Podcasts about Sales engineering

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Best podcasts about Sales engineering

Latest podcast episodes about Sales engineering

Telarus
53. UC & Microsoft Teams: When is it the right fit? – With Shams Khan of SCB Global

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 34:37


Do you want to dive deeper into the Microsoft Teams roadmap and understand Teams at a deeper level? Tune in to hear Shams Khan of SCB Global as he discusses their unique and rare partnership with Microsoft that helps them (and you) architect high-level Microsoft Teams and voice solutions on a global scale! Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. All right, everybody, welcome back. We are talking about unified comms, Microsoft teams, everything in between. And so today I would like to welcome in one of the world's most well-traveled men, Shams Khan, VP at SCB Global Shams. Welcome onto the show, man. Excited to have you. Shams Kahn (00:35): Hey, Josh. Thank you for having me here. And I'm just trying to meet the levels of, you know, how much you would travel from one side of the cost to the other. Yeah, not, not there yet. Josh Lupresto (00:48): Not, not there, but you, you have touched pieces of the world that I think give you so much cool experience, and we'll get into that here in a minute, and Sure. Maybe that, maybe it kicks us off with that. I, I, I wanna, I want everybody to learn a little bit about you. You know, we'll get to SCB in just a second, but, but talk to me about your personal background. You know, how did you get into this space? Where did you start? And, and let's kick it off there. Shams Kahn (01:11): Sure. So there will probably many things that will be you know, uncovered, as I say, and probably your audience or people who are listening to this will learn a lot more about me on the personal front. So I started in this space when it comes to this space, meaning communications at a very tender age of 10. And people will not know this I'm 34 now, but I started at, at the age of 10 because of our family business. I think I've mentioned some of this in our personal conversations with you, Josh, but it was more so internet was booming and communication was one of the things that we are an ISP in Mumbai. I got interested by it computers and, you know, my father or the computer trainer. So I was always around computers, and I think I'm of the generation that I used computers and I played games on computers, which were pixelated versus, you know, team games, right? Shams Kahn (02:06): Or consults. So computer was really the center of my universe in terms of how I grew up. And communication was really exciting. And I was 16 when I started to really take the reins of the business our networking, internet communications within the s p world. And that too was a life event where somebody said, Hey, you, you know, you guys are just delivering this service because you got Monopoly in this area. And that kind of kicked me off you know, as a trigger moment, as, as I would say to try and say, no, it's not really true. And I decided to learn that in the first of two years, and then decided to study that that led me to come to United Kingdom study at Chapel Hallam University doing computer and network engineering as a degree which is where I came here and I said, I wanna study now that I've kind of got a background in understanding. Shams Kahn (03:02): And the idea was to always go into something that will help me in my career path, right? And that is how it started. Now, what got me into cloud is another life event. It was 2009 ish, I would say. I was coming back from my you know, like normal class in, in my college or university, as we call it, here in the UK. And somebody had broken into our house. I was renting a house with my friends and, and they stole my laptop. And this was really like, you know, college fees and everything my parents were sponsoring and funding before. I'm like,

Telarus
52. Microsoft Teams, Is it always the right fit? With Shane Speakman

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 26:46


Tune in today to hear Shane Speakman, VP of the UC practice at Telarus. Shane comes back on for Season 2 after being our very first guest on the show last season. Today we discuss something we're all familiar with, which is Microsoft Teams. More importantly, we talk about when it is a fit, and when it isn't. Shane lays out some very specific scenarios that I think our partners will like to hear. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. All right, everybody. Today we're back here as you can see with the special guest, Mr. Shane Speakman, VP of the UC practice at Telarus. Shane, thanks so much for agreeing to come back to the podcast. Shane Speakman (00:28): Yes, thank you. Josh Lupresto (00:30): Shane was guest number one on the podcast, so when we had no plan, no goals, no whatever, and we just kind of winged it, here we are back coming up on 50 episodes. So appreciate you, and we're back here in the studio, studio 19 in Utah. So excited to jump in, man. Shane Speakman (00:46): Yeah, thanks. Congrats on the success. It's been really fun to hear about your different guests. Josh Lupresto (00:51): Yeah, thanks. It's fun. It's, it's, you know, it's been so cool to just learn so much about people that, you know, we, we thought we knew a lot about your illustrious scrapbooking career. Josh Lupresto (01:03): It's where it all started. That's right. But today we're not talking scrapbooking. If people wanna know about your career back in the scrapbooking days and, and where your, your awesome path has gotten you to, they can go back and listen to episode number one on that. But you know, let's, let's remind everybody though of, is this the path that you set out to, right. When, when did it really click for you? When did you know this technology area, this space was the path for you? Yeah, maybe let's start it off there. Shane Speakman (01:30): So, a actually, let's go, let's go back to scrapbooking, which is, I, I sold my company in my late twenties and, and moved into a little nicer neighborhood. And it's just so happened that my neighbor owned a telecom company, and as we became friends and worked out and vacationed, he said, Hey, why don't you come lead my sales organization and I'll give you a piece of the company? And I said, I don't know anything about telecom. He said, that's alright. It's easy. And, and I'll tell you, my thought process was I saw that the industry that I had invested in was starting to die. It was, it was turning digital. And as I looked forward towards telecommunications and the cloud services that were coming, I thought, oh, here, here's, here's a, a long term play. And so as we look at the ebb and flow, whether it's through the macroeconomics or microeconomics here locally, it's been a, a fantastic industry. And so for me, it was really about longevity, which is obviously proven to be that the internet and communicating is not exactly a fad , Josh Lupresto (02:28): See, I think it's gonna stay. And, and speaking of fads, not, not a fad. Who knows? The topic of today that we're talking about is Microsoft Teams easy at the right fit. I mean, there was a period where, where we went through where that was just every other word that we said was Microsoft teams. And so, so that's the point that I wanna lay out of this podcast is we're gonna dial in as we go through this talk track of the fact of is Microsoft Teams always the right fit, rhetorical, but we're gonna end it and we're gonna answer it and, and solve that as we kind of go through this. So talking about that I wanna see what, what are you seeing, right? Yeah. It's been a while since you've been on. What have you seen with customers that are moving to teams? Is it working?

Screaming in the Cloud
Defining and Nurturing a Self-Supporting Community with Alyss Noland

