Podcasts about Tableau

  • 745PODCASTS
  • 1,355EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 30, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Tableau

Show all podcasts related to tableau

Latest podcast episodes about Tableau

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP299 - Thanksgiving Week 2022 with Rob Garf of Salesforce

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 48:14


EP299 - Thanksgiving Week 2022 with Rob Garf of Salesforce A discussion of Thanksgiving Week 2022 from a retail perspective with Rob Garf, Vice President and General Manager, Retail at Salesforce. This is Robs' fourth time on the show, having previously been on episodes 110, 248, and 282. Thanksgiving week 2022 will go down as one of the most complicated holiday weeks on record. With covid impacts still in place, a global economic crisis, supply chain disruptions, labor shortages, new retailer discounting practices, and new consumer behaviors we have a lot to unpack. This episodes covers a wide range of topics around the most important shopping week of the year. We make liberal use of real-time data from Salesforce Shopping Insights HQ, which tracks how 1.5+ billion consumers are shaping shopping trends. You can see a real-time holiday dashboard, powered by Tableau so you can interact with the data yourself on the Salesforce Holiday Insights page. Episode 299 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Tuesday November 29th, 2022. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 299 being recorded on Tuesday November 29th 2022 the day after Cyber Monday I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:41] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason and Scot show listeners Jason it wouldn't be a delicious turkey five if we didn't have our regular holiday guests robbed our van Rob is the vice president and general manager I think it's total maybe longer than yours a retail at Salesforce let's see those two forces that's like eight words so you need to get to work this is Rob's fourth appearance on the Jason Scott show he was here for episode 1 10 to 40 9282 and back for number four here and episode 299 Rob welcome back. Rob: [1:15] Gentlemen it is such a pleasure to join you today I can't wait to talk about cyber week. Jason: [1:21] It wouldn't be a several week if we weren't talking to you Rob and as a I feel like a special bonus for me two of the three people on this podcast have received a 10 out of 10 rating from room Raider. Rob: [1:33] Hmm who Could That Be Well I know you did it because you have a sweet pillow that shows it off. Jason: [1:39] And I think I feel like you got up before me. Rob: [1:42] I think so you know I gotta tell a really funny story quickly if I can I was doing early on in the pandemic a webinar I think it was probably with. Business Insider and they brought like a staging expert online and I thought I had the best background I had like a. Something like my wife got me for my 40th birthday long time ago by the way I like 1910 or 1920 National Cash Register in the background I felt all good about that and she totally. Blew up my room and thankfully she did cuz I turned out on top with a 10/10. [2:18] I know I probably shouldn't have given that away but I felt pretty cool about it. Scot: [2:21] Jason had a team of 10 people at publicist set his up so don't don't don't listen to him. Rob: [2:26] Either and he probably gets like product placement dollars as well as a influencer for all the cool things he has in the. Scot: [2:33] And they came in from France. Jason: [2:34] And side note on that the jury is out on whether giant marketing holding companies can actually help your sales but they can for sure help you win Awards. Rob: [2:43] Congratulations. Scot: [2:46] Well Rob weird. Rob: [2:47] Scot the trifecta anyways we digress. Scot: [2:49] Well yes some of us I guess my day job I'm like I don't know not really working on my room. Rob: [2:55] Actually you are about to say you're actually working or aren't ya. Scot: [2:59] Well yeah the so in case even though this is your fourth time around let's there's definitely we always pick up millions of new listeners so let's if you could recap the data that you guys have at Salesforce where it comes from and then you know we're recording this the day after Cyber Monday you've got some hot delicious fresh data will jump in after you kind of give the high-level overview in case people aren't aware. Rob: [3:25] I can't wait I'm loving it we've been swimming through this data for a better part of the we can't wait to share it with your crowd your audience yeah so by way of introduction again Rob Garf here. With Salesforce I came to Salesforce by way of the demandware acquisition which is about. Six years ago I spent five years prior at demandware on the GM for retail what that means is I oversee our product. And solution strategy along with our industry insights team and that's what gives me the great pleasure of talking cyber week and actually providing insights and intelligence for our customers all year long and the way we do that is all the data that flows through the platform we bubble that up we obviously strip out all pii data. And in its aggregate form billions of billions Shoppers it gives us an amazing read and pulse on the industry and we publish at throughout cyber week on our shopping insights HQ it's an interactive dashboard, built on Tableau and it really allows our customers the broader industry to understand what's going on in digital and be able to Benchmark themselves. Scot: [4:32] Frequent thanks for that summary so let's start with the kind of the elephant in the room I get this question and Jason does a lot as well you know I'm a CNBC junkie and all they talk about is inflation and recession so so anything kind of in the macroeconomics showing up in the data that you've seen. Rob: [4:51] Yeah absolutely and I think it's important to understand this holiday while the global numbers look really promising much of that if not all of that growth was concentrated. In the u.s. there's a bunch of headwinds happening for various reasons across Europe and UK along with Australian and Zealand but the US consumer who was really happy this. Cyber week and we'll talk about the data but yeah in terms of inflation are shopping index which the shopping insights ahq is built off of, has been showing an average selling price increase for the last seven quarters and that's been pretty steady and so, that's definitely played a key role in this holiday season in that much if not all of the growth that we're seeing, is driven by increased pricing not necessarily people buying more, product and I think that's a really important distinction now what I will say and I'm happy to say this in the first time we're seeing a leveling off of that inflation globally over cyber week it was only I say only a three percent increase which is promising as we're looking forward to the new year. Scot: [6:02] Yeah I think it's Cressida at least the macroeconomic around 10% so so 3 is 3 is a pretty good. Rob: [6:09] Yeah exactly it's promising. Scot: [6:12] And then that ASP increase is, does that account for mix shift so like you know if people buy more luxury goods than our and then another segment goes value could that factor into that ASP or you normalize for that in some way. Rob: [6:27] We normalize for that because to your point obviously average order value for luxury versus value segments are going to be different but we really normalize that look at it across the board, and so it's taking into account of the various factors based on segments. Jason: [6:44] Yeah and as the resident Debbie Downer it's. We always want to have simple sound bites to describe this weekend like all of these Trends to me are super complicated because you just highlighted the, conflicting Trend that like we have inflation goods are costing more / we're probably going to talk about discounting later to help Goose holiday sales which of course brings prices down and when people are nervous about the economy they shift to more needs which have higher inflation than the wants and it seems when you really dive into it it's really complicated kind of inflation seems different on online versus offline and category by category. Rob: [7:25] Yeah it is complex you're right there's not a single kind of soundbite answer although if we stay on long enough I'm sure I'll come up with one or two. But you know you're right in terms of the discount right so if I dive into that for a sec Jason to put a little color around it we saw for the week in the US there was a 30%. Average discount rate globally it was twenty-seven percent and we can talk about how that looks your rear and how it looked, compared to 2019 but even with those large discounts and by the way those are large discounts compared to any normal day. During the year we're looking at 15 16 percent discount rate so it's you know in the double of what we typically see, the reality is the reality is people are still paying more for a particular product than they were two years ago so people are feeling really good obviously that average is 30 in the us but we all saw over the last couple days, 40% 50% even yesterday 60% in the massive amount of emails that I got trying to push and really. Incentivize people to actually click the buy button so my point here though is even with these high discount rates people are still spending more for a particular product than they did a couple of years ago. Jason: [8:42] Yeah I like to say 40% off is the new 30% off for this holiday. Rob: [8:48] Yeah I mean my father was in retail growing up so we would get discounts at the various apparel and Footwear companies he worked for and he always would joke that my mother would save us so much money we're going to go broke. Jason: [8:58] I love that we might come back to this counting but I do want to zoom out for just a second. Traditionally Black Friday is the official heart start of the holiday shopping season here in the u.s. is that even true anymore. Rob: [9:15] Well certainly retailers don't want that to be true they want it obviously to be pulled earlier and earlier in the season and that's another story line that we've seen here you know we actually saw a little bit. Of holiday happen over the summer don't forget and I know you two wouldn't of Amazon Prime day or the first Amazon Prime day and for those retailers not named, Amazon we saw a 21% year over year increase looking at the second week of July compared to the second week of July two thousand twenty one so there was a little bit, very little pull forward and then of course people getting retailers Brad's wanted to take advantage of the halo effect of the second. [9:56] Prime day that happened in October and once again we saw a little bit of a bump interestingly enough some of the larger retailers front ended that with Weekend sales and that pulled a lot of growth during that time you know the weekend before Prime day in October, but the reality Jason after a couple years of spreading out of that demand earlier earlier for various reasons which we can talk about, there was so much of a concentration that happened, over cyber week meaning and based on our data the pulling forward of the couple of percentage points to earlier, in November really we're taking back, this year and were put back in cyber week and it all came down to discounts it all came down to Consumers being really patient. Not seeing what they liked in terms of the lackluster deals and waiting for. Cyber week which really contributed some very positive growth particularly in the US. Jason: [10:57] Yeah it's super interesting because as you pointed out Amazon added a second sale day which I think they technically don't call Prime day right is like Prime Early Access today. Rob: [11:05] Right right right get behind the Velvet Rope and be able to get some early deals. Jason: [11:09] Exactly and Walmart Target and others all counter programmed against that with big sales but it cut it kind of feels like all that got defeated by the fact that consumers are well aware that the discounts are going to be deep this year and it almost seems like they may have decided to wait for deeper discounts. Rob: [11:29] Yeah yeah we call this and I've said it before on the show but I gotta do it right it's an annual tradition, discount chicken right the idea that retailers go into the holiday season with a really well thought out. Plan for the promotional calendar and by the first weekend they typically rip it up and call inaudible. And really try to chase the deals and you know that's what happened this year contrary or in contrast to last year if you remember I know you do gentlemen. Because you track this closer than anyone you know their inventory inventory scarcity issues there was high demand so retailers didn't feel compelled to Discount they didn't we saw the lowest discount rates. In recent history last year and so retailers thought that the consumer was reprogrammed reconditioned and they would buy earlier the problem was, the Retailer's didn't come to the table with the biggest discounts again discount chicken the consumers are going to wait it out and wait for that. [12:29] Best deal and finally the retailers came to the table during cyber week and the consumers answered, in kind you know again last year was probably the first year that retailers won the game of discount chicken this year consumers you know, fought with their leverage and wait and they ended up winning and got some really good deals again 30 percent discount rate in the US over the course of. Thanksgiving it really peaked at Black Friday with 31 percent in the US so they really finally came to the table. Scot: [13:04] Wow, you know we were reading all about last year all those cargo ships were sending off the coast of Long Beach where it is and then you know I've heard a lot of retailers in their commentary talk about being overstocked, do you think do you think that played a role in these big discounts is just retailers or just kind of we got a really clear the shelves out kind of thing. Rob: [13:27] Absolutely absolutely both in the store and in warehouse space they got spooked a little bit right in terms of, them waiting it out didn't quite work and so the Retailer's really had to step up Scott to your point they don't want to go into the new year with too much inventory they really needed a free up both inventory and cash now of course they did that. At the feet of margin right because you see I don't care how great your margin is alright some probably are that great particularly in the luxury segment but 50 60 70 percent discount or you know I saw some it was 50% oh and by the way we'll give you an extra ten percent just to make it sound like they weren't really giving away everything but the reality is. Really margin took a hit because of the deeper discounts that retailers just had to do and to your point they have to free up both the inventory the Shelf space and the cash. Jason: [14:26] Yeah I think even Makin where's I've had a number of clients come to me and say hey we've got too much inventory but even worse it's the wrong inventory that like a lot of that stuff that we ordered for mid-year all the Home Improvement and outdoor furniture stuff that they were trying to get four last year is all in stock now and so what even further incentive fising retailers to discount. Rob: [14:52] Yeah yeah and I give credit to some of the big box players who took a hit over the summer recognizing they tear Point Jason had the wrong inventory and they did something about it they tried to clear it out earlier they were public about it and they took a hit but I think they're going to come back strong you know it's interesting I was a, analysts back in the day and one of our Focus was on supply chain and Mr research was known for supply chain got acquired by Gartner for their supply chain and industries practice, and you know always tracked the gentleman how Lee who came up with the bullwhip effect the idea that, you know any shock in the supply chain will just have this ripple effect that could last, quite some time I got it conceptually heard some examples of it but we've been living that over the last couple of years you know going from inventory scarcity buyers getting really excited thinking of the demand would really. [15:47] Keep steady and then when finally dear points got it came through the port of LA got through the domestic supply chain it was the wrong product or enough people had bought, you know a new monitor or TV or a desk or some cool background to get you know 10 out of 10 on rumerator and the demand wasn't there anymore so you're right I mean some of the things, in terms of replenishable products sure they have a long shelf life they have a long turn but some don't they have an expiration date and retailers are struggling with that and certainly, coming back around it is driving the discount strategy it's not over either will continue to see probably not the same heightened levels but now that we have an extended holiday season because, of create a fulfillment options will see some more discounts it's not the end of it. Scot: [16:34] Yeah that that's a good segue into kind of talking about the shape of the holiday so last year sounds like you saw the data we started a bit earlier and maybe maybe we kind of ended around after the turkey five or kind of came off a cliff there seems like this year consumers waited they won discount chicken and then we've had a robust turkey five maybe walk us through the days we've talked a little bit about Black Friday Cyber Monday anything else you want to hit there and then what do you think happens kind of post. Rob: [17:07] Yeah absolutely to round it out actually and just give that perspective for the entire shape as you talked about the anatomy of the Season as a bunch of my customers talk about. Um there are some kind of pretty nervous people in the industry coming out of the first two weeks of November the last two weeks of October and the first two weeks, of November you know sales kind of words Riri we saw a negative seven percent during that time again little bit of a spike the first. Week in October because of prime day and then it really leveled off quite dramatically 27 percent decline, globally and so we're really worried is this a trend is this going to continue in really what it told us is, that cyber week becomes back into Focus again people were willing to wait people are willing to be patient waiting for those deals you know what we saw for cyber week with again a higher concentration probably around 25 percent of all, digital sales will be when it's all said and done over the course of cyber week in the way we look at it sales force is, the Tuesday before American Thanksgiving through Cyber Monday so we put another two days and it just to make it a full week but we can slice and dice it anyway, you want especially on the dashboard via Tableau on our shopping insights. [18:30] HQ but for the overall cyber week for us we saw nine percent growth. [18:38] And for Global we saw two percent growth. That again as you can tell because of the global number largely buoyed By Us sales Black Friday really strong us we saw. 12% in the US and we saw. [18:57] 3.5 percent growth globally that's Black Friday Cyber Monday we saw eight percent growth in us and we saw four percent growth, globally so very strong what we also saw by the way is healthy traffic we even saw healthy traffic. Earlier in the season so what that told us is people were interested they showed intent to buy but they weren't given the right incentive to actually purchase so you know there's a demand there's. Need there's a want earlier in the season because of the traffic we saw that traffic stayed pretty steady both us and globally, throughout the week as well and obviously that turned into higher conversion rate because people are actually now buying. Scot: [19:47] Cool and then from your day to do you think Cyber Monday was the biggest day we've ever had is do you guys pontificate on them. Rob: [19:54] Yeah we do we do we actually saw a turn of the corner about 3 or 4 years ago where Black Friday. Digitally became the largest day and really what that was, primarily driven by many retailers were actually shuttering their doors both on Thanksgiving either part of or all of Black Friday and they were encouraging people to shop online that was a great altruistic message from a brand perspective but it was also great you know to actually give their Workforce some time off, as well and so n obviously Drive traffic towards digital while providing great deals, online the other piece to it that really helped drive that change was mobile. Really the huge increase in Mobile we saw a mobile traffic this year through the course of cyber week account for about seventy nine percent. [20:52] All traffic and so people were on the go it was more accessible. And they either did more of their shopping during Black Friday or actually what we started to see and it really came into Focus this year buying on the couch in the later days after Thanksgiving meal. In the u.s.a. people got sick of their family needed to digest a little watch football and they took out their phone you know they either got distracted or I don't know if you're a marketer inspired by something they saw on their phone and they started shopping so that's my long way saying we actually see Black Friday of a higher concentration a bigger, overall sales volume for online then Cyber Monday. Scot: [21:38] Interesting okay and then there used to be this big disparity between mobile traffic and sales so used to be if you had 80% traffic you could knock that in more than half or is that number closed into you guys track that. Rob: [21:50] We do we do yeah it hovers around 60% of orders and that has progressively gone up up until about. How long have we been, going through this pandemic up until a pandemic because what happened is people are actually at home they weren't visiting their friends and family they weren't as much on the go so they actually went to their computer during Thanksgiving you know for me I spent the last couple years out by my fire pit and, you know came in from the cold and went to my computer instead of my phone to check out the latest deals on Thanksgiving or. The day after two Black Friday so we did see a dip. Last couple years in Mobile because people were at home but it spiked back up this year both traffic and orders and I give you know retailers credit because, and I know Jason you spent a lot of time with your customers thinking about customer experience and design and really breaking down that friction between inspiration and purchase, you know retailers are getting much better at making it easier to actually not only find the product they want on their phone but make that purchase. Scot: [22:58] Okay so that brings us up to Cyber Monday and then you kind of hinted that you think they'll be some more discounting seems like if consumers One retail chicken you can't you can't kind of go off of it right so if you've got this inventory left you're going to have to either discount further at least keep the discounts on is that what you think is going to happen. Rob: [23:17] Yeah exactly I mean we typically see a little bit of a dip coming off of cyber week to just. Retailers take a breath analyze what they have what they did how their margin looks and then get back at it a little bit but we we are going to see perhaps not higher rates, because retailers I'm sorry consumers are getting really, crafty around price adjustments so it's not only dipping further into their margin but it's creating more operational expenses and headaches as well for the retailer and so I don't necessarily anticipate, higher discount rates but a steady drumbeat of discounts particularly those retailers that have physical stores and can extend the shipping cut off window by offering, store fulfillment options so you'll see you know a real leaning into discounts promotion. Overall just attracting people hey you haven't missed the window yet you can get that last gift for your cousin or uncle or family member and oh by the way you don't have to pay for it and you're more guaranteed to get it because you can pick it up in an around the store or will get it. To you through some sort of last mile delivery that is shipped from the store. Scot: [24:35] I think one takeaway is you know so Jason's hearing there's some concerns about revenue and stuff and then you know I'm hearing discounting could be a rough earning season as we kind of come out of the holiday if all this discounting is go on but at least I guess they'll start the year kind of having flushed out all this massive inventory. Rob: [24:54] Yeah yeah you know coming into this year we do our predictions all the way back in June and we kind of look at the data what we've seen what the storylines are and. Start craft the narrative we were big Partners in that a couple of years ago where you coin ship a get in and you know we were both early on seeing man there's some issues with this surge going on in the capacity issues with. The carriers but you know one of those storylines or the main storyline just last June was. And here's comes your soundbite so get ready are you ready to rumble. I just set way too high expectations sorry about that but you know we're really concerned that margin will be the Grinch That's deals, Christmas and to your point we don't see that until the February timeframe after the Retailer's close out their fiscal year and start reporting again some retailers got ahead of it and caution what this is going to look like but I'm. Anticipating that will be a key storyline come February Scott. Scot: [25:57] All the who's in Whoville loved prophets a lot but. Rob: [26:00] Oh nice I like it I like it and we haven't even talked about returns yet right because that's I know that's one of Jason's favorite topping that's going to certainly come into play as well as we talk about margin. Jason: [26:12] You guys are bringing me down and actually I'm afraid I might want to bring us down even more because, I would say like I came into this holiday season thinking hey top binds going to be okay because of inflation because of you know pent-up demand a variety of things but that you know the story was going to be about profits as you guys just perfectly laid out um and then you know the Cyber weekend happen and Rob's been on every news program I've watched for the for the last 12 hours and you know they're also citing these like Salesforce vanity stats right that like oh my gosh e-commerce was higher than it's ever been before which is not shocking right like. And then the internet came out with a study today more people went shopping this weekend than ever before which again. There are more people in the United States than ever before so that's not that's not shocking I have in talking with retailers, they're more guarded like they all did scenario planning for like sort of good good weekends and bad weekends and they're all like talking about being on the low end of those, scenario plantings I know you have great data for the online portion of spending but you know 74 ish percent of all this spending is in stores I know you have some signals for the in-store sales but do you. [27:38] Like are you confident that this was a really strong turkey 5 I'm I'm not clear if it was or wasn't. Rob: [27:46] Yeah I think it remains to be seen if we're defining it as Jason we should be. Retail in totality and the fact that a vast majority of sales still happen in the physical store right and we're seeing that traffic. Is up but oh by the way it was Don the last couple years so what's that comparison set right is it actually up from 2018 or 2019 I'm not, convinced it necessarily, is and so we don't track that but we look at smart people like you Jason and Scott and some other friends in the industry and the word on literally the street or the mall or whatever strip center anyways I digress, is that it was the physical traffic a bit lighter and so we can say that. [28:37] Also online sales were strong but I also to your point want to temper that by if somebody or a retailer was reading this in almost any country in Europe. They probably wouldn't believe that headline right because it just you know they've been visiting head wins, not only during cyber week for the better part of this year and so most categories saw a negative growth, throughout Europe and you can see the data specifically by each country, on our dashboard and so it to your point earlier Jason it's not a sound bite that we'll be able to tell you the entire story right and so it was positive I'm feeling pretty good about the sales and you know the retailers I'm talking to who are forecasting closer to Fat flat not fat flat, growth were pretty happy but I think it still remains to be seen in terms of stores what that looks like margin what that's going to look like and if you're a global brand how does it look in totality. Jason: [29:44] Yeah for sure, decided I'm going to make a prediction most of the good store traffic data is about three days leg so we don't have it yet but I think what I think you called it exactly right I think store traffic is going to be up from last year but still below, 2019 levels and what's confusing it is there's a few Pockets there's a few a malls that did really well this weekend as they always do and so I think journalists went to these a malls and saw a bunch of people and they you know they're talking about how it was a robust in-store holiday but I I am going to be eager to see that that store data which brings me to my next question a lot of people use your tool set for Boba so I'm imagining that you got to see. Some of the trends in both us and like did that reveal anything in terms of people that might be going to store to pick up orders. Rob: [30:37] Yeah I think that's interesting and it also talks about Jason like what are the new metrics given this new world like do. Bo piss or curbside orders count as traffic I don't know you know the consumers come in close. To the store or they're going to the pickup area within the store in many cases they buy more product so I think again if. [31:00] Weaving in those stats it helps definitely the online traffic I don't think by the way many retailers are looking at it that way just yet and I think it's an important factor to consider. But he has your question yeah I mean I think. [31:16] Bo pasts and create a fulfillment options from the store are helping Elevate traffic and driving people to brick-and-mortar based on our data what we saw is botes usage. Overthrew we'll call it cyber weekend we saw close to 10% growth compared to earlier, in the holiday season what super interesting what we typically see is the lead up to a big holiday like for instance we looked at Halloween for the two days leading up to Halloween we actually saw. Double the amount of, Opus orders because people realize they didn't get the costume or the candy or whatever other ornaments that they needed and they knew it wouldn't get shipped in time they also want to make sure it would be available if they actually purchased it. And they did both this the other really interesting thing is throughout cyber week and again we look at that for the full seven days but even no matter how we slice it it's high what we saw is and this is u.s. specifically by the way, retailers that had bo piss they offered it grew online Revenue by 38% more. [32:33] Then those without this creative fulfillment option and so it does speak to. How important the store is to your digital business right so you know another stat. [32:47] Why not I'm on a roll that I'll say is. Our research shows that 60% of digital orders are influenced by the physical store whether that's where demand is being generated or demand, is being fulfilled in this case it's being fulfilled because somebody's buying it from the comfort of their own home and it's convenient and they're able to pick it up with the confidence that the product would actually, be there so again the new rules of you know both how do you provide the incentives to the store associate how their role is changing and how you measure, Effectiveness because of such the interplay between digital and physical is super interesting to be a part of. Jason: [33:29] Yeah that to me I saw that stat about the bow purpose retards that offering boat best outperforming returns that don't and, that was super interesting and kind of tragic Rob because I don't know if you've noticed this but so both this isn't universally offered by all retailers more retailers were offering both pissed last year than this year like everybody scrambled in the pandemic to come up with some version of bow pose and a number of them turned it off either because they didn't have a robust implementation or they couldn't hire enough labor this year to support. Rob: [34:05] Yeah yeah it's less about a technology. [34:09] Project or initiative and it is to your point it's about operations and you know part of the reason people turned it off you mentioned some of them is. They couldn't get down the operational efficiency we're seeing more retailers lean into Automation and, more productivity to really refine their fulfillment operations and it's not easy it's not just about having. The right amount of labor but it's having them focused on the right tasks based on the time of day and what. The priorities are and that's not easy to do at all especially you know when consumers are standing right in front of the associate and the associate is you know tasked with having to make a call do they. Fulfill this. Bullpen disorder because they have to within 15 minutes or do they serve the consumer who explicitly came in the store because they wanted to be in a physical space and talk to a human. And get some knowledgeable service so it's my long way saying it's not easy those retailers that have been able to move from Scrappy which many did to scale really thinking about how to automate some of the processes, how to really focus on efficiency and productivity will be winners because they're not only helping with loyalty serving the consumers who want to shop that way but also thinking about the margin pressures they're feeling otherwise. Jason: [35:35] Yeah that totally agree and I can definitively answer one thing I rarely I'm almost always guessing but in terms of whether both is counts a store traffic or not I have no idea whether it should count or not or whether returns would like it to counter not but I can tell you when it does and doesn't count most retailers in America have a device on their front door that counts how many people walk in the store and it excludes employees and so two companies sell those devices sensor Matic and Retail next and they both publish Anonymous store traffic data so if you see data from either of those companies it did not include dopest but Place Rai is the third company that provides that data and they use the GPS in the consumers phone which does Campo. Rob: [36:23] Yes. Jason: [36:24] So in three days you're going to see data from all three of those companies and it's not going to agree and that is why. Rob: [36:31] That's super rich I've been that right there that is the best nugget of the last however long we've been talking that's. Jason: [36:37] Six hours. Rob: [36:38] It feels like it I could talk another six though that's the fun part but that's Jason that's super interesting and that's the type. Data you know it typically use whichever one helps tell the story you want but understanding the differences like you just dissected is so important. Scot: [36:54] Cool let's we're getting towards the end so we know you had a long day but one of my favorite things about your data is you can peel the onion on categories I have a sixteen-year-old daughter and I can vouch for the Beauty and athleisure categories but did you see those kind of pop in any other categories up or down that you want to talk about. Rob: [37:15] Yeah absolutely well again there is a correlation between performance and discounts at least from a top-line perspective and so yeah we saw some strong performance in health and beauty for sure. We also saw in consumer electronics. And we also saw it in actually General apparel and Footwear as well believe it or not particularly on the Footwear side we saw it because people are actually putting on shoes and sneakers again and getting out the. You know world again whereas I guess I can't live in my slippers or flip-flops anymore actually when we looked at the data by actual product, we saw flip-flops actually had some of the largest decline that we saw your every year because again people are getting out in the world again. The good news is two by the way again to plug the shopping insights HQ you can slice and dice by I think it's at least nine if not about 12. Categories and see what it looks like for orders and sales and the like along with traffic as well. Jason: [38:27] I did. Notice so I've been playing with the dashboard a lot and side note as you know my pandemic hobby as I learned to have well so it's super exciting for me that you you are publishing the data and Tabla, it does seem like some categories popped that like. Had been underperforming for most of the pandemic so like you know Electronics had not been a very bright spot but it does seem like they they had a pretty decent weekend like do you have a, am I seeing that data right and do you think like that that might mean they've turned the corner or do you think that that could be a holiday anomaly. Rob: [39:07] It's hard to say because again discounts drove so much of the buying there was such a correlation between discounts and sales and so it's a little hard to say and it's really interesting to understand to like some of that. Binge shopping that we all did over the pandemic and it subsided perhaps over the last 6 to 12 months, and then in gift-buying times you're seeing a pop again so I wouldn't necessarily stake the claim on this is now what's going to happen for the next 12 months in terms of demand for these categories, because a lot of it again is correlated to Discount a lot of it is correlated to what people have pot over the purchased excuse me over the last couple of years. Jason: [39:51] That's totally fair so let's pivot to how they paid for it you alluded earlier to buy now pay later traction like can you share what you saw in the data and where there any other interesting Trends in terms of payment methods. Rob: [40:06] Yeah totally this was kind of fun because we put it in there as we did each of the mornings early early early particularly those that are on the west coast thank you to the team by the way I should have done this at the beginning but it's not just me I have the fun part to have this conversation with you and speak to so many people about this including a lot of retailers not just today but we have through the rest of the holiday season we have a way to go. But it's make possible through the team that brings these data and insights to life and, the reason I say that is we are trauma through the data one morning and we got the normal like what the sales look like what does traffic look like what are the hot categories biggest discounts, and then Kayla Schwartz on my team who really is the master behind the shopping index was that. This is super interesting around buy now pay later because of the Divergence between orders. [41:04] For buy now pay later and at the average order value and what I mean by that is specifically we saw. A five percent this is throughout the course of cyber week. In the u.s. in particular where we saw in the increase of 5% year-over-year, of orders with buy now pay later and by the way this is after, a couple of years of really nice growth so five percent based on the bass is really we consider noticeable however on the other side we saw. [41:37] Average order value for the same transactions decrease by five percent so it's indicating to us. [41:46] Again you know this better than anyone buy now pay later really was hatched as a finance option for. Bigger ticket items home appliances television couches and other Home Furniture but what we're seeing is a turning of the corner. Because of the ubiquity and he is and also I think the desire to finance and spread payments over the course of a given time period rather just at once for lower price for less expensive goods and gifts, compared to 2021. Jason: [42:21] Yeah I will say you know a lot of the retailers that are like looking at the economic snapshot for next year and I really concerned about. The consumers discretionary dollar they're they're kind of concerned about this you know. Acceleration of buy now pay later and other credit means as kind of a an early indicator that the consumer might be overextending themselves. Rob: [42:47] Yeah I mean we don't look at that very closely but it is fairly intuitive to see it that way that people are leaning on. Newer creative finance options over the holiday and what does that mean for the subsequent quarters will be keeping an eye on that really closely for sure. Jason: [43:05] Yeah so we are coming up on time Rob there's one other topic I just wanted to touch on with you you know you you alluded to capacity concerns in pass holidays and of course you know we've talked a lot on the show about ship again um I'm kind of worried about a new thing this year. With the moat with this really prevalent version of discount chicken if a bunch of consumers are thinking they're going to wait till the very last minute. To get the best discount we have all the usual things in place we have like a fragile inventory that might start running out. But we also this year have lower labor levels like stores tried to hire less people and they weren't able to hire all the people they tried to hire UPS and FedEx didn't get all the people they want so I'm a little worried if consumers way too long that we you know might have another ship again in situation on our hands where there just isn't enough labor capacity to get all these orders out the last week of the year. Rob: [44:04] Yeah that's a super interesting point one that I haven't dove into very deep but I'm with you Jason that's going. Potentially be an issue I mean I'm a sample size of one but I see it any time I shop or any restaurant I go in there not taking reservations or they're not limiting reservations based on tables there. You know basically limiting it because of waitstaff and so, that's true too in the physical store when the associate is being asked to do so many things now right it's not just about scanning and bagging at the cash wrap, it's you know they're becoming social media managers that are fulfillment experts there live streamers so you're stretching them thin. Capacity gets issue by the way the other interesting thing that we didn't touch upon was returns we saw such an increase of returns heading into cyber week than we ever have in our thesis is that. People who bought product earlier in the season. Star the better discounts and we're doing price adjustments in way of returning a product and then buying it back, at the cheaper price so there may be earlier returns that are playing and usually that's not, a storyline that we talked about until you know January at NRF right but now it's actually happening more so add that to your Litany of things that will create capacity issues. Jason: [45:30] Oh my gosh know for sure and you know it's already a distant memory but with all those early sales that people tried to do one of the things that may have gone unnoticed is a lot of retailers also extended the return window because the fear was will never get people the holiday shop early if they don't think that gift recipients will be allowed to return the gifts so a bunch of these sales are on more liberal return policies, then ever before and again you know the economist are like come January we could be in stagflation and you know we don't know what returns might even look like in that kind of economic environment so it's, it's a concern for sure and that on that happy note Rob we've used up our allotted time. Because on top of everything else during this show I received about 1,000 emails from the Salesforce marketing cloud with even better deals than Cyber Monday so I'm gonna, after to go a little early so that I can get some more shopping. Rob: [46:28] Go for it please do shop on of course Salesforce Commerce Cloud websites if you may. Jason: [46:33] I didn't know there were other kinds. But in all seriousness Rob it's always a pleasure to talk to you about anything and for sure to talk about the the holiday sales loyal listeners will know the number one piece of feedback we get is they like to hear more from Kayla and from Michelle and I have to keep telling him that you always insist on coming. Rob: [46:54] Hey that will happen they are amazing I gotta say though before we go Jason Scott first of all as I mentioned before I love doing this like seriously this is. Highlight it's our Super Bowl or dare I stake a World Cup given where we are right now go us but you know. More than anything I just really appreciate your friendship it's so amazing to have friends like you and the retail industry and the amazing Community we have and I also love how humble you are in terms of you asking me these questions but the reality is you're so on top of what's Happening Now and in the future and I really value that so A big thank you all around. Scot: [47:34] Boom and you just secured yourself a fifth spot there you go Rob thanks for joining us on Twitter you are retail Rob Garf you're very active on LinkedIn I've noticed we will put a link to the hub of activity in the show notes thanks for joining us. Jason: [47:54] And until next time happy Commercing.

