44:36


Jamie begins the show with a Royal Rant. Then it's onto the top news stories of the day, including the Patriots hitting South Beach early and the Bills being favorites over the defending Super Bowl champs.

DJ KenDAWG
Episode 32767: 09.02.22 Freestyle FridayZ Podcast

DJ KenDAWG

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 101:06


Freestyle 80s from Friday Night1. hold you tight-  tara kemp2. heartbeat - seduction3. sending all my love - linear4. hippychick - soho5. hard day - george michael6. in the night time - pretty poison7. summertime - nocera8. hooked on you - sweet sensation9. fascinated - company b10. searchin - debbie deb11. show me - cover girls12. respectable - mel & kim13. i like you - phyllis nelson14. down and counting - claudja barry 15. dont you want my love - angelina16. i dont need your love - quasi rhythm17. fading away - will to power18. come into my arms - judy torres19. what you see is what you get - brenda k star20. be mine tonight - promise circle21. yo no se - pajama party22. please dont go - nayobe23. like a child - noel24. spring love - stevie b25.dont you want me - jody watley 26. rocket to you - jets27. no parking on the dance floor - midnight star28. tina cherry - giorgio29. full circle (sax n dawg mix) - company b

Florida's Fresh Mix
Episode 38: Dilo Murad of South Beach on Promoting Nightclubs, Finding Purpose, and Owning Avo Miami

Florida's Fresh Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 84:54


Many people tend to evaluate their past decisions that led to their present circumstances. Whether those circumstances are good, bad, or...meh, some people are content with being content. But today's guest reached the pinnacle of his career only to ask himself, "What's next?" Dilo Murad is the Founder and Owner of Avo Miami -- a fast-casual Mediterranean-inspired restaurant that serves tons of healthy cuisines to South Beach visitors and locals.  He's also a longtime friend of Gerard's! Dilo talks about finding purpose in life, following your intuition, and changing a destructive lifestyle. He also shares his transition from promoting nightclubs to owning a restaurant. Plus, Gerard and Dilo reminisce about the first time they met, which may or may not have involved Gerard screaming at a room full of people...Listen in and learn something new today! Host: Gerard Legagneur Guest: Dilo Murad of Avo Miami Links: Avo Miami's Instagram | Facebook | Yelp Links: Dilo's Instagram DONATE: Gerard's Guitars Over Guns fundraiser! Visit The Fresh Mix Website: FreshMixPodcast.com Follow The Fresh Mix on Social Media: Instagram | Twitter Email the Show: FreshMix@FloridaPodcastNetwork.com Executive Producer: Jaime Legagneur Lead Content Producer: Amber Amortegui Additional Support Provided by: Listeners Like You and Flint Stone Media ------------------------------- Production House: Flint Stone Media Partner with FPN: Become the voice of YOUR segment of Florida!! From sponsoring episode segments through creating and growing your own branded show, we have the solution to promote you while we promote Florida! FPN Media Kit We are currently boarding shows to build out our network. And, you don't want to miss ANY of the new hosts and podcasts were have joining us. Search for and subscribe to “Florida Podcast Network” on iTunes and all your favorite podcast players to get more of this and ALL our shows. Become a Patron: Have a suggestion for the Network? Join us in the FPN Insiders group on Facebook and let us know!    FPN:  Check out the other shows on the Florida Podcast Network

Florida Podcast Network's All Shows Feed
Fresh Mix Podcast - Episode 38: Dilo Murad of South Beach on Promoting Nightclubs, Finding Purpose, and Owning Avo Miami

Florida Podcast Network's All Shows Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 84:54


Many people tend to evaluate their past decisions that led to their present circumstances. Whether those circumstances are good, bad, or...meh, some people are content with being content. But today's guest reached the pinnacle of his career only to ask himself, "What's next?" Dilo Murad is the Founder and Owner of Avo Miami -- a fast-casual Mediterranean-inspired restaurant that serves tons of healthy cuisines to South Beach visitors and locals.  He's also a longtime friend of Gerard's! Dilo talks about finding purpose in life, following your intuition, and changing a destructive lifestyle. He also shares his transition from promoting nightclubs to owning a restaurant. Plus, Gerard and Dilo reminisce about the first time they met, which may or may not have involved Gerard screaming at a room full of people...Listen in and learn something new today! Host: Gerard Legagneur Guest: Dilo Murad of Avo Miami Links: Avo Miami's Instagram | Facebook | Yelp Links: Dilo's Instagram DONATE: Gerard's Guitars Over Guns fundraiser! Visit The Fresh Mix Website: FreshMixPodcast.com Follow The Fresh Mix on Social Media: Instagram | Twitter Email the Show: FreshMix@FloridaPodcastNetwork.com Executive Producer: Jaime Legagneur Lead Content Producer: Amber Amortegui Additional Support Provided by: Listeners Like You and Flint Stone Media ------------------------------- Production House: Flint Stone Media Partner with FPN: Become the voice of YOUR segment of Florida!! From sponsoring episode segments through creating and growing your own branded show, we have the solution to promote you while we promote Florida! FPN Media Kit We are currently boarding shows to build out our network. And, you don't want to miss ANY of the new hosts and podcasts were have joining us. Search for and subscribe to “Florida Podcast Network” on iTunes and all your favorite podcast players to get more of this and ALL our shows. Become a Patron: Have a suggestion for the Network? Join us in the FPN Insiders group on Facebook and let us know!    FPN:  Check out the other shows on the Florida Podcast Network

First Ballot: The Hall of Fame Podcast
Notre Dame vs. Miami 2017 with FOS CEO Adam White

First Ballot: The Hall of Fame Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 59:47


Notre Dame and Miami.  The Fighting Irish face the Hurricanes.  ND vs. The U.  What's so special about this historic matchup in 2017?  The CEO of Front Office Sports talks about his South Beach alma mater and how he built a company valued at 25 million out of his dorm room.  Plus, the rudest segment in podcasting: More Important!!!

Scar Bearers
#122: How to run around the world 5.6 times with Robert "Raven" Kraft!

Scar Bearers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 45:29


Thanks for reading this! Please like and share this episode, and also subscribe to the channel. I would greatly appreciate it! Care warning: Running is discussed in this episode. Robert "Raven" Kraft was a downtrodden songwriter who made a vow in 1975 to run on Miami's South Beach for an entire year. 47 years later, he's still at it. He's run enough miles to circle the globe four times, doing so through chronic pain, hurricanes, and pandemics. Learn what makes this renaissance man lace up his running shoes every day! Raven's contact information: https://www.ravenrun.net/ Find Raven on Facebook My contact information: www.chrisdtgordon.com @chrisdtgordon Chris DT Gordon's TAG and POP Shop: https://chris-dt-gordons-tag-and-pop-store.myshopify.com/ Two guys who have breathed air every day of their lives: @nateberan

La Ventanita
Jeremy Ford, "Top Chef" wrestled Anthony Bourdain

La Ventanita

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 74:22


Miami's first and only “Top Chef” winner, Jeremy Ford, wrestled Anthony Bourdain. He wrestled with demons as a Miami chef. And he wrestles with raising three daughters. Ford has a Hollywood vibe, but he's a down-to-earth guy who gave up cooking for a stretch to look after his diabetic mother. It was her diabetes diagnosis when he was 8 that led him to grow his own food for the family and make "clean eating" a thing long before it was cool. He talks about how his late mother, who was adopted, found her biological family and Ford learned he had an Italian grandmother — who taught him how to cook Italian food at 14. It changed his life. We get into all of it, plus his being awarded a Michelin star at his South Beach restaurant Stubborn Seed, his branching out with new restaurants. PLUS! And update on La Planchita — sandwich days are coming soon, we hope. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Landry Football's Conference Call
LFN--What to look for this College Season Nationally & the future of the U.Miami program