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 33:48


About AlyssAlyss Noland is the head of Developer Relations Relations and Product Marketing at Common Room, an intelligent community-led growth platform. She previously led product marketing for Developer Experience at GitHub where she focused on open source community investment and helping engineering teams find success through development metrics and developer-focused research. She's been working in tech since 2012 in various roles from Sales Engineering and Developer Advocacy to Product Marketing with companies such as GitHub, Box, Atlassian, and BigCommerce, as well as being an advisor at Heavybit. Links Referenced: Common Room: https://www.commonroom.io/ Heavybit: https://www.heavybit.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/PreciselyAlyss Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/PreciselyAlyss TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Tailscale SSH is a new, and arguably better way to SSH. Once you've enabled Tailscale SSH on your server and user devices, Tailscale takes care of the rest. So you don't need to manage, rotate, or distribute new SSH keys every time someone on your team leaves. Pretty cool, right? Tailscale gives each device in your network a node key to connect to your VPN, and uses that same key for SSH authorization and encryption. So basically you're SSHing the same way that you're managing your network.So what's the benefit? You'll get built-in key rotation, the ability to manage permissions as code, connectivity between two devices, and reduced latency. You can even ask users to re-authenticate SSH connections for that extra bit of security. Try Tailscale now - it's free forever for personal use forever.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Logicworks. Getting to the cloud is challenging enough for many places, especially maintaining security, resiliency, cost control, agility, etc, etc, etc. Things break, configurations drift, technology advances, and organizations, frankly, need to evolve. How can you get to the cloud faster and ensure you have the right team in place to maintain success over time? Day 2 matters. Work with a partner who gets it - Logicworks combines the cloud expertise and platform automation to customize solutions to meet your unique requirements. Get started by chatting with a cloud specialist today at snark.cloud/logicworks. That's snark.cloud/logicworksCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I often wonder how to start these conversations, but sometimes it's just handed to me and I don't even have to do a whole lot of work. My guest today is Alyss Noland, who's the Head of Developer Relations Relations and Product Marketing at Common Room. Alyss, thank you for joining me.Alyss: Thanks for having me, Corey. I'm really excited to be here.Corey: So, developer relations relations. It feels like an abstraction that has been forced to be built on top of another abstraction that has gotten too complicated, so as best I can tell, you are walking around as a human equivalent of Kubernetes.Alyss: Oh, gosh, I would really hope not to be a human equivalent of Kubernetes. I think that would make me an octopus. But—Corey: Yeah, “What did you say about me?” Yeah.Alyss: [laugh].Corey: “I didn't come here to be insulted, Quinn.” Yeah.Alyss: No, like listen, I love octopodes. Which [tattoo 00:01:24] is which? So, developer relations relations. Yes, it's an abstraction on an abstraction. A really critical level, it is how do I relate? Can I relate to people that are in the developer relations profession at large?We are at the point at which this is a somewhat poorly-defined area that is continuing to grow. And there's a lot of debates in that space and so I'm really excited to be at an organization that will give me a platform to try and move the industry forward.Corey: Your relatively recent career history is honestly fascinating to me. You spent about a year and a half as a senior developer advocate at Box. And as anyone who's ever tried it knows, it's very hard to beat Box [beatboxing noises]. But you tried and went to GitHub, in which case, you basically transitioned pretty quickly from a Senior Product Marketing Manager to Director of Product Marketing, where you were the go-to-market lead for GitHub Copilot.Alyss: Yeah, that was a really interesting project to be on. I started off at the technical preview back in 2021, launching that too—it ended up being with about a little over a million, two million folks in technical preview. And it's fairly new to the market. There was nothing else—or at the time, there had been nothing else that was using a descendant of GPT-3. There was nothing else using a descendant of GPT-3 to generate suggestions for code to—there were a couple that were using GPT-2, but the amount of language coverage they had was a little bit limited, what they were suggesting was a little bit limited.And it's hard to say, like, highlight of my career, but at that point in time, I would say probably, highlight of my career to be able to work on something with that opportunity for impact.Corey: As someone who was in the technical preview and now tried to be a paying customer of it, but I can't because of my open-source work, it wound up giving it to me for free. I found it to be absolutely transformative. And I know I'm going to get letters and I don't even slightly care because it's not, “I'm going to tab-complete my application.” If a tool can do that, your application is probably not that complex. No, for me, what I find incredibly valuable is the ability to tab-complete through obnoxious boilerplate. CloudFormation, I am not subtweeting you; I am calling you out directly. You are wordy and obnoxious. Fix yourself.And especially in languages that I don't deal with day-to-day—because I'm not a full-time developer—I forget certain parameters or argument order or things like that and being able to effectively tab-complete is awesome for that use case. It's not doing my job; it's automating the crappy part of my job. And I absolutely love it for that.Alyss: Yeah, and was really interesting working on a common portion of product marketing work is that we build messaging houses. We try to identify where's the value to the user, to the organization at large, depending on, like, who it is we're trying to sell to, how does that ladder up from, like, an IoT to a manager. And so, one of the things that I got really excited about as we started to see it—and there's some great work that Dr. Eirini Kallaimvakou has published that I would definitely refer to if you're interested in diving deeper into it—is the way in which Copilot and this, like, ability to improve the boilerplate experience, improve the boring shit—automate the boring shit, if you will—is about developer satisfaction. It's not about making you build your commits faster or about having more lines of code that you like get deployed out; it's about making your jobs suck less.Corey: Well, if you spent, what was it roughly two years, give or take, at GitHub between your various roles—and yes, I'm going to pronounce it ‘GIF-ub' because that's my brand of obnoxious, so I'm going to go for it—you went to Common Room. Let's begin there. What does Common Room do, exactly?Alyss: So, Common Room is an intelligent community-led growth platform. And there's a few things kind of packed into that really short description, but the idea is that we've seen all of these product-lead grows businesses. But at a critical point, and something we've seen at GitHub, which is a product-led growth company, it's something that we've seen at Atlassian, Asana, you name half a dozen different, like, SaaS companies, self-hosted software, open-source, community is at the heart of it. And so, how do you nurture that community? How do you measure that community? How do you prove that the work that you're doing is valuable?And that's what Common Room is setting out to do. And so, when I saw—like, they're not the only person or organization in the market that's doing this, but I think they're doing it exceptionally well, and with really great goals in mind. And so, I'm enthused to try and facilitate that investment in community for more organizations.Corey: One of the challenges that I have seen of products in the community space is it tended, historically, to go in really, I guess I'll call them uncomfortable directions. In the before times, I used to host dinner parties near constantly here, and someone confide into me once—after, you know, six beers or so, because that's when people get the excitingly honest—they mentioned that, “Yeah, I'm supposed to wind up putting these dinners into Salesforce”—or whatever the hell it was—“To track the contacts we have with influencers in this space.” And that made me feel so profoundly uncomfortable. It's, you're invited here to spend time with my friends and my family. You're meeting my kids, it's, yeah, this is just a go-to-market motion and you can [BLEEP] on out of here and never come back.And I did not get that sense to be clear and I'm told the company wound up canceling that horrifying program, but it does feel like it's very easy to turn an authentic relationship into something that feels remarkably sleazy. That said, Common Room has been around for a while and I have yet to hear a single accusation that you folks have come within a thousand miles of doing that. How do you avoid the trap?Alyss: It's a slippery slope, and I can't say that Common Room creates any kind of like enforcement or silos or prevents organizations from falling into this trap. Fundamentally, the way in which community can be abused, the way in which these relationships can be taken advantage of, at least from the perception of the parties that initially built the relationship, is to take the context out of them, to take the empathy out of them, take the people out of them. And so, that is fundamentally left to the organization's principles, it's left to how much authority does community have within the business relative to a sales team. And so first, being able to elevate community in such a way to show that they are having that impact already without having to turn the community into a prospect pool is, I think, one of the critical first steps, and it's something that we've been able to break through initially by connecting things like Slack, Discord, Twitter to show, here's all these people talking about you, here's all the things that they're saying, here's the sentiment analysis, and also, now we're going to push that into Salesforce. So, you can see that this started out in community and it was fostered there. Now, you can see the ROI, you don't need to go hitting up our community contacts to try and sell to them because we're doing it on your behalf in a very real way.Corey: Part of the challenge, I think, is that—and you've talked to me about this in previous conversations we've had—that so much of community is distilled down to a sales motion, which let's be direct, it kind of sucks at, in some levels, because it's okay, great, I'm here to talk to you about how community works. Well, in the AWS community, for example, the reason that formed and is as broad and fast as it is because AWS's documentation is Byzantine and there's a sort of shared suffering that we all get to commiserate over. And whenever AWS tries to take, “Ownership,” quote-unquote, of its community, right, that doesn't actually work that way. They have community watering holes, but to my understanding, the largest AWS-centric Slack team is the Open Guide to AWS's Slack team, which now has, at last count, 15,000 people in it. I'm lucky enough to be the community lead for that project.But it was pre-existing before I got there and it's great to be able to go and talk to people who are using these things. It doesn't feel like it is owned, run, or controlled—because it's not—by AWS themselves. It's clear from the way that your product has evolved, that you feel similarly around that where it's about being aware of the community rather than controlling the community. And that's important.Alyss: Absolutely. And one of the ways in which we, like, highlight this as soon as you're in the product, is being able to show community responsiveness and then what percentage of those responses are coming from my team members. And frankly, as someone who's previously set strategy for developer relations teams, for developer communities, what I want to see is community members responding to each other, community members knowing what's the right place to look, what's the right answer, how am I ensuring that they have the resources that they need, the answers that they need. Because at the end of the day, I can't scale one-to-one; no one can. And so, the community being able to support itself is at the heart of the definition of community.Corey: One of the other problems that I've seen historically, and I'll call it the Chef problem because Chef had an incredibly strong community, and as someone who is deep in the configuration management space myself, but never use Chef, it was the one that I avoided for a variety of reasons at the time, it was phenomenal. I wound up going to ChefConf, despite not being a Chef user, just to spend time with some of the great people that were involved. The blunder that they made before they were acquired into irrelevance by progress—and to be fair, the industry changed direction toward immutable infrastructure in ways that were hard to foresee—but the problem is, they made was hiring their entire community. And it doesn't sound like that would be a bad thing, but suddenly, everyone who was talking about the product had a Chef email address, and that hits very differently.Alyss: It does. And it goes back to that point of trying to maintain those authentic relationships. And if we're to step outside of tech, I have a background prior to tech in the video game industry, and that was a similar problem. Nearly every single community-made application, extension ends up getting acquired by some organization, like Curse, and then piped full of ads, or the person that you thought you could ask or to see build some other better experience of version control software, or a Git client ends up getting consumed into a large business and then the project never sees the light of day. And frankly, that's not how you run community in my estimation.My estimation is, if the community is doing things better than you are, take notes. Product management, pay attention. That's something that is another aspect of doing developer relations is about checking in with those teams, about showing them evidence. And like, it so often ends up being qualitative in a way that doesn't change people's minds or their feelings, where people want to see quantitative numbers in order to say, “Oh, this is the business justification. Like, this is the ROI. This proves that this is the thing we should invest in.” And frankly, no. Like, sometimes it is a little bit more about stepping back and letting the organic empathy and participation happen without having to own it.Corey: There's a sense, I think that a lot of companies feel the need to own every conversation that happens around them, their product, et cetera, and you can't. You just can't, unless—to be direct—your company is failing. Just because if no one's talking about you, then great, you're the only ones talking about you. And you can see this from time to time and it's depressing as hell when you have people who work for a company all tweeting the same cookie-cutter statement, and they get zero interaction except from a bot account. It's sad.Alyss: Yeah. And I've unfortunately seen this more times than I can count in community Slacks where people just, like, copy-paste whatever marketing handed to them, and I would be shocked if they got any engagement at all. Because that's… cool. What do I know about you? Why do I care about this event? Have you personalized it to me?And yeah, you don't want the organization to be the only one talking about you. If you are then you've already failed in this, you know, product-led growth motion. You've kind of—if we want to get into the murky water of NPS, like, nobody's going and telling their friends about your product [laugh]. And the thing that's so valuable is the authentic voice. It's the, “I'm excited to talk about this and I like it enough to tell you what I like about it.” I like it enough to tell you about this use case that might never seen the light of day, but because we're having a conversation between ourselves, it can all be personalized. It can all be about what's going on between us and about our shared experiences. And that is ten times more powerful than most Twitter-promoted ads you'll ever see.Corey: So, I want to unpack a little bit about not developer relations as such, but developer relations relations because I can mostly understand—badly—what product marketing is, but developer relations relations—or as you'd like to call it developer relations squared—that's something new. I've always called DevRel to be devrelopers, and people get annoyed enough at that. What is that newfound layer of abstraction on top of it?Alyss: Well, there's several things that I'm going to end up—and I say end up; I'm six weeks into the role, so I have a lot of high hopes for where I hope this goes. And one of those is things, like, we don't have a very shared understanding and shared definition of what developer advocacy even is, what is developer relations? Does developer marketing belong under that umbrella? How should organizations approach developer relations? How should they value it? Where should it, you know, belong in terms of business strategy?And there's an opportunity for a company whose business it is to elevate this industry, this career path, if you will, where we can spend the time, we can spend the money to say, here's what success looks like. We've interviewed all these groups, we've talked with the leaders in this space that are making it their jobs to think about this. Here's a set of group-developed recommendations for how the industry should mature. Or here's an open-source set of job descriptions and requirements. And like, let's get to some level of shared understanding.So, as an example of, kind of, where I'm leading to with all of this, and some of the challenges that developer relations faces is the State of Developer Relations report that just came out. There's a significant number of people that are coming into developer advocate, developer relations roles for the first time, they have one to two years of experience, they're coming into programs that have been around for one to two years, and so what does that tell you? That tells you you're bringing in people with no experience to try to establish brand new programs, that they're being asked to by their business, and they don't have the vocabulary, the tools, the frameworks in which to establish that for themselves. And so, they're going to be swayed by, you know, the tides of business, by the influences of their leadership without having their own pre-built notions. And so, how do we give them that equipment and how do we elevate the practice?Corey: Cloud native just means you've got more components or microservices than anyone (even a mythical 10x engineer) can keep track of. With OpsLevel, you can build a catalog in minutes and forget needing that mythical 10x engineer. Now, you'll have a 10x service catalog to accompany your 10x service count. Visit OpsLevel.com to learn how easy it is to build and manage your service catalog. Connect to your git provider and you're off to the races with service import, repo ownership, tech docs, and more. Corey: It feels like so much of the DevRel discourse has turned into, one, we define it by what is not, and two, it doesn't matter how you're measuring it, you're measuring it wrong. I feel like that is, I guess we'll call it counterproductive, for lack of a better descriptor. It feels like there's such a short-sighted perspective on all of this, but at the same time, you've absolutely got to find ways to articulate the value of DevRel slash community to the business otherwise, it turns into a really uncomfortable moment when, okay, time to cut costs. Why should we keep your function over a different function? If there's not a revenue or upside or time to market or some form of value story tied to that, that the business can understand that isn't just touchy-feely, it's a very difficult path forward from there. How do you see it?Alyss: I agree with you and I've, frankly, run into this problem several times in my career, and every time I've been a developer advocate. It's, you know—and where I've found the most success is not in saying, “Here's exactly the numbers that I'm going to be constantly looking at. I'm going to try to produce this many pieces of content, or I'm absolutely not speaking at events. And that's not my job. Or I'm not writing code. That's not my job.”It's about understanding what is driving the business forward. Who do I need participation and buy-in from and where am I hoping to go? Like, what does a year out from this look like? What does three years out from this look like? At Box, we do not want to be the API governance standard. That is not our job. That's not where we sit within engineering.That's frankly, if you really want to get into it, internal developer advocacy because it can influence the impact on the community. It is not the core focus and there are probably people better equipped and better educated on the core application. Big commerce, platform ecosystem, platform flywheel developers are fundamentally a part of continuing to grow the business and how do I go make that point to sales, how do I go make that point to partners, how do I go make that point to customer success, so that I can build a function that has more than one person. And so, I think to kind of bring it back to the larger question, that is where I see our greatest challenge is that we haven't given ourselves the vocabulary or the framework to understand the level of complexity that DevRel has become in being across so many industries, and being in B2B, and being in business to developer, and being in business to consumer. No one size fits all and we need to stop trying to treat it as though it can be.Corey: I think that there is a, how to put it, a problem in terms of how Twitter views a lot of these things. Someone wound up finally distilling it down for me in relatively recent times with a very resonant quote, which was simply put, that Twitter is not where you go for nuance. Twitter is where you go to be righteous. And I realized, oh, my God, that describes a good 80% of the things I've put up there. Like when I talk about how when companies do this thing to their staff and it's crappy, I am not necessarily for a nuanced debate, although of course there's always nuance and edge cases in the rest.As a counterpoint, whenever I wind up talking about things on Twitter and speak in generalities, I get a whole bunch of people pushing back with a, “Well, what about this edge case? That renders your entire point invalid.” And, ugh, not really. It feels like one of the casualties of the pandemic has been a sense of community in a sense of humans relating to other humans. I think we're all tired of the Zoom calls from hell I got to see you a couple of weeks before this recording at Monktoberfest in Portland, Maine, and oh, my God, dealing with people face to face, it was so much richer, at least from my perspective, compared to everything that we've been able to do during the pandemic. Am I alone on that? Are you seeing this across the board? Where companies are talking about this?Alyss: I will say with confidence, you're not alone in this. Whether or not companies are talking about it is also across the board. How rich are those understandings? How rich are those conversations? Because trying to step back as a brand is not really a way.Like, having nuance, being real, been community members, like that's not a way in which I think companies can participate in a way that feels truly authentic. That's why you need faces. That's why you need people. That's why you need folks whose job it is to do this. But in terms of things are lost, like, Twitter is not the right place to be having these conversations. It's not the right place in which to necessarily relate to people, absolutely.When you get distilled down all of your interactions into oh, I've got a notification. Oh, I have a checkmark, and so I have, like, better moderation tools. Oh, like, I made a statement and I don't want to hear a solution for it. We get all of these, uncurated experiences that are so dissatisfying that it does make us miss being around people who can read body language, that can understand my immediate relationship to them in spaces that we choose to be in, whereas Twitter is this big panopticon where we can just get yelled at and yell at each other. And it loves to amplify those conversations far more than any of the touchy-feely, good news success stories.Corey: When you take a look across the entire landscape of managing DevRel programs and ensuring that companies are receiving value for it, and—by which I mean, nurturing the long-term health of communities because yes, I am much more interested in that than I am in next quarter's numbers, how do you see that evolving, particularly with the recent economic recession or correction or drawback or everything's on fire, depending upon who it is you talk to? How do you see that evolving?Alyss: It goes back to what I said earlier about, I can speak in generalities, there will be specifics to various organizations, but at a fundamental part, like, I'll kind of take a step back and maybe make some very strong statements about what I think DevRel is, in a regard, which is, without documentation, without support, you don't have a product. And if you don't have folks going out and understanding what it is your customers need, and especially when those customers are maybe all the time or sometimes developers, and understanding what it is that they're saying and truly how having empathy for what's going on in their day-to-day, what task are they trying to complete, how relevant is this to them, if you don't invest in that, when that happens, you've lost the plot. And so, in those instances, unfortunately, that's a conversation with leadership team. Your leadership doesn't fundamentally understand the value and maybe it's worth it to make the argument in favor of to illustrate that without this feedback loop, without this investment in the educational journey of developers, without the investment in what is going on in our product, and where have we allowed ourselves to remain ignorant of what is happening in the day-to-day of our users. We need those folks.Product managers are in sprints, they're in standups. They're doing, like, strategic planning and their yearly planning. We need a group who is rewarded to care about this but also is innately driven to do so as well. And that's not something that you can make. And it's not something that we otherwise see. It's part of why we have such an absence in good developer marketing is because marketers aren't paid well enough to ever have learned the skills to be developers, and so there's no skills transfer.Corey: One last topic that I want to get into something you've only been doing for a short while, but you've become an advisor at Heavybit, which is a VC firm. How did that come about and what do you do?Alyss: So currently, I—I'll do the super-high level. What I do right now is I host office hours with seed startups and Series A that are in the dev tool space. And we generally talk about developer relations, a little bit in developer marketing go-to-market strategies. And it's super enriching for me because I love hearing about different experiences and problems and, like, areas of practice. But it was really interesting, and a little bit of a make-your-own-luck-and-opportunity type deal.Where I live in Austin, Texas; I do not live in the Bay Area, I don't have all those connections, I've been a bit distant from it. And I saw someone who had accepted a role that I had interviewed for, end up in some of their content. And I was like, “They're doing a great job. They definitely deserve to be there, but I also had similar qualifications, so why should I also be there?” And I found someone, his name's Tim, on LinkedIn, who runs their events. And I reached out and I said, “Hey, Tim, how would you like a new advisor?” And so, Tim responded back and we—Corey: Knock knock. Who's there? It's me.Alyss: Yeah, exactly. It's—and it was just, I want this thing to happen. How do I make it happen? I ask.Corey: And what does it day-to-day that look like? How much time does it take? What do you do exactly?Alyss: Yeah. I mean, right now, it's about five hours every quarter. So, I spend anywhere between 30 minutes to an hour with various organizations that are a part of Heavybit's portfolio, talking with them through their motion to go general availability, or they want to start participating in events, or they want to discover what are the right events for them to—or, like, DevOpsDays, should we participate in that? Should we hire a DevRel person? Should we hire a product marketing person? Just helping them sort wheat from chaff in terms of, like, how to proceed.And so, it's relatively, for me, lightweight. And Heavybit also gives us the opportunity to contribute back in blog posts, participate in podcasts and be able to have some of those richer conversations. So, I have a set of bookmarks, so there's over 100, bookmarks long, that is fully curated across several different categories. That was my first blog post was diving into a few of those where I think are critical areas of developer relations. What are some of the conversations on DevRel metrics? How do I think about setting a DevRel strategy for the first time? How do I do my first DevRel hire? And so, I wouldn't even call it a second job. It's more of a getting to, again, enrich my own experience, see a wider variety of different problems in this space and expand my own understanding.Corey: I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, how you view the world, and basically just come along for the ride as you continue to demonstrate a side of tech that I don't think we get to see very often, where can they find you?Alyss: I am@PreciselyAlyss on Twitter, as well as Twitch. Aside from that, I would not recommend looking for me.Corey: Excellent. Always a good decision. I will put links to that in the [show notes 00:30:00]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Alyss: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Alyss Noland, Head of Developer Relations Relations and Product Marketing at Common Room. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry, insulting comment belittling community and letting the rest of us know by observation just why you've been thrown out of every community to which you've ever been a part.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Telarus
51. What are the customer interactions of the future?