One Thing In A French Day
2189 — Au Louvre, le tableau scandaleux de la devinette ! — mercredi 30 novembre 2022

One Thing In A French Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 7:32


  Dans l'épisode de lundi, Anne-Laure vous a proposé une devinette autour d'un tableau du Louvre. Quel était donc ce tableau ? Il est temps de retrouver Anne-Laure qui va nous révéler le nom de ce tableau, très connu.  www.onethinginafrenchday.com  

Equity
Corporate comms for the startup soul

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 30:47


Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch's venture capital focused podcast where we unpack the numbers and nuance behind the headlines.Today we have something a bit different for you. In light of the never-ending Musk-Twitter saga, and news that the new social media CEO had cut its corporate communications staff to the bone -- and then some. So to get more perspective on the role that a corporate comms team plays in both startups and public companies alike, we wrangled two folks who have just that experience set:Kelly Boynton, senior director of communications at GustoKeyana Corliss, until recently the head of global communications and PR at DatabricksThe pair discussed the role that comms plays in companies both internally and externally, and why it deserves a seat at the decision-making table. Given the media furor surrounding Musk himself, you can imagine that we had a lot to talk about.Oh, and Keyana has a podcast that Alex was a guest on, in case you want to hear more from her! Regular service returns tomorrow!Equity drops at 7 a.m. PT every Monday and Wednesday, and at 6 a.m. PT on Fridays, so subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Overcast, Spotify and all the casts. TechCrunch also has a great show on crypto, a show that interviews founders, one that details how our stories come together, and more!

Bernard Marr's Future of Business & Technology Podcast
The Importance Of Data Literacy And Data Storytelling (with Tableau CEO & President, Mark Nelson)

Bernard Marr's Future of Business & Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 22:55


Data literacy is one of the most important skills people need to get ready for the workplace of the future. In this podcast I am joined by Tableau President and CEO Mark Nelson to explore the importance of being able to interpret and tell stories with data.

Les chroniques de Daniel Morin
Mon frigo sur un tableau !

Les chroniques de Daniel Morin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 3:27


durée : 00:03:27 - Le Billet de Daniel Morin - par : Daniel Morin - Vous aussi, participez à la grande campagne gastro écolo qui fait le tour du monde !

Les Grandes Gueules
Le meilleur de la semaine des GG - des militants écologistes jettent de la soupe sur un tableau

Les Grandes Gueules

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 27:28


Alain Marschall et Olivier Truchot présentent un show de 3 heures avec leurs invités, où actualité rime avec liberté de ton, sur RMC la radio d'opinion. Dans les Grandes Gueules, les esprits s'ouvrent et les points de vue s'élargissent. 3h de talk, de débats de fond engagés où la liberté d'expression est reine et où l'on en ressort grandi ! Cette année, une nouvelle séquence viendra mettre les auditeurs au cœur de cette émission puisque ce sont eux qui choisiront le débat du jour ! Et pour cette 18ème saison, Alain Marschall et Olivier Truchot, accompagnés des GG issues de la société civile feront la part belle à l'information et au divertissement. En simultané sur RMC Story.

The Stack
Quarterly Themes to Boost Your B2B Pipeline with Grant Johnson, CMO at Emburse

The Stack

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 32:31


Generating meaningful prospects for your pipeline doesn't come through shotgun marketing. It comes through smart strategies and full-team alignment. That's why Grant Johnson is so big on quarterly themes.Grant is the CMO at Emburse. He's all about meaningfully speeding up his pipeline velocity, and making smart choices to leave time for the best prospects. His themes are helping his team make focused decisions to get those prospects in the pipeline. From there, he's tracking and pushing only the best for maximum efficiency. Main Takeaways:How quarterly themes help align your teams and connect with your audienceHow he's measuring meaningful pipeline velocityThe free tool Grant's using to mature prospects into customersLinks:Stackbuilder.comDan's Top Tools:TableauPendoHighspotJoin us every week as we journey to the bleeding edge of the modern tech stack. You'll hear from real experts on how to nail your strategy, build a revenue machine and take your sales to the next level.

Google Cloud Platform Podcast
Top 5 Data & Analytics Launches from Next 2022 with Bruno Aziza and Maire Newton

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 30:51


Debi Cabrera and Stephanie Wong have more great Next content this week as we focus on launches specifically related to data and analytics with guests Bruno Aziza and Maire Newton. We start the episode with a look at current customer trends in data, including tools for increasing efficiency when working with many different types of data. Data governance and security is another area where Bruno sees advances in satisfying customer needs. Maire talks about the steps Google is taking to help customers implement knowledge gained with data, including Looker and new integrations with tools like Looker Studio to easily connect tools for better data access and use. Strategic partnerships with companies like Tableau help accomplish these goals as well. With 21 data and analytics launches at Next, exciting solutions are out there for customers. Bruno and Maire highlight their five favorites, like BigQuery support for unstructured data, allowing analysts working with SQL to do more with more data. To simplify workflows, BigQuery integration with Spark is a new feature that Maire tells us about, and we hear more about BigLake and it's increased format support. Data reaches more people easier now with Connected Sheets available for anyone using Google Workspace, and finally we talk more about Looker. Bruno details the four use cases of business intelligence customers and how Google's suite of data products satisfy their needs for a reasonable price. Bruno Aziza Bruno is head of data and analytics for Google Cloud and leads the outbound product management team. He has more than two decades' of Silicon Valley experience, specializing in scaling businesses, and has written two books on Data Analytics and Enterprise Performance Management. Maire Newton Maire is an Outbound Product Manager at Google Cloud with almost 15 years of experience partnering with organizations to develop data solutions and drive digital transformation. She's passionate about helping customers develop data-driven cultures by using technology to meet users where they are. Cool things of the week Google Cloud Next for data professionals: analytics, databases and business intelligence blog ANA104 How Boeing overcame their on-premises implementation challenges with data & AI site ANA100 What's new in Looker and Data Studio site ANA101 What's new in BigQuery site ANA106 How leading organizations are making open source their super power site Google Cloud Next: top AI and ML sessions blog Interview Building the most open data cloud ecosystem post Data Journeys videos Google Cloud Next ‘22 site Looker site Looker Studio site Tableau site BigLake ste BigQuery site Use the BigQuery connector with Spark docs Connected Sheets docs What's something cool you're working on? Debi is getting married and working on Dataflow Prime. Hosts Stephanie Wong and Debi Cabrera

Islas de Robinson
Islas de Robinson - Fui neón - 17/10/22

Islas de Robinson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 58:53


Esta semana en Islas de Robinson, sesión de actualidad. Suenan: THE BOBBY LEES - "GRETA VON FAKE" ("BELLEVUE", 2022) / WUNDERHORSE - "TEAL" ("CUB", 2022) / FLOODLIGHTS - "THE MORE I AM" (SINGLE 2021) / DEHD - "BAD LOVE" ("BLUE SKIES", 2022) / THE BIG MOON - "TROUBLE" ("HERE IS EVERYTHING", 2022) / LERA LYNN - "I'M YOUR KAMIKAZE" ("SOMETHING MORE THAN LOVE", 2022) / WET LEG - "BEING IN LOVE" ("WET LEG", 2022) / PARTNER LOOK - "SPEED LIMIT" ("BY THE BOOK", 2022) / JULIA JACKLIN - "I WAS NEON" ("PRE PLEASURE", 2022) / HORSEGIRL - "OPTION 8" ("VERSIONS OF MODERN PERFOMANCE", 2022) / GOAT GIRL - "SAD COWBOY" ("ON ALL FOURS", 2021) / THE ORIELLES - "THE ROOM" ("TABLEAU", 2022) / SORRY - "THERE'S SO MANY PEOPLE THAT WANT TO BE LOVED" ("ANYWHERE BUT HERE", 2022). Escuchar audio

Coffee with Closers
The Importance of Sales for Entrepreneurs Tips from the CEO of Sales Training Firm | John Barrows

Coffee with Closers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 42:49


Here's the hard truth founders often don't want to hear. Whatever you're building isn't cool enough to sustain without sales. If you don't build your entire organization around sales, you'll fail eventually. My today's guest for Coffee with Closers has provided sales training and consulting services to some of the world's fastest-growing companies like Google, Slack, Tableau, DropBox… And all those companies eventually got sales reps even though many of them would pride themselves on having a product-led growth model. Meet John Barrows, the CEO of JB Sales and author of the sales book for kids, I Want to be in Sales When I Grow Up. As an inside sales rep, he would make 400 cold calls a week to eventually become the VP of Sales at his first startup, which was later sold to Staples. ►Why is it important to start a business with a partner who has a different skill set than yours? ►What is the minimum viable structure for someone trying to build a sales team? ►How do you become a great sales leader and hire the right people for the organization? ►How do you approach prospecting as an account executive? ►How do you leverage content to create sales opportunities? Enjoy!

L'innovation du jour - Anicet Mbida
Automobile : des jeux vidéo directement sur le tableau de bord

L'innovation du jour - Anicet Mbida

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 2:23


Anicet Mbida nous livre chaque matin ce qui se fait de mieux en matière d'innovation. Ce jeudi, il s'intéresse à une nouveauté automobile pour nous aider à tuer le temps dans les bouchons. Il s'agit de jeux vidéo directement sur le tableau de bord.