Landry Football's Conference Call

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 25:07


Veteran Coach, Scout and Front Office man joins the guys down on South Beach to discuss the upcoming season in College Football including exactly how where the Hurricanes program could be headed. Landry Football Podcast Network brings you a Coaching & Scouting perspective on College Football, NFL, Recruiting, NFL Draft, Coaching Searches and much more. Get inside the game and see the game through the eyes of a Coach & Scout over at www.LandryFootball.com . Your one stop Shopping Football Analysis Shop. If you have not yet tried out LandryFootball.com, get the same inside information that NFL teams and College Football programs get from a veteran Coach/Scout/Administrator on both the college and NFL level. Try it our for a month or take advantage of our Savings Discount on our yearly plan. LandryFootball.com ---put it in your browser and bookmark it for all the latest Inside Information as well as Coaching/Scouting Analysis from Chris Landry. Follow on Social Media---Twitter= @LandryFootball, FaceBook = LandryFootball, Instagram= LandryFootball Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sorry We Love Football
100th Episode w/Ed Larson

Sorry We Love Football

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 71:31


It's a 100th episode bonanza! Comedian Ed Larson joins the show to shit all over his beloved Miami Dolphins -- Can Mike McDaniel keep his players from going wild on South Beach? Is Stephen Ross the biggest piece of shit in the league? Next we discuss kickers inherent goodness and the evils of punting, Hartigan reveals his dad's excellent song suggestion for when the Browns come to Houston, and Danny goes off on people who laugh at mascots' pain. We churn through some NFL.com headlines and finally, as always, YOUR listener mail!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Rock and Roll Geek Show
Notes From South Beach Miami

The Rock and Roll Geek Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022


This is Day 26 of the Dog Days of Podcasting, where I attempt to do a show a day for the entire month of August. On this episode, I'm at South Beach, Miami Music by St Paradise Listen to all of these bands on Amazon Music and I get a kickback. Donate to the show […]

Dog Days of Podcasting Challenge
Michael Butler : The Rock and Roll Geek Show

Dog Days of Podcasting Challenge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022


This is Day 26 of the Dog Days of Podcasting, where I attempt to do a show a day for the entire month of August. On this episode, I'm at South Beach, Miami Music by St Paradise Listen to all of these bands on Amazon Music and I get a kickback. Donate to the show […]

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz
Hour 1: Real Recognize Real

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 39:55 Very Popular


It's Winning Wednesday here on the Le Batard Show. Mike and Witty are going to a Kid Cudi concert together, David hates the South Beach parking garage, and we discuss how long to stick with lies in sports. Then, Mike Schur joins us for a Stat of the Day and to discuss the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, Tom Brady's hair, and David's refusal to take a compliment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hey, Boomer
The Toxicity of the Wellness Culture

Hey, Boomer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 46:12 Transcription Available