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 36:05


Listen in today with our incredible partner, Ryan Urbanski of Martin Advisory, as we talk trends, tech stacks, customer interactions, and more. Martin Advisory has been consulting for over 10 years, so pay close attention as Ryan shares what he's seen, dissects some customer environments he has been through, and also lays out where he thinks we're headed next! Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. Josh Lupresto (00:15): Hey everybody, welcome back. We are on wrapping up the exciting track of contact center, kind of contact center, CC CX, customer experience, all kinds of good names. This is about specifically the interactions of the future. And, and what you're gonna hear throughout this is you've seen with the contact center practices that it evolves. We have to communicate with our customers, and you have to communicate with your customers in the way that they wanna be communicated with. So I'm excited today to, to hear this from a partner's perspective. So, Ryan Urbanski of Martin Advisory is on with us today. Ryan, thanks so much for coming on, man. Ryan Urbanski (00:52): Hey, thanks Josh. Thanks for having me. Josh Lupresto (00:55): So you know, we, we, we launched this talk track, Ryan, with first hearing from, from Sam Nelson, our fearless leader of the contact center side of the business, the CX practice. We'll get some perspective after that from one of our suppliers and then now on on with you. So before we get in, you know, get into these weeds of, of, of talking about deals and technology and evolution, I just wanna hear about you. Tell us about how did you get started in this? You know, have you always been in tech? Did you start out doing something else, polishing boats? Like what's the story? Ryan Urbanski (01:30): ? No, we Christina and I, we started its organization in oh five. And so we had established it before that we were with mci directly prior to that. And then before that, yeah, just dabbled around in another technology fields. I'd say a little stint with Inner Call a little stint with rhythms. I think Dan was there as well. So just kind of, kind of worked our way through. And then once we decided that cuz there was a line where a lot of the carriers were actually kind of drawing a line in the sand that was delineating the customer service and stuff like that. Similar stories to everybody that started at our time. That's when we created Martin Advisory Group. And so Martin Advisory we, we kept it agnostic. You have no idea who we are, no one knows who Martin is. So we we weren't sure where the company was gonna go at first, so kind of just started it from there and have evolved since then, so to speak. Josh Lupresto (02:30): Love it. And, and evolved you have, right? Obviously huge partner, fantastic partner. Love the the energy and the effort that you guys have. So, so certainly appreciate the partnership. I wanna talk about, you know, you, you started in oh five, right? That the cx we weren't even calling it CX then. And, you know, we weren't contact center, I think met some, met in something different back then. Tell me about where did this, where did the cx, where did contact Center first start, you know, and how did you really learn about that broader contact center landscape? Ryan Urbanski (03:06): Well, the, on the contact center side, I mean, back in the day, right, there really wasn't a lot of cloud solutions or anything for us. So when we heard of a contact center solution, immediately the, the, the flag that went up was, how many minutes can I, you know, can we propose and, and look at solutions for our clients? Right? So you wanted them to have a pretty substantial contact cente...