C'est presque sérieux
Salut les copions - Catherine Ronvaux, Jean-Jacques Jespers et Roul Reyers sont appelés au tableau en ce mardi.

C'est presque sérieux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 36:00


Catherine Ronvaux, Jean-Jacques Jespers et Roul Reyers sont appelés au tableau en ce mardi. Sujets imposés par Walid : réseaux sociaux, justice et loi du plus fort, mais aussi jeux de mots, énigmes et mauvaise foi, le tout dans l'allégresse pour accompagner votre fin de journée...

Screaming in the Cloud
HeatWave and the Latest Evolution of MySQL with Nipun Agarwal

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 38:43


About NipunNipun Agarwal is a Senior Vice President, MySQL HeatWave Development, Oracle. His interests include distributed data processing, machine learning, cloud technologies and security. Nipun was part of the Oracle Database team where he introduced a number of new features. He has been awarded over 170 patents.Links Referenced: Oracle: https://oracle.com MySQL HeatWave info: https://www.oracle.com/mysql/ MySQL Service on AWS and OCI login (Oracle account required): https://cloud.mysql.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us in part by our friends at Datadog. Datadog's SaaS monitoring and security platform that enables full stack observability for developers, IT operations, security, and business teams in the cloud age. Datadog's platform, along with 500 plus vendor integrations, allows you to correlate metrics, traces, logs, and security signals across your applications, infrastructure, and third party services in a single pane of glass.Combine these with drag and drop dashboards and machine learning based alerts to help teams troubleshoot and collaborate more effectively, prevent downtime, and enhance performance and reliability. Try Datadog in your environment today with a free 14 day trial and get a complimentary T-shirt when you install the agent.To learn more, visit datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloud to get. That's www.datadoghq.com/screaminginthecloudCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle, and back for a borderline historic third round going out and telling stories about these things, we have Nipun Agarwal, who is, as opposed to his first appearance on the show, has been promoted to senior vice president of MySQL HeatWave. Nipun, thank you for coming back. Most people are not enamored enough with me to subject themselves to my slings and arrows a second time, let alone a third. So first, thanks. And are you okay, over there?Nipun: Thank you, Corey. Yeah, very happy to be back.Corey: [laugh]. So, since the last time we've spoken, there have been some interesting developments that have happened. It was pre-announced by Larry Ellison on a keynote stage or an earnings call, I don't recall the exact format, that HeatWave was going to be coming to AWS. Now, you've conducted a formal announcement, this usual media press blitz, et cetera, talking about it with an eye toward general availability later this year, if I'm not mistaken, and things seem to be—if you'll forgive the term—heating up a bit.Nipun: That is correct. So, as you know, we have had MySQL HeatWave on OCI for just about two years now. Very good reception, a lot of people who are using MySQL HeatWave, are migrating from other clouds, specifically from AWS, and now we have announced availability of MySQL HeatWave on AWS.Corey: So, for those who have not done the requisite homework of listening to the entire back catalog of nearly 400 episodes of this show, what exactly is MySQL HeatWave, just so we make sure that we set the stage for what we're going to be talking about? Because I sort of get the sense that without a baseline working knowledge of what that is, none of the rest of this is going to make a whole lot of sense.Nipun: MySQL HeatWave is a managed MySQL service provided by Oracle. But it is different from other MySQL-based services in the sense that we have significantly enhanced the service such that it can very efficiently process transactions, analytics, and in-database machine learning. So, what customers get with the service, with MySQL HeatWave, is a single MySQL database which can process OLTP, transaction processing, real-time analytics, and machine learning. And they can do this without having to move the data out of MySQL into some other specialized database services who are running analytics or machine learning. And all existing tools and applications which work with MySQL work as is because this is something that enhances the server. In addition to that, it provides very good performance and very good price performance compared to other similar services out there.Corey: The idea historically that some folks were pushing around the idea of multi-cloud was that you would have workloads that—oh, they live in one cloud, but the database was going to be all the way across the other side of the internet, living in a different provider. And in practice, what we generally tend to see is that where the data lives is where the compute winds up living. By and large, it's easier to bring the compute resources to the data than it is to move the data to the compute, just because data egress in most of the cloud providers—notably exempting yours—is astronomically expensive. You are, if I recall correctly, less than 10% of AWS's data egress charge on just retail pricing alone, which is wild to me. So first, thank you for keeping that up and not raising prices because I would have felt rather annoyed if I'd been saying such good things. And it was, haha, it was a bait and switch. It was not. I'm still a big fan. So, thank you for that, first and foremost.Nipun: Certainly. And what you described is absolutely correct that while we have a lot of customers migrating from AWS to use MySQL HeatWave and OCI, a class of customers are unable to, and the number one reason they're unable to is that AWS charges these customers all very high egress fees to move the data out of AWS into OCI for them to benefit from MySQL HeatWave. And this has definitely been one of the key incentives for us, the key motivation for us, to offer MySQL HeatWave on AWS so that customers don't need to pay this exorbitant data egress fees.Corey: I think it's fair to disclose that I periodically advise a variety of different cloud companies from a perspective of voice-of-the-customer feedback, which essentially distills down to me asking really annoying slash obnoxious questions that I, as a customer, legitimately want to know, but people always frown at me when I asked that in vendor pitches. For some reason, when I'm doing this on an advisory basis, people instead nod thoughtfully and take notes, so that at least feels better from my perspective. Oracle Cloud has been one of those, and I've been kicking the tires on the AWS offering that you folks have built out for a bit of time now. I have to say, it is legitimate. I was able to run a significant series of tests on this, and what I found going through that process was interesting on a bunch of different levels.I'm wondering if it's okay with you, if we go through a few of them, just things that jumped out to me as we went through a series of conversations around, “So, we're going to run a service on AWS.” And my initial answer was, “Is this Oracle? Are you sure?” And here we are today; we are talking about it and press releases.Nipun: Yes, certainly fine with me. Please go ahead.Corey: So, I think one of the first questions I had when you said, “We're going to run a database service on AWS itself,” was, if I'm true to type, is going to be fairly sarcastic, which is, “Oh, thank God. Finally, a way to run a MySQL database on AWS. There's never been one of those before.” Unless you count EC2 or Aurora or Redshift depending upon how you squint at it, or a variety of other increasingly strange things. It feels like that has been a largely saturated market in many respects.I generally don't tend to advise on things that I find patently ridiculous, and your answer was great, but I don't want to put words in your mouth. What was it that you saw that made you say, “Ah, we're going to put a different database offering on AWS, and no, it's not a terrible decision.”Nipun: Got it. Okay, so if you look at it, the value proposition which MySQL HeatWave offers is that customers of MySQL or customers have MySQL compatible databases, whether Aurora, or whether it's RDS MySQL, right, or even, like, you know, customers of Redshift, they have been migrating to MySQL HeatWave on OCI. Like, for the reasons I said: it's a single database, customers don't need to have multiple databases for managing different kinds of workloads, it's much faster, it's a lot less expensive, right? So, there are a lot of value propositions. So, what we found is that if you were to offer MySQL HeatWave on AWS, it will significantly ease the migration of other customers who might be otherwise thinking that it will be difficult for them to migrate, perhaps because of the high egress cost of AWS, or because of the high latency some of the applications in the AWS incur when the database is running somewhere else.Or, if they really have an ecosystem of applications already running on AWS and they just want to replace the database, it'll be much easier for them if MySQL HeatWave was offered on AWS. Those are the reasons why we feel it's a compelling proposition, that if existing customers of AWS are willing to migrate the cloud from AWS to OCI and use MySQL HeatWave, there is clearly a value proposition we are offering. And if we can now offer the same service in AWS, it will hopefully increase the number of customers who can benefit from MySQL HeatWave.Corey: One of the next questions I had going in was, “Okay, so what actually is this under the hood?” Is this you effectively just stuffing some software into a machine image or an AMI—or however they want to mispronounce that word over an AWS-land—and then just making it available to your account and running that, where's the magic or mystery behind this? Like, it feels like the next more modern cloud approach is to stuff the whole thing into a Docker container. But that's not what you wound up doing.Nipun: Correct. So, HeatWave has been designed and architected for scale-out processing, and it's been optimized for the cloud. So, when we decided to offer MySQL HeatWave on AWS, we have actually gone ahead and optimize our server for the AWS architecture. So, the processor we are running on, right, we have optimized our software for that instance types in AWS, right? So, the data plane has been optimized for AWS architecture.The second thing is we have a brand new control plane layer, right? So, it's not the case that we're just taking what we had in OCI and running it on AWS. We have optimized the data plane for AWS, we have a native control plane, which is running on AWS, which is using the respective services on AWS. And third, we have a brand new console which we are offering, which is a very interactive console where customers can run queries from the console. They can do data management from the console, they're able to use Autopilot from the console, and we have performance monitoring from the console, right? So, data plane, control plane, console. They're all running natively in AWS. And this provides for a very seamless integration or seamless experience for the AWS customers.Corey: I think it's also a reality, however much we may want to pretend otherwise, that if there is an opportunity to run something in a different cloud provider that is better than where you're currently running it now, by and large, customers aren't going to do it because it needs to not just be better, but so astronomically better in ways that are foundational to a company's business model in order to justify the tremendous expense of a cloud migration, not just in real, out of pocket, cost in dollars and cents that are easy to measure, but also in terms of engineering effort, in terms of opportunity cost—because while you're doing that you're not doing other things instead—and, on some level, people tend to only do that when there's an overwhelming strategic reason to do it. When folks already have existing workloads on AWS, as many of them do, it stands to reason that they are not going to want to completely deviate from that strategy just because something else offers a better database experience any number of axes. So, meeting customers where they are is one of the, I guess, foundational shifts that we've really seen from the entire IT industry over the last 40 years, rather than you will buy it from us and you will tolerate it. It's, now customers have choice, and meeting them where they are and being much more, I guess, able to impedance-match with them has been critical. And I'm really optimistic about what the launch of this service portends for Oracle.Nipun: Indeed, but let me give you another data point. We find a very large number of Aurora customers migrating to MySQL HeatWave on OCI, right? And this is the same workload they were running on Aurora, but now they want to run the same workload on MySQL HeatWave on OCI. They are willing to undertake this journey of migration because their applications, they get much faster, and for a lot less price, but they get much faster. Then the second aspect is, there's another class of customers who are for instance running, on Aurora or other transactions or workloads, but then they have to keep moving the data, they'll keep performing the ETL process into some other service, whether it's Snowflake, or whether it's Redshift for analytics.Now, with this migration, when they move to MySQL HeatWave, customers don't need to, like, have multiple databases, and they get real-time analytics, meaning that if any data changes inside the server inside the OLTP as a database service, right? If they were to run a query, that query is giving them the latest results, right? It's not stale. Whereas with an ETL process, it gets to be stale. So, given that we already found that there were so many customers migrating to OCI to use MySQL HeatWave, I think there's a clear value proposition of MySQL HeatWave, and there's a lot of demand.But like, as I was mentioning earlier, by having MySQL HeatWave be offered on AWS, it makes the proposition even more compelling because, as you said, yes, there is some engineering work that customers will need to do to migrate between clouds, and if they don't want to, then absolutely now they have MySQL HeatWave which they can now use in AWS itself.Corey: I think that one of the things I continually find myself careening into, perhaps unexpectedly, is a failure to really internalize just how vast this entire industry really is. Every time I think I've seen it all, all I have to do is talk to one more cloud customer and I learn something completely new and different. Sometimes it's an innovative, exciting use of a thing. Other times, it's people holding something fearfully wrong and trying to use it as a hammer instead. And you know, if it's dumb and it works, is it really dumb? There are questions around that.And this in turn gave rise to one of my next obnoxious questions as I was looking at what you were building at the time because a lot of your pricing and discussions and framing of this was targeting very large enterprise-style customers, and the price points reflected that. And then I asked the question that Big E enterprise never quite expects, for whatever reason, it's like, “That looks awesome if I have a budget with many commas in it. What can I get for $4?” And as of this recording, pricing has not been finalized slash published for the service, but everything that you have shown me so far absolutely makes developing on this for a proof of concept or an evening puttering around, completely tenable: it is not bound to a fixed period of licensing; it's, use it when you want to use it, turn it off when you're done; and the hourly pricing is not egregious. I think that is something that historically, Oracle Database offerings have not really aligned with.OCI very much has, particularly with an eye toward its extraordinarily awesome free tier that's always free. But this feels like it's a weird blending of the OCI model versus historical Oracle Database pricing models in a way that, honestly I'm pretty excited about.Nipun: So, we react to what the customer requirements and needs are. So, for this class of customers who are using, say, RDS, MySQL, Aurora, we understand that they are very cost sensitive, right? So, one of the things which we have done in addition to offering MySQL HeatWave on AWS is based on the customer feedback and such. We are now offering a small shape of HeatWave instance in addition to the regular large shape. So, if customers want to just, you know, kick the tires, if developers just want to get started, they can get a MySQL node with HeatWave for less than ten cents an hour. So, for less than ten cents an hour, they get the ability to run transaction processing, analytics, and machine learning.And if you were to compare the corresponding cost of Aurora for the same, like, you know, core count, it's, like, you know, 12-and-a-half cents. And that's just Aurora, without Redshift or without SageMaker. So yes, you're right that based on the feedback and we have found that it would be much more attractive to have this low-end shape for the AWS developers. We are offering this smaller shape. And yeah, it's very, very affordable. It's about just shy of ten cents an hour.Corey: This brings up another question that I raised pretty early on in the process because you folks kept talking about shapes, and it turns out that is the Oracle Cloud term that applies to instance size over an AWS-land. And as we dug into this a bit further, it does make sense for how you think about these things and how you build them to customers. Specifically, if I want to run this, I log into cloud.oracle.com and sign up for it there, and pay you over on that side of the world, this does not show up on my AWS bill. What drove that decision?Nipun: Okay, so a couple of things. One clarification is that the site people log in to is cloud.mysql.com. So, that's where they come to: cloud.mysql.com.Corey: Oh, my apologies. I keep forgetting that you folks have multiple cloud offerings and domains. They're kind of a thing. How do they work? Given I have a bad domain by habit myself, I have no room to judge.Nipun: So, they come to cloud.mysql.com. From there, they can provision an instance. And we, as, like, you know, Oracle or MySQL, go ahead and create an instance in AWS, in the Oracle tenancy. From there, customers can then, you know, access their data on AWS and such. Now, what we want to provide the customers is a very seamless experience, that they just come to cloud.mysql.com, and from there, they can do everything: provisioning an instance, running the queries, payment and such. So, this is one of the reasons that we want customers just to be able to come to the site, cloud.mysql.com, and take care of the billing and such.Now, the other thing is that, okay, why not allow customers to pay from AWS, right? Now, one of the things over there is that if you were to do that and there's a customer, they'll be like, “Hey, I got to pay something to AWS, something to Oracle, so we'd prefer, it'd be better to have a one-stop shop.” And since many of these are already Oracle customers, it's helpful to do it this way.Corey: Another approach you could have taken—and I want to be very clear here that I am not suggesting that this would have been a good idea—but an approach that you could have taken would have been to go down the weird AWS partner rabbit hole, and we're going to provide this to customers on the AWS Marketplace. Because according to AWS, that's where all of their customers go to discover new softwares. Yeah, first, that's a lie. They do not. But aside from that, what was it about that Marketplace model that drove you to a decision point where okay, at launch, we are not going to be offering this on the AWS Marketplace? And to be clear, I'm not suggesting that was the wrong decision.Nipun: Right. The main reason is we want to offer the MySQL HeatWave service at the least expensive cost to the user, right, or like, the least cost. If you were to, like, have MySQL HeatWave in the Marketplace, AWS charges a premium. This the customers would need to pay. So, we just didn't want the customers to have to pay this additional premium just because they can now source this thing from the Marketplace. So, it's really to, like, save costs for the customer.Corey: The value of the Marketplace, from my perspective, has been effectively not having to deal as much with customer procurement departments because well, AWS is already on the procurement approved list, so we're just going to go ahead and take the hit to wind up making it accessible from that perspective and calling it good. The downside to this is that increasingly, as customers are making larger and longer-term commitments that are tied to certain levels of spend on AWS, they're increasingly trying to drag every vendor with whom they do business into the your AWS bill so they can check those boxes off. And the problem that I keep seeing with that is vendors who historically have been doing just fine, have great working relationships with a customer are reporting that suddenly customers are coming back with, “Yeah, so for our contract renewal, we want to go through the AWS Marketplace.” In return, effectively, these companies are then just getting a haircut off whatever it is they're able to charge their customers but receiving no actual value for any of this. It attenuates the relationship by introducing a third party into the process, and it doesn't make anything better from the vendor's point of view because they already had something functional and working; now they just have to pay a commission on it to AWS, who, it seems, is pathologically averse to any transaction happening where they don't get a cut, on some level. But I digress. I just don't like that model very much at all. It feels coercive.Nipun: That's absolutely right. That's absolutely right. And we thought that, yes, there is some value to be going to Marketplace, but it's not worth the additional premium customers would need to pay. Totally agree.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: It's also worth pointing out that in Oracle's historical customer base, by which I mean the last 40 years that you folks have been in business, you do have significant customers with very sizable estates. A lot of your cloud efforts have focused around, I guess, we'll call it an Oracle-specific currency: Oracle Credits. Which is similar to the AWS style of currency just for a different company in different ways. One of the benefits that you articulated to me relatively early on was that by going through cloud.mysql.com, customers with those credits—which can be in sizable amounts based upon various differentiating variables that change from case to case—and apply that to their use of MySQL HeatWave on AWS.Nipun: Right. So, in fact, just for starters, right, what we give to customers is we offer some free credits for customers to try a service on OCI of, you know, $300. And that's the same thing, the same experience you would like customers who are trying HeatWave on AWS to get. Yes, so you're right, this is the kind of consistency we want to have, and yet another reason why cloud.mysql.com makes sense is the entry point for customers to try the service.Corey: There was a time where I would have struggled not to laugh in your face at the idea that we're talking about something in the context of an Oracle database, and well, there's $300 in credit. That's, “What can I get for that? Hung up on?” No. A surprising amount, when it comes to these things.I feel like that opens up an entirely new universe of experimentation. And, “Let's see how this thing actually works with his workload,” and lets people kick the tires on it for themselves in a way that, “Oh, we have this great database. Well, can I try it? Sure, for $8 million, you absolutely can.” “Well, it can stay great and awesome over there because who wants to take that kind of a bet?” It feels like it's a new world and in a bunch of different respects, and I just can't make enough noise about how glad I am to see this transformation happening.Nipun: Yeah. Absolutely, right? So, just think about it. So, you're getting MySQL and HeatWave together for just shy of ten cents an hour, right? So, what you could get for $300 is 3000 hours for MySQL HeatWave instance, which is very good for people to try for free. And then, you know, decide if they want to go ahead with it.Corey: One other, I guess, obnoxious question that I love to ask—it's not really a question so much as a statement; that that's part of the first thing that makes it really obnoxious—but it always distills down to the following that upsets product people left and right, which is, “I don't get it.” And one of the things that I didn't fully understand at the outset of how you were structuring things was the idea of separating out HeatWave from its constituent components. I believe it was Autopilot if I'm not mistaken, and it was effectively different SKUs that you could wind up opting to go for. And okay, if I'm trying to kick the tires on this and contextualize it as someone for whom the world's best database is Route 53, then it really felt like an additional decision point that I wasn't clear on the value of. And I'm still not entirely sure on the differentiation point and the value there, but now you offer it bundled as a default, which I think is so much better, from the user experience perspective.Nipun: Okay, so let me clarify a couple of things.Corey: Please. Databases are not my forte, so expect me to wind up getting most of the details hilariously wrong.Nipun: Sure. So, MySQL Autopilot provides machine-learning-based automation for various aspects of the MySQL service; very popular. There is no charge for it. It is built into MySQL HeatWave; there is no additional charge for it, right, so there never was any SKU for it. What you're referring to is, we have had a SKU for the MySQL node or the MySQL instance, and there's a separate SKU for HeatWave.The reason there is a need to have a different SKU for these two is because you always only have one node of MySQL. It could be, like, you know, running on one core, or like, you know, multiple cores, but it's always, like, you know, one node. But with HeatWave, it's a scale-out architecture, so you can have multiple nodes. So, the users need to be able to express how many nodes of HeatWave are they provisioning, right? So, that's why there is a need to have two SKUs, and we continue to have those two SKUs.What we are doing now differently is that when users instantiate a MySQL instance, by default, they always get the HeatWave node associated with it, right? So, they don't need to, like, you know, make the decision to—okay when to add HeatWave; they always get HeatWave along with the MySQL instance, and that's what I was saying a combination of both of these is, you know, like, just about ten cents an hour. If for whatever reason, they decide that they do not want HeatWave, they can turn it off, and then the price drops to half. But what we're providing is the AWS service that HeatWave is turned on by default.Corey: Which makes an awful lot of sense. It's something that lets people opt out if they decide they don't need this as they continue to scale out, but for the newcomer who does not, in many cases—in my particular case—have a nuanced understanding of where this offering starts and stops, it's clearly the right decision of—rather than, “Oh, yeah. The thing you were trying and it didn't work super well? Well, yeah. If you enable this other thing, it would have been awesome.” “Well, great. Please enable it for me by default and let me opt out later in time as my level of understanding deepens.”Nipun: That's right. And that's exactly what we are doing. Now, this was a feedback we got because many, if not most, of our customers would want to have HeatWave, and we just kind of, you know, mitigating them from going through one more step, it's always enabled by default.Corey: As far as I'm aware, you folks are running this effectively as any other AWS customer might, where you establish a private link connection to your customers, in some cases, or give them a public or private endpoint where they can wind up communicating with this service. It doesn't require any favoritism or special permissions from AWS themselves that they wouldn't give to any other random customer out there, correct?Nipun: Yes, that is correct. So, for now, we are exposing this thing as a public endpoint. In the future, we have plans to support the private endpoint as well, but for now, it's public.Corey: Which means that foundationally what you're building out is something that fits into a model that could work extraordinarily well across a variety of different environments. How purpose-tuned is the HeatWave installation you have running on AWS for the AWS environment, versus something that is relatively agnostic, could be dropped into any random cloud provider, up to and including the terrifyingly obsolete rack I have in the spare room?Nipun: So, as I mentioned, when we decided to offer MySQL HeatWave on AWS, the idea was that okay, for the AWS customers, we now want to have an offering which is completely optimized for AWS, provides the best price-performance on AWS. So, we have determined which instance types underneath will provide the best price performance, and that's what we have optimized for, right? So, I can tell you, like, in terms of many of—for instance, take the case of the cache size of the underlying processor that we're using on AWS is different than what we're using for OCI. So, we have gone ahead, made these optimizations in our code, and we believe that our code is really optimized now for the AWS infrastructure.Corey: I think that makes a fair deal of sense because, again, one of the big problems AWS has had is the proliferation of EC2 instance types to the point now where the answer is super easy, too, “Are you using the correct instance type for your workload?” Because that answer now is, “Of course not. Who could possibly say that they were with any degree of confidence?” But when you take the time to look at a very specific workload that's going to be scaled out, it's worth the time investment to figure out exactly how to optimize things for price and performance, given the constraints. Let's be very clear here, I would argue that the better price performance for HeatWave is almost certainly not going to be on AWS themselves, if for no other reason than the joy that is their data transfer pricing, even for internal things moving around from time to time.Personally, I love getting charged data transfer for taking data from S3, running it through AWS Glue, putting it into a different S3 bucket, accessing it with Athena, then hooking that up to Tableau as we go down and down and down the spiraling rabbit hole that never ends. It's not exactly what I would call well-optimized economically. Their entire system feels almost like it's a rigged game, on some level. But given those constraints, yeah, dialing in it and making it cost-effective is absolutely something that I've watched you folks put significant time and effort into.Nipun: So, I'll make two points, right, to the questions. First is yes, I just want to, like, be clear about it, that when a user provisions MySQL HeatWave via cloud.mysql.com and we create an instance in AWS, we don't give customers a multitude of things to, like, you know, choose from.We have determined which instance type is going to provide the customer the best price performance, and that's what we provision. So, the customer doesn't even need to know or care, is it going to be, like, you know, AMD? Is it going to be Intel? Is it going to be, like, you know, ARM, right? So, it's something which we have predetermined and we have optimized for it. That's first.The second point is in terms of the price performance. So, you're absolutely right, that for the class of customers who cannot migrate away from AWS because of the egress costs or because of the high latency because of AWS, right, sure, MySQL HeatWave on AWS will provide the best price-performance compared to other services out in AWS like Redshift, or Aurora, or Snowflake. But if customers have the flexibility to choose a cloud of their choice, it is indeed the case that customers are going to find that running MySQL HeatWave on OCI is going to provide them, by far, the best price performance, right? So, the price performance of running MySQL HeatWave on OCI is indeed better than MySQL HeatWave on AWS. And just because of the fact that when we are running the service in AWS, we are paying the list price, right, on AWS; that's how we get the gear. Whereas with OCI, like, you know, things are a lot less expensive for us.But even when you're running on AWS, we are very, very price competitive with other services. And you know, as you've probably seen from the performance benchmarks and such, what I'm very intrigued about is that we're able to run a standard workload, like some, like, you know, TPC-H and offer seven times better price-performance while running in AWS compared to Redshift. So, what this goes to show is that we are really passing on the savings to the customers. And clearly, Redshift is not doing a good job of performance or, like, you know, they're charging too much. But the fact that we can offer seven times better price performance than Redshift in AWS speaks volumes, both about architecture and how much of savings we are passing to our customers.Corey: What I love about this story is that it makes testing the waters of what it's like to run MySQL HeatWave a lot easier for customers because the barrier to entry is so much lower. Where everything you just said I agree with it is more cost-effective to run on Oracle Cloud. I think there are a number of workloads that are best placed on Oracle Cloud. But unless you let people kick the tires on those things, where they happen to be already, it's difficult to get them to a point where they're going to be able to experience that themselves. This is a massive step on that path.Nipun: Yep. Right.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking time out of your day to walk us through exactly how this came to be and what the future is going to look like around this. If people want to learn more, where should they go?Nipun: Oh, they can go to oracle.com/mysql, and there they can get a lot more information about the capabilities of MySQL HeatWave, what we are offering in AWS, price-performance. By the way, all the price performance numbers I was talking about, all the scripts are available publicly on GitHub. So, we welcome, we encourage customers to download the scripts from GitHub, try for themselves, and all of this information is available from oracle.com/mysql where they can get this detailed information.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the show notes. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Nipun: Sure thing, Corey. Thank you for the opportunity.Corey: Nipun Agarwal, Senior Vice President of MySQL HeatWave. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry insulting comment. You will then be overcharged for the data transfer to submit that insulting comment, and then AWS will take a percentage of that just because they're obnoxious and can.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Bernard Marr's Future of Business & Technology Podcast
The Importance Of Data Literacy And Data Storytelling (with Tableau CEO & President, Mark Nelson)