That is a radical statement! Being well is something we all want. We follow the latest diet trends. We take the recommended supplements. We become "fat phobic," telling ourselves we are not "good enough" if we are overweight. Debra Benfield, founder and owner of Body in Mind Nutrition, told me that there is an ageist diet/wellness culture that leads to a lack of body respect in the Pro-Aging movement. Deb wants to blaze a path into elderhood without the scales! Topics covered: Internal biases around eating, diet, weight and fitness, specifically focused on women over 50 We have learned that in order to be loved, be worthy or be of value, we must be thin, This belief leads to disordered eating, feeling badly about ourselves.  Intuitive eating - eat when you are hungry, stop when you are full. Stay out of your head, stop counting calories, stop tracking,  We can feel overwhelmed by so many different diets and even may have forgotten how to eat a healthy diet. Research shows that it is not obesity that causes heart disease, diabetes or other diseases, it is actually the behaviors or genetics or trauma. You can be fat and fit.  Being thin does not equal healthy. Episode Takeaways: 1. Wrap your head around the idea that all bodies are worthy 2. These suggestions can help you age with vitality and protect you from disordered eating Move your body so it feels like play Be socially connected Manage your stress Use intuitive eating Thanks so much for listening. Subscribe on Apple Podcast, Stitcher , Google Podcast. or Spotify Follow up on Facebook and Instagram How to reach us You can email me with questions or comments at wendy@heyboomer.biz Join the Hey, Boomer Walk to End Alzheimer's Team at act.alz.org/go/HeyBoomer  – Wendy Green is a Certified Life Coach, working with people going through the sometimes uncomfortable life transition from full-time work to “what's next.” Find out more about Wendy's 6-week “What's Next Transition” Coaching workshop – You can find Debra Benfield at debrabenfield.com  - On Instagram at @agingbodyliberation - or email her at deb@debrabenfield.com Books mentioned in the show The Beauty Myth: How Images of Beauty Are Used Against Women The Body is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love Intuitive Eating: A Revolutionary Anti-Diet Approach How to Raise an Intuitive Eater: Raising the Next Generation with Food and Body Confidence Show transcript Toxicity of the Wellness Culture.m4a Hello. Welcome to the Hey Boomer Show, which is live each Monday on Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube and then available the next day on your favorite podcast app. My name is Wendy Green and I am your host for Hey Boomer. And Hey, Boomer is for those of us who believe we are never too old to set another goal or dream, a new dream. It is for lifelong learners who have found meaning and are finding meaning and purpose in their lives and are living their best lives into this new chapter. We at hey boomer are on a push to grow our hey boomer Walk to end Alzheimer's team and what I would like to do is welcome our newest walk member, Kathy McAfee. She joined our Greenville, South Carolina, team. We also have Melanie Whitlock, who is out in Clearlake, California. And you can join her team, her hey, boomer team or Bernadette Wagner. She's having a team out in Hagerstown, Maryland. Everybody who joins the team is going to get a cute, hey, boomer hat that you can wear for the walk and you can wear afterwards with great pride because you are a boomer. So join our team, any of these teams by going to act.ALZ.org/goto/HeyBoomer and if you don't want to walk with us or you feel like you can't, you can still go ahead and contribute so that we can find a cure and end this disease and meanwhile help people that are still going through the disease. I also wanted to mention the What's Next Group Coaching program. This program helps answer the question Who am I now? Who do I want to be? Will I ever feel useful and productive in society again? And what is my value to my family, my community, my society now that I am no longer fully employed or following my career path? At the end of the six week program, you will have a six month plan and possibly a 12 month plan, and the next cohort begins on September the 20th. And let me show you how you can reach out. You can go to Calendly/heyboomer/20min and we can set up a free 20 minute consultation. Find out where you're at, where you want to be. See if this makes sense to you or you don't have to talk to me if you don't want to. You can just check out the program at HeyBoomer.biz/Coaching and learn all about it. It really can be a program that can move you into your next chapter with great comfort and ease. So let's get to what we're talking about today. And I've been struggling with this topic a little bit, the toxicity of the wellness culture. I mean, I mostly try to eat healthy. I take supplements. I exercise some most of the time. No, probably not as much as I should. And I have to admit, I am a fair weather walker and hiker when it is cold and rainy. I am not the one that's out there, but I do get uncomfortable when the scale says I've gained a few pounds and all of these beliefs about weight and fitness and behaviors. These all are reinforced by my family and by the media. You know, we all hear comments like, oh, she's really put on some weight or, well, wouldn't she be pretty if she just lost some weight? Advertisements and TV shows portray happy, slender people and not so happy larger people. And if they're heavy older people, the images can be even more demeaning. So preparing for this show has shown me how much I've bought into these ideas that fat is bad and skinny is good. Did you know that we as a society spend over $35 billion on diet products annually? It is a lucrative industry. And diet culture is that collective set of social expectations telling us that there's one way to be. And one way to look. And one way to eat. So that we are a better person. And we're a more worthy person if our bodies are in that mold that we all hear about. So today we're going to dissect what it is meant by the wellness culture, how it can be toxic and how it affects us as we age. And I really want you to join in and ask questions, because a lot of this is learning for me, and I'm sure it's learning for you. So feel free to join us. And let me bring on our expert today. Her name is Deborah Benfield. Hi, Deb. Wendy. Hey, everybody. So Deborah invites you to join her on the intersection of pro aging and body liberation on her newest website. DebraBenfield.com. From her experience, she understands how aging creates vulnerability to the ageist, diet, wellness, culture, and how frustrating it is to find a profound lack of body respect in the pro aging movement. And I had to check with her on that quote because I was like, Wait, pro, aging? Aren't we, like all about accepting where we are? Well, you're going to hear about some of how it's not accepting. Deb is a registered dietitian nutritionist with over 35 years of experience in that field. She's also a registered yoga teacher. She is the founder and owner of Body and Mind Nutrition, a group practice of registered dietitians and nutritionists. And like I said, the founder of her newest site, which is more focused on the aging, she'll tell us more about that. Deborah Benfield She's passionate about preventing and treating disordered eating and eating disorders and supporting you in feeling more comfortable and confident in your relationship with food, eating and your body. So, Deb. Tell me how you got into this field in the first place and then kind of what your journey has been to move more into the aging space. Well, I first want to thank you. I really appreciate your openness to this conversation, because I know it's kind of tricky and surprising to think about how the pro aging movement may have some problems with how we look at bodies. And I think that may be more true for women's bodies. I also want to say that my pronouns are she, her, hers. And I want to talk just a minute about my vocabulary. I you'll hear me say obesity right now as a word that I will not be saying any further. I believe that the way we talk about bodies further stigmatizes pathologizing as bodies that are fat and fat, in my worldview is a descriptor just like you have red hair. Wendy I believe that it's just a descriptor of who you are. I have brown eyes, so it's a description of me. So fat in my worldview is not pejorative. It's a description. So you'll hear me say a fat and not the ugly words. And I'll talk a lot more about that later, too. So I got into this because I really like talking to people as whole human beings. So when I started my career, I pretty quickly started referring clients to therapists to talk about issues outside of what was going on in their eating and their relationship with their bodies. And I happened to develop a relationship with a therapist. That was amazing. Her name is Joan Wilkins, and she was my supervisor, and her specialty was eating disorders. So I, very early in my career, started developing this curiosity and interest in learning more. And it's just kind of become what I do. And I'm very passionate about the work. It's very rewarding to watch and work with a woman who starts to become more powerful in her life and doesn't kind of give her power away by wanting to shrink herself. So I hope that's all well. And so, you know, we talked about the early time we're getting into the eating disorders, but now you're moving into how it's affecting us as we age. So what brought your interest there? Well, I will be 64 in December. And when I turned 60, I also became a grandmother for the first time. Oh, congratulations. Thank you. So something happened in my head where I just wanted to do more research on what we know to be true about how to support aging with vitality and being who I am and understanding what I understand about diet and wellness culture. I was absolutely shocked by how the anti-aging messages hit me hard and fast that I had to get through what I consider to be a bunch of bullshit. I didn't ask you if I can say those kinds of words on your show. Of course, again, this is an adult show. But it just felt like I had to wade through a lot of things that I knew were not based in science and I knew were very adjust and what I consider to be phobic. So I quickly saw that I had to dig a little deeper and I really couldn't find what I was looking for. So I realized that I had to I wanted to create what I think people are needing, what I needed to start with. And it's been it's been fascinating to me to really look at how you can support aging with vitality without getting pulled into all of the you must lose weight. Yeah. So I want to talk about those biases and I want to talk about internal biases because those certainly do hold us back. I mean, and we have more control over those than we do some of the external biases we hear from the media. So in my world, I talk about living an engaged, meaningful life and getting over that internal bias of I'm too old, I don't have the energy anymore. I don't learn as quickly. And shifting that message. In your world, it's more about eating and diet and weight and fitness. And so what are some of the messages that you hear that are internal biases and how do we address those? Yeah, I think that it's I really love that we're kind of focused on a particular group of people right now because coming of age, when we all came of age, I went back and looked at the timeline of how women's bodies were portrayed in the media. The forties and fifties, women's curvy and voluptuous bodies were heralded as the ideal, the beauty ideal. And as a matter of fact, there are there is evidence of, like ads for weight gain products. Really? Yes. I'll show you. There are like you can't be too skinny in the forties and fifties. That's not appealing. Now, of course, all of this marketed to women. Right. And then guess what happened in the sixties? Twiggy, twiggy. Twiggy entered our lexicon and the diet industry took hold and just blew up. And women quickly believed they had to be like Twiggy and which, in my opinion, is unachievable and ridiculously thin and likely fragile. And if you pursue that kind of ideal, you have to diet. I mean, that's what happened is the women believed that in order to be beautiful, in order to be valued, in order to have worth, they must diet. So I don't know if you watched Mad Men. I watch some of that, yeah. I think the character Betty Draper is an amazing character to talk about when it comes to this, because that show took place when all of this happened and it's set in that time period. They did a great job of showing what happened, especially with women in that time. And she joined Weight Watchers and that was the classic choice. And they show her in several shows going back into the kitchen and sneaking her food and actually bingeing the foods that she was deprived of. So it's really interesting to look at how in the sixties. The dive industry took hold because women felt to be worthy, to be loved, to be valued, they must be thin. And I really feel like that's where it really shifted in a in a big way. And also what you're describing about the money that was to be made based on that. And there are a lot of people that believe that it's not surprising that that's also when the women's movement was taking place and that perhaps there was kind of this interesting way to get women to be disempowered. If they're really focused on dieting, they won't have as much of a voice. They will have as much power. So Naomi Wolf's book, The Beauty Myth, is a wonderful book to read if you want to dig into that concept. Interesting. She's not the only one that believes that, but that book is very powerful. And what's interesting, Deborah, is that if that started in the sixties, here we are. What. 60 years later and it's still going on. I mean, you know, I can look in my in my cabinet, you know, I have the whole body diet. I have, you know, diet for a small planet. I have South Beach diet. I have like all these books because I'm like, oh, gosh, you know, I've got to lose a little weight. And every trend changes. You know, it's like, Whoa, och, don't eat carbs. Well, now you should eat carbs. Don't eat fruit. Well, now you should eat fruit. You know, it's like count calories don't count calories. And it's so confusing and no wonder it creates disordered eating. I don't know about eating disorders, so maybe you can differentiate that for me because I don't understand that. Yeah, we're definitely going to talk about that. I don't know if you want to jump into that now, but I think we're we need to talk. I know it's way outside the scope of the show to get to details about eating disorders, but I think it is helpful to look at what is normal and what is disordered and what is an actual diagnosable eating disorder. Yeah. Do you want to do that now? Well, first of all, Angela says, what was the name of that book you mentioned? It is titled The Beauty Myth. The Beauty Myth. And the author is Naomi Woolf was written quite a while ago, but it's exceptional when it when you look into the principle that we're talking about. So yeah, we can go one of two ways. Why don't you describe the difference right now? And then we'll talk a little bit more about the dieting and intuitive eating. How about that? Okay. So perhaps I feel that eating occurs on a continuum and most of us kind of travel up and down that continuum, hopefully not too far toward disordered eating, but normal eating is. Easy. Normal eating is messy. It's eating when you're hungry. When your body says it's time to eat. And stopping. When you're full and. Even a variety of foods that satisfy you. So that you can actually notice when you're satisfied and full. It is not being in your head, counting and calculating and tracking at all. It is only listening to your body and therefore not struggling with feeling guilty or even ashamed of what you're doing. So there's no reaction in your emotional life and there's no space taken up in your head. You're very simply easily eating when you're hungry. Stop it when you're satisfied. And disordered. Disordered eating is likely getting much more in your head with it. And much more rule based, much more tracking, and therefore more reaction. More in your head following rules, and therefore feeling like you're being bad if you've eaten something that you've decided is bad. And eating disorders are. We have many we have anorexia nervosa. We have bulimia nervosa. We have binge eating disorder. We have arfid, which is a new diagnosis, relatively new ARFID stands for If I Get All This right, avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. And it's really about having a negative experience like choking or vomiting, that's created an anxiety about eating or a sensory issue where there are many foods that you feel like you can't eat, that you can only eat a shorter list of foods. And there's also something called Orlistat, which is basically a group of disorders that don't fit into any other boxes. So it's like a catchall phrase, but there is a disorder to the point of some debilitation in your lifestyle, so we can break each of these down. There's a lot to talk about with you. I know this is where I get hung up, because when you describe normal eating, just eat what you want, when you want until you're full. I mean, I think I had mentioned this to you once, you know, like if I had a plate of chocolate chip cookies here, which is my go to dessert and I have a refrigerator with carrots, celery and lettuce, I'm going for the chocolate chip cookies every time. You know, it tastes good. It's easier than putting together a salad. How is that normal eating? Of course, I'm probably going to beat myself up about it and say, Why did you do that? You know that's not good for you. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I do want to say you mentioned before that, you know, there was this diet and that diet and sometimes they contradict each other. I do want to say that. Probably every single client that I work with comes to me with that particular feeling of overwhelm by all the different kinds of diets that have they've heard about feeling kind of lost and like, Which way do I go? Because they're so contradictory. Also really noticing that they feel kind of like they have forgotten how to eat. Like, actually, like I forgot eat. I've lost my way because of all the diets that they've been on. And they may not have a full blown eating disorder, but they are feeling all of those things. They're trying to find their way back. So the way that we find your way back is by trying to get out of your heads and starting to realize that your body carries innate wisdom that your body actually knows. When you need to be nourished and what even what foods would nourish you and when you've got enough. Now there's a look on your face that is to look at people's faces. It's like, I can't believe that could possibly be true. But if you think about if you've been around a baby, you know that a baby cries a very distinct I'm hungry cry. It's very distinct. And babies pull away when they've had enough, when they're satisfied. We know that if children are allowed to eat with the structure of family meals, with some security around the fact that there will be food and those variety provided without a lot of food rules, without a lot of judgment, without pressure, that over time they will eat a variety of foods and their bodies will go where their bodies are genetically dictated to go. And sadly, nobody really allows that to happen. I think it's more and more true because parents are being taught that this is the way to sorry, actually raise competent eaters to prevent children from getting eating disorders. Because eating disorders are very much on the increase right now, and we're all born with that capacity. It's the culture, the cultural messages, the diets, the millions, billions of dollars that market, those diets that make us no longer trust ourselves. Yeah, I think you're right about parents today. I know when I was raising my kids again, I went through all these different diets, tofu and vegetarian, and then know we're having roast beef and whatever. And, you know, my daughter and this is where. You know, was it because I was putting the pressure on or not? But I mean, she didn't want to eat what I was cooking. And I was like, this is healthy food. You need. To be eating. This. And she does not do that to her kids. And I mean, and we got into some battles over food, you know, which is unfortunate. And Martha makes the point that even when we were young moms, I mean, we had our babies on a schedule, you know, every 3 hours you need to eat at. And so we were raised with that belief that there is a right way and a wrong way to eat. How do we undo that? Well, you know, boy, I don't even know which way to go with this. There's of talk about when I was a mom. Young mom. I was well, I was already a dietician, so I was reading certain things. And the reading that I was I mean, there were folks that were telling young moms to follow the baby. Baby led weaning there. There was that phenomenon that we should say up away. And I don't know if you want to get into all this, but Ellen Satter is the woman's name who wrote all of those books. Those books were available in the eighties and they're still available. There's also a new book called Intuitive Eating for Kids. So it's like parenting with intuitive eating. So this can be prevented or we can develop a little bit more resilience in our children when they hit all the diet messages, when they get to school or when they go to grandmother's house. Because I think that's what you're describing. I don't know. I've heard so many clients talk about that rub in the family around what people say to the children about how they're eating. If you if you think as the grandmother that there are certain rules or that you have concerns about the size of your grandchildren's bodies, you know, you can get all into like, well, should you really do you really need that or like, don't you? Should you eat your vegetables before you get your cookies? All the things you clean your plate or not clean your plate, all those things are not helpful. The children actually can be trusted to feed themselves well if we stay out away again. Very hard for people to believe. But the more you follow this intuitive eating way of feeding yourself and your family, the more you'll prevent disordered eating and eating disorders. So that's why I'm talking about it. And we haven't gotten into aging bodies yet. That's a whole nother. Yeah. And I think I think June raises a good question here. You know, eating because we're hungry or are we eating because we're angry or bored or lonely or tired or. Yeah, so discerning that you can't discern that if you're not slowing down and paying attention if you the principles of intuitive eating. We're way into this really fast. Yeah, let's. Go. The principles of intuitive eating. Start with ditching diet mentality. You have to get rid of the good bad list in your head first so that you can. Really listen to your body. If you're still in your head with what? I shouldn't have this or I should have that. It's very hard to get the discernment to give yourself space for this discernment. So to slow down and eat as mindfully as you can. I know we're all really distracted and moving really fast, so it's not that easy to slow down and notice your body. I mean, I'm a yoga teacher, and the reason I'm a yoga teacher is because I think you have to have embodiment practices where you kind of ground yourself like perhaps if you say grace or if you try to have gratitude for the food in front of you to also notice your body. And I do this because this is what I do. I put my hands on my heart and my belly to notice my own body's hunger first. And the principles of intuitive eating are to dismantle diet culture in your head, to notice your hunger sensation, to eat foods that are satisfying. And we can talk more about that so that you can stop when you're full and emotional eating as the question that's in front of us. That's very real. Emotional eating is normal human behavior. Nobody likes to hear that either. Is actually that's very normal. And can you develop some skills that help you manage your emotions in other ways as well so that you have choices like, I know I'm really angry, so I need to like. Go punch the pillows for a walk or call a friend or write in a journal, or just sit and let yourself feel. Let yourself ride the. Wave of anger because it does pass. All right. So that's a lot. That's a lot. Not easy. I mean, you started by saying, yeah, yeah, okay, good. There's a distinction because I'm going to say you started by saying normal eating is simple, but it's not easy to be mindful to slow yourself down, you know, to be out in a group or to feel frustrated and not want to just go grab a chocolate bar or something. So let's talk about aging, right? So, so easy for me to see how the anti aging movement is displaying perfect bodies and get rid of the wrinkles and all of that. And they're trying to sell something just like the diet industry. But talk to me about how the pro aging industry is not respecting the way we look. Well, what I am noticing on social media especially, is a lot of thin white bodies. So. My the person who taught me the most about all of these issues in our culture is Sonya Renee Taylor. She wrote a book called The Body is Not an Apology. The Body Is Not An Apology. And she talks about how we live in a culture that has a body hierarchy, the default body that's at the top that everybody knows without knowing is thin. Young, male, heterosexual, cisgendered, able bodied, white. Probably neuro normative, you know, all of those things, that kind of body people that live with that kind of body have power and easily belong in our culture. If you are. Anything other than that. And you may have one or more things that are not in that description. You're more in the margins, therefore more marginalized. We marginalize people based on their bodies. And the more marginalized you are, the more marginalized your identity is, the more your risk of wanting to be thin. Because the feeling is, well, I can at least be thin if I am a woman, I can at least be fat. Then if I'm old, I can at least be thin. If I am disabled, I can at least be that great black or brown. I'm can be thin because it brings you into feeling like you may belong. You may have more of a sense of power. In our culture. You're not quite as invisible either. Right. So there's increased pressure and increased pressure to be thin as you age. And if you have any other marginalized identity, it's even more so. In fact, I noticed in the most recent AARP magazine talk about they're all about pro aging right there. One of their articles was How to Stay Thin If You're a Chef. It's like I would not even have noticed that, Deb, if I hadn't been talking to you. But, yeah, it's like. There's a lot of pressure. There is a lot of pressure. A lot of there's a lot of pressure. But now I'm going to be devil's advocate. But we hear that if you are overweight, it's hard on your heart. You are at risk for diabetes. It's harder on your joints and it's not healthy. So how do you how do you deal with that image that we have, that belief that we've been told from the medical world and for years, I mean, even with COVID, oh, you're more at risk if you're overweight. You know, I have so many references for what I'm about to say. It's this is not my opinion. This is I try not to say anything. That's my opinion because I am an old fashioned scientist. I really like to read and learn and speak with an expert, you know, kind of. Status and through that lens. So what I'm going to say is I can send you lots of like links to articles and podcasts, etc.. So all of the resource that talks about. I'm going to say that medical term obesity causes hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, even COVID, and not that it caused COVID. We can talk about that in just a minute. But all of that research is correlational. And not causal. We have no causal research that shows that being a certain way causes a disease process. What we have is certain activity patterns, certain particular dietary patterns. Definitely genetics. Definitely stress. There are many things that we actually do have research on that causes those diseases. And people assume people have assumed because of correlation that's correlated, but it's actually the behavior. I have worked with many folks that are fat, that have high levels of fitness, that have perfect labs. I've worked with very thin folks that are not at all fit and have high cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension. You cannot tell by looking at somebody that they're healthy. Being thin does not equal healthy. Losing weight does not equal healthy. As a matter of fact, what we also know is that yo-yoing weight cycling actually does cause hypertension and other aspects of heart disease. So we also know that 95% of people who go on diets regain the weight plus. So dieting is not a solution. So if I understand you right. What you're saying is that. Being fat does not cause. Hypertension does not cause diabetes. It's the lifestyle around that that's causing those illnesses. It's the particular kinds of behaviors. And it may be genetic. It may be stress and anxiety. We also know that trauma having trauma experiences, especially early in life, is related to certain body sizes and diseases. So it's much more complicated than we are, we assume. We make a lot of assumptions that make it very black and white and simplified. And there's a lot of problems with that because then people who are in fat bodies are stigmatized. They especially are stigmatized in the health care setting so that that kind of stress and we also have research that weight stigma is a stressor that can contribute to disease process. So it's such a mess. Because you're afraid to go to the doctor, because you're going to be embarrassed. And it's how you treat it when you do go to the doctor. There's shame. There's fetching, there's body shame that's experienced. That's very legit. So, yeah, it's very, very messy. It's not. I'm afraid in our culture we see it very simply that losing weight is good. Being thinner is good. Certain foods are superfoods and goods, and it's so much more complicated. Then there's also access. Access to food. I think that we actually believe that there is a moral value to food and a moral value to thinness, that people are better people if they're thinner and that certain foods are good. I mean, if you listen to what people say, I'm being sinful. Yeah, I mean, it gets really convoluted pretty quickly. I still need to learn a lot to shift my beliefs and to think that I'm not going to eat those chocolate chip cookies instead of the. Well, something we should talk about with intuitive eating is that there is a psychological phenomenon called habituation. But if you have something that you're deprived of, of course you want to eat it all. That's a normal reaction to deprivation if you have permission to eat the food consistently. Like if you start to bring chocolate chip cookies in and you eat them, you know you can eat them and you know you can have them whenever you're hungry again. You will start to lose interest in the chocolate chip cookies over time. You habituate to cookies and they have less and less and less power over you. Okay. Well, we're getting towards the end here. I mean, we could probably talk for another couple of hours. There's so much to talk about. I know. But give me a couple of takeaways that those of us who are just learning about this for the first time, what we can do to take this into this next chapter of our lives as we are aging. I think the first thing is to wrap your head around the fact that all bodies are worthy. I mean, we can't. White knuckle and control. Our bodies into a particular size and shape. As a matter of fact, the more you try to do that, the more likely you are to get disordered in your eating. And you could you could end up with an eating disorder. And we didn't really get into that very much today. But it's a real problem with midlife and older women because you do feel like you can't control your body. And the more you like knuckle, the more disordered you become. So trying to. Be a little bit more compassionate with yourself and understanding that all bodies are worthy. Number one. Number two, to try to in my research, what I found is the things that really contribute to aging with vitality and protective of getting disordered in your eating are moving your body so that it feels like play. So just like play, you have some joy in it. Trying to be socially connected, trying to actually manage your stress, which I know is easier said than done. And to eat with an intuitive eating mindset. All of that is protective and supports vital aging. So that's enough take aways. Yeah. Thanks. I'm going to learn more about this intuitive eating because I certainly. It can do the good, bad thing. So if you want to reach out to Deborah, you can email her at Deb at Deborah Benfield. Benfield. You can find her on Instagram at Aging Body Liberation. And check out her new website. In fact, Deb, you have some kind of coaching program that's getting ready to start. Quickly, tell us about that. I'm doing what I've been talking about today. I'm doing intuitive eating through the lens of pro aging. Yeah. It's a it's a. A group coaching cohort that begins the end of September. Okay. All right. I'm sure. We could all. Use some help on understanding that. So her website is Debra. DebraBenfield,Com Thanks. Thank you. Yeah. And let me remind people about our walk to end Alzheimer's. Please join our team at actor ALS dot org slash go to slash. Hey Boomer and check out also at the end of September, September 20th our hey boomer coaching the what's next after your full time career and that's it hey boomer dot biz slash coaching. So my guest for next week. Her name is Melanie Gordon and she's the founder of Do.Love.Walk Collective. And one of the programs Melanie offers through the collective are Ubuntu circles. And I wrote a blog about Ubuntu probably a year ago and it's just fascinates me. So in the Ubuntu circles they address empathy, social isolation, belongingness, compassion and reconciliation. And the groups gather for a weekend retreat or eight weekly sessions or extended experiences. So join me next week to learn more about Melanie Gordon and Ubuntu circles. And I'd like to leave you all with the belief that we can live with passion, live with relevance and live with courage. And remember, we are never too old to set another. Goal.Or dream. A new dream. My name is Wendy Green, and this has been. Hey, Boomer.