Telarus
50. What are the customer interactions of the future? with Guest Paul Jarman of NICE CXone

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 24:21


Listen in to this special episode where we get an opportunity to speak with a long-time friend and pioneer in the contact center space, Paul Jarman, of Nice CXone. Paul talks business lessons, along with key paradigm shifts that have happened over the years all of which have created incredible opportunities in the contact center space more than ever before. Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:00): Welcome to the podcast that's designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. Hey everybody, welcome back. I'm your host Josh Lupresto here today. A lot of special stuff going on. We're in the studio, as you can see. We've got a special guest. I'd like to welcome in here, Paul Jarman, CEO of Nice CXone. Paul, thanks for coming in. Paul Jarman (00:29): Hey, great. How you doing today? Josh Lupresto (00:31): I can't complain. I could, but nobody would listen, so doesn't matter. Hey, special special note today. This is a big deal. This is actually episode number 50, so appreciate you coming in, being here in the studio. You know, like we were talking earlier, you guys are a stones throwaway, so love that you could break away and get some time to come out here and excited to do this with you. Paul Jarman (00:51): Well, that's great to be here. We're practically neighbors and you got a great place here and a great studio. So it's great to do the podcast with. Yeah. Josh Lupresto (01:00): So let's talk about where we always like to kick these off. You know, you've been at this, you've built a, an incredible company, but I want to talk about you personally. You know, where, where was your background, how did you start this, and what was that journey like for you? Right? Did you, did you wake up and go, this is, I know what I wanna build, I know what it needs to look like, or was there a path that you took to get to where you were to start this? Paul Jarman (01:24): You know, it's most good stories. This is over 25 years that we've been doing this, and as we began this, it was really, it started in a very different place. So really we started principally in telecommunications. Early on it was a little bit of b2c, and then it became more B2B telecommunications. And then about 2005, we really looked at the market and, and we said, you know, we can't be that unique or special in telecommunications, but we could do something in software. And it was right about then we started to look at the opportunity for cloud software and in we did a small acquisition in 2006 of a company called My City. And that ended up being the very first piece to this puzzle that we started with that created this idea that we could provide cloud-based basically, you know, great software that people could use as a pay as you go service. And, and that started really combining that with our telecommunications that we had been doing for five or six years. And all that started in about 2006, but the company started back right before 2000. And as we, as we started to combine the software with the telecommunications, we started to really see a new growth pattern for us, which was what then became in contact. And obviously what now is NICE CXone? Josh Lupresto (02:49): Yeah, it's been an interesting growth path. I, you know, I came into this space obviously knowing it as as in contact, but there's been such a long history here where you guys have been such a great supplier, great partner. So it's been cool to see it grow cool to see the partners get behind it, the channel get behind it, and it, it, it's been fun, right? And excited for where the future goes of which we'll get into here in just a minute. So let's, let's give a little bit of an overview for anybody that is not, you know, the whole goal of this podcast is to help partners step into a space either deeper if they're in it already or if they're selling something adjacent.

From CPA to CFO
“How Do You Close the Books?” Audit to Accounting, to Sales: FloQast's Shivang Patel Has Done It All

From CPA to CFO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 50:01


Shivang Patel was on track to make audit partner when a client poached him to join his team at a rapidly-growing, soon-to-IPO tech company. After learning the books, Shivang was thriving in his role as Accounting Manager, fully overseeing the Month-End Close, when a chance meeting to discuss a software solution designed to streamline the Close change his professional trajectory forever.Nearing his seventh-anniversary at FloQast, learn how Shivang transitioned from audit to accounting, and from accounting to sales. In this episode of Blood, Sweat & Balance Sheets, Mike and Shivang discuss how he got to FloQast, learning to sell, launching FloQast's Sales Engineering organization, and taking on a new role as Senior Director, Growth Markets, and just what that entails.

Telarus
49. What are the customer interactions of the future?

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 24:52


Listen in as we dive in with Sam Nelson, leader for the Telarus CX Practice. We chat about current trends how the customer expectations are changing, what we are seeing in actual deals, and what to watch out for in the next 12-18 months as new technology enters the space. If you stay till the end and hear a discovery call role play! Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. Hey everybody, welcome back. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is the Next Level BizTech podcast. Today I'm joined with the wonderful Sam Nelson, leader of the Contact Center Practice at Telarus. Sam, thanks for joining today. Sam Nelson (00:30): Thanks for having me, Josh Josh Lupresto (00:31): In studio. So the title of this track is Interactions and Contact Center and, and really what the future that looks like. So we're gonna go through some good stuff today, but before we jump into that journey, what your role is, the experience, all this good stuff. How did you get here? Have, has this been a linear path for you, ? Did you used to make Happy Meals, sell cars? How did you get here? Sam Nelson (00:53): Yeah, When I was two years old, three years old, my first words were, I wanna sell contact center . Absolutely. No, no, I'm kidding. Well, when I was younger, I really wanted to get into sports and until I realized that you actually have to be tall to have an advantage playing tennis. So when I realized that my path to Wimbledon was not going to happen I actually got into sports medicine. That's where I started. Yeah. And then I sat through about 30 minutes of biology and immediately knew that was not for me, . So I switched it to business. I actually started my my job in retail banking, and that's where I got like the first taste of anything having to do with customers. I loved building relationships. People trusted me with their money. It was a great experience. And so it eventually led to finding a sales job in technology, in disruptive technology. And that's how I made it here. Josh Lupresto (01:49): The important thing here to share is that you and I share the fact that we're never gonna bump into any ceiling fans. So Absolutely. With you on the height chain as well. Sam Nelson (01:57): Absolutely. Josh Lupresto (01:58): . Alright, so, so let's talk, you know, there's been an evolution. It's contact center, it's call center, it's all these good things. We're talking about it cx it's about the experience. But talk to me about, you know, the title of this is Interactions, but, but bring this back to center, right? Where are we now? What does this technology solve and what is it encompassing here? Sam Nelson (02:18): Well, what's interesting is the pandemic did a lot of things including the way that we as consumers like to do business with companies, right? We now expect things to show up on our doorstep, not even tomorrow or two days from now, but the same day right. And we're even willing to pay more for better experiences and just for the least path of least resistance, I should say. Right? So the technology leading up to that has changed quite a bit with the way people have set up their roadmaps. Now, from a supplier standpoint, it's leading more toward giving people different options depending on how they prefer to interact, right? Because, you know, like I said, our consumer expectations are so high and we want to reach out to companies the way that we prefer to do so, right? We don't always want to pick up the phone and call somebody we want to text, right? We want to send an email if we don't have time, Right? There's so many different ways. And so what you're seeing now is a shift from, hey, here's my physical doorstep to more of a digital doorstep, right?

Telarus
48. Why Shouldn’t I Run a Security Operations Center? with Guest, Sean Weisenburger

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 38:11


Listen in today as we talk with our partner, Sean Weisenburger of JIL Communications. Sean has been immersed in Security for 20+ years, originally as an MSP, and also as a seller. His angle of viewing security as a risk is very complimentary to how he helps customers leverage the power and economies of scale when it's time to add Security Operations. Find out for Sean how it all started with the computer store next door! Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. Hey everybody, welcome back. I'm here wrapping up the security track. You know, we were on, if you, if you tuned in a couple weeks ago, we started this with Jeff Hathcote, and we got his purview, Telarus solution architect, and then we went and we talked to Ben Bowman of Masergy talked about all the things that, the great things that Masergy's doing with SOC and, and SEM and MDR and all of that. Now we're on with Sean Weisenburger of JIL Communications, the Man of the Hour. Sean, thanks for coming on, man. Sean Weisenburger (00:42): Hey, thanks for having me. I appreciate it, Josh. Josh Lupresto (00:45): Sean, I'd like to kick these off with any unique background or any blackmail I can use against you later, however this translates. But I really just wanna know, how did you get started? How long have you been in it? Where did you start? And then we'll learn a little bit about JIL Sean Weisenburger (00:59): I'm going to contribute this to my father, actually, because he used to work for a bank doing the ATM network, right? Mm-Hmm. And he, and this was like mid eighties, late eighties, right? And he always had the coolest toys to bring home. I mean, these things were suitcases, right? Of these, these computers and everything. And we would sit there and just bang on 'em and, and kind of, you know, kick it around. And before I know it, I had a a Commodore 64, a Tandy T 100, all of the evolution of those and everything. And I can remember from my eighth, my eighth grade, like dissertation final project, right? We, we were writing programming, we were writing programming, basic, right? No big deal, you know, 10 print, go-to 10, you know, that kind of stuff, right? Mm-Hmm. pretty Simple. So I did a kind of a whole program, and I, you know, I, this was all pre-done. Sean Weisenburger (01:56): Everything. I just hit play, man. And the, and the, the whole class was amazed of what we were doing. So it was, it was kind of cool. So that kind of spun my propeller head right there. You know, you get a little older, you kind of get away from it. You're 16, you know what happens, you know when, when that happens, right? So there's stories in there, we won't go for it. Yeah. Yeah. But, but but really after I was working, you know, I started as a paperboy, went to a lumber yard, was working through there. Kind of got my business knowledge from just that retail sales acumen. Next door there was a a computer shop next door, right? And one of the, with the sales managers would go over there and, and actually on the side build clones, right? Clone computers all day long. Sean Weisenburger (02:45): And that just fascinated me. This was 94 or five, like right when Windows 95 was coming out. So, yeah. You know, we were all on dos. And this 95 was like, oh my gosh, gooey, gooey, gooey, right? Mm-Hmm. , it was so cool. Mm-Hmm. everything. So yeah. So I got really interested in that piece of it, and I decided to apply for a position at a local var integrator here in Louisville, Kentucky, entree computers. And my first real, real quote, real sales job was going out and getting clients to buy networks and printers and all these devices and services,...

Satellite Stories
Antarctica Revisited: Trek To The South Pole #ChallengeAccepted

Satellite Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 15:24


“When Robert first went to the South Pole, back in 1985, believe it or not there were actually more people that had been to the moon than had actually been to the South Pole!”Gez Draycott, Vice President of Sales Engineering at SES returns to the Satellite Stories podcast with a follow up of the latest twists and turns working with explorer Robert Swan. He announces that SES will be sponsoring him to head back to Antarctica for Robert's next expedition - but this time they'll be pushing the boundary further physically and technically than any of SES's other ESG feats to date: #ChallengeAcceptedListen back to our earlier episodes, when we supported Robert and the 2041 ClimateForce expedition in March 2022: https://www.ses.com/podcasts/live-streaming-antarctica-part-1-whyhttps://www.ses.com/podcasts/live-streaming-antarctica-part-2-howAnd to follow Gez's progress visit instagram.com/gez_antarctica and www.gdraycott.co.uk Satellite Stories podcast is presented by SES Senior Creative, Kristina Smith-Meyer.If you'd like to find out more about the technology and causes we're supporting with our Corporate Social Responsibility team - you can read more on our ESG page.