Bernard Marr's Future of Business & Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 22:55


Data literacy is one of the most important skills people need to get ready for the workplace of the future. In this podcast I am joined by Tableau President and CEO Mark Nelson to explore the importance of being able to interpret and tell stories with data.

Great Data Minds
The Truth About Poor Dashboard Adoption — Hint: It's Not Your Software

Great Data Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 53:59


Let us know if this sounds familiar: A company invests in a great new piece of data analytics technology and spends time and resources getting it set up. A roll out ensues and then... nothing. It doesn't get adopted by the business users and the 'investment' heads towards 'sunk cost'. Why is this such a common story and what can we do to change it? Turns out, data analytics professionals have more power to change this than they may think. Join our conversation with special guest Lee Feinberg as he shares practical advice on how to use data to tell stories that get business users engaged. Lee has created a robust career around helping organizations stop needlessly struggling with data literacy. He is an expert at teaching people how to consolidate and effectively present large amounts of data.   ABOUT LEE: For the last 15 years Lee has been helping people and businesses change the way they present and consume data. He is the author of the internationally recognized eBook "Rewrite Your Charts Into Data Stories". He has run analytics team and helped data megaliths like Verizon and Ford Motor Company improve how they look at data. He led Nokia's Decision Planning and Visualization practice where he launched Tableau 5.0 (yes, 5.0) worldwide, and then became a Tableau partner in 2012.

Screaming in the Cloud
ChaosSearch and the Evolving World of Data Analytics with Thomas Hazel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 35:21


About ThomasThomas Hazel is Founder, CTO, and Chief Scientist of ChaosSearch. He is a serial entrepreneur at the forefront of communication, virtualization, and database technology and the inventor of ChaosSearch's patented IP. Thomas has also patented several other technologies in the areas of distributed algorithms, virtualization and database science. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from University of New Hampshire, Hall of Fame Alumni Inductee, and founded both student & professional chapters of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).Links Referenced: ChaosSearch: https://www.chaossearch.io/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChaosSearch Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CHAOSSEARCH/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is brought to us by our returning sponsor and friend, ChaosSearch. And once again, the fine folks at ChaosSearch has seen fit to basically subject their CTO and Founder, Thomas Hazel, to my slings and arrows. Thomas, thank you for joining me. It feels like it's been a hot minute since we last caught up.Thomas: Yeah, Corey. Great to be on the program again, then. I think it's been almost a year. So, I look forward to these. They're fun, they're interesting, and you know, always a good time.Corey: It's always fun to just take a look at companies' web pages in the Wayback Machine, archive.org, where you can see snapshots of them at various points in time. Usually, it feels like this is either used for long-gone things and people want to remember the internet of yesteryear, or alternately to deliver sick burns with retorting a “This you,” when someone winds up making an unpopular statement. One of the approaches I like to use it for, which is significantly less nefarious—usually—is looking back in time at companies' websites, just to see how the positioning of the product evolves over time.And ChaosSearch has had an interesting evolution in that direction. But before we get into that, assuming that there might actually be people listening who do not know the intimate details of exactly what it is you folks do, what is ChaosSearch, and what might you folks do?Thomas: Yeah, well said, and I look forward to [laugh] doing the Wayback Time because some of our ideas, way back when, seemed crazy, but now they make a lot of sense. So, what ChaosSearch is all about is transforming customers' cloud object stores like Amazon S3 into an analytical database that supports search and SQL-type use cases. Now, where's that apply? In log analytics, observability, security, security data lakes, operational data, particularly at scale, where you just stream your data into your data lake, connect our service, our SaaS service, to that lake and automagically we index it and provide well-known APIs like Elasticsearch and integrate with Kibana or Grafana, and SQL APIs, something like, say, a Superset or Tableau or Looker into your data. So, you stream it in and you get analytics out. And the key thing is the time-cost complexity that we all know that operational data, particularly at scale, like terabytes and a day and up causes challenges, and we all know how much it costs.Corey: They certainly do. One of the things that I found interesting is that, as I've mentioned before, when I do consulting work at The Duckbill Group, we have absolutely no partners in the entire space. That includes AWS, incidentally. But it was easy in the beginning because I was well aware of what you folks were up to, and it was great when there was a use case that matched of you're spending an awful lot of money on Elasticsearch; consider perhaps migrating some of that—if it makes sense—to ChaosSearch. Ironically, when you started sponsoring some of my nonsense, that conversation got slightly trickier where I had to disclose, yeah our media arm is does have sponsorships going on with them, but that has no bearing on what I'm saying.And if they take their sponsorships away—please don't—then we would still be recommending them because it's the right answer, and it's what we would use if we were in your position. We receive no kickbacks or partner deal or any sort of reseller arrangement because it just clouds the whole conflict of interest perception. But you folks have been fantastic for a long time in a bunch of different ways.Thomas: Well, you know, I would say that what you thought made a lot of sense made a lot of sense to us as well. So, the ChaosSearch idea just makes sense. Now, you had to crack some code, solve some problems, invent some technology, and create some new architecture, but the idea that Elasticsearch is a useful solution with all the tooling, the visualization, the wonderful community around that, was a good place to start, but here's the problem: setting it up, scaling it out, keep it up, when things are happening, things go bump in the night. All those are real challenges, and one of them was just the storaging of the data. Well, what if you could make S3 the back-end store? One hundred percent; no SSDs or HDDs. Makes a lot of sense.And then support the APIs that your tooling uses. So, it just made a lot of sense on what we were trying to do, just no one thought of it. Now, if you think about the Northstar you were talking about, you know, five, six years ago, when I said, transforming cloud storage into an analytical database for search and SQL, people thought that was crazy and mad. Well, now everyone's using Cloud Storage, everyone's using S3 as a data lake. That's not in question anymore.But it was a question five, six, you know, years ago. So, when we met up, you're like, “Well, that makes sense.” It always made sense, but people either didn't think was possible, or were worried, you know, I'll just try to set up an Elastic cluster and deal with it. Because that's what happens when you particularly deal with large-scale implementations. So, you know, to us, we would love the Elastic API, the tooling around it, but what we all know is the cost, the time the complexity, to manage it, to scale it out, just almost want to pull your hair out. And so, that's where we come in is, don't change what you do, just change how you do it.Corey: Every once in a while, I'll talk to a client who's running an Amazon Elasticsearch cluster, and they have nothing but good things to say about it. Which, awesome. On the one hand, part of me wishes that I had some of their secrets, but often what's happened is that they have this down to a science, they have a data lifecycle that's clearly defined and implemented, the cluster is relatively static, so resizes aren't really a thing, and it just works for their use cases. And in those scenarios, like, “Do you care about the bill?” “Not overly. We don't have to think about it.”Great. Then why change? If there's no pain, you're not going to sell someone something, especially when we're talking, this tends to be relatively smaller-scale as well. It's okay, great, they're spending $5,000 a month on it. It doesn't necessarily justify the engineering effort to move off.Now, when you start looking at this, and, “Huh, that's a quarter million bucks a month we're spending on this nonsense, and it goes down all the time,” yeah, that's when it starts to be one of those logical areas to start picking apart and diving into. What's also muddied the waters since the last time we really went in-depth on any of this was it used to be we would be talking about it exactly like we are right now, about how it's Elasticsearch-compatible. Technically, these days, we probably shouldn't be saying it is OpenSearch compatible because of the trademark issues between Elastic and AWS and the Schism of the OpenSearch fork of the Elasticsearch project. And now it feels like when you start putting random words in front of the word search, ChaosSearch fits right in. It feels like your star is rising.Thomas: Yeah, no, well said. I appreciate that. You know, it's funny when Elastic changed our license, we all didn't know what was going to happen. We knew something was going to happen, but we didn't know what was going to happen. And Amazon, I say ironically, or, more importantly, decided they'll take up the open mantle of keeping an open, free solution.Now, obviously, they recommend running that in their cloud. Fair enough. But I would say we don't hear as much Elastic replacement, as much as OpenSearch replacement with our solution because of all the benefits that we talked about. Because the trigger points for when folks have an issue with the OpenSearch or Elastic stack is got too expensive, or it was changing so much and it was falling over, or the complexity of the schema changing, or all the above. The pipelines were complex, particularly at scale.That's both for Elasticsearch, as well as OpenSearch. And so, to us, we want either to win, but we want to be the replacement because, you know, at scale is where we shine. But we have seen a real trend where we see less Elasticsearch and more OpenSearch because the community is worried about the rules that were changed, right? You see it day in, day out, where you have a community that was built around open and fair and free, and because of business models not working or the big bad so-and-so is taking advantage of it better, there's a license change. And that's a trust change.And to us, we're following the OpenSearch path because it's still open. The 600-pound gorilla or 900-pound gorilla of Amazon. But they really held the mantle, saying, “We're going to stay open, we assume for as long as we know, and we'll follow that path. But again, at that scale, the time, the costs, we're here to help solve those problems.” Again, whether it's on Amazon or, you know, Google et cetera.Corey: I want to go back to what I mentioned at the start of this with the Wayback Machine and looking at how things wound up unfolding in the fullness of time. The first time that it snapshotted your site was way back in the year 2018, which—Thomas: Nice. [laugh].Corey: Some of us may remember, and at that point, like, I wasn't doing any work with you, and later in time I would make fun of you folks for this, but back then your brand name was in all caps, so I would periodically say things like this episode is sponsored by our friends at [loudly] CHAOSSEARCH.Thomas: [laugh].Corey: And once you stopped capitalizing it and that had faded from the common awareness, it just started to look like I had the inability to control the volume of my own voice. Which, fair, but generally not mid-sentence. So, I remember those early days, but the positioning of it was, “The future of log management and analytics,” back in 2018. Skipping forward a year later, you changed this because apparently in 2019, the future was already here. And you were talking about, “Log search analytics, purpose-built for Amazon S3. Store everything, ask anything all on your Amazon S3.”Which is awesome. You were still—unfortunately—going by the all caps thing, but by 2020, that wound up changing somewhat significantly. You were at that point, talking for it as, “The data platform for scalable log analytics.” Okay, it's clearly heading in a log direction, and that made a whole bunch of sense. And now today, you are, “The data lake platform for analytics at scale.” So, good for you, first off. You found a voice?Thomas: [laugh]. Well, you know, it's funny, as a product mining person—I'll take my marketing hat off—we've been building the same solution with the same value points and benefits as we mentioned earlier, but the market resonates with different terminology. When we said something like, “Transforming your Cloud Object Storage like S3 into an analytical database,” people were just were like, blown away. Is that even possible? Right? And so, that got some eyes.Corey: Oh, anything is a database if you hold that wrong. Absolutely.Thomas: [laugh]. Yeah, yeah. And then you're saying log analytics really resonated for a few years. Data platform, you know, is more broader because we do more broader things. And now we see over the last few years, observability, right? How do you fit in the observability viewpoint, the stack where log analytics is one aspect to it?Some of our customers use Grafana on us for that lens, and then for the analysis, alerting, dashboarding. You can say that Kibana in the hunting aspect, the log aspects. So, you know, to us, we're going to put a message out there that resonates with what we're hearing from our customers. For instance, we hear things like, “I need a security data lake. I need that. I need to stream all my data. I need to have all the data because what happens today that now, I need to know a week, two weeks, 90 days.”We constantly hear, “I need at least 90 days forensics on that data.” And it happens time and time again. We hear in the observability stack where, “Hey, I love Datadog, but I can't afford it more than a week or two.” Well, that's where we come in. And we either replace Datadog for the use cases that we support, or we're auxiliary to it.Sometimes we have an existing Grafana implementation, and then they store data in us for the long tail. That could be the scenario. So, to us, the message is around what resonates with our customers, but in the end, it's operational data, whether you want to call it observability, log analytics, security analytics, like the data lake, to us, it's just access to your data, all your data, all the time, and supporting the APIs and the tooling that you're using. And so, to me, it's the same product, but the market changes with messaging and requirements. And this is why we always felt that having a search and SQL platform is so key because what you'll see in Elastic or OpenSearch is, “Well, I only support the Elastic API. I can't do correlations. I can't do this. I can't do that. I'm going to move it over to say, maybe Athena but not so much. Maybe a Snowflake or something else.”Corey: “Well, Thomas, it's very simple. Once you learn our own purpose-built, domain-specific language, specifically for our product, well, why are you still sitting here, go learn that thing.” People aren't going to do that.Thomas: And that's what we hear. It was funny, I won't say what the company was, a big banking company that we're talking to, and we hear time and time again, “I only want to do it via the Elastic tooling,” or, “I only want to do it via the BI tooling.” I hear it time and time again. Both of these people are in the same company.Corey: And that's legitimate as well because there's a bunch of pre-existing processes pointing at things and we're not going to change 200 different applications in their data model just because you want to replace a back-end system. I also want to correct myself. I was one tab behind. This year's branding is slightly different: “Search and analyze unlimited log data in your cloud object storage.” Which is, I really like the evolution on this.Thomas: Yeah, yeah. And I love it. And what was interesting is the moving, the setting up, the doubling of your costs, let's say you have—I mean, we deal with some big customers that have petabytes of data; doubling your petabytes, that means, if your Elastic environment is costing you tens of millions and then you put into Snowflake, that's also going to be tens of millions. And with a solution like ours, you have really cost-effective storage, right? Your cloud storage, it's secure, it's reliable, it's Elastic, and you attach Chaos to get the well-known APIs that your well-known tooling can analyze.So, to us, our evolution has been really being the end viewpoint where we started early, where the search and SQL isn't here today—and you know, in the future, we'll be coming out with more ML type tooling—but we have two sides: we have the operational, security, observability. And a lot of the business side wants access to that data as well. Maybe it's app data that they need to do analysis on their shopping cart website, for instance.Corey: The thing that I find curious is, the entire space has been iterating forward on trying to define observability, generally, as whatever people are already trying to sell in many cases. And that has seemed to be a bit of a stumbling block for a lot of folks. I figured this out somewhat recently because I've built the—free for everyone to use—the lasttweetinaws.com, Twitter threading client.That's deployed to 20 different AWS regions because it's go—the idea is that should be snappy for people, no matter where they happen to be on the planet, and I use it for conferences when I travel, so great, let's get ahead of it. But that also means I've got 20 different sources of logs. And given that it's an omnibus Lambda function, it's very hard to correlate that to users, or user sessions, or even figure out where it's going. The problem I've had is, “Oh, well, this seems like something I could instrument to spray logs somewhere pretty easily, but I don't want to instrument it for 15 different observability vendors. Why don't I just use otel—or Open Telemetry—and then tell that to throw whatever I care about to various vendors and do a bit of a bake-off?” The problem, of course, is that open telemetry and Lambda seem to be in just the absolute wrong directions. A lot.Thomas: So, we see the same trend of otel coming out, and you know, this is another API that I'm sure we're going to go all-in on because it's getting more and more talked about. I won't say it's the standard that I think is trending to all your points about I need to normalize a process. But as you mentioned, we also need to correlate across the data. And this is where, you know, there are times where search and hunting and alerting is awesome and wonderful and solves all your needs, and sometimes correlation. Imagine trying to denormalize all those logs, set up a pipeline, put it into some database, or just do a SELECT *, you know, join this to that to that, and get your answers.And so, I think both OpenTelemetry and SQL and search all need to be played into one solution, or at least one capability because if you're not doing that, you're creating some hodgepodge pipeline to move it around and ultimately get your questions answered. And if it takes weeks—maybe even months, depending on the scale—you may sometimes not choose to do it.Corey: One other aspect that has always annoyed me about more or less every analytics company out there—and you folks are no exception to this—is the idea of charging per gigabyte ingested because that inherently sets up a weird dichotomy of, well, this is costing a lot, so I should strive to log less. And that is sort of the exact opposite, not just of the direction you folks want customers to go in, but also where customers themselves should be going in. Where you diverge from an awful lot of those other companies because of the nature of how you work, is that you don't charge them again for retention. And the idea that, yeah, the fact that anything stored in ChaosSearch lives in your own S3 buckets, you can set your own lifecycle policies and do whatever you want to do with that is a phenomenal benefit, just because I've always had a dim view of short-lived retention periods around logs, especially around things like audit logs. And these days, I would consider getting rid of audit logging data and application logging data—especially if there's a correlation story—any sooner than three years feels like borderline malpractice.Thomas: [laugh]. We—how many times—I mean, we've heard it time and time again is, “I don't have access to that data because it was too costly.” No one says they don't want the data. They just can't afford the data. And one of the key premises that if you don't have all the data, you're at risk, particularly in security—I mean, even audits. I mean, so many times our customers ask us, you know, “Hey, what was this going on? What was that go on?” And because we can so cost-effectively monitor our own service, we can provide that information for them. And we hear this time and time again.And retention is not a very sexy aspect, but it's so crucial. Anytime you look in problems with X solution or Y solution, it's the cost of the data. And this is something that we wanted to address, officially. And why do we make it so cost-effective and free after you ingest it was because we were using cloud storage. And it was just a great place to land the data cost-effective, securely.Now, with that said, there are two types of companies I've seen. Everybody needs at least 90 days. I see time and time again. Sure, maybe daily, in a weeks, they do a lot of their operation, but 90 days is where it lands. But there's also a bunch of companies that need it for years, for compliance, for audit reasons.And imagine trying to rehydrate, trying to rebuild—we have one customer—again I won't say who—has two petabytes of data that they rehydrate when they need it. And they say it's a nightmare. And it's growing. What if you just had it always alive, always accessible? Now, as we move from search to SQL, there are use cases where in the log world, they just want to pay upfront, fixed fee, this many dollars per terabyte, but as we get into the more ad hoc side of it, more and more folks are asking for, “Can I pay per query?”And so, you'll see coming out soon, about scenarios where we have a different pricing model. For logs, typically, you want to pay very consistent, you know, predetermined cost structure, but in the case of more security data lakes, where you want to go in the past and not really pay for something until you use it, that's going to be an option as well coming out soon. So, I would say you need both in the pricing models, but you need the data to have either side, right?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at ChaosSearch. You could run Elasticsearch or Elastic Cloud—or OpenSearch as they're calling it now—or a self-hosted ELK stack. But why? ChaosSearch gives you the same API you've come to know and tolerate, along with unlimited data retention and no data movement. Just throw your data into S3 and proceed from there as you would expect. This is great for IT operations folks, for app performance monitoring, cybersecurity. If you're using Elasticsearch, consider not running Elasticsearch. They're also available now in the AWS marketplace if you'd prefer not to go direct and have half of whatever you pay them count towards your EDB commitment. Discover what companies like Equifax, Armor Security, and Blackboard already have. To learn more, visit chaossearch.io and tell them I sent you just so you can see them facepalm, yet again.Corey: You'd like to hope. I mean, you could always theoretically wind up just pulling what Ubiquiti apparently did—where this came out in an indictment that was unsealed against an insider—but apparently one of their employees wound up attempting to extort them—which again, that's not their fault, to be clear—but what came out was that this person then wound up setting the CloudTrail audit log retention to one day, so there were no logs available. And then as a customer, I got an email from them saying there was no evidence that any customer data had been accessed. I mean, yeah, if you want, like, the world's most horrifyingly devilish best practice, go ahead and set your log retention to nothing, and then you too can confidently state that you have no evidence of anything untoward happening.Contrast this with what AWS did when there was a vulnerability reported in AWS Glue. Their analysis of it stated explicitly, “We have looked at our audit logs going back to the launch of the service and have conclusively proven that the only time this has ever happened was in the security researcher who reported the vulnerability to us, in their own account.” Yeah, one of those statements breeds an awful lot of confidence. The other one makes me think that you're basically being run by clowns.Thomas: You know what? CloudTrail is such a crucial—particularly Amazon, right—crucial service because of that, we see time and time again. And the challenge of CloudTrail is that storing a long period of time is costly and the messiness the JSON complexity, every company struggles with it. And this is how uniquely—how we represent information, we can model it in all its permutations—but the key thing is we can store it forever, or you can store forever. And time and time again, CloudTrail is a key aspect to correlate—to your question—correlate this happened to that. Or do an audit on two years ago, this happened.And I got to tell you, to all our listeners out there, please store your CloudTrail data—ideally in ChaosSearch—because you're going to need it. Everyone always needs that. And I know it's hard. CloudTrail data is messy, nested JSON data that can explode; I get it. You know, there's tricks to do it manually, although quite painful. But CloudTrail, every one of our customers is indexing with us in CloudTrail because of stories like that, as well as the correlation across what maybe their application log data is saying.Corey: I really have never regretted having extra logs lying around, especially with, to be very direct, the almost ridiculously inexpensive storage classes that S3 offers, especially since you can wind up having some of the offline retrieval stuff as part of a lifecycle policy now with intelligent tiering. I'm a big believer in just—again—the Glacier Deep Archive I've at the cost of $1,000 a month per petabyte, with admittedly up to 12 hours of calling that as a latency. But that's still, for audit logs and stuff like that, why would I ever want to delete things ever again?Thomas: You're exactly right. And we have a bunch of customers that do exactly that. And we automate the entire process with you. Obviously, it's your S3 account, but we can manage across those tiers. And it's just to a point where, why wouldn't you? It's so cost-effective.And the moments where you don't have that information, you're at risk, whether it's internal audits, or you're providing a service for somebody, it's critical data. With CloudTrail, it's critical data. And if you're not storing it and if you're not making it accessible through some tool like an Elastic API or Chaos, it's not worth it. I think, to your point about your story, it's epically not worth it.Corey: It's really not. It's one of those areas where that is not a place to overly cost optimize. This is—I mean we talked earlier about my business and perceptions of conflict of interest. There's a reason that I only ever charge fixed-fee and not percentage of savings or whatnot because, at some point, I'll be placed in a position of having to say nonsense, like, “Do you really need all of these backups?” That doesn't make sense at that point.I do point out things like you have hourly disk snapshots of your entire web fleet, which has no irreplaceable data on them dating back five years. Maybe cleaning some of that up might be the right answer. The happy answer is somewhere in between those two, and it's a business decision around exactly where that line lies. But I'm a believer in never regretting having kept logs almost into perpetuity. Until and unless I start getting more or less pillaged by some particularly rapacious vendor that's oh, yeah, we're going to charge you not just for ingest, but also for retention. And for how long you want to keep it, we're going to treat it like we're carving it into platinum tablets. No. Stop that.Thomas: [laugh]. Well, you know, it's funny, when we first came out, we were hearing stories that vendors were telling customers why they didn't need their data, to your point, like, “Oh, you don't need that,” or, “Don't worry about that.” And time and time again, they said, “Well, turns out we didn't need that.” You know, “Oh, don't index all your data because you just know what you know.” And the problem is that life doesn't work out that way business doesn't work out that way.And now what I see in the market is everyone's got tiering scenarios, but the accessibility of that data takes some time to get access to. And these are all workarounds and bandaids to what fundamentally is if you design an architecture and a solution is such a way, maybe it's just always hot; maybe it's just always available. Now, we talked about tiering off to something very, very cheap, then it's like virtually free. But you know, our solution was, whether it's ultra warm, or this tiering that takes hours to rehydrate—hours—no one wants to live in that world, right? They just want to say, “Hey, on this date on this year, what was happening? And let me go look, and I want to do it now.”And it has to be part of the exact same system that I was using already. I didn't have to call up IT to say, “Hey, can you rehydrate this?” Or, “Can I go back to the archive and look at it?” Although I guess we're talking about archiving with your website, viewing from days of old, I think that's kind of funny. I should do that more often myself.Corey: I really wish that more companies would put themselves in the customers' shoes. And for what it's worth, periodically, I've spoken to a number of very happy ChaosSearch customers. I haven't spoken to any angry ones yet, which tells me you're either terrific at crisis comms, or the product itself functions as intended. So, either way, excellent job. Now, which team of yours is doing that excellent job, of course, is going to depend on which one of those outcomes it is. But I'm pretty good at ferreting out stories on those things.Thomas: Well, you know, it's funny, being a company that's driven by customer ask, it's so easy build what the customer wants. And so, we really take every input of what the customer needs and wants—now, there are cases where we relace Splunk. They're the Cadillac, they have all the bells and whistles, and there's times where we'll say, “Listen, that's not what we're going to do. We're going to solve these problems in this vector.” But they always keep on asking, right? You know, “I want this, I want that.”But most of the feedback we get is exactly what we should be building. People need their answers and how they get it. It's really helped us grow as a company, grow as a product. And I will say ever since we went live now many, many years ago, all our roadmap—other than our Northstar of transforming cloud storage into a search SQL big data analytics database has been customer-driven, market customer-driven, like what our customer is asking for, whether it's observability and integrating with Grafana and Kibana or, you know, security data lakes. It's just a huge theme that we're going to make sure that we provide a solution that meets those needs.So, I love when customers ask for stuff because the product just gets better. I mean, yeah, sometimes you have to have a thick skin, like, “Why don't you have this?” Or, “Why don't you have that?” Or we have customers—and not to complain about customers; I love our customers—but they sometimes do crazy things that we have to help them on crazy-ify. [laugh]. I'll leave it at that. But customers do silly things and you have to help them out. I hope they remember that, so when they ask for a feature that maybe takes a month to make available, they're patient with us.Corey: We sure can hope. I really want to thank you for taking so much time to once again suffer all of my criticisms, slings and arrows, blithe market observations, et cetera, et cetera. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Thomas: Well, of course, chaossearch.io. There's tons of material about what we do, use cases, case studies; we just published a big case study with Equifax recently. We're in Gartner and a whole bunch of Hype Cycles that you can pull down to see how we fit in the market.Reach out to us. You can set up a trial, kick the tires, again, on your cloud storage like S3. And ChaosSearch on Twitter, we have a Facebook, we have all this classic social medias. But our website is really where all the good content and whether you want to learn about the architecture and how we've done it, and use cases; people who want to say, “Hey, I have a problem. How do you solve it? How do I learn more?”Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the show notes. For my own purposes, you could also just search for the term ChaosSearch in your email inbox and find one of their sponsored ads in my newsletter and click that link, but that's a little self-serving as we do it. I'm kidding. I'm kidding. There's no need to do that. That is not how we ever evaluate these things. But it is funny to tell that story. Thomas, thank you so much for your time. As always, it's appreciated.Thomas: Corey Quinn, I truly enjoyed this time. And I look forward to upcoming re:Invent. I'm assuming it's going to be live like last year, and this is where we have a lot of fun with the community.Corey: Oh, I have no doubt that we're about to go through that particular path very soon. Thank you. It's been an absolute pleasure.Thomas: Thank you.Corey: Thomas Hazel, CTO and Founder of ChaosSearch. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry, insulting comment that I will then set to have a retention period of one day, and then go on to claim that I have received no negative feedback.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Slalom On Air
Feeding America & the fight to end hunger