Silver and Black Today Show
Full Show: Raiders vs. Dolphins Postgame Reaction

Silver and Black Today Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 60:48


The Las Vegas Raiders leave South Beach with a 15-13 Preseason Week 2 win over the Miami Dolphins with lots to be happy about. The Radiers offense, with QBs Jared Stidham, Nick Mullens, and Chase Garbers, looked good once again, as did rookie RB Zamir White. Hosts Scott Gulbransen and Murf break down the game, including another forgettable performance by RT Alex Leatherwood. Is the concern over the Raiders' offensive line getting more serious? Also, the guys talk about the Tom Brady/Rob Gronkowski/Dana White story that broke Saturday night. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Men's Locker Room
Big 3 Take South Beach

Men's Locker Room

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 66:54


The three of us are officially back for the first time in months. We start off with sharing stories, moments, and funny thoughts. We transfer into some football talk. As always we end our show with some Hot Takes.

DJ DEKADE
OUT OF KONTROL

DJ DEKADE

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 87:34


A performer that will knock your socks off and keep the party going all night, DJ Dekade is one of South Florida's premier DJs. From humble beginnings in Virginia Beach, DJ Dekade has evolved from Turntables all the way to Controllers, and for the last 20 plus years, he has been rocking the beats in South Florida. His professionalism and determination to keep the party dancing are what makes DJ Dekade a Local Favorite. His ability to blend a wide spectrum of genres makes him a well sought after performer in Florida and around the world. He has wowed crowds at renown venues throughout Virginia, Florida, and has even sailed the high seas to please thousands with his captivating energy! Growing up on the east coast has allowed DJ Dekade to be exposed to a multitude of talented artists, thus helping mold his particular fun party style. During his early days in Virginia Beach, DJ Dekade could be frequently heard at such places as Peppermint Beach Club, Rogues, The Roxx, and many more of the big local hotspots spinning hip-hop, techno, top 40's and Latin. Once he made the move to Florida DJ Dekade turned his love of music into a business offering his skills and service to help some of the most elite party planners and corporate planners here in South Florida. He has the ability to create an amazing soundtrack for each special event that clients rave about. From weddings to birthday parties, corporate events to grand opening events, Cruise events to In-The-Park events, DJ Dekade has you covered. Presently, DJ Dekade can be spotted at places such as The Pub, Tacocraft, Monty's South Beach, Rok Brgr and many other popular venues throughout the posh Miami scene. The growth of over 25 years of DJing is obvious through Dekade's professionalism and ability to flow through the different genres popular with the Millenials as well as the Generation Xers and Baby Boomers. Remember “Everyone Loves DJ Dekade” and your guests will agree. As DJ Dekade continues his evolution in life, he has set his eyes on music production. Just like the many songs he enjoys playing he plans on creating his own blend of fun upbeat and energetic music to pump the crowd at your next party. We look forward to what the future holds for DJ Dekade. If you are looking for a DJ to bring the party to the next level, DJ Dekade is who you want. ​