Telarus
47. Why shouldn’t I run a Security Operations Center on my own? With Guest Ben Bohman

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 32:35


Listen in as Ben Bohman, Director of Solution Engineering Comcast Masergy talks about the value a customer gets from their Security Operations Center, with everything from endpoint detection to threat hunting and remediation. The price to value in this offering is unparalleled! Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. Hey everybody, welcome back. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering here at t Telarus. Today we are on talking Security, but we're talking with Ben Bowman, the man with the most well manicured beard in the channel. He's also the director of Solution Engineering for Comcast and Masergy on the indirect channel. Ben, welcome on my man. Ben Bohman (00:38): Hey, thanks Josh. Thanks for having me. Josh Lupresto (00:41): So today the track is why should I not run a security operations center on my own, obviously from the customer perspective. So Ben, before we kind of get into a little bit of the why and your product sets and some, some deals and things like that, I wanna hear your story. Uh, talk to me about your personal background, how you got into this world. Is it a linear path and you always wanted to be this, or did you have some crazy jobs along the way? Ben Bohman (01:08): Yeah, I'd say this definitely wasn't linear, and even working in technology was kind of a nod. Like if I go back to like my days in high school and what I was focused on, it definitely nothing in technology and fast. In fact, when I got my first technology job, I had never even own a computer at that point. But anyhow, I was reading a newspaper at a Denny's, I was working as a waiter at Denny's when I was 18 years old. And it was back when the MCSE were getting very popular, right? Mm-hmm. , the, the Microsoft certifications were gaining traction. I heard some side people talking about people were making a ton of money as an mcse, and that really was the motivation. I was like, well, maybe I don't have to work at Denny's anymore, or something like that. And so I went and signed up for a MCSE course, uh, ended up getting my certification, was hired by a friend of mine who was running a IT department. Ben Bohman (01:58): He was an IT director for an international printing company, uh, out in Utah. And he hired me on just part-time to gimme a little bit of experience. And that just kind of took off from there. He actually quit one year later. I started running the computer department after like one year of total computer experience. , it's all, yeah, it's all surreal to me. I mean, literally, like I didn't, he gave me my first computer as a Windows 95 by 86, a three by 86, like Windows 95 machine, because I own one, but I just somehow picked it up. I mean, Google was my best friend, right? . I just would Google everything and, and within two years, you know, I was, I was running the department and it just, again, it just kind of organically worked out. And then I ended up getting into the consulting side of things after that. And I think that was great, experiencing that buying side and being the IT director, and then also like getting into the consulting and understanding that, but understanding the pain points that you have when you're dealing with vendors, especially the communication and all the, all those kind of problems in technology. You know, it, it helped me a ton. Josh Lupresto (03:02): So, uh, what I heard from that is that next time we get together, we're going to Denny's, Ben Bohman (03:06): We're going Josh Lupresto (03:07): Where? To Denny's? Ben Bohman (03:08): Yes. Denny's, . I was, I was a great waiter at Denny's. And I, you know, what's funny is I always talk about like, uh, EQ over IQ when it comes to technology and eng...

Telarus
46. Why shouldn’t I run a Security Operations Center on my own? With Guest Jeff Hathcote

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 41:02


Tune in as we speak with Jeff Hathcote, Telarus Solution Architect for Security, and one of the most advanced security architects around. He talks about Security Operations and how, as a customer, why you should NOT try to build one on your own. Jeff has 20+ years of real-world practice building, managing, and designing under his belt, along with the foremost security certifications in the channel! Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. Hey everybody, welcome back. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto. Today I am joined with the world's most interesting man, Jeff Hathcote, Telarus Security architect. Jeff, welcome back to the show, my friend. Jeff Hathcote (00:31): Thank you, sir. Glad to be here. Josh Lupresto (00:34): Today we're talking about security. We're talking about a security operations center, a SOC, and making a bold claim as to why it's a really bad idea to run one on my own. Before we get to that, I want to talk a little bit about, for anybody that didn't tune in to season one, your background, how did you get here? Give us a quick, uh, quick summary on that and then we'll get started. Jeff Hathcote (00:59): I, I was the kid, Josh, there was the geek back before there were such things as geeks. Uh, I actually had an old Radio Shack, TRS 80 Model three, if you're, you're still too young to remember those. Josh Lupresto (01:13): What's Radio Shack? Jeff Hathcote (01:15): Yeah, exactly. That was a, that was a very cool computer and I even had a dot matrix printer attached to it, so I got very interested in that. Uh, just kinda learned on my own, learned how to, you know, write things in basic, actually did a little, uh, little machine code as well. And it just, it was fascinating to me. And this was about the time that the original, uh, war Games movie came out. So I saw that and I went, oh, yeah, that's what I wanna do. Uh, never, never ne never went that direction. Uh, but in college, uh, I was always interested in this new technology that was coming around. The only curriculum that my particular university had was called Mathematical computing, which did not interest me in the lease, even though I did take some programming classes. Uh, I just tinkered. I was a tinkerer. I would take things apart, put them back together, figure out how they worked. Uh, and that led me to, you know, this just career of exploration. I worked in law enforcement. I actually worked in the prison system. I worked my way through college in the Louisiana State Department of Corrections, uh, which allowed me to enhance my technical skills. Cause I ran the commissary where inmates bought things. Josh Lupresto (02:33): This is gonna be a whole podcast, but go ahead. Yeah, Jeff Hathcote (02:37): They bought their cigarettes and their ice cream and things of that nature. But I was one of the few organizations that had a, at a computer. And I found out quickly that I was attached to the entire, uh, department of Public for the state of Louisiana, which allowed to and print driving things of that nature. And I found some I some holes and I was able to report those up and, you know, we'd get them fixed. And that just got me interested in the security aspect. Moved on, went to the, went to work for the federal government in the same capacity with Federal Bureau Prisons, and was actually one of the first, or the, the charter member really, of the group that built at the time was called Computer Services, which is now obviously it, but I was part of that initial group that built the policies and procedures and created a division within a, within a government bureau. Jeff Hathcote (03:33): Uh, security was always a big part of that right there. Was it, I was an application developer, software guy.

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#242 What Account Managers and Sales Engineers Need from Each Other

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 55:58


Michael Griego is a world-class sales trainer and sales effectiveness management consultant based in California. In the last 20 years, he's founded MXL Partners a Silicon Valley-based sales effectiveness consulting and training firm. He's conducted sales management consulting for companies around the world and has led sales training for thousands of salespeople in companies ranging from Silicon Valley startups to Fortune 500 firms. His books are 42 Rules to Increase Sales Effectiveness and No Excuses! A Better Way to Sell.  David McCulley is the Senior Vice President of Sales Engineering at Provarity, a full lifecycle and continuous Proof-of-Value platform that provides enterprise sales and purchase stakeholders with real-time visibility, seamless collaboration, and AI-powered insights. Provarity's platform combines intelligent services for workflow management and collaboration and success monitoring to transform how businesses, partners, and customers manage the enterprise customer lifecycle. https://wethesalesengineers.com/show242

Telarus
45. So you’re in Azure, now what? – with Aaron Bock

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 40:56


Listen in as we talk with Aaron Bock of Opkalla and how he went from an IT Accounting job to starting Opkalla where they solve infrastructure and technology problems. They have a deep focus around Microsoft and an in-depth understanding of the infrastructure provider landscape. We talk roadblocks, deals, and more! Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering, at Telarus, and this is Next Level BizTech. All right, everybody. Welcome. We are back on another cloud track. Excited to be here today with somebody else that has a cool mic. Also does a podcast and can talk cloud. This is, this might be like a trifecta here. So Aaron, Aaron Bock of Upcall. Thanks for coming on, man. Aaron Bock (00:33): Yeah, thanks for having me, Josh. Really excited for this one. That's a sweet intro that you do. Josh Lupresto (00:39): Hey, I, I, I gotta try to keep up with the It Matters podcast, man. So I'm doing the best I can over here. Aaron Bock (00:45): We cheat. We we outsource the intro so it's not my voice. Josh Lupresto (00:49): Oh, secrets. People are learning. They're getting secrets. Fair enough. Right? We're adding value. Aaron Bock (00:54): Well, I think they'd figure it out real quick. It's a, it's a, it's a female's voice right off the bat, so I'm not that good. Fair, Josh Lupresto (01:01): Fair, fair enough. All right, so today we're talking about Azure. We're talking about cloud. I, if you tuned into the first episode of this track, we got Kobe Phillips, who leads out the Telarus Cloud practice talking about what we're doing you know, and, and what our purview on, on this is. And then we heard from one of our providers of, of their play and Azure, their modernization strategy, the different things that they can do. And now we get to the good part here where we get to hear from Aaron and, and his purview on cloud and how he approaches this. And so, Aaron, maybe if you can kick us off a little bit. I always love to hear how everybody got started in this space. Were you always destined to do this? Did you, did you stumble into this? What's your path? Aaron Bock (01:42): Yeah, no, definitely not destined to do this. And it's, it's, it's funny, I love to hear the story of people's paths, how they got there. But for me personally, I went to college as a finance major. I took a job at a big four accounting for firm thinking I was doing, kind of auditing for financials. And it ended up being, it auditing, they called it risk risk assurance, which there's no way I would've known that was it unless they told me. And I maybe didn't listen . So I ended, I ended up auditing kinda IT systems access change management like monitoring controls. And after a while realized I didn't really like, I liked the tech, I liked what the IT stuff was, and kind of listening to the customer's problems, I didn't like just the endless amounts of documentation testing. Aaron Bock (02:32): And so at that point in my career, I switched into a sales and I was selling for a data center maintenance third party data center, maintenance company. Very small niche in a market that exists in a lot of companies back, you know, before cloud was a thing. So everyone had on-prem data centers, servers would get older, we would support them. And I think along the way, what I realized was typically tech trends, the ones that catch on, they take a little while and you hear about them for a long time. Mm-Hmm. . And I kept hearing like every place I was at, like, no, you know, cloud's not gonna totally disrupt us. Like it's actually helping us, blah. And when you hear people try to spin something like that, you kind of know it's coming. Mm-Hmm. . And so I remember at the company I was at, they would stand up on stage and say, no, everyone moving to AWS is great for us.