Slalom On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 12:08


One platform, 173M lbs. of produce & 110M meals for people facing hunger. Sourcing more food at scale is just one of the results from Slalom's multiyear partnership with Feeding America. Tune in to learn more about how we're transforming the fight to end hunger. Engagement lead Alex Zinicola talks about using Salesforce, Microsoft, and Tableau to amplify the dedication and skill of Feeding America's employees and volunteers, and empower them on the ground.

Lexman Artificial
Satrap: Tableau, Overtone and the Balcony with Richard Karp

Lexman Artificial

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 3:53


Richard Karp discusses his new book, Satrap: Tableau, Overtone and the Balcony.

The Guiding Voice
A Data Analyst's journey From SQL to Visualisation | ANKIT KOTNALA | #TGV263

The Guiding Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 21:38


A Data Analyst's journey From SQL to Visualisation | Ankit Kotnala | #TGV263“Information is the oil of the 21st century, and analytics is the combustion engine.”~ Peter SondergaardTune into #TGV263 to get clarity on the above topic. Here are the timestamp-based pointers from Ankit Kotnala's conversation with Naveen Samala0:00:00 INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT SETTING 0:02:30 Ankit's PROFESSIONAL JOURNEY AND THE TOP 3 THINGS THAT HELPED IN His/Her SUCCESS0:05:45 The role of a data analyst.0:06:45 Why data analyst role is important for any organization?0:08:30 Visualization techniques - sample charts based on the metrics or KPIs0:11:00 How to extract data from multiple sources…DBs, DWH, unstructured DBs, etc0:13:20 Tools available in the market, Qlikview, Power BI, Tableau, BO, etc.0:15:00 Getting started as a Data analyst - tools and tech to learn, etc.0:17:00 WITTY ANSWERS TO THE RAPID-FIRE QUESTIONS0:19:00 ONE PIECE OF ADVICE TO THOSE ASPIRING TO MAKE BIG IN THEIR CAREERS 0:20:30 TRIVIA ABOUT data using different sources ABOUT THE GUEST (In his words):As a Metrics & Reporting Specialist, I identify and integrate new datasets that can be leveraged through our product capabilities. I also work closely with the insights team to strategize and execute the development of data products. Connect with Ankit on LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankitk2611/CONNECT WITH THE FOUNDERS ON LINKEDIN:Naveen Samala: https://www.linkedin.com/in/naveensamalaSudhakar Nagandla: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nvsudhakarFOLLOW ON TWITTER:@guidingvoice@naveensamala@s_nagandla Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Screaming in the Cloud
How Data Discovery is Changing the Game with Shinji Kim