Style Your Mind Podcast
MIAMI RETREAT Announcement! The Power of Connection

Style Your Mind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 32:45


Reserve your spot for THE RETREAT: MIAMI here.   There is something so incredibly powerful about in-person connection and changing your environment. Which is why I am so excited to announce my first-ever RETREAT in Miami!   And the best part? I'm teaming up with my badass besties, Gwen + Dara from Crazy Filthy Rich to bring you the ultimate luxe experience down in Miami Beach next month. 3 ultra-fabulous and action-packed days with like-minded women and stunning surroundings.   You are officially invited to: THE RETREAT: MIAMI. Join us on September 16th – September 18th, 2022, in the magic city, on the famed white sands of South Beach to level up, get inspired and elevate to the next, most electrifying version of yourself.   If you know me, you know how magical Miami is for me. It is the place I go to restore myself, reimagine myself, and remember myself. I've even dubbed my alter ego, "Miami Cara" when I am down there because the energy is that powerful. And now we get to experience it together!   Picture it now: morning masterminds under the swaying palm trees, glamorous cocktail hours with your new best friends, boating on a multimillion dollar yacht while embodying the next, best version of yourself, gorgeous dinners, a professional photo shoot to amp up your personal branding, and so much more.  

Life is Short, Get Divorced.
Material Girls!

Life is Short, Get Divorced.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 27:24


Episode 13: Material Girls!In this week's #LISGD episode, Wendy Wallace with Lighthouse Financial Group is back for another segment of “Watch yo money with Wendy”! @honestlyHannah and @justJenSav quiz Wendy on YOUR questions surrounding planning for the future and living within your means. Because really, are we living to work or working to live? Listen in as our hosts talk living in excess, changing financial priorities, and being bad influences on each other… (Especially in South Beach!)Want more details? Here's what honestlyHannah and justJenSAV cover in this Episode:While honestlyHannah budgets to live within her means, justJenSAV admits her heavy hand with a credit card is what taught her how to hustle! Wendy proposes a challenge to our hosts: For 30 days, no matter what the expense, write down what you spend your money on… Better bring out the wine now! justJenSav can attest - Women love to live in excess. Listen in as Wendy gives her expert tips on earning an income to afford all the mani pedis your heart desires. justJenSav and Wendy discuss the books that changed their financial lives forever. Our hosts agree, finally being able to retire can seem like a fairytale. Wendy talks about ways to turn that fairytale into a reality. Education is the key to financial success! For more information, visit Wendy's website at www.lifigroup.com for free downloads, questionnaires, and information on available workshops. #lifeisshortgetdivorced #lisgd #podcast #savannah #divorce #podcastsofinstagram #podcastersofinstagram #spotify #applepodcasts #lifestylepodcast #womenpodcasters #womenempowermentwww.lifeisshortgetdivorced.com 

Not A Diving Podcast with Scuba

Miami is one of those places whose reputation precedes it. South Beach, basically. Which anyone with any smarts will reassure you is far from the whole story. Danny Daze is a second-generation Cuban who is Miami to the core. He's a former pro-level tennis player who spends his time running TR808s through an Eventide H9000, and is currently preparing to perform his forthcoming album in a planetarium. He also has strong opinions on just about everything. We discuss topics including the aforementioned legendary FX processor, the unintended consequences of diversity riders, why Web3 is going to change the lives of musicians, and what it's like to accidentally become a Tech House star with no prior knowledge of Tech House. Danny is a dude with a deep voice and stories to tell, and this is an awesome conversation. https://patreon.com/scubaofficial (Support the show on Patreon! )There's never-to-be released SCB track going up there this week... Join us in the https://discord.com/invite/98423K8gap (Hotflush Discord Server) Listen to all the music discussed on the show via the https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6gs2nOUls8kP3UmMVPWhL3?si=00ba0908e4c14c4f (Not A Diving Podcast Spotify playlist) For more links and other info visit https://scubaofficial.io (the official Scuba website) Follow Scuba: https://twitter.com/scubaofficial (twitter) https://instagram.com/scubaofficial (instagram) http://scubaofficial.bandcamp.com/ (bandcamp) http://spoti.fi/scuba (spotify) https://music.apple.com/us/artist/scuba/220276686 (apple music) https://www.beatport.com/artist/scuba/1550 (beatport)

DJ DEKADE
GOOD VIBRATIONS

DJ DEKADE

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 86:49


A performer that will knock your socks off and keep the party going all night, DJ Dekade is one of South Florida's premier DJs. From humble beginnings in Virginia Beach, DJ Dekade has evolved from Turntables all the way to Controllers, and for the last 20 plus years, he has been rocking the beats in South Florida. His professionalism and determination to keep the party dancing are what makes DJ Dekade a Local Favorite. His ability to blend a wide spectrum of genres makes him a well sought after performer in Florida and around the world. He has wowed crowds at renown venues throughout Virginia, Florida, and has even sailed the high seas to please thousands with his captivating energy! Growing up on the east coast has allowed DJ Dekade to be exposed to a multitude of talented artists, thus helping mold his particular fun party style. During his early days in Virginia Beach, DJ Dekade could be frequently heard at such places as Peppermint Beach Club, Rogues, The Roxx, and many more of the big local hotspots spinning hip-hop, techno, top 40's and Latin. Once he made the move to Florida DJ Dekade turned his love of music into a business offering his skills and service to help some of the most elite party planners and corporate planners here in South Florida. He has the ability to create an amazing soundtrack for each special event that clients rave about. From weddings to birthday parties, corporate events to grand opening events, Cruise events to In-The-Park events, DJ Dekade has you covered. Presently, DJ Dekade can be spotted at places such as The Pub, Tacocraft, Monty's South Beach, Rok Brgr and many other popular venues throughout the posh Miami scene. The growth of over 25 years of DJing is obvious through Dekade's professionalism and ability to flow through the different genres popular with the Millenials as well as the Generation Xers and Baby Boomers. Remember “Everyone Loves DJ Dekade” and your guests will agree. As DJ Dekade continues his evolution in life, he has set his eyes on music production. Just like the many songs he enjoys playing he plans on creating his own blend of fun upbeat and energetic music to pump the crowd at your next party. We look forward to what the future holds for DJ Dekade. If you are looking for a DJ to bring the party to the next level, DJ Dekade is who you want. ​

The Tara Granahan Show
Terry Gray RI DEM Director - Scarborough South Beach Closed on Weekdays - 8/15/22

The Tara Granahan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 9:35


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
Swimming At Edgartown's South Beach Closes From Multiple Shark Sightings

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 0:45


The southern beach on Martha's Vineyard had a few unconfirmed sightings earlier in the day. WBZ's Tim Dunn reports.

Locked On Canes - Daily Podcast On Miami Hurricanes Football & Basketball
Miami Hurricanes Have A Lot To Work On Before Season Opener, Saturday Scrimmage Preview!