Telarus
44. So you’re in Azure, what’s next? With Guest Chad Muckenfuss

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 30:22


Tune in to listen as we chat with Chad Muckenfuss, Director of Channel, from Ancero. Ancero is a leading Managed Service Provider with a core focus on all things Microsoft & Azure. We talk about licenses, infrastructure & modernization, along with how to fully uncover these types of customers. You might even hear about how not only does Chad run the channel for Ancero, but may or may not have a cattle farm... Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering, at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. All right, everybody, welcome back to another episode. We are here, we are talking cloud, we're talking Azure, and I'm on with my good friend Chad Muckenfuss, director of channel from Ancero. Chad, welcome on my man. Chad Muckenfuss (00:32): Well, thanks for having me, Josh. I'm, uh, I'm excited to talk Azure with you today. Josh Lupresto (00:37): Uh, we got a, we got a lot, uh, to talk about. We could, we could certainly narrow this down. But before we do that, before we get into the, the nuts and bolts, uh, I wanna talk a little bit about you. Uh, we'll get to Ancero, but my favorite part of this whole thing is hearing everybody's background story. So, Chad, how did you get here? Did you, did you grow up and say, I'm destined to do Azure and all that fun stuff, or what's the course? Man? Chad Muckenfuss (00:59): No, it's, it's a windy path for sure. Um, so, uh, born and raised in the greater Philadelphia area in Southern New Jersey. Um, I, uh, I went to Temple University. My degree is in telecommunications and new technologies. Um, one of the few universities that offered that back in the day. Um, showing my age a little bit with that, but, uh, regardless, I've always liked technology, uh, always liked to play in that world. Um, but it, my career post-college did not take me right to that place. Um, I went, uh, and worked for, um, a children's video company as a national marketer right outta college. Uh, traveled the whole US worked, um, primarily in retail stores and all that type of thing. And then from there, um, I started a, um, a, an auto franchise, uh, when General Motors bought Hummer. Um, I started a Hummer franchise in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, and ran that for about six years. Chad Muckenfuss (01:55): And then finally transitioned into the technology space, um, back when T1s were still, uh, in use and all that regular fund stuff. And, uh, just have grown. Um, always worked in the channel, either, um, on the partner agent side or on, um, on the channel side for, uh, for the different suppliers and really, really like the channel. Have always liked the channel, um, but have been challenged host, uh, post telecom to really grow in cloud. So for the past, uh, three to five years, been focused on that, really digging into it, um, aligning myself with, with some people that are very knowledgeable, uh, like yourself and the whole team there that really understand the cloud and where it's going and what it's doing. Um, and hopefully on that trajectory of, of where it's gonna go in the next five years and, and how, you know, currently we can help some, uh, some partners and everything learn how to leverage the cloud. Chad Muckenfuss (02:53): It's, it's a difficult transition for a lot of the partners, and that's one of the key things I think we'll touch on today. And as a side note, um, outside of my day job here, I, I own and operate a cattle farm. And, um, so, so something a little bit, uh, different, uh, born and raised, I'm third generation, uh, purchased a family farm about, uh, 16 years ago. And so, uh, we raise currently about between 30 and 40 head of beef cattle. Um, I have, uh, pigs. So we have 10 pigs now and about 150 chickens for eggs. And, um, so I leave work every day and, and go home and, and play farmer for, uh,

Horizen
ZenCon0 2022 Panel: The Art of the Game

Horizen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 22:42


ZenCon0 is the first Horizen Ecosystem Summit to celebrate what we have achieved, share ideas for growth, and envision the future of the broader Horizen ecosystem. We welcomed partners, advisors, and community members on stage to discuss visions and expertise in the area.  Moderator: Maurizio Binello, VP of Sales Engineering at Horizen Labs Panelists: David Johansson, CEO at Metaking Studios and Blocklords Gareb Shamus, Founder at Heromaker Studios Roberto Reigada, Senior Offensive Security Engineer at Halborn Jonathan Teplitsky, CEO at Pipeline Marketing Sebastian Radu, Chief Strategy Officer at Banger Games Event website: https://zencon.events/ ***** Twitter: https://twitter.com/horizenglobal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/horizenglobal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/horizenglobal/ Reddit page: https://www.reddit.com/r/Horizen/ Discord channel: https://horizen.global/invite/discord Telegram channel: https://t.me/horizencommunity Website: https://horizen.io Horizen on CoinMarketCap – https://bit.ly/ZENCoinMarketCap Horizen on CoinGecko – https://bit.ly/ZENCoinGecko

Software Process and Measurement Cast
SPaMCAST 730 - Solving Problems As A Sales Engineer, A Conversation With Ramzi Marjaba

Software Process and Measurement Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 31:19


The SPaMCAST 730 features our conversation with Ramzi Marjaba. Ramzi and I discussed the role of a sales engineer. The role solves customers' problems and is a bridge between customers and technical teams. With all that going for it, why is it a forgotten job path for people with deep technical acumen?  Ramzi is an established Sales Engineer and the Founder of We The Sales Engineers and found his calling in helping people change their lives for the better, either by breaking into the difficult world of Sales Engineering or upskilling their current skill levels to get that pay raise and promotion. Contact Information Website  https://wethesalesengineers.com/ or wetheses.com   Ramzi's LinkedIn Profile linkedin.com/in/ramzimarjaba  Email rmarjaba@gmail.com   Podcast https://apple.co/3EdrUlb   Twitter WeTheSEs Re-read Saturday News This week we re-read Chapter 3 of Extraordinarily Badass Agile Coaching: The Journey from Beginner to Mastery and Beyond (Amazon Associate Link). In Chapter 3, Agile Coaching Framework, the authors create a line in the sand stating “professional badass agile coaching needs to support and model a multivariate framework that supports all aspects (stances) of our craft.”   Week 4:  Agile Coaching Frameworks - http://bit.ly/3Ok60S7  Previous Weeks: Week 1: Logistics and Forewords - https://bit.ly/3zoAYlx  Week 2: Introduction to Badassery in Agile Coaching  - https://bit.ly/3hcEPMs  Week 3: The Mindset of the Badass Agile Coach - http://bit.ly/3Eu0qJu  A quick advertisement: Controlling work entry requires preparation and knowledge, building to establishing a path to control work entry (magic wands are normally not available), which is why Jeremy Willets and I have developed a work entry workshop. Interested? Please email us at tcagley@tomcagley.com or willetsjm@gmail.com Next SPaMCAST  The SPaMCAST 731 continues our answer to the question: if one product owner is good, aren't two, three, or four better? We will also have a visit from Jon M Quigley who brings his Alpha and Omega of Product Development column to the podcast.   

Telarus
43. So you’re in Azure, what’s next? With guest Koby Phillips

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 41:19


Buckle up as we talk Microsoft Azure and cloud strategy with Koby Phillips, leader for the Telarus Cloud Practice. If you have customer moving or considering a move to Azure, you'll want to listen in. We dissect trends around key business drivers along with when a technical conversation works and when a business outcomes conversation makes more sense! Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering, at Telarus, and this is Next Level BizTech. Hey everybody, welcome back. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering, at Telarus, and this is Next Level BizTech. Today we're here in studio with Koby Phillips, VP of the Cloud Practice. We're back on season two and we're talking about Azure. So we're, we're moving to Azure. We've made the move. Where do we go from there? Koby, welcome. Thanks for agreeing to come on and do this again with me again. Koby Phillips (00:39): Yeah, man, I appreciate you having me. It's always great to be your 19th guest of the year, Josh Lupresto (00:43): . So more about you. I want to hear a little bit about your background. Refresh us, how did you get here? Your path? Koby Phillips (00:52): Yes so VP of cloud now, right? So super, super straightforward path to get here. Started off in Telco worked at Telarus, and then a data center, and then now VP at Cloud. So, totally makes sense, but no, in all reality, what, what's happened is I started off at a little clec Integra left there, went to TW, got gobbled at by level three moved over started as an spdm here at Telarus a few years back. Moved into an RVP role for exiting the company for a bit and went to work at Equinex data center provider. That really opened in my eyes to a lot of things. It set at a lot of the center of a lot of technology. You see a lot of you know, the on ramps to get to Azure, to get to aws, all reside within there. Koby Phillips (01:41): And so there's a lot of communication, a lot of ecosystem discussions, and it made a lot of sense to come back knowing the channel community and then knowing, you know, where we wanted to go to come back and really help build out this cloud practice. It was real interesting when we started it, right? 2020 January. So that was a really good time to build something out. Why not? The, the original strategy was really to go out and meet with a bunch of partners, do a bunch of, you know, academies and shows, and we all know how that turned out. Mm-Hmm. . So we, we pivoted, we did a lot of digital education and have we worked through it. What we really started to build is an impressive entire practice, right? It was kind of, you know, utilizing a couple of the engineers at, at the beginning going out and doing a bunch of deals. Then we have architects, we have engineers that are certified across the board. I would, you know, put up that team against anybody in the industry. And what we've been able to focus on is extending out, you know, where we're going, what products are available, and really start to work on the business, not just in the business as much. And we've seen a tremendous growth in partner participation as well as the RC component, which are both, you know, tremendous successes so far. Josh Lupresto (03:02): All important for sure. Give us maybe an example. Hit us with something here. I mean, you see a lot of things. We see a lot of deals, we have a lot of conversations. I'd like to hear something from you. I mean, we're talking about Azure people that have already made a little bit of a move, but gimme something that you've seen a mistake that people have made something out there where, you know, whether that was a business decision, a technical decision, just what are you seeing? Koby Phillips (03:26): I can give you a combination of both.

Construct Your Life With Austin Linney
Blockchain: How it will change everything with Russell Korus & Corey Cottrell | Construct your life #451

Construct Your Life With Austin Linney

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 51:08


Co-founder of EZ365, and CEO of publicly traded Wee-Cig International, Russell is a futurist and visionary. He has been a blockchain and cryptocurrency evangelist since first discovering this groundbreaking technology 8 years ago. A TEDx alumnus and having spoken around the world, Russell is a globally recognized thought leader. He is also a leading innovator, and is deeply immersed in the amazing new world of NFTs. While his career began in the financial services and insurance industries, Russell noted the rapidly growing influence of technology in the late 90's and switched careers to begin building e-commerce platforms in a java environment. After several years of development work, Russell moved into Sales Engineering, eventually running the Sales Engineering departments at several prominent technology firms. From there, Russell moving into full time investment, searching out emerging markets and emerging technologies. This led him to discover Bitcoin in 2014, and from there he never looked back. Russell's vision is to bring cryptocurrency to the masses in an easy and secure way.   Get in touch with Russel: https://www.linkedin.com/in/russell-korus-ez/?originalSubdomain=ca Who's Corey Cottrell and what is The Uplift? Corey is the co-founder of Uplift, an adaptable economics. Human focused. Centered around creating more and more network effect (connect communities together). It means we have a real shot to make a 1.0 version of Ready Player One centered around the principles of COMMUNITY and GRATITUDE instead of greed. It means friends, families, and businesses can connect with a sense of PLACENESS and build those connections up contextually over time. It means we can encode our shared history into a digital strata that you can visit by walking through it years later. The Uplift is built on blockchain because you can own what you play with. This, ultimately, is the only reason it can exist as it does as all. The Uplift of the future is an expanding metaverse that is multi-chain, multi-platform (not just Minecraft), 4-dimensional Spotify/Ebay for everything from NFTs to sneakers, with thousands of games/quests, thousands of interconnected tokens and DAOs.   Follow @coreycottrell on FB and twitter.  