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 32:58


About ShinjiShinji Kim is the Founder & CEO of Select Star, an automated data discovery platform that helps you to understand & manage your data. Previously, she was the Founder & CEO of Concord Systems, a NYC-based data infrastructure startup acquired by Akamai Technologies in 2016. She led the strategy and execution of Akamai IoT Edge Connect, an IoT data platform for real-time communication and data processing of connected devices. Shinji studied Software Engineering at University of Waterloo and General Management at Stanford GSB.Links Referenced: Select Star: https://www.selectstar.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/selectstarhq/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/selectstarhq TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while, I encounter a company that resonates with something that I've been doing on some level. In this particular case, that is what's happened here, but the story is slightly different. My guest today is Shinji Kim, who's the CEO and founder at Select Star.And the joke that I was making a few months ago was that Select Stars should have been the name of the Oracle ACE program instead. Shinji, thank you for joining me and suffering my ridiculous, basically amateurish and sophomore database-level jokes because I am bad at databases. Thanks for taking the time to chat with me.Shinji: Thanks for having me here, Corey. Good to meet you.Corey: So, Select Star despite being the only query pattern that I've ever effectively been able to execute from memory, what you do as a company is described as an automated data discovery platform. So, I'm going to start at the beginning with that baseline definition. I think most folks can wrap their heads around what the idea of automated means, but the rest of the words feel like it might mean different things to different people. What is data discovery from your point of view?Shinji: Sure. The way that we define data discovery is finding and understanding data. In other words, think about how discoverable your data is in your company today. How easy is it for you to find datasets, fields, KPIs of your organization data? And when you are looking at a table, column, dashboard, report, how easy is it for you to understand that data underneath? Encompassing on that is how we define data discovery.Corey: When you talk about data lurking around the company in various places, that can mean a lot of different things to different folks. For the more structured data folks—which I tend to think of as the organized folks who are nothing like me—that tends to mean things that live inside of, for example, traditional relational databases or things that closely resemble that. I come from a grumpy old sysadmin perspective, so I'm thinking, oh, yeah, we have a Jira server in the closet and that thing's logging to its own disk, so that's going to be some information somewhere. Confluence is another source of data in an organization; it's usually where insight and a knowledge of what's going on goes to die. It's one of those write once, read never type of things.And when I start thinking about what data means, it feels like even that is something of a squishy term. From the perspective of where Select Start starts and stops, is it bounded to data that lives within relational databases? Does it go beyond that? Where does it start? Where does it stop?Shinji: So, we started the company with an intention of increasing the discoverability of data and hence providing automated data discovery capability to organizations. And the part where we see this as the most effective is where the data is currently being consumed today. So, this is, like, where the data consumption happens. So, this can be a data warehouse or data lake, but this is where your data analysts, data scientists are querying data, they are building dashboards, reports on top of, and this is where your main data mart lives.So, for us, that is primarily a cloud data warehouse today, usually has a relational data structure. On top of that, we also do a lot of deep integrations with BI tools. So, that includes tools like Tableau, Power BI, Looker, Mode. Wherever these queries from the business stakeholders, BI engineers, data analysts, data scientists run, this is a point of reference where we use to auto-generate documentation, data models, lineage, and usage information, to give it back to the data team and everyone else so that they can learn more about the dataset they're about to use.Corey: So, given that I am seeing an increased number of companies out there talking about data discovery, what is it the Select Star does that differentiates you folks from other folks using similar verbiage in how they describe what they do?Shinji: Yeah, great question. There are many players that popping up, and also, traditional data catalog's definitely starting to offer more features in this area. The main differentiator that we have in the market today, we call it fast time-to-value. Any customer that is starting with Select Star, they get to set up their instance within 24 hours, and they'll be able to get all the analytics and data models, including column-level lineage, popularity, ER diagrams, and how other people are—top users and how other people are utilizing that data, like, literally in few hours, max to, like, 24 hours. And I would say that is the main differentiator.And most of the customers I have pointed out that setup and getting started has been super easy, which is primarily backed by a lot of automation that we've created underneath the platform. On top of that, just making it super easy and simple to use. It becomes very clear to the users that it's not just for the technical data engineers and DBAs to use; this is also designed for business stakeholders, product managers, and ops folks to start using as they are learning more about how to use data.Corey: Mapping this a little bit toward the use cases that I'm the most familiar with, this big source of data that I tend to stumble over is customer AWS bills. And that's not exactly a big data problem, given that it can fit in memory if you have a sufficiently exciting computer, but using Tableau don't wind up slicing and dicing that because at some point, Excel falls down. From my perspective, problem with Excel is that it doesn't tend to work on huge datasets very well, and from the position of Salesforce, the problem with Excel is that it doesn't cost a giant pile of money every month. So, those two things combined, Tableau is the answer for what we do. But that's sort of the end-all for us of, that's where it stops.At that point, we have dashboards that we build and queries that we run that spit out the thing we're looking at, and then that goes back to inform our analysis. We don't inherently feed that back into anything else that would then inform the rest of what we do. Now, for our use case, that probably makes an awful lot of sense because we're here to help our customers with their billing challenges, not take advantage of their data to wind up informing some giant model and mispurposing that data for other things. But if we were generating that data ourselves as a part of our operation, I can absolutely see the value of tying that back into something else. You wind up almost forming a reinforcing cycle that improves the quality of data over time and lets you understand what's going on there. What are some of the outcomes that you find that customers get to by going down this particular path?Shinji: Yeah, so just to double-click on what you just talked about, the way that we see this is how we analyze the metadata and the activity logs—system logs, user logs—of how that data has been used. So, part of our auto-generated documentation for each table, each column, each dashboard, you're going to be able to see the full data lineage: where it came from, how it was transformed in the past, and where it's going to. You will also see what we call popularity score: how many unique users are utilizing this data inside the organization today, how often. And utilizing these two core models and analysis that we create, you can start looking at first mapping out the data flow, and then determining whether or not this dataset is something that you would want to continue keeping or running the data pipelines for. Because once you start mapping these usage models of tables versus dashboards, you may find that there are recurring jobs that creates all these materialized views and tables that are feeding dashboards that are not being looked at anymore.So, with this mechanism by looking initially data lineage as a concept, a lot of companies use data lineage in order to find dependencies: what is going to break if I make this change in the column or table, as well as just debugging any of issues that is currently happening in their pipeline. So, especially when you will have to debug a SQL query or pipeline that you didn't build yourself but you need to find out how to fix it, this is a really easy way to instantly find out, like, where the data is coming from. But on top of that, if you start adding this usage information, you can trace through where the main compute is happening, which largest route table is still being queried, instead of the more summarized tables that should be used, versus which are the tables and datasets that is continuing to get created, feeding the dashboards and is those dashboards actually being used on the business side. So, with that, we have customers that have saved thousands of dollars every month just by being able to deprecate dashboards and pipelines that they were afraid of deprecating in the past because they weren't sure if anyone's actually using this or not. But adopting Select Star was a great way to kind of do a full spring clean of their data warehouse as well as their BI tool. And this is an additional benefit to just having to declutter so many old, duplicated, and outdated dashboards and datasets in their data warehouse.Corey: That is, I guess, a recurring problem that I see in many different pockets of the industry as a whole. You see it in the user visibility space, you see it in the cost control space—I even made a joke about Confluence that alludes to it—this idea that you build a whole bunch of dashboards and use it to inform all kinds of charts and other systems, but then people are busy. It feels like there's no ‘and then.' Like, one of the most depressing things in the universe that you can see after having spent a fair bit of effort to build up those dashboards is the analytics for who internally has looked at any of those dashboards since the demo you gave showing it off to everyone else. It feels like in many cases, we put all these projects and amount of effort into building these things out that then don't get used.People don't want to be informed by data they want to shoot from their gut. Now, sometimes that's helpful when we're talking about observability tools that you use to trace down outages, and, “Well, our site's really stable. We don't have to look at that.” Very awesome, great, awesome use case. The business insight level of dashboard just feels like that's something you should really be checking a lot more than you are. How do you see that?Shinji: Yeah, for sure. I mean, this is why we also update these usage metrics and lineage every 24 hours for all of our customers automatically, so it's just up-to-date. And the part that more customers are asking for where we are heading to—earlier, I mentioned that our main focus has been on analyzing data consumption and understanding the consumption behavior to drive better usage of your data, or making data usage much easier. The part that we are starting to now see is more customers wanting to extend those feature capabilities to their staff of where the data is being generated. So, connecting the similar amount of analysis and metadata collection for production databases, Kafka Queues, and where the data is first being generated is one of our longer-term goals. And then, then you'll really have more of that, up to the source level, of whether the data should be even collected or whether it should even enter the data warehouse phase or not.Corey: One of the challenges I see across the board in the data space is that so many products tend to have a very specific point of the customer lifecycle, where bringing them in makes sense. Too early and it's, “Data? What do you mean data? All I have are these logs, and their purpose is basically to inflate my AWS bill because I'm bad at removing them.” And on the other side, it's, “Great. We pioneered some of these things and have built our own internal enormous system that does exactly what we need to do.” It's like, “Yes, Google, you're very smart. Good job.” And most people are somewhere between those two extremes. Where are customers on that lifecycle or timeline when using Select Star makes sense for them?Shinji: Yeah, I think that's a great question. Also the time, the best place where customers would use Select Star for is that after they have their cloud data warehouse set up. Either they have finished their migration, they're starting to utilize it with their BI tools, and they're starting to notice that it's not just, like, you know, ten to fifty tables that they're starting with; most of them have more than hundreds of tables. And they're feeling that this is starting to go out of control because we have all these data, but we are not a hundred percent sure what exactly is in our database. And this usually just happens more in larger companies, companies at thousand-plus employees, and they usually find a lot of value out of Select Star right away because, like, we will start pointing out many different things.But we also see a lot of, like, forward-thinking, fast-growing startups that are at the size of a few hundred employees, you know, they now have between five to ten-person data team, and they are really creating the right single source of truth of their data knowledge through a Select Star. So, I think you can start anywhere from when your data team size is, like, beyond five and you're continuing to grow because every time you're trying to onboard a data analyst, data scientist, you will have to go through, like, basically the same type of training of your data model, and it might actually look different because the data models and the new features, new apps that you're integrating this changes so quickly. So, I would say it's important to have that base early on and then continue to grow. But we do also see a lot of companies coming to us after having thousands of datasets or tens of thousands of datasets that it's really, like, very hard to operate and onboard anyone. And this is a place where we really shine to help their needs, as well.Corey: Sort of the, “I need a database,” to the, “Help, I have too many databases,” pipeline, where [laugh] at some point people start to—wanting to bring organization to the chaos. One thing I like about your model is that you don't seem to be making the play that every other vendor in the data space tends to, which is, “Oh, we want you to move your data onto our systems. The end.” You operate on data that is in place, which makes an awful lot of sense for the kinds of things that we're talking about. Customers are flat out not going to move their data warehouse over to your environment, just because the data gravity is ludicrous. Just the sheer amount of money it would take to egress that data from a cloud provider, for example, is monstrous.Shinji: Exactly. [laugh]. And security concerns. We don't want to be liable for any of the data—and this is, like, a very specific decision we've made very early on the company—to not access data, to not egress any of the real data, and to provide as much value as possible just utilizing the metadata and logs. And depending on the types of data warehouses, it also can be really efficient because the query history or the metadata systems tables are indexed separately. Usually, it's much lighter load on the compute side. And that definitely has, like, worked well for our advantage, especially being a SaaS tool.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: What I like is just how straightforward the integrations are. It's clear you're extraordinarily agnostic as far as where the data itself lives. You integrate with Google's BigQuery, with Amazon Redshift, with Snowflake, and then on the other side of the world with Looker, and Tableau, and other things as well. And one of the example use cases you give is find the upstream table in BigQuery that a Looker dashboard depends on. That's one of those areas where I see something like that, and, oh, I can absolutely see the value of that.I have two or three DynamoDB tables that drive my newsletter publication system that I built—because I have deep-seated emotional problems and I take it out and everyone else via code—but as a small, contained system that I can still fit in my head. Mostly. And I still forget which table is which in some cases. Down the road, especially at scale, “Okay, where is the actual data source that's informing this because it doesn't necessarily match what I'm expecting,” is one of those incredibly valuable bits of insight. It seems like that is something that often gets lost; the provenance of data doesn't seem to work.And ideally, you know, you're staffing a company with reasonably intelligent people who are going to look at the results of something and say, “That does not align with my expectations. I'm going to dig.” As opposed to the, “Oh, yeah, that seems plausible. I'll just go with whatever the computer says.” There's an ocean of nuance between those two, but it's nice to be able to establish the validity of the path that you've gone down in order to set some of these things up.Shinji: Yeah, and this is also super helpful if you're tasked to debug a dashboard or pipeline that you did not build yourself. Maybe the person has left the company, or maybe they're out-of-office, but this dashboard has been broken and you're quote-unquote, “On call,” for data. What are you going to do? You're going to—without a tool that can show you a full lineage, you will have to start digging through somebody else's SQL code and try to map out, like, where the data is coming from, if this is calculating correctly. Usually takes, you know, few hours to just get to the bottom of the issue. And this is one of the main use cases that our customers bring up every single time, as more of, like, this is now the go-to place every time there is any data questions or data issues.Corey: The first and golden rule of cloud economics is step one, turn that shit off.Shinji: [laugh].Corey: When people are using something, you can optimize the hell out of it however you want, but nothing's going to beat turning it off. One challenge is when we're looking at various accounts and we see a Redshift cluster, and it's, “Okay. That thing's costing a few million bucks a year and no one seems to know anything about it.” They keep pointing to other teams, and it turns into this giant, like, finger-pointing exercise where no one seems to have responsibility for it. And very often, our clients will choose not to turn that thing off because on the one hand, if you don't turn it off, you're going to spend a few million bucks a year that you otherwise would not have had to.On the other, if you delete the data warehouse, and it turns out, oh, yeah, that was actually kind of important, now we don't have a company anymore. It's a question of which is the side you want to be wrong on. And in some levels, leaving something as it is and doing something else is always a more defensible answer, just because the first time your cost-saving exercises take out production, you're generally not allowed to save money anymore. This feels like it helps get to that source of truth a heck of a lot more effectively than tracing individual calls and turning into basically data center archaeologists.Shinji: [laugh]. Yeah, for sure. I mean, this is why from the get go, we try to give you all your tables, all of your database, just ordered by popularity. So, you can also see overall, like, from all the tables, whether that's thousands or tens of thousands, you're seeing the most used, has the most number of dependencies on the top, and you can also filter it by all the database tables that hasn't been touched in the last 90 days. And just having this, like, high-level view gives a lot of ideas to the data platform team about how they can optimize usage of their data warehouse.Corey: From where I tend to sit, an awful lot of customers are still relatively early in their data journey. An awful lot of the marketing that I receive from various AWS mailing lists that I found myself on because I've had the temerity to open accounts has been along the lines of oh, data discovery is super important, but first, they presuppose that I've already bought into this idea that oh, every company must be a completely data-driven company. The end. Full stop.And yeah, we're a small bespoke services consultancy. I don't necessarily know that that's the right answer here. But then it takes it one step further and starts to define the idea of data discovery as, ah, you will use it to find a PII or otherwise sensitive or restricted data inside of your datasets so you know exactly where it lives. And sure, okay, that's valuable, but it also feels like a very narrow definition compared to how you view these things.Shinji: Yeah. Basically, the way that we see data discovery is it's starting to become more of an essential capability in order for you to monitor and understand how your data is actually being used internally. It basically gives you the insights around sure, like, what are the duplicated datasets, what are the datasets that have that descriptions or not, what are something that may contain sensitive data, so on and so forth, but that's still around the characteristics of the physical datasets. Whereas I think the part that's really important around data discovery that is not being talked about as much is how the data can actually be used better. So, have it as more of a forward-thinking mechanism and in order for you to actually encourage more people to utilize data or use the data correctly, instead of trying to contain this within just one team is really where I feel like data discovery can help.And in regards to this, the other big part around data discovery is really opening up and having that transparency just within the data team. So, just within the data team, they always feel like they do have that access to the SQL queries and you can just go to GitHub and just look at the database itself, but it's so easy to get lost in the sea of metadata that is just laid out as just the list; there isn't much context around the data itself. And that context and with along with the analytics of the metadata is what we're really trying to provide automatically. So eventually, like, this can be also seen as almost like a way to, like, monitor the datasets, like, how you're currently monitoring your applications through Datadog or your website with your Google Analytics, this is something that can be also used as more of a go-to source of truth around what your state of the data is, how that's defined, and how that's being mapped to different business processes, so that there isn't much confusion around data. Everything can be called the same, but underneath it actually can mean very different things. Does that make sense?Corey: No, it absolutely does. I think that this is part of the challenge in trying to articulate value that is, I guess, specific to this niche across an entire industry. The context that drives data is going to be incredibly important, and it feels like so much of the marketing in the space is aimed at one or two pre-imagined customer profiles. And that has the side effect of making customers for whom that model doesn't align, look and feel like either doing something wrong, or makes it look like the vendor who's pitching this is somewhat out of touch. I know that I work in a relatively bounded problem space, but I still learn new things about AWS billing on virtually every engagement that I go on, just because you always get to learn more about how customers view things and how they view not just their industry, but also the specificities of their own business and their own niche.I think that is one of the challenges historically, with the idea of letting software do everything. Do you find the problems that you're solving tend to be global in nature or are you discovering strange depths of nuance on a customer-by-customer basis at this point?Shinji: Overall, a lot of the problems that we solve and the customers that we work with is very industry agnostic. As long as you are having many different datasets that you need to manage, there are common problems that arises, regardless of the industry that you're in. We do observe some industry-specific issues because your data is either, it's an unstructured data, or your data is primarily events, or you know, depending on how the data looks like, but primarily because of most of the BI solutions and data warehouses are operating as a relational databases, this is a part where we really try to build a lot of best practices, and the common analytics that we can apply to every customer that's using Select Star.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking so much time to go through the ins and outs of what it is you're doing these days. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Shinji: Yeah, I mean, it's been fun [laugh] talking here. So, we are at selectstar.com. That's our website. You can sign up for a free trial. It's completely self-service, so you don't need to get on a demo but, like, we'll also help you onboard and happy to give a free demo to whoever that is interested.We are also on LinkedIn and Twitter under selectstarhq. Yeah, I mean, we're happy to help for any companies that have these issues around wanting to increase their discoverability of data, and want to help their data team and the rest of the company to be able to utilize data better.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to all of that in the [show notes 00:28:58]. Thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate it.Shinji: Great. Thanks for having me, Corey.Corey: Shinji Kim, CEO and founder at Select Star. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment that I won't be able to discover because there are far too many podcast platforms out there, and I have no means of discovering where you've said that thing unless you send it to me.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Data + Love
Data + Love - Mark Bradbourne

Data + Love

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 76:46


Frequent pod-collaborator, Tableau superstar, and pal Mark Bradbourne returns to the show for a friendly catch-up, breeze shooting, and discussions of random minutia. Aren't you glad you read this? --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/datapluslove/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/datapluslove/support

Tech Driven Business
Inside Insights: Choosing a Cloud Analytics Tool with Hau Ngo

Tech Driven Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 19:58


In this next episode of Tech-Driven Business, Mustansir Saifuddin continues the conversation with Hau Ngo of  Summerlin Analytics to discuss what enterprises should consider when choosing a tool like SAP Analytics Cloud (SAC). They cover everything from system landscape, data sources, visuals, security, and cost considerations. His key takeaway: look at how an analytics tool fits into your business, timeline, and total cost of ownership. Hau is an SAP Analytics Architect and an early adopter of SAP Analytics Cloud. In 2017, he helped a technology company in California consolidate global sales reporting across 7 different ERP systems. This effort culminated in one executive dashboard that displayed real-time information, eliminating weeks of manual coordination and data wrangling. Subsequently, Hau has presented his work at conferences such as SAPPHIRE 2019 in Orlando Florida, and has gone onward to help additional customers streamline their reporting processes and visualize the key company metrics. His experience with SAP Analytics Cloud extends to customers with various systems such as SAP Data Warehouse Cloud, BW/4HANA, and S/4HANA.  Connect with Us: LinkedIn: Hau Ngo, Mustansir Saifuddin, Innovative Solution Partners  Twitter: @Mmsaifuddin YouTube or learn more about our sponsor Innovative Solution Partners to schedule a free consultation.    Episode Transcript [00:00:05.170] - Mustansir Saifuddin Welcome to Tech-Driven Business. Brought to you by Innovative Solution Partners. In this episode, I welcome back Hau Ngo of Summerlin Analytics. Listen in as he shares key points to consider when choosing an analytics tool like SAP Analytics Cloud or SAC.   [00:00:27.750] - Mustansir Saifuddin Hello, how are you, man?   [00:00:29.530] - Hau Ngo I'm doing well, Mustansir how are you doing?   [00:00:32.610] - Mustansir Saifuddin Doing well. Welcome to Tech-Driven Business again.   [00:00:36.030] - Hau Ngo I'm good to be here. Thanks for having me.   [00:00:38.470] - Mustansir Saifuddin Awesome. Hey, so I know we've been kind of talking about different topics so far, and today I would like to kind of zoom in into this very important point where a lot of customers, when we talk about considering SAC as their cloud analytics tool of choice. What are some of the considerations they should take into account? That's how I'm thinking we can dig a little bit deeper, at least from a cloud analytics point of view.   [00:01:11.490] - Hau Ngo Yeah. So it really depends on what their system landscape looks like, if they have the legacy ECC or S/4, or maybe they have a BW or HANA Data Warehouse. So all those decisions sort of come into play. And I don't think a lot of customers are aware that SAC Analytics Cloud as a tool has different functionality depending on what you have on the back- end. So we can talk about that in this episode.   [00:01:43.230] - Mustansir Saifuddin Absolutely. And I think that kind of is a good segue to what I was alluding to earlier. When we talk system landscapes, it means a lot of different things depending on who you're asking. In this example, I'll use the system landscape, especially from a data source point of view. Especially when we're talking about creating models in SAC and those visuals, how does that come into play when you're dealing with, let's say, for example, an ECC source system or an S/4 for that matter, or compared to a non-SAP source, what are some of the things that you should take into account when creating your SAC models?   [00:02:30.070] - Hau Ngo Oh, sure. So one thing SAP does really well is they market their tool in terms of features and benefits and everything you can do from a Dashboarding perspective. I think the inherent problem, though, is SAP has such a large product matrix that it's hard to say, does this feature work here versus another one? So if you're using the legacy ECC as a source, there's really nothing you can do in terms of getting around it. You have to have some sort of data warehouse because SAP Analytics Cloud works best with a proper data warehouse. But if you happen to have an S/4 system, you can connect your dashboarding tool directly to S/4. And I was going to say on my first project in late 2017-2018, the integration between the front-end Analytics Cloud and all the back-end system weren't fully fleshed out or developed at that time. But if you were to fast forward to today, you're almost looking at feature parity for all the different systems. Before, it used to be that we have to import the data into the tenant, into the cloud tenant first, to have everything in terms of all the functionality, all the utility of the tool.   [00:03:46.820] - Hau Ngo But now a lot of that feature set is rolled out to BW, to the HANA data warehouse, of course, data warehouse, cloud, and now even S/4. So there are differences now, but they're getting much less and smaller between the different systems.   [00:04:04.770] - Mustansir Saifuddin That's good to know, because especially you see, a lot of customers have a mixed bag of systems and depending on whatever source system they are using, it seems like the tool itself is capable of consuming that data, right. In a way that is, from a user standpoint, it doesn't really matter what is the source, it's just the visuals. And the tool itself can mask that from them, right?   [00:04:34.680] - Hau Ngo Yes, absolutely. And then I think in certain cases, I think my current client now we're exploring even a use case, a dual use case where some reports come from their BW system that we're initiating, and then a different set of reports come from S/4. But the UI, the interface is still SAC, so to the user is transparent, but depending on the use case, it could come from a data warehouse or their transactional system.   [00:05:03.690] - Mustansir Saifuddin Right. And I think that kind of brings up this point. Right? The lines are getting blurry when it comes to the data itself. Right. It is real time information versus data stored in a warehouse and being consumed based on whatever frequency is getting updated, right?   [00:05:22.310] - Hau Ngo Yep, absolutely.   [00:05:24.810] - Mustansir Saifuddin So, talking about tips, right? Can you share some ideas or tips that when it comes to using different visuals in SAC, are there any best practices or any ideas that you like to share?   [00:05:43.410] - Hau Ngo Oh, sure. So the cloud itself, the tool itself, Analytics Cloud, has a number of different chart visualizations and they're categorized primarily by function. For example, you have a group of bar charts for comparisons. If you want to see trends, there are a set of line graphs, and then there's pie graphs and tree maps for distribution. So you have a good number of chart types to choose from, depending on what you wish to communicate with. That being said, the three that I've seen the most on my last ten projects has been bar, number one, numeric, the large numbers, the aggregation as number two, and tables as number three. And what I found early on, when I try to experiment with all the different chart types, it tends to confuse people if they're not statisticians. Right. You can't just throw a scatter plot and assume people know what that means. So what I find is most people tend to stick to those three bar numeric and table as the three most common chart types. If you stick with that and start from there, you should be in good shape.   [00:06:57.150] - Mustansir Saifuddin That's a good tip. I mean, keep it simple. It seems like the more simple you keep, the better usability you get out of that, right?   [00:07:05.940] - Hau Ngo Absolutely. And a lot of these folks, they do generate their existing dashboard from Excel. And if you were to look and use the existing dashboard from the managerial report deck, they almost typically use those three chart types.   [00:07:23.270] - Mustansir Saifuddin I think one of the things that I'm looking at from a prerequisite point of view, talking about, what are some of the prerequisites required for a client. When they're using SAC as a self service tool? Because it's almost like a parallel, right. Things that are done currently in Excel, especially when you're doing some kind of manager or reporting that you want to customize in Excel and you want to take those skills into SAC. So what are some of the things that they should have in place from a prerequisite standpoint if they want to use this as a self service tool?   [00:08:04.000] - Hau Ngo Oh, sure. So I think that may be a two part answer. From a personnel or staffing perspective, I would suggest that our audience consider finding someone, whether they be internal or external, who is excited about dashboards and what this tool can do for the company. And I'm not talking about the technical features of the tool, but the way the tool itself can benefit someone's day to day chores or workload. And now imagine if you were a business analyst and you can tell your team that they don't have to open their laptop and log into SAP to see the numbers. And that would be cool, because if they got an email each morning with a full color PDF with all information they needed, that simplifies and cuts out that friction. Right. And for the field staff, if they could open up a phone or a small tablet and get the customer sales history before going to a sales meeting, that would be easier than what they're using now. And from a technical perspective, companies with an S/4 landscape should consider SAC as a reporting tool of choice. I'm working on a proof of concept where I'm embedding the SAC dashboards into the S/4 environment for a customer, and maybe we can talk about that on a future episode.   [00:09:28.670] - Hau Ngo But if you have a BW or Hana data warehouse and you're deciding between SAC or another cloud based tool, then I would strongly suggest you consider SAC. And that's because you get tighter integration with live data connections and you don't really have to worry about the security.   [00:09:48.550] - Mustansir Saifuddin Yeah, for sure. And I think that kind of is a good segue into my next question, which is all about leveraging what you already have in place, right. So when you are dealing with an S/4 or data warehouse cloud source system, what are some of the quick wins when you want to leverage the security models the roles definition that you have in your source system, do you have some examples that you can share with us?   [00:10:17.800] - Hau Ngo Oh, sure. So I would say the quickest wins you can do when you're going in and highlighting the features of a new tool is to eliminate the unnecessary things that you would have to do, which is building data model, model data validation, and setting up security. If you could connect your dashboard to existing data warehouse or S/4 system, you're halfway there. And the beauty of SAC in terms of integration is there is no security. You inherit the security profiles of your source system, whether it's BW Hana or S/4. And the front end tool with single sign on respects all of the privileges you set up versus another tool where you have to kind of maintain or even duplicate that setting. With SAC, you don't have to worry about it, single sign on takes care of all of that.   [00:11:13.790] - Mustansir Saifuddin I think that can go a long way, right? I mean, I'm thinking from the ease of use as well as the ease of deployment. It seems like if I can leverage my source systems for my security and my roles that are already in place, it can make much easier for folks to kind of leverage that information. That mapping that is already in place.   [00:11:40.450] - Hau Ngo Yeah, I would say it's an easier sell. And also long term, there's only one point of failure. There's no dual maintenance that someone has to maintain in different systems. So I think it's an easier path as well. In terms of the actual tool itself, you can have some limitation in terms of whether user is a content viewer where they can consume the information or if they're a power user. Right. But in terms of the actual line by line, row by row authorization, let that be taken care of centrally in either your data warehouse or your S/4 system.   [00:12:18.830] - Mustansir Saifuddin Okay, that makes sense. Now, what are the opportunities? It seems like that's a good feature to have. Right. And that comes out of the box from SAC if you want to do any additional security in SAC because I know there are some planning functionalities as well as just pure reporting and dashboarding capabilities. Are there features available in SAC that allow you to further customize your securities or the role?   [00:12:49.410] - Hau Ngo Yeah, sure. So for some customers, they have data sets that they upload, whether they're doing manual compiling of information or planning or something like that. You can still set up security inside analytics cloud from a team perspective. So you can define team roles where certain team members can see the financial information but other team members cannot. So there are some security functionality, but it's more around who can see what sensitive information that's maybe not in your systems, but in these confidential flat files.   [00:13:29.990] - Mustansir Saifuddin That's good to know because I think your point earlier, right, when you talked about source systems, and especially when you're dealing with multiple source systems, it seems like it may be a better idea to have SAC drive some of the security of the role definitions. Right, because you have a mixed bag of information coming in to your models.   [00:13:48.530] - Hau Ngo Yes, absolutely.   [00:13:50.930] - Mustansir Saifuddin Good to know that. It's interesting when you look at this overall, we talk about everybody's looking at cloud analytics as the way to go and it's just so much simpler and the technology has advanced so much across the board. Right. It seems like the most logical choice for customers to move forward in the direction. Would you say so?   [00:14:17.290] - Hau Ngo I would say so. I think what you're going to see moving forward is maybe not SAP specific, but more cloud based technology. Just because from a deployment perspective, the vendor only has to maintain one instance or one master copy of the tool. It's just so much easier to use than what I think we've had a struggle with in the past, where even though a lot of customers are doing similar things, we have to have our own installation on custom repository. Here I've noticed at least on the early days, SAP was rolling out features every two weeks and it was really hard to keep up. But now the products seem to have matured a lot more. So I think at this point we're going to focus more on usability versus features.   [00:15:07.910] - Mustansir Saifuddin For sure. I know we covered a lot of different things in the session. Would you like to share any one key takeaway that our listeners can take it with them?   [00:15:19.750] - Hau Ngo Oh, sure. So we talk about SAC quite often and some of the different considerations for implementing this tool. But overall there are other tools and if you consider implementation and tool selection in a broader perspective, I've been lucky to be in a few early conversations during the tool selection phase and most customers seem to struggle with either SAC or another cloud based tool such as Power BI or Tableau and deciding which one to use. And most of the time the conversation seems to be centered around features versus cost between these tools. And what I've seen in terms of outcome from a couple of these meetings with different companies is that the SAP centric customer tends to stay under the SAP umbrella due to the tighter integration and security benefits that we spoke about. And other customers with non SAP systems in the mix choose the other tools because they have similar features at a lower cost. But that cost saving is usually offset by higher development times. So that's just the cost of doing business when you're integrating different systems. But that's just something to think about.   [00:16:42.830] - Mustansir Saifuddin Yeah, and that's a good tip, right. And a good takeaway, especially when you have all these choices available to you. One thing that folks tend to leave behind is the fact that sometimes costs can be a factor in most cases, it is a factor. But what is the cost? Are you looking at the cost at this point in time, or are you looking at a future cost perspective? Especially when you're doing integration? Right. And this is all about maintaining your systems in the long run, right. So you have to keep that in mind.   [00:17:18.090] - Hau Ngo Yes, absolutely. I think a lot of customers, they're very intelligent, but sometimes they get too focused on a certain thing and they get tunnel vision. But like you said, if you were to step back and look at the total cost of ownership of not only the tool, but maintenance, and will this be accepted? And which tool can actually be embraced by the business community? So those factors are taken into account. I would leave, I guess, the audience with one thing. People now are more impatient than they were in the past, because at the speed of things and their expectations have changed. Right. So app development, dashboard development, it's much faster. And if your tool can meet that demand from your customer base, then you're golden. The fact that you can whip up a dashboard in an hour or two is great, but if you're taking three months to get a lower cost tool up and running, that might be a deal breaker for your community, for sure.   [00:18:20.070] - Mustansir Saifuddin And that's a great takeaway. I mean, it's something to keep in mind, especially when you're doing any cloud based analytics, right? What is the time to delivery that matters? Thank you so much, how. This has been a great session. Thanks for some of the insights into what things we should consider, especially when you're going with SAP analytics cloud as a tool of choice. So really appreciate your time and we'll look forward to meeting with you in the future.   [00:18:47.940] - Hau Ngo Yes, absolutely. Have a good one, Mustansir.   [00:18:50.930] - Mustansir Saifuddin You too.   [00:18:55.770] - Mustansir Saifuddin Thanks for listening to Tech-Driven Business, brought to you by Innovative Solution Partners. Hau has shared some key pointers for you to think about when choosing SAC. His main takeaway? Look at the bigger picture when choosing a tool. Be careful when being driven by cost. We would love to hear from you. Continue the conversation by connecting with me on LinkedIn or Twitter. Learn more about Innovative Solution Partners and schedule a free consultation by visiting Isolutionpartners.com. Never miss a podcast by subscribing to our YouTube channel. Information is in the show notes.