Locked On Canes - Daily Podcast On Miami Hurricanes Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 30:35 Very Popular


The Miami Hurricanes still have plenty of work to do in order to improve their physicality, effort, and consistency before the season opens on September 3rd against Bethune-Cookman. Head coach Mario Cristobal was not happy about Canes players “fading” late in Friday's practice. He has high expectations for the team's first scrimmage of fall camp on Saturday, August 13th. Cristobal wants the team to run around 150 plays in the scrimmage and will not allow the “crutch” of having assistant coaches on the field helping players line up.  Host Alex Donno breaks down Miami's progress so far, as the Canes are one week into the first fall camp of the Cristobal era. Donno takes a look at comments made by Mario, quarterback Tyler Van Dyke and defensive end Jahfari Harvey about the team's discipline, practice habits and execution. Van Dyke is excited to embrace the new offense under coordinator Josh Gattis. Harvey tells Donno that the defensive players are constantly drilling proper tackling and are making improvements.  Alex also takes a look at Miami's brand new alternate uniforms. The school recently unveiled their new black and neon “Miami Nights” uniforms from Adidas, inspired by South Beach. Donno thinks it's a great look but Canes twitter seems very split. Do you like them? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! LinkedIn LinkedIn jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at Linkedin.com/lockedoncollege Terms and conditions apply. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Miami Herald
Miami Herald Daily Briefing

Miami Herald

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 3:16


The top headlines from the Miami Herald including the latest on new housing in Miami Beach and downtown Miami, a new New York restaurant in South Beach, monkeypox vaccine sites at Tropical Park and Miami Beach, a Disney World malfunction

Chef AF
Rosie's | A Couple's Journey to Offering Feel-Good Soul Food

Chef AF

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 30:55


The next generation of culinary artisans are changing up the industry. These artisans have a whole new approach to reaching and satisfying the next generation consumer. In this podcast we will explore chefs and artisans from around the world diving into their story and passion. In this episode of Chef AF, I chat with the owners Jamila and Akino West of Rosie's, a Southern-American, NY-style café that has progressed from a simple to-go concept to a full-service restaurant, offering feel-good soul food brunch with subtle Italian nuances and classic techniques. The couple has thirty years experience in the food and beverage industry and were nationally celebrated by Vogue Magazine, The New York Times and Travel + Leisure magazine when they opened the Copper Door Bed and Breakfast in 2017. The West's are utilizing the culinary skills at Rosie's with a chef-driven menu. Chef Akino West's career spans from working for James Beard award winning Chef Michael Schwartz in Miami and three-Michelin starred NOMA, in Copenhagen, Denmark. Jamila West graduated from The Culinary Institute of America and has worked for James Beard award winning Chef Jose Andres via the SLS Hotel in Beverly Hills and South Beach. West transitioned to the front of house management in the Middle East opening multiple locations of Katsuya, a Japanese concept. I talk to the Wests about being married and being business partners, they talk about the challenges but both as individuals had big dreams. Both being workaholics were very driven by food, hospitality and their professional careers. Jamila says, “ I think that there were just synergies while we were dating so we ended up committing in different ways on a very serious level. We bought our first house together before being married, we opened up our business together before being married, so we had that. We had this growing relationship for about six years.” The couple shares that Rosie's was created out of a pivot when it came to the pandemic. They were operating a twenty-two room bed and breakfast where they were doing fifty covers at a small communal table that turned every thirty minutes out of a residential kitchen. Jamila and Akino always considered themselves restaurant people and have relied on their expertise from a culinary and hospitality perspective. To hear how the Wests went from opening Rosie's in Miami as a simple to-go concept to a full-service restaurant and their commitment to the community plus get their recipe for Lemon Ricotta Pancakes, check out this episode of Chef AF “It's All Food” or you can listen at Spotify!

Hablemos de Comida
#130: Juliana González (Caña & Barceloneta)

Hablemos de Comida

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 52:57


En este episodio #130 Hablamos de Comida con Juliana González. Esta chef ponceña cuenta con sobre 15 años en la industria y es la chef ejecutiva de los restaurantes Barceloneta (Miami) y Caña (San Juan).Conversamos con Juliana sobre sus inspiraciones culinarias desde temprana edad, sus años universitarios en Johnson & Wales, el internado que cambió su perspectiva culinaria en España, su regreso a Miami para trabajar de la mano con grandes chefs, la oportunidad de abrir su propio restaurante en South Beach y consecuentemente en Puerto Rico.Conoce más sobre Juliana y sus restaurantes Barceloneta y Caña a través de las redes sociales.

The Shawty Show
#28 South Beach Bachelorette Fun & French Riviera Upcoming!

The Shawty Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 37:48


We're back!  All the juice on Queen's wild weekend in Miami for Janey's bachelorette.  Kitty previews the week ahead in the French Riviera!Use code SHAWTY for 20% off and free shipping on all Ceres Medical CBD Products at ceresmedical.com

The Ryan Kelley Morning After
8-9-22 Segment 1 We Like Ice Cream

The Ryan Kelley Morning After

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 67:59 Transcription Available


Matt Carpenter injured. Audio forensics of Iggy claiming Tom O'Toole called him a made man at Normandie. Iggy is playing Norwood today for media day. Grub n' Groove at Francis P. What defines Hoosier? Loop trolley. STL Skyline. FPCC update. StrodeCast. Iggy wants to turn STL into South Beach. We like Ice Cream. Iggy vs. The Eastside. Larry Nickel joins us for the WWE Recap.

Boss Body
Can you eat carbs if you're trying to lose weight?

Boss Body

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 14:12


Episode Summary:Keto, South Beach, Atkins, oh my!….Eating low carb or no carb is all the rage right now!And people that are doing it appear to be dropping pounds quickly. So this must be the answer, right?!Well….it's not as straightforward as you may think.In this episode, I'll explain:Why quality carbs absolutely SHOULD be a regular part of your dietWhy cutting out or dramatically reducing carbs does more harm than goodHow to make healthy eating sustainable and enjoyable long termWhen you start cutting out entire food groups (like all carbohydrates), your body misses the vital nutrients it needs to function.Eating healthy, fibrous, complex carbohydrates gives you nutrition and energy, AND it staves off cravings, so you don't end up inhaling every carb in sight when you get to your breaking point.I'll break it all down for you so you can eat in a way that supports your weight loss AND is doable so you can stick with it.Get Sarah's Free Weight Loss Jumpstart CourseWebsite: sarahhaaswellness.comFacebook: Sarah Haas WellnessInstagram: @sarahhaaswellnessYoutube: Sarah Haas Wellness Thanks for Listening:Thanks so much for listening to my podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!Subscribe to The Podcast:If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can follow Boss Body on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast app. You can also watch the podcast on YouTube at Sarah Haas Wellness.Leave Us an Apple Podcasts Review:Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to me and greatly appreciated. It helps more awesome listeners like you find me so I can make a positive impact on more people. 

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
Brian Flores might have saved football

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 45:14


Hour 1 Major news out of the NFL this week with Deshaun Watson being suspended along with the owner of the Miami Dolphins, Stephen Ross, for tampering. Ross had communicated with Brady and Sean Peyton during the season about making a move to South Beach, breaking league policy. Should owners be kept to a similar standard as players? Or should the standard for players be reevaluated? Wiggy brings up the idea and believes players are being mistreated in how their accountability is approached.

VHS Bandits
145 South Beach Academy

VHS Bandits

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 57:04


It's summer and the Bandits are off to earn a degree at South Beach Academy where the bustiest and longest-butted babes go to get an education on beach etiquette. Join the main character who know one cares about and has never heard of, Corey Feldman in an add-libbed supporting role and total pervert Grandpa Munster in this sex comedy from the mid 90's where volleyball is the game of choice against Italian mobster, James Hong. Get ready for babes, bush and lots of filler in South Beach Academy!

The Inner Circle with Carrie Doll
How Event Producer Jennifer Bergman Creates Wedding Bliss

The Inner Circle with Carrie Doll

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 56:30


Jennifer Bergman is an Event Producer and Designer with over 15 years experience producing events of all types and sizes. She is the President of Jennifer Bergman Weddings and Events, an Edmonton-based firm that has planned over 400 events (and counting!), both locally and abroad.The firm currently produces over $2 Million in events per year - from intimate elopements to large multi-day weddings, baby showers to 90th birthdays, new product launches to corporate anniversaries – theyhave planned events all over Alberta and B.C., as well as internationally, including Cabo, Jamaica, Scottsdale, Palm Springs and South Beach.Their work has been published in National and International magazines and blogs, and they have been honoured with numerous awards and nominations, including: a Canadian Special Events Award for Best Wedding; Wedding Planners Institute of Canada Best Destination Wedding, Edmonton Event Awards Best Wedding and Best Startup Event, to name a few.Jennifer has a Bachelor of Commerce specializing in Marketing from the Alberta School of Business and is a Certified Wedding Coordinator through The Wedding Planners Institute of Canada. Prior to launching her company in 2008, she gained crucial event planning experience organizing large, multi-day conventions, and honed her creative and design skills working on national advertising campaigns.Jennifer has served on the Board of Directors for the Alberta School of Business Alumni Association, andwas on the founding board of the International Live Events Association (ILEA), Edmonton Chapter. She has shared her event planning skills with the Stollery Womens Network, helping to raise funds and awareness for the Stollery Children's Hospital Foundation. Presently, Jennifer is a board member of Food for Thought Edmonton – a non-profit program that provides meals for hungry schoolchildren. Jennifer enjoys travelling and staying active with her husband Sean and their two children, Aila and Meyer. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tobin, Beast & Leroy
08-01-22 Tobin and Leroy Part 3 - BREAKING NEWS: Deshaun Watson Suspended!