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#239 The Benefits of the Traditionally Long Path To Sales Engineering

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 48:52


James Connor McCann is a Pre-sales Consultant for CyberRes which is a dedicated business unit from MicroFocus, which specializes in cyber resilience specifically. He has been with the organization for 12 years since graduating from university. He started in support before transitioning to a Solutions Consultant which is the presales role at the same company. He's got to cover the Netherlands, Nordics, UK & Ireland and is currently based in Belfast.   Shownotes: wethesalesengineers.com/show239

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#238 Overcoming Lone Ranger Syndrome and Becoming a Great Team Member

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 49:25


Cyrus Harbin is a sales engineer, Marine Corps veteran, content creator and host of the podcast Tech is the New Black. Before working in sales engineering, Cyrus was a full-time travelling poet and public event speaker.  With over 6+ years of experience in sales and profit optimization, customer service, IT systems security and management, and cross-functional teams leadership, Cyrus dedicate much of his personal time to my Patreon community assisting mainly black and brown men and women (basically POCs like myself) and others from under-represented groups to consider careers in the tech industry.   https://wethesalesengineers.com/show238

Being an Engineer
Ramzi Marjaba | Sales Engineering & Using Story to Communicate Impact

Being an Engineer

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 52:54 Transcription Available


Ramzi Marjaba holds a bachelor's degree in engineering as well as a Master's degree in Engineering Management. He started his career in software development and eventually made his way into the sales engineer world. He is currently a senior sales engineer with Keysight Technologies, and also runs the website WeTheSalesEngineers.com where he helps other sales engineers develop the skills to succeed.https://wethesalesengineers.com/podcasts/https://wethesalesengineers.com/aaronAaron Moncur, hostWe hope you enjoyed this episode of the Being an Engineer Podcast.Help us rank as the #1 engineering podcast on Apple and Spotify by leaving a review for us.You can find us under the category: mechanical engineering podcast on Apple Podcasts.Being an Engineer podcast is a go-to resource and podcast for engineering students on Spotify, too.Aaron Moncur and Rafael Testai love hearing from their listeners, so feel free to email us, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and subscribe on Apple Podcast and Spotify! About Being An EngineerThe Being An Engineer podcast is a repository for industry knowledge and a tool through which engineers learn about and connect with relevant companies, technologies, people resources, and opportunities. We feature successful mechanical engineers and interview engineers who are passionate about their work and who made a great impact on the engineering community.The Being An Engineer podcast is brought to you by Pipeline Design & Engineering. Pipeline partners with medical & other device engineering teams who need turnkey equipment such as cycle test machines, custom test fixtures, automation equipment, assembly jigs, inspection stations and more. You can find us on the web at www.teampipeline.us 

Telarus
Solving the massive talent shortage in Security & Tech with Chris Moore

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 35:28


Hear Chris discuss how his winding path went from restaurants and management to Security and Innovation. Join us as Chris Moore, VP of Solutions Architecture for Thrive lays out the key problems facing customers in the midst of this massive tech talent shortage. Thrive has tons of tools, but more importantly, the talent to manage just about any customer environment while modernizing and augmenting whatever technology they might run up against. Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering, Telarus, and this is Next Level BizTech. Hi everybody, welcome back. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, and today we are joined by a good man, Chris Moore, VP of Solution Architecture for Thrive. Chris, thanks for jumping on with me, man. Chris Moore (00:28): Josh, thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it. Josh Lupresto (00:31): So, title today we're talking about, you know, in this managed services world, but more importantly we're laying a claim. We're saying it's really hard and it's real, the talent shortage in technology, you know, in security in cloud, all of these things, right? So, so we're gonna get to that. I'm excited to kind of hear, obviously you guys have a lot of incredible solutions around that, and we'll get into that as we go. And we're gonna try to answer this. Now, more importantly, though, I wanna hear about your background. You know, if, look, if you've had a, you've had a great linear path and you knew exactly what you wanted to be your entire life, kudos to you. But if you took some weird, windy path and you, you know, you used to train goldfish or whatever, that's okay too. So, first of all, tell me about your background, Chris, let everybody know kind of how you got here. Chris Moore (01:18): Absolutely. Thanks Josh. So, as a kid my dad brought home this lovely IBM computer, and I turned on the monitor. I was like, What the heck is this? I'm looking at, And there was a five and a quarter inch floppy sitting next to it, and I plugged it in the 28 discs or whatever it was to get it Lotus 1, 2, 3 loaded up. Then the next evolution came. I was like, Oh, we can put this modem in it and I can get Prodigy loaded up and everything's good. And then as I progressed through my childhood I didn't honestly really play that much for the computers. I got sucked into working at restaurants and washing dishes and helping the bartenders and all that good stuff. And then I realized when I went to college, I wanted to go get my restaurant resort management degree. Chris Moore (02:07): So that's what I started off down that path. And then right around that time is right when the the CD writers came out where you could burn your own music onto, yeah, CDs. And they were all running by a parallel port, and you expect hundreds and thousands of dollars on CDs that never burnt correctly, and you threw 'em out. And it was right around that point in time where I decided actually, I want to go do something with computers for a career. So I went down and saw my counselor, said, Hey, I wanna change majors. And she looked at me and she goes, Well, if you wanna be here for three more years, and I had about 18 months left, right? So she goes, If you wanna be here for three more years, then you can change majors. And I looked at her and said, Nope, I'll get my degree, and then I'll go do what I want to do. So I did, and ironically, my first job out of college was working at a national restaurant chain on their help desk. Josh Lupresto (03:05): Ah. Chris Moore (03:06): So from there, I did help desk support. I went out to restaurants, pulled CAT5 cable, redid their POS systems, and kind of terminated everything you know, at two o'clock in the morning after the restaurant had closed, and then came back in the next morning and trained the...

Kubernetes Bytes
Part 2 - Live from Kubecon North America 2022 - Interviews with Redis, Teleport, Instruqt, and Pulumi

Kubernetes Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 41:24


In this part - 2 episode of Kubernetes Bytes - live from Detroit during the Kubecon + CloudNativeCon North America 2022, Ryan Wallner and Bhavin Shah talk to guests on the show floor and learn more about what's new at Kubecon, what are their thoughts on Day 0 events, Keynotes, etc, and also share some things to do in Detroit. They talk to Brad Ascar - Principal Product Manager at Redis, Ben A - Developer Relations at Teleport, Sean Carolan - Director of Sales Engineering at Instruqt, Scott Lowe - Developer Relations at Pulumi. Show Notes: Redis Active - Active Databases on Kubernetes What's new with Pulumi + Kubernetes Oct 2022 Teleport at Kubecon 2022 Buddy's Pizza - Detroit Happy's Pizza - Detroit Instruqt

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#237 From SDR to Global Sales Engineer Manager in 5 Years

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 56:07


Sarah Halley is currently the director of solutions engineers at Ungerboeck. After she graduated, she moved to South Africa and worked as a marketing intern. Funnily enough, she fell in love with sales engineering when she came home to Germany. Sarah experienced working in an SDR position but it wasn't her favorite later on she found what she enjoys most and it helped her grow.  

Telarus
40. Security Part 1 – Jason Stein with Telarus

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 19:50


Tune in as we learn how Jason Stein went from theology to bartending and ultimately landed on Security! Hear him discuss the key issues facing most customers right now in security and what you can do to get in front of them. Transcript of episode can be found below. Josh Lupresto (00:01): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus. And this is Next Level BizTech. Josh Lupresto (00:19): Welcome!Excited to be back. We are here it is season two. It, you know, we're, we're diving in, we've got so much technology to talk about, but today we're kicking it off with managed services and we're talking about something near and dear. The technology landscape has changed and we got a talent shortage out there. This manifests itself everywhere, but today specifically, we're talking about security. So we're back kicking off season two with the man, the myth, the legend. Jason Stein, head of the security practice at Telarus. Jason, thanks for agreeing to come back again. Jason Stein (00:52): Thanks for having me. What's going on? Josh Lupresto (00:55): Oh, we live the dream. Man, where do we, where do we kick this off? So if anybody goes back and listens to season one, we talked about your background where you thought you were gonna be a practicing theologian and then you maybe were a bartender. So you gotta go back and listen to that story. We're not gonna give it away again. Today we're gonna talk a little bit about what's the problem, How did we get here, Why is this such a big deal? Jason Stein (01:24): So when you think about the talent shortage, it's massive in the industry right now. There's just not enough resources that are focused on security. Security's kind of become a hot topic over the last 10 years since I think the target compromise. And so we've tried to escalate and get people accelerated into the security world, but there's just not enough people. So there's 2.7 million jobs available. So by the time he finally finds somebody, that guy's got 10 other job offers. So if he doesn't like the vision, the direction, the budget, he's just gonna leave. Or he is gonna implement all of his security measures and then go to the next organization. So we see a lot of companies not sure what to do. So they're coming to us and we're actually helping them with a virtual chief security officer. We're coming in with a SOC approach, a security operation center, and giving them a team of people that are experts that you don't have to worry about turnover. If you do find one security person, chances are you can't staff at 24 by seven, cuz you need six to nine to even remotely be able to function properly. Josh Lupresto (02:27): Well, it seems like if, if we look at, since the last time we've talked, right, it's been a little while and, and it seems like, you know, the security people were hard to find before. I mean, we can't even find people now. Customers can't find people to manage an end device, endpoint security, the soc, the sim, any of that stuff. What has anything changed that has made you more optimistic that this talent shortage is gonna magically fix itself in the next 12 to 18 months? Or what's your perspective there? Jason Stein (02:55): Well, if you think about it, the technology just keeps changing as fast as we get, get people ramped up on the current technology, it changes overnight. 75% of CIO CTOs and CISOs say they want new innovative technology to help protect their organization. So how are you gonna get new innovative technology and yet find somebody who's up to speed on that new technology? So it, I'm optimistic that people will get caught up to the technology that we have today, but here in two years, think about all the technology that's changed over the last three years with zero Trust and sassy and protecting on the edge, and then MDR and now XDR.

Sales Enablement Society - Stories From The Trenches
Ep. 39 Pt. 2 - John Care - Effective Enablement For Sales Engineers

Sales Enablement Society - Stories From The Trenches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 29:35


What are the areas of professional development that Sales Engineers are interested in but that many Sales Enablement teams miss? How can Revenue Enablement teams generate excitement and boost morale within Sales Engineering teams? What do  customers say they want Sales Engineers enabled to  do well?John Care, Author and Managing Director of Mastering Technical Sales shares his insights with me in this 2 part series. In Part 2 we focus on discovering and developing professional development pathways for SEs that focus on the experiences and skills they're most interested in developing. Since 35% of SEs say they'd like to go into leadership we also cover how to help them prepare for that career goal.During his career, John built world-class sales engineering organizations at Oracle, Sybase, Business Objects, Nortel, CA Technologies, and HP. His responsibilities have varied from an individual level up to a VP of Presales running teams of over 200 people. He also has diverse experiences as both a quota-carrying salesperson and a senior IT executive/ CIO listening to salespeople and presales engineers trying to sell him their “solutions.”

The Wireless Way, with Chris Whitaker
Josh Lupresto, Host of "Next Level Biz Tech" podcast and SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus, discusses egos, ugly babies and vacuum cleaners. Oh, and his favorite technology.

The Wireless Way, with Chris Whitaker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 38:24


Watch the video version of this podcast- https://youtu.be/lzAgiVJQWDkJosh and I have worked together for several years. He is in the small class of technologist that fires on all cylinders.  Smart, funny, humble and confident.  Could not be a better leader for our sales engineering team. Check out Josh's own Podcast- Next Level Biz Tech. Telarus Spotify Channel: http://ow.ly/OtFv50KWmEATelarus Apple Podcast Channel: http://ow.ly/IuI450KWmECJosh Lupresto was born and raised in South Bend, IN, where he began his professional career in the automotive field. Upon relocating to Utah, Josh completed his bachelor's degree in Communications and Engineering Technology and transitioned his career into a system engineer with Telecom Recovery. Within his role, Josh began working with customers and managing a prod/devAWS environment.   Josh currently holds the position of SVP of sales engineering for Telarus, where he leads a growing group of 15 sales engineers & solution architects, including outside and inside teams who are responsible for driving solution-based sales for partners nationwide. Josh and his team help architect and design solutions such as cloud, network, contact center, security, and unified communications, along with helping partners ask the right questions to help their customers make a digital transformation. Under his leadership, the broader team has led the industry and attained 200+ technical certifications in the last 24 months.  Josh has been involved in engineering and cloud technologies for over a decade. He currently holds multiple certifications, including Solutions Architect certification from AWS, CompTIA Network +, and a CISSP. Additionally, after obtaining his CISSP, he was accepted into the Utah division of FBI InfraGard as a private sector liaison for communications and information technology. Most recently, he was elected President of the Utah Chapter of ISC.Support the show

Security Architecture Podcast
Seraphic (Browser Security) - Season 04/07 - Episode #44

Security Architecture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 40:09


Our guest for the show is Alon Levin, Alon is the VP of Product Management at Seraphic, the enterprise browser security solution. With a successful track record of over 15 years in the cybersecurity industry Season 4 KickOff episode with Chase https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWB05cb7XRQ&feature=youtu.be Demo: https://www.seraphicsecurity.com/contact-us Whitepaper: https://seraphicsecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Final-3-ESG-Technical-Validation-Seraphic-Aug-2022.pdf About Alon: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alonlevin1/ Alon Levin is the VP of Product Management at Seraphic, the enterprise browser security solution. With a successful track record of over 15 years in the cyber security industry, Alon specializes in building and supporting the growth of new, innovative products in the areas of Product Management, Presales, and Customer Success. Prior to joining Seraphic, he fulfilled numerous leadership positions such as VP of Product Management at Infinipoint, and earlier in VDOO, and as a Global Consulting Engineer at Palo Alto Networks, as well as leading Sales Engineering roles at Cyvera and Wave. Alon holds a Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree in Electrical Engineering from Tel-Aviv University. About Seraphic: Seraphic offers a unique security solution introducing enterprise-grade browser security on any browser on any device, protecting both the employees and the enterprise assets all while providing security teams with advanced governance and policy enforcement. Seraphic's solution is easy to deploy, has no impact on performance, leaves user experience untouched, and is fully compatible across all browsers, all operating systems, and all devices (including Android and iOS mobile devices). With Seraphic, security teams are minutes away from closing the most significant blind spot in their organization's cyber defense, securing any browser, any device, anywhere. Learn more at seraphicsecurity.com

Telarus
38. Telecom Expense Management Part 2 – Jordan Philip with Brightfin

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 24:45


This week we continue to explore Telecom Expense Management, with special guest Jordan Philip, Sales Engineer at brightfin. Automated Transcription: Josh Lupresto (00:02): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, VP of Sales Engineering at Telarus, and this is Next Level Biztech. Hey everybody, welcome back. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP here at Telarus. And this is the Next Level Biztech podcast. So we're getting towards the end of season one here on the podcast, and we're kicking this final session off with telecom expense management. So today we've got on Jordan Philip of Brightfin, who's got a cool engineering and, and partner success background. Jordan, appreciate you being on. Thanks for coming on, man. Jordan Philip (00:55): No, thanks for having me. Really appreciate it. Josh Lupresto (00:57): So, so Jordan, I I love to hear everybody's background, where they started, how they got into this space. Why don't you just kick us off. Have you always been in tech? Did you know you wanted to do tech? You know, what's your path getting up to this point? And then go into a little bit about your role now. Jordan Philip (01:11): Sure, yeah. Okay. so no, I didn't actually always know I wanted to be in tech. I was obsessed with airplanes, honestly, when I grew up and never really saw that as a, as a, a path forward. So, out of high school, I attended a University of Colorado with a concentration on pre-med. This is never my passion, but I couldn't figure out what I, what I wanted to do when I grew up. So I had some doctors in my family, so I figured I'd just go for it. It, it wasn't good and I was miserable. So I kind of moved over to my passion. I got through flight school between Emry Brittle and airs sorry, asu through all that huge expense and realized I didn't wanna fly for a living. So it's still a passion, but it's not really something I wanted to do for the rest of my life. Jordan Philip (01:56): So I still fly general aviation from time to time, like little puddle jumpers just to kind of feed my inner child. So I left there and pursued one of my other passions. Cuz as a kid I was always taking apart computers and trying to figure out what was inside and what kind of made them tick, right? So moved into tech and specifically computer and home theater systems. So I started my own IT consulting business in 2006. I was 23 at the time. Shortly thereafter I moved back to Denver where I'd been since 96. And I kind of got hooked up with Mobile Solutions which you'll find out later, was one of the feeder companies into Brightfin during the three-way merger that's kind of existed over the last three years. So I, I was a sys admin for them from 2008 until 2015 through my consulting business. Jordan Philip (02:45): And at that time I never really understood why such a company existed, a telecom expense management company. I was just kind of awestruck at that, like that there's actually a need for that type of service. So in 2014 the CEO kind of took me golfing and attempted to take me off the market and he offered me a job with their sales team. The sales team was growing over there and they wanted to kinda have somebody come in and normalize the sales process. They needed a technically minded person like me to deliver sales demonstration and overall offer presale support. I took the role in early 2015, kind of made 'em sweat a little bit but I still keep a couple of clients on the side even to this day. Then until 2022 or so, I filled roles like sys admin uem, mdm administrator, Director of Logistics solution architects. So there were a lot of hats on my desk, honestly which kept it really interesting cuz to be honest with you, te as a whole is, it's a little dry. It's not the most exciting sales demonst Josh Lupresto (03:49): You're ever gonna no Jordan Philip (03:51): . It is like, oh,

Revenue Collective Podcast
Ep 257: The Pre-Sales Engineering Playbook w/ Paul Vidal

Revenue Collective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 19:26


The Pre-Sales Engineering Playbook w/ Paul Vidal Part of the "Is This A Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Telarus
37. Telecom Expense Management (TEM) Part 1 – Jason Kaufman

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 28:31


This week we dive into Telecom Expense Management (TEM), with special guest Jason Kaufman, Sales Engineer, Southeast of Telarus. Automated Transcript: Josh Lupresto (00:02): Welcome to the podcast that is designed to fuel your success in selling technology solutions. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering at Telarus, and this is Next Level Biztech. Josh Lupresto (00:30): Hey everybody, welcome back. I'm your host, Josh Lupresto, SVP of Sales Engineering for Telarus. And this is the Next Level Biztech podcast. So today we are actually wrapping up our first part of the track for the end of season one. We're back, we're talking about telecom, we're talking about expense management, and we have the amazing Jason Kaufman, who is our southeast sales engineer at Telarus, but also part-time moonlighting as mobility, solution architect, IoT, all that good stuff. But before we let him introduce himself again today's a special episode because this is our first time having a return guest. So Kaufman, welcome back my man. Jason Kaufman (01:10): Thanks Josh. You know what they say? Fool me once. Shame on you, fool me twice. You get the gist, but I really appreciate you having me back on here. Yeah, Josh Lupresto (01:17): Yeah. Truth is like, I forgot you were on. And so, you know, when we realize you were on a second time, we just thought, Oh, let's just go with it. . No kidding. So let's you know, I, I wanna talk backstory again, right? Let, let's refresh everybody. Tell me about, you know, have, have you always had an interest in this? Have you always gotten to the telecom side, expense management, mobility, wireless, you know, where, where did things start for you and kind of how did you get to this spot? Jason Kaufman (01:43): Yeah so my previous role, you know, skip, skip a few different you know, positions, but I ended up being, I run the, ran the operations for a desktop as a service little micro organization to where we were the first one to do like UCaaS within a vdi. And so running the operations, my whole goal was trying to save money on the bottom line, you know, make, you know, robotics, process automation, you know, trying to save time, money anywhere we could so we could scale without having to hire, you know, more, more people unless it was absolutely needed. So, you know, the effective turn of running skinny, some I've never done in my life. But but yeah, so when I, when I got here and started with Telarus, you know, one of the things that came up, you know, somebody started asking about expense management. Jason Kaufman (02:28): So I started looking into it, you know, prior to my tenure here. But it was something I took a real interest in because it did exactly that. It allows somebody to run way more efficient. It puts everything in a single pan of glass, you know, all your contracts, you know, proactive management. And then when I started digging into it more and started actually getting some high level customers that really needed it, I, you know, thought, you know, I really need to learn this pretty quickly because it's coming down the pipe quite a bit, You know, with the rising gas prices, all the expenses rising, the great resignation causing, you know, salaries to go through the roof. People, companies are trying to find a way to save money anyway they could. So the technology spin was one of it. And one thing that we specialize really well is looking at what you're, what you have now, and trying to find ways to give you, like, for like to save money or give you more features and benefits for the same amount money. Jason Kaufman (03:15): But if a custom, if a company is really like, Hey, we need to save money here and need a way to, you know, optimize everything that we have from a contract perspective, that's something I took a heavy interest in because that's streamlining process. So I just took a heavy interest in it.

PreSales Podcast by PreSales Collective
123. The Six Demo Types (Video - PSC Webinar)

PreSales Podcast by PreSales Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 56:29


** Early Release ** This week the PreSales Podcast is utilizing VIDEO! ​Research shows that what buyers want most from vendors are product demos. But what type of demo should we deliver at each stage of the buyer journey?​ ‍Many PreSales professionals categorize demos into two types: the standard demo and the technical demo. ‍In reality, there are six critical types of demos that most stakeholders in the buying group must go through to reach a decision. Knowing what the buyer is thinking and the problems they are trying to solve at each stage of the buying process is key to understanding what type of demo to deliver. ​In this webinar, we discuss the six essential types of demos, their recommended content, recommended length, and who should be leading them. We'll also discuss the role demo automation can play--where it is useful and where you should avoid it.​ J Hear from Garin Hess, author of "Selling is Hard. Buying is Harder." and Founder of Consensus on leveraging each of the demo types to make your PreSales team more effective. Sign up or sign in at www.presalescollective.com

ScholarChip