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere
Brésil: le tortueux chemin vers la démocratie (1/5)

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:30


Le Brésil a plus de 210 millions d'habitants et représente la moitié de la superficie de l'Amérique du Sud. Une puissance sur laquelle a été collée l'étiquette de "pays du futur", expression d'autant plus problématique que le Brésil peine à se pencher sur son histoire. Or, à quelques jours de la présidentielle, cette introspection est essentielle pour comprendre l'origine des nombreuses fractures et inégalités du Brésil. La société brésilienne a vécu plusieurs traumatismes récents et vit toujours une période agitée. Tout au long de son histoire, elle a fait face à de fortes inégalités. Pour comprendre ces clivages encore très importants, nous remontons au début du XIXe siècle, alors que le Brésil était encore une colonie portugaise… Laurent Huguenin-Elie reçoit Armelle Enders, spécialiste du Brésil, professeure d'histoire contemporaine à l'Université Paris-8 et chercheuse à l'Institut Français de Géopolitique. Armelle Anders a notamment publié "Histoire de Rio de Janeiro", (Fayard) et "Histoire du Brésil" (Editions Chandeigne). Dimanche 25 septembre à 20h55 sur RTS Deux, vous pourrez voir "Jair Bolsonaro, un autre Brésil", réalisé par Laetitia Rossi et Ingrid Piponiot (France, 2022). Disponible dès aujourd'hui en cliquant sur le lien ci-contre. Illustration: départ de la cour portugaise au Brésil (détail). Tableau anonyme, début du XIXe siècle. A la fin de l'année 1807, après l'invasion du Portugal par les armées françaises de Napoléon, le prince régent Jean VI de Portugal est contraint, pour échapper à la menace des armées napoléoniennes, de transférer la cour royale de Lisbonne vers le Brésil.

Kino+
#405 | Gibt es genrelose Filme? Außerdem: Don't Worry Darling, Jeepers Creepers: Reborn und Goodnight Mommy

Kino+

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 113:50


Drama, Horror, Musical, Romanze – die Genrevielfalt im Kino ist riesig! Aber gibt es eigentlich auch Filme, die sich partout nicht zuordnen lassen? Antje wirft zum Beispiel MANIFESTO und PAINT DRYING aufs Tableau. Eddy stellt PARASITE und THE BIG LEBOWSKI zur Debatte. Und Daniel versucht sich an einer Genreanalyse zu UNDER THE SKIN und DISTRICT 9. Doch bevor sich die drei an diese große Genrediskussion wagen, geht es erst einmal um die Filme, die da vielleicht schon etwas eindeutiger in ihrer Auslegung sind. Warum ist JEEPERS CREEPERS: REBORN kein guter Horrorfilm? Warum CHASE mit Gerard Butler nur so ein mittelmäßiger Actionkracher? Und Warum machen Julia Roberts und George Clooney noch lang keine gute Romcom aus? Die Antworten auf diese Fragen erfahrt ihr im Rahmen der heutigen Kinostartsvorstellung, nachdem erst einmal ausgiebig geschwärmt werden durfte. Von DREIZEHN LEBEN und THE RESCUE, von MITTAGSSTUNDE und von den PR-trächtigen Eskapaden hinter den Kulissen von DON'T WORRY DARLING, von dem Daniel und Antje dann doch leider enttäuscht wurden. Dafür bieten die Mediatheken mit DURST, SCREAM, BEERFEST, THE AUTOPSY OF JANE DOE und Einigem mehr genügend Möglichkeiten, sich von diesem hochglänzenden Durchschnitt zu erholen. Und dann wird's auch noch kurz nachdenklich, denn der französische Regisseur Jean-Luc Godard ist verstorben und dies gebührt selbstverständlich einer kleinen Rückschau. Ihr seht: Egal ob Genre oder nicht – Kino Plus hat wieder einmal für jeden möglichen und unmöglichen Geschmack das Richtige zu bieten. Wir wünschen euch viel Spaß!

DataFramed
#105 What Data Visualization Means for Data Literacy

DataFramed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 41:53 Transcription Available


Understanding and interpreting data visualizations are one of the most important aspects of data literacy. When done well, data visualization ensures that stakeholders can quickly take away critical insights from data. Moreover, data visualization is often the best place to start when increasing organizational data literacy, as it's often titled the “gateway drug” to more advanced data skills. Andy Cotgreave, Senior Data Evangelist at Tableau Software and co-author of The Big Book of Dashboards, joins the show to break down data visualization and storytelling, drawing from his 15-year career in the data space. Andy has spoken for events like SXSW, Visualized, and Tableau's conferences and has inspired thousands of people to develop their data skills. In this episode, we discuss why data visualization skills are so essential, how data visualization increases organizational data literacy, the best practices for visual storytelling, and much more. This episode of DataFramed is a part of DataCamp's Data Literacy Month, where we raise awareness about Data Literacy throughout September through webinars, workshops, and resources featuring thought leaders and subject matter experts that can help you build your data literacy, as well as your organization's. For more information, visit: https://www.datacamp.com/data-literacy-month/for-teams

How We Got There
How We Got There: Bethany Blackwell, VP at Carahsoft

How We Got There

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 35:12


In today's episode of How We Got There, I talk with Bethany Blackwell, who is a VP at Carahsoft. Bethany runs the Salesforce channel for Carahsoft, which includes Salesforce, Slack, Mulesoft, Tableau, ISVs, and SIs. Carahsoft has worked with Salesforce for the past 15 years as a Value-Added Reseller and got there start on the GSA schedule to help Salesforce sell to the public sector here in the US. They help with sales, marketing, and contracting for Salesforce and it's partners to federal, state, and local government organizations. If you have public sector demand for your application that includes interest from a customer, it's a good time to reach out to Carahsoft who will get you set up on the correct contract vehicle. This will expedite the purchasing process, sometimes even avoiding the need to take it to RFP. The earlier you call them the better, even before pricing is discussed. As your public sector gtm becomes more intentional with at least one FTE focused on this industry, Carahsoft will work with partners add value to your sales and marketing efforts. Top examples are Nintex, Copado, Ownbackup, and many more. Recent legislation in the US has caused even more opportunity for the Salesforce platform and ISV partners to help deliver value to it's citizens. During the pandemic, Bethany recalls all of the amazing solutions that the ecosystem helped to create with 20+ states using the Salesforce platform for contact tracing and vaccine rollouts. We discuss FedRamp, which is a set of standards put in place for security standards for software offerings. The program is great for buyers but takes significant money and time for an ISV but is required for companies looking to go “all-in” for public sector. A common misconception for ISVs that are native to Salesforce is that because they are built on the Salesforce platform and they are FedRamp/SOC 2 Type 2 certified, you as an ISV inherit that. It's true it makes it easier but it involves (much more) than just that. If you're interested in exploring this channel, reach out to them at salesforce@carahsoft.com for an introductory meeting. A tip for your conversations is to ask them how they purchase today, do they leverage Carahsoft? Carahsoft can help partners with their gtm approach for public sector! Here's a closer look at the episode: '0:01:19 What role does Salesforce have in the ecosystem that they lived in? '0:01:44 What Carahsoft does for salesforce and for the broader ecosystem? '0:03:22 How should they think about Carahsoft and how you can help? '0:06:37 What's the best strategy on how to go to market in this ecosystem? '0:06:57 How does your team work with the Salesforce AEs in the public sector? '0:10:20 Who do you work with today, and some lessons learned? '0:10:26 What are some mistakes folks can avoid? '0:18:33 What's a mistake to avoid for folks starting to dip their toe into federal or state? '0:20:22 What the process for an ISV would look like? How long does it takes? '0:25:40 What are you most proud of from your work at Carahsoft? '0:26:59 What's your team working on, in. regards to the Salesforce ecosystem? Resources: E-maill: salesforce@carahsoft.com Website: https://www.carahsoft.com/ Bethany's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bethany-blackwell-8a3b5016/

How to Get an Analytics Job
Listener Question: What if a company uses an analytics tool that I have no experience with? (Example: Knowing Power BI but new opportunity uses Adobe Analytics)

How to Get an Analytics Job

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 5:59


Have a question too? Leave us a message here: https://anchor.fm/john-david-ariansen In this episode one of our listeners asks about applying to jobs that use a different analytics tool stack. Adobe Analytics is not taught nearly as much as Excel, Power BI and Tableau but he is applying for jobs that use Adobe Analytics. In this episode John David gives advice on how to think about this problem and some potential solutions to navigate this situation successfully. Trying to break into the Analytics Industry? You should check out the Greensboro College Analytics Apprenticeship program. Learn more here: https://learn.silvertoneanalytics.com/apprenticeship/ Already established as an analyst but ready to level up your career? Check out the Silvertone Analytics Career Servicers Program here: https://learn.silvertoneanalytics.com/career-services/ Welcome to the How to Get an Analytics Job channel. Discover how you fit into the analytics marketplace, what skills you should build, and how to land your analytics dream job. Analytics agency owner John David Ariansen and his team will give you tips and tricks to land your dream job and level up your analytics career. Check Out Our Playlists How to Get an Analytics Job Podcast: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBvzkZLydYX0D28bbnfRCV6M4zMQrhXsd Greensboro College Analytics Lecture Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBvzkZLydYX2UenX5FGME-n-KDjvKmeKp Looking to land an analytics job? Sounds like you need a solid resume... Sign up for our email list to get a free analytics resume guide: https://mailchi.mp/df01df1e8856/analyticsjob Follow us on LinkedIn: John David Ariansen https://www.linkedin.com/in/johndavidariansen/ Hunter Brown https://www.linkedin.com/in/hunterhbrown/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-david-ariansen/support

Büchermarkt - Deutschlandfunk
Angela Steidele: "Aufklärung. Ein Roman" - Das Licht der Vernunft

Büchermarkt - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 19:50


Leipzig im 18. Jahrhundert: In Angela Steideles Roman wird das Glücksversprechen einer ganzen Epoche in den Blick genommen, dabei gilt die Aufmerksamkeit den gelehrten Frauen. Ein erhellendes wie schalkhaftes Tableau mit sehr heutigen Anklängen.Von Angela Gutzeitwww.deutschlandfunk.de, BüchermarktDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Sixteen:Nine
Paul Ciolino, OptiSigns

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 35:31


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT It has been nagging at me for the last few months that I didn't know a hell of a lot about OptiSigns, even though the Houston-based company was a main advertiser on Sixteen:Nine. That's been fixed, having had a great conversation last week with the company's sales director Paul Ciolino. We got into a whole bunch of things, from the company's roots, how software development bridges the US and Vietnam, and their go-to-market model. OptiSigns is focused on making a product and services available that manage to tick the much-demanded boxes of intuitive and affordable, but also have a lot of sophistication and scalability. Ciolino works out of New York City, which will help explain why you might hear sirens in the background. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Paul, thank you for joining me. Can you give me the background on what OptiSigns is all about? Because I know them, but I don't know much about your company yet.  Paul Ciolino: Yeah, absolutely. Dave, thanks so much for having me. First of all, excited to be here. You're my first podcast ever so it's a wonderful honor for you to have, but OptiSigns is a cloud-based digital signage solution and really the key tenets of OptiSigns signs are: Can we make it a low barrier to entry? Can anybody use it? Is it easy? Is it accessible? Can people deploy on myriad, different platforms or OSs?  And we try to check all those boxes as much as possible while making it all cost-effective.  And the company's based in Houston?  Paul Ciolino: That's right, yep.  How long has the company been around?  Paul Ciolino: So it was founded in 2015, but really the growth started happening within the last three years and we're seeing incredible year-over-year growth now.  Back in 2015, there was already any number of easy-to-use, I don't wanna say entry-level because that kind of diminishes the product, but friendly, price effective, on and on, and I'm curious what prompted the founders to look at the market and go, okay, there's an opportunity here, because, from my perspective, there was a lot of what you've described already out there? Paul Ciolino: Yeah, absolutely. That's a really good question. I think when you think about digital signage top-down and you're looking at it with a bird's eye view, there's just a huge TAM there, right? Even if it is a saturated market, there are hundreds of vendors that do it today. There are a few really big players and there are a few really big players that do it really well. The key differentiator for us is probably just going to be on the usability side of things, and I think that was where, the powers that be, were sitting in a back room somewhere saying, how do we put our footprint on this industry? What can we do to make ourselves stand out and be late adopters of getting into the industry while also being a significant factor?  Yeah, it's an interesting balance that has to be struck in that I've seen a few times promotions for companies who say that we have a very easy-to-use friendly platform and when I've looked at it or other people have looked at it, they said, it's not really all that friendly or easier, or sure, it is friendly, but it doesn't do much.  Paul Ciolino: Yeah, I think that's a good point. When we have this conversation internally a lot, and sometimes I talk to our customer base about it, but really the idea behind designing OptiSigns from the ground up with our engineering team and from a product perspective was like taking a look at something like an iPhone, right? When you purchase an iPhone, you get the iPhone, you take it out of the box, you put a SIM card in it and you just start using it. You've got an iPhone now. So we thought about that with a digital signage lens, and that's where we started putting our plan into motion.  So when you are a new user of the system, how does it work, is it software as a service?  Paul Ciolino: Yeah, absolutely. At our core, we're a software company. We don't do the installation. We don't do hardware sales outside of a couple of pre-configured devices that you can get. Really, what we do focus on is just that UX/UI component. We have 135 native app integrations now, from a simple weather app to Tableau, Power BI and more sophisticated web scripting and an open API, so we run the gamut of what you can do with digital signage.  Is there a particular market that you guys are targeting?  Paul Ciolino: So the nice thing about digital signage is that there's just so much variability in actual implementations. So when we think about targeting somebody specific, we do have our eyes on a couple of industries like logistics right now is something that we're making a big push into. We're also looking into things like healthcare, we've got a pretty good customer base with healthcare already, but we're seeing a lot of organic conversations happen there. So we're like, hey, what do we do? How can we accelerate their growth into this vertical and things like that? That's interesting because I was waiting for you to say, yeah we're chasing retail and QSR and then I'd be rolling my eyes because everybody and their sister is, but logistics and healthcare, I think that's really smart. They're not all that addressed yet, and I'm curious, what's the ask in logistics, is it for visualizing data like Power BI and Tableau? Paul Ciolino: Yeah, absolutely. A lot of times these people are using more bespoke dashboards as well. So when you think about trying to take something out of the box, and then you think about maybe the staff over at one of these logistics companies, let's call it a trucking company or something like that for example, maybe they don't have the bandwidth on the it side of the ball to have somebody spend three weeks creating a custom integration with an API or something like that, which they can do with us. But we offer OptiSigns where you can basically take your internal dashboards that are gated by username and password, and you can script the authentication and the execution of that username and password, and then get to your target resource that way.  Why do they want that? Where are they showing on these screens?  Paul Ciolino: They're showing everything from lead times to rotation schedules to availability to weather, to all kinds of different, increment factors that could be going into either a trucking scenario again, or maybe we've got some type of supply chain issue, and they're doing a full SWOT analysis in their backroom and they have to have all of this real-time data come up as they're planning around the next week, month, quarter, half year, whatever they're gonna do.  So it's really myriad, just like all of our deployments are as well in different verticals, you can use it however you need to.  I find that interesting because so much of the attention in digital signage is around the wow factor, creative like amazing displays and all these things that are going on, and to me the long tail of digital signage is the stuff that you might describe as boring, just like showing KPIs on a screen or giving instructions on what to do when something happens like an alarm trigger or whatever, like that stuff doesn't get anybody's pulse racing, but it's incredibly valuable to the day to day of a company, right?  Paul Ciolino: I think there's been like this large front end push to make signage sexy when I think, at the end of the day, the reason that somebody's gonna go pay for anything in a digital signage space is that they need it and they need specific things to be up on the screen. I'm not saying you can't make things look sexy with OptiSigns, obviously, you can do that, but at the end of the day, we want people to be able to take anything that they need to have up on their screens and deploy it easily and efficiently without breaking the bank.  You mentioned breaking the bank, your pricing tiers are pretty friendly in that. I think I saw it was $10-12 a month, depending on what you're doing. Is that accurate? Paul Ciolino: Yeah, that's about right, and that's gonna be the starting price, obviously, if people are gonna be looking at growing their business with us and scaling, which is something that we specialize in as well, just making that ease of scaling, something that comes out of the box with us. It could be anywhere from $10-15 a month per screen, unlimited users, unlimited resources uploaded into the cloud, and all that kind of stuff.  The $10 one gives you a lot of functionality, but as you scale up or tier up, so to speak, you are just adding more capability. Paul Ciolino: Yeah, basically the way you can think about it is, let's say somebody's got maybe they even have a hundred screens or something like that, but they're gonna be putting the same thing on a hundred of their screens. They probably don't need to go into the conversation about creating manual permissions or a brand kit or reporting for their advertisers that are paying for ad space or things like that, so they can live with that standard plan that we have and be happy all day.  They still have access to 95% of the functionality on the platform. It's just gonna be some of those more robust features binding to an IDP or an SSO provider or something like that or creating a monitoring and alerting system where they can enable triggers for different events to go to specific people and make sure that they've got as much uptime as possible. That's all quite interesting because when I think of the pricing tier that you're at, it's usually small to medium business operators who the company is targeting and they're never talking about data binding or anything like that, it's just about you can put this menu on a screen and you can change it on demand. Paul Ciolino: Yeah, and you hit the nail on the head there. We have incredible organic growth within those verticals where you're looking at QSRs gyms, and places like that. But I think the thing that we've been doing really well this year, especially, and especially in the last quarter and a half or so, has been getting into really earnest more of those enterprise deployments, where we're talking about, we've got a GDPR situation in Germany or something like that, and we have facilities on five different continents and we need to make sure that everybody's got the right access and we've got audit logs that they can enable and we really do pair very well with very robust security concerns.  Yeah, that's interesting as well in that I've talked to a few companies who started out targeting the small to medium business market and have migrated to enterprise because of the demands of customers, but also it's just that if you're dealing with the entry level market, you're being beaten up on price and it's not necessarily easy to scale that kind of management of all those different customers.  Paul Ciolino: Yeah, and I think that's something that's, again, credit to our engineering team, they make it so easy for people to scale on multiple different levels, whether you're talking about headcount as users within the platform, you're talking about multiple locations, or you're talking about multiple screens within a single location, and it really does just make it very intuitive. We've got our support team as well who's great. I think the CSAT that we talked about in our H1 review was like 94 or something like that, and that's an objective number, I'm not putting a lens on that one, but I think when you think about implementing something new and you're looking at a by process that maybe has 15-20 touchpoints or something like that, you're making a pretty big commitment just from a G&A perspective as a client, and then you think about, okay, is this gonna save my needs for the next year, three years, five years, ten years, and if so, how is that gonna look? What is my hardware, reliability gonna look like and things like that, and we kind of cover all bases.  Is it important when you're dealing with those kinds of pricing tiers to minimize the number of customer touches, make as much of your offer and your software self-service and not have to provide a lot of support and customer contact? Not that you don't wanna talk to your customers, but it's just that if you have a whole bunch of them, that means you need a whole bunch of people to deal with them. Paul Ciolino: Absolutely. Yeah, so that's again, credit to our engineering team and the way that we laid the bedrock as a company from our founders to be able to build this thing where it is very self-service.  Another thing that we do that a lot of companies these days are moving towards is we've got a support blog, we've got a support site. We've got a ticket creation system, a phone number, and an email. It's very multi-threaded in how people can actually go about getting the help they need, and I think that's something that has allowed us to spend time on growth and not as much time on maintenance, while still providing an exceptional level of service to our customer base.  You've mentioned a lot of growth in the last three years. Why do you think that is? What is it that's resonating?  Paul Ciolino: So at the end of the day, every company's going to have a little bit of this slow out of the gates kind of motion, right? And once you get the feeling for an industry and a customer base, and you have enough conversations and you get enough feedback, all of those things combined into something very powerful, even from a business owner's perspective, where you're like, okay, I can listen to these things and then I can go act on them. And one of the nice things about us is we run a very agile team, a very lean team, and we have the same communication with the same people, a lot of the time, and so that means that we can go ahead and pivot on almost a weekly basis with our roadmap if we need to, and we can effectively release functional app integrations or just things that maybe we don't think about that our users think about. And I think that level of service that comes from, even the engineering team level, is something that is really hard to achieve in any business in 2022 these days.  And some of the software development's done in Vietnam, right?  Paul Ciolino: That's right. They have a very close working relationship with our founders. They've worked together for a long time. They know how to communicate effectively, and it's really paid dividends for us as a business.  Is that kind of a historical thing? I don't know South Texas all that well, but I believe that there's a pretty big Vietnamese diaspora there that went over there for fishing fleets and everything else, but I suspect there's still a lot of business ties back? Paul Ciolino: Yeah, absolutely. I can't speak to the geopolitical business ties within the founder's relationship levels. Personally, I've benefited from the influx of the Vietnamese community in Houston via Cajun cuisine, but outside of that, I think it's just something where people have worked together before, I've worked with people and at a few different companies or something like that, and we can talk about anything at the drop of a hat and we can make an effective decision when it needs to be made How do you sell? Is it just direct to the customer or are you doing things like an affiliate channel or reseller channel? Paul Ciolino: Yeah, so we absolutely do offer that. We have a couple of different options available. We've got an affiliate program to where, maybe you don't wanna spend the time or you don't have the time or the capital or anything else to be able to go and become a reseller, but you have a lot of people that you know in your network that are interested in digital signage. So we've got that affiliate program. You can make some money off of referring customers to us and it pays out quarterly and things like that, and we try to make it very easy and low maintenance for them to maintain those relationships, and then also generate business for us that are not cold leads at all. They're very warm leads.  The other side of that is gonna be that reseller pro reseller program that you mentioned and that can work in a few different ways. You can package the software, if you need to, you can white label it, and that's not even in our top-level plan, that's in our middle level plan. It's not like we're gate keeping too much here like we really do wanna make this software available to anybody that needs it, and we're doing that in several different ways as well.  You're happy enough to be just operating under the hood and nobody even knows it's OptiSigns?  Paul Ciolino: Absolutely, that's why I'm off camera.  You have an $80 Android stick that you offer as a hardware option. I'm curious how often that comes up as an ask or are they using any number of different platforms out there, because I know you have a web player or that's the foundational player. Paul Ciolino: So going back to the low barrier to entry that we're going with at OptiSigns. We're OS agnostic. You can deploy Windows or Linux, we've got an ARM Linux. We've got LG commercial grade native app, an Android native app, and Fire TV so you can use a Fire Stick as well. It really doesn't matter how you deploy with us, that is just there as an Option. We don't make any money off of those devices, they're literally just there in case somebody thinks that's the best deployment for them, and if you go to, like Reddit or somewhere third party where there's no Optisign sales lens on it, you can see that these Android players are generally very reliable.  We've had them deployed for, I think over a year and a half now, and we've got over 99% uptime with them. So things like that, providing reliability to our customers and, places like Australia, where it gets super hot over there, maybe there's not the best wifi connection, things like that. Those are really good deployments. I think we've got over 10,000 of our Android sticks that are out right now, and that's just one of our deployments. Oh really, and are people going down that path because they are price sensitive or they just want like a dumb-down device that they can just stick in? Paul Ciolino: Yeah, I think it's somewhere between those two. Okay. So if you think about it like a Fire Stick, it's gonna be a little bit cumbersome, people can go watch ESPN or something like that on a Fire Stick. If you're looking at something like a Raspberry PI, right now those are incredibly expensive. We do sell those too, just in case that's what people are familiar with and maybe they need more granular security pushes or something like that to their systems..  That's interesting, I've never heard somebody say Raspberry PIs are incredibly expensive, but I know what you're saying. Once you fully get them out, they're not $35, right?  Paul Ciolino: Yeah, with supply chain stuff happening right now, they're like $300 or something like that. That's what I've been hearing. We're selling them for $130 on our site, I think, but outside of that, you've got the ability to do something like an Intel NUC, or you can do a Micro PC, or you can have a full-blown computer behind a screen. When you think about something that marries the functionality of what those things can do without the processing power, because you don't need it, but you also have the reliability that's gonna be above something like a Fire Stick, or if you're just using a web browser version or something like that, I think that's a really nice, happy medium.  One of the devil's advocates arguments around web players for digital signage is: yes, you can get this application running on any number of different kinds of devices, whether they're smart TVs or Fire sticks or whatever it may be, but there's not a lot of device management. How do you counter that argument?  Paul Ciolino: Honestly, it's not really our job to counter that argument because it's not gonna be our most recommended deployment. We're not gonna sit in front of the University of Central Florida and say, you guys should be using a web browser version for all 360 TVs that you have or something like that. We're gonna tell 'em like, what do you need? Do you have wifi in every area? Do you need an ethernet adapter? Do you need to go to a Raspberry PI? And so we'll have a very consultative conversation with our customer base before we even get into demoing the software. So that's like the first thing that we wanna nail down with our customers: How are you gonna deploy? And let's figure out the reasons why you wanna do that, and not just because, you're used to doing it that way, or you heard it was the best from like Jim down the street.  So you are saying that you have native players as well, or you have web players that have device management? Paul Ciolino: Yeah, so kind of all of the above. So if you wanted to go, like with what's called our managed device route, right? Like you could do something where you get that $80 Android stick, we'll charge you a little bit extra, as long as you have a pro plus package, you're gonna have our version of an Apple Care where we have an MDM, our support team can remote in, they can troubleshoot. You don't have to spend valuable time with your IT professionals or anything like that to go and troubleshoot these sticks. We can do it for you.  So is that your happy place? If a customer goes down that path where obviously you're making a bit more money out of them, but you remove some of the mystery, so to speak because it's a known device. Paul Ciolino: Yeah, absolutely, and I think at the end of the day, we're happy if our customers are happy, and that's why we have that consultative approach on the deployment.  Tell me about the app store/library. You mentioned you have a hundred plus apps on there. Paul Ciolino: Yeah. So we've everything from, something like just a native designer app that's within the platform, or something like the Adobe Designer Suite, or like Canva or something like that. Something simple, something that most people that are creating digital signage are gonna need at some point. How does that work?  Paul Ciolino: Yeah, it's basically a frame within the platform, it is just like an app. It'll take you to a page where you can design from a template, we've got like 700 plus templates out there right now. Everything from menus to employee appreciation to emergency notices, all that kind of stuff, and then you can go ahead and configure each element on the page. You could even do something like pull from a data source where we can map elements within that page to a spreadsheet in Google or Excel, and so for QSRs in particular, this is really beneficial because they can go into a spreadsheet, never have to log into OptiSigns again, once they get the framework of their menu done, they can just change their pricing by changing that spreadsheet. Do you have to work with your customers to help them figure out what to do? Paul Ciolino: Absolutely, and that's within the fee structure that we have, with supporting meetings, and obviously we've got our blog with really good documentation on it as well. Where are you seeing traction in the marketplace? I know you mentioned healthcare and logistics. Are there particular areas where there seems to be a lot of interest and more of an ask than maybe in the past?  Paul Ciolino: We talked about it earlier actually, but one of the places where we see a ton of room for growth is gonna be in that reseller side. So creating those partnerships and channels. We have a couple of partners where if they need to have somebody do install and maintenance, we can do that as well. We're never gonna be that company that vertically integrates all of that under one umbrella, but we can certainly provide the introductions to those. We predict that the reseller marketplace is gonna be a significant chunk of our revenue within the next two years.  You also have a mobile app, which I was curious about. Is that a mobile app for control of the screens?  Paul Ciolino: Yep, nail on the head. So that's just gonna be an admin app. You don't want to go on an iPhone 5s and start designing on there for screens that are gonna be much bigger than that. We tried to keep it pretty myopic with the app deployment. That's just one of those things where somebody's on the go, maybe it's a small business owner, maybe it's somebody in a larger company that is going around and they wanna show something cool to their stakeholders or shareholders or whatever it's gonna be, and they can go ahead and just control it ad hoc as they need it. Was that something that you developed because a customer was asking for it, or you could just figure out that this is something that would be useful? Paul Ciolino: I honestly can't speak to the inception of the idea. But I do know the way that we think about things in general and it's like:  Is there going to be a need for this at some point?cHow much is it gonna cost us from a time money perspective? Is it worth it? And then we just go do it.  You also have an audience analytics add-on, what's that about? And is that something you guys wrote or is it a partner?  Paul Ciolino: No, that is actually a proprietary algorithm that our engineering team has done as well. We're talking about basically three different statistics here. The first one is going to be gender: Is the person looking at the screen male or female or walking by the screen, male or female? The second is going to be dwell time, and that's gonna be, how long is this person in front of the screen for? The third is gonna be attention time and that's how long is this person interacting with the screen for? And so when you think about reporting, OptiSigns does it really well in a couple of different ways. The first way is going to be like a proof of play reporting where you've got an advertiser, they're paying for a certain ad to be played a certain number of times over a certain period, you can batch those reports, send them out, do whatever you need to do, make sure that everybody's cool. Everything's transparent. Everything's above board.  Same thing with AI reporting, but that's gonna be more in the split testing realm of things, right? Where you design an advertisement or you design a menu or you design something and you want to see how people engage with it when you test different versions of it and so you can basically take August 1 through August 31 on this design, September 1 through September 30 on this design. What does my dwell time look like? What does my attention time look like? How's my split looking? Are males interacting more with this design? Are females interacting more with that design? All that kind of stuff. The audience analytics stuff using computer vision has been around for probably 15 years, and the challenge in the past was that it was expensive and you had to have additional hardware and everything else, and that kind of ruled out much adoption.  Has that changed? I believe it's $5 a month at MSRP so I suspect at scale it gets cheaper than that, and I'm assuming you're using just simple USB cameras to do the capture.  Paul Ciolino: Yeah, honestly, I think you could probably just pitch this for me at this point, but basically you need any camera that can see, right? It doesn't have to be a fancy camera that can do like 4k or anything like that. You wanna make sure that you're setting it up at the right distance, obviously, you don't want a $20 USB camera trying to find out who's looking at the screen 50 yards away or something like that.  But outside of that, it really is just plug-and-play. Does it make sense financially for you to go invest the time and the little bit extra money for that to get that kind of feedback for your own purposes or for your client's purposes? If yes, then, it's a great option to have.  Does that change the hardware set-up at all? I guess what I'm saying is does the $80 Android stick no longer the right device because you've got the extra overhead of the video processing?  Paul Ciolino: Yep, nail on the head again. You're gonna need to do a Linux or a Windows deployment with something like that, just because of the processing power that's needed to be able to effectively communicate that data back to the algorithm.  So just going back to the company, how large is it?  Paul Ciolino:  So we're just sub-20 right now so we're a very small shop. We definitely move quickly for sure, and again, just going into that, learned communication that we all have together, makes it really efficient for all of us to get stuff done. And it's just privately held, self-funded that sort of thing?  Paul Ciolino: Yep, precap and no debt. I asked about shares when I was joining and they said yes, but it'll be very expensive.  So what can we expect out of OptiSigns through the rest of this year and into next year?  Paul Ciolino: I think more the same, we're gonna be obviously focusing on a few different verticals going forward as we identify some customers, as we continue to move internationally, we've got a decent customer base in the EU, UK. We're blowing out into South America at this point a little bit. We do have a decent customer base in Australia as well, and then I've been having conversations with people in places like Somalia and other countries in Africa. So the reach is wide, right? And we've really only tapped that kind of outreach from a marketing perspective, even. We really haven't put a whole lot of dollars into growing our business internationally. It's mostly been organic.  So I think you can see that we're gonna be growing organically again. We're gonna be trying to be more aggressive in the way that we ideate on how we're going to tackle new verticals and things like that as well. But yeah, at the end of the day, we want to continue to make a product that will take any screen and turn it into a digital sign that you can use in any way that you and your team or your clients need to use it.  All right, and they can find the company at optisigns.com?  Paul Ciolino: Yes. Paul, thank you very much for spending time with me.  Paul Ciolino: Absolutely. Dave, it was a pleasure.

The Next CMO
Personalizing messages across channels with Adri Gil Miner, CMO of Iterable

The Next CMO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 39:32


In this episode, we speak to Adri Gil Miner, the CMO of Iterable, a growth marketing platform for cross-channel experiences. Iterable is a cross-channel platform that powers unified customer experiences and empowers marketers to create, optimize, and measure relevant interactions and experiences customers love. Leading brands, like Zillow, DoorDash, Calm, Madison Reed, and Box, choose Iterable to power world-class customer experiences throughout the entire lifecycle.Adri has 20+ years of experience in high growth marketing executive roles. She was previously CMO at Qumulo and Artefact, and held leadership positions at Tableau, Weber Shandwick, and American Express. Learn more about Adriana Gil MinerLearn more about IterableFollow Peter Mahoney on Twitter and LinkedInLearn more about PlannuhJoin The Next CMO CommunityRecommend a guest for The Next CMO podcastProduced by PodForte

Les pieds sur terre
Entrer dans un tableau 

Les pieds sur terre

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 28:19


durée : 00:28:19 - Les Pieds sur terre - par : Sonia Kronlund - Aude est tombée amoureuse du portrait de Tocqueville. Sophie revient sans cesse voir « La raie » de Chardin au Louvre. Emma se réfugie dans les peintures de Maurice Denis. Trois histoires qui nous font basculer à l'intérieur d'un tableau, comme s'il devenait vivant.

France Culture physique
Entrer dans un tableau 

France Culture physique

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 28:19


durée : 00:28:19 - Les Pieds sur terre - par : Sonia Kronlund - Aude est tombée amoureuse du portrait de Tocqueville. Sophie revient sans cesse voir « La raie » de Chardin au Louvre. Emma se réfugie dans les peintures de Maurice Denis. Trois histoires qui nous font basculer à l'intérieur d'un tableau, comme s'il devenait vivant.

Fukabori.fm
79. BigQuery と D.Node w/ g_suzutatsu

Fukabori.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 39:21


D.Nodeのsuzutatsuさんをゲストに、BigQueryの基本、BigQueryの内部、最近のアップデート、D.Nodeなどについて語っていただいたエピソードです。 話したネタ BigQueryとは? データウェアハウス(DWH)とは? データウェアハウスとRDBとの違いは? BigQueryの利用フロー・方法 RDBの変更をBigQueryに反映するユースケース BigQueryと併用されるBIツール Tableau Google データポータル BigQuery の内部アーキテクチャは? Compute と Storage Colossus とは? Dremel とは? Slot というCPUとメモリを抽象化した単位 分散メモリとは? 分割統治法 最近の BiqQuery の進化で面白いところは? BigQuery の マテリアライズドビュー そもそもマテリアライズドビュー(マテビュー)の一般的な意味とは? マテリアライズドビュー利用時の注意点とは? D.Node とは? suzutatsuさんのお仕事内容 社内にはどんな人が多い? D.Node 採用ページ エピソード提供スポンサー デロイト トーマツ ノード合同会社(D.Node)

Chip & Charge – meinsportpodcast.de
Serena Williams‘ Abschied – Die offenste Auslosung der US-Open-Geschichte?

Chip & Charge – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 63:58


Willkommen zur neuen Ausgabe von Chip & Charge dieses Mal mit der Auslosungsvorschau für die US Open 2022. Nach all den verschiedenen Siegerinnen und Siegerin, die wir in den letzten Wochen auf der Tour erlebt haben, ist das 4. Grand Slam Turnier durchaus als offen zu betrachten. Medvedev früh gegen Kyrgios? Das Herrenfeld hat als Topgesetzten jedoch einen Altbekannten. Denn Daniil Medvedev hat das Turnier im letzten Jahr gewonnen und zwei Jahre zuvor das Finale erreicht. Er könnte schon recht früh auf Nick Kyrgios oder Roberto Bautista-Agut treffen. Auch im oberen Viertel befindet sich Felix Auger-Aliassime und der Montreal-Sieger Pablo Carreno-Busta. Auch zur oberen Hälfte gehören Stefanos Tsitsipas, Matteo Berrettini und Taylor Fritz. Die unter Hälfte wird angeführt von Rafael Nadal, hinter dessen Form jedoch auch dass ein oder andere Fragezeichen steht. Kann er die fehlende Matchpraxis mit Erfahrung wettmachen? Zu den anderen Topgesetzten in seiner Hälfte der Auslosung gehören unter anderem Carlos Alcaraz, Marin Cilic und Cameron Norrie. Wie gut drauf ist Iga Swiatek? Bei den Damen ist die Sache wie gewohnt noch ein bisschen offener. Hier führt die beste Spielerin des Jahres das Tableau an. Doch wird Iga Swiatek einen Weg durch die Auslosung finden? Sie könnte schon recht früh auf Amanda Anisimova oder Jelena Ostapenko treffen. Auch in der oberen Hälfte sind die Siegerin aus dem letzten Jahr, Emma Raducanu, die zweifache Gewinnerin Naomi Osaka und die Wimbledon-Siegerin Naomi Osaka. Der Abschied von Serena Williams Weit unten im vierten Viertel ist Serena Williams zu finden. Sie könnte schon sehr früh auf die an 2 gesetzte Anett Kontaveit treffen. Doch davor muss Williams erstmal gegen Danka Kovinic gewinnen. Auch Simona Halep ist einer der großen Namen in der unteren Hälfte. Sie könnte im Achtelfinale gegen einen anderen prominenten Namen spielen, Coco Gauff. Ebenso zu finden sind hier zwei der Formspielerinnen der letzten Wochen, Beatriz Haddad Maia und Carolina Garcia. Du möchtest deinen Podcast auch kostenlos hosten und damit Geld verdienen? Dann schaue auf www.kostenlos-hosten.de und informiere dich. Dort erhältst du alle Informationen zu unseren kostenlosen Podcast-Hosting-Angeboten.