Tobin, Beast & Leroy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 39:38


In the first segment we go into detail on the new reports of a Rocky Spin-off. Following this Tobin describes his vision of Hell which leads us to a deeper conversation on the failure of the Marlins. Is it time to criticize Marlins GM Kim Ang? Next we play, Could be somethin, Could be Nothin as Miami HEAT target Donovan Spida Mitchell took his talents to South Beach this weekend. In the final segment we get Breaking News that a Deshaun Watson suspension has officially been handed down. 

The Mark Moses Show
Tim Walters-Florida Today Interview (7/28/22)

The Mark Moses Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 26:37


The Mark Moses Show is joined by Tim Walters of The Florida Today to go over how Tim wants to buy a pool right now, how Mark wants to eat a $90 steak in South Beach and the latest update on the new High School Football Season started next week in Brevard County.  The Mark Moses Show weekday afternoons from 3-6 pm on Sports Radio 1560 The Fan & Sportsradio1560.com. You can also listen to Mark Mid days on 95.9 The Rocket. Follow him on social media @markmosesshow

UNF*CK YOUR WEIGHT LOSS
Doing Weight Loss Differently

UNF*CK YOUR WEIGHT LOSS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 10:59


Your human brain wants me to just give you macros, a meal plan, and workouts. It wants me to tell you how to lose weight. But I'm going to offer you this first. I want you to think about doing weight loss differently. If you're who I think you are, you're a woman who's over 35 and has been on many diets. I mean you've done it all. You've tracked macros, counted calories, done meal plans, done South Beach, or even tried Weight Watchers. And that's okay. But I'm here to help you do things differently. In order to lose weight permanently, you have to do things differently. About the Host- Bonnie Lefrak has been in the health and fitness industry for 25 years. As a former bikini competitor, Bonnie helps other women achieve their dreams of being on stage as bikini competitors through her bikini program at the gym she owns in Massachusetts called Fitness Asylum. But as a self-proclaimed professional dieter, Bonnie also realized the toll dieting takes on the human brain. Bonnie helps women over 40 lose weight without killing themselves in the gym, eliminate all the BS food drama, and help to create a life and body they LOVE. She wants to help women create certainty in their own lives, their own results, and their own abilities. Weight loss is not about the one “right” diet. It is about MUCH more than that. Weight loss is not about the one “right” workout. Weight loss is not about being positive and putting a big smile on. Weight loss is about FEELINGS. All of them. Not trying to bury them or hide from them but knowing and allowing the full human experience. Weight loss is not about grinding hustling and will powering your way to some end line. Transformation (when done well) is done from the inside out. Transformation doesn't happen on the scale. She is an expert at Demystifying weight loss and helps you unfuck your diet brain. Connect with Bonnie- Facebook Group- https://www.facebook.com/groups/707942356603835 Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/bonnielefrak/ Website- https://bonnielefrak.com Selfmade Application- https://bonnielefrak.com/application

The JamirSmith Show
Q&A Essence Festival to South Beach "Let's Chat!"

The JamirSmith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 28:20


Thank you all for following me on my Essence Festival journey, to my time in South Beach where I got to relax at The Goodtime Hotel. Let's answer some of your travel questions. Check out the season on Jamirsmith.com and follow on Instagram@jamir_smith

No Disrespect
068 - Dredging It Up (Jordan Jensen)

No Disrespect

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 84:55


Jordan Jensen joins Mike Vecchione and together they investigate Jordan's contractor mom, why Jordan doesn't believe in therapy, Italian racism in Canada, the right way to apply sunscreen, Jordan's arrest warrant, Mike getting blotchy sunburns while in South Beach, getting to the bottom of Jordan's relationship status, the woman who traveled to meet a date then got abandoned, the Person Of The Week - Joseph Merrick (The Elephant Man), whether fear is genetic, the modern day Elephant Man and his mother and so much more!(Air Date: July 14th, 2022)Support our sponsors:RockAuto.com - Check out Rock Auto for every auto part at the best price! And tell them Mike Vecchione Investigates sent you!YoDelta.com - Use promo code: Gas to get 25% off!Submit your own video investigation to MikeVecchioneInvestigates@gmail.comYou can watch Mike Vecchione Investigates LIVE for FREE every Thursday at 3pm ET at GaSDigitalNetwork.com/LIVEOnce you're there you can sign up at GaSDigitalNetwork.com with promo code: MVI for a 7-day FREE trial with access to every No Disrespect and Mike Vecchione Investigates episode show ever recorded! On top of that you'll also have the same access to ALL the shows that GaS Digital Network has to offer!Follow the whole show on social media!Jordan JensenInstagram: https://instagram.com/JordanJensenLOLStopMike VecchioneTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/comicmikevInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/comicmikevWebsite: https://www.comicmikev.comShannon LeeTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/imshannonleeInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/shannonlee6982GaS Digital NetworkTwitter: https://twitter.com/gasdigitalInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gasdigital/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Corner Table Talk
S2:E22 Craig Robins I In Miami, All Roads Lead To Craig

Corner Table Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 53:38


"In Miami, all roads lead to Craig."  Virgil Abloh, fashion designer, artistic director of Louis Vuitton's menswear No one of our generation has played a more influential role in defining, redefining and shaping the culture in Miami than Craig Robins. Craig is a visionary in the truest sense of the word, nothing short of brilliant. However, it was his unpretentious personal warmth and willingness to engage with this unknown restaurateur in the 80s that established our connection, one that has endured through his astronomical rise over the past four decades. As the CEO and President of Dacra, the real estate development company he founded in 1987, Robins focuses on developing creative communities that integrate art, design and architecture to accelerate asset value creation and enrich urban life. Dacra has spearheaded some of the most successful and transformative commercial, residential and mixed-use projects in Miami's history, including South Beach, the Lincoln Road area, Allison Island and the Miami Design District, an 18-square block neighborhood dedicated to fashion, design and art that incorporates the work of emerging and established architects, public art, Michelin restaurants and stores by the world's most significant luxury brands. In 2005, the neighborhood's rapid renewal inspired the creation of Design Miami/ (Jun) in Basel, Switzerland and subsequently Design Miami/ Basel (Dec) in Miami, design fairs that have evolved into the world's premier global forum for collectible design. Robins is the Chairman of the show, which he owns in partnership with MCH Swiss Exhibition, the producers of Art Basel. Join me, your host Brad Johnson , and Craig as we discuss his family life growing up, how a year studying abroad in Spain broadened Craig's view of urban design and inspired his citizen-of-the-world perspective. We learn about the three mentors in his career, the importance of historical buildings in preserving and reflecting culture, and how Craig's love of art, design, architecture and sense of community melded into his business philosophy and storied journey.  * * * Instagram: Corner Table Talk  and Post and Beam Hospitality LinkedIn: Brad Johnson Medium: Corner Table Media E.Mail:  brad@postandbeamhospitality.com For more information on host Brad Johnson or to join our mailing list, please visit: https://postandbeamhospitality.com/ Corner Table™ is a trademark of Post & Beam Hospitality LLC © Post & Beam Hospitality LLCSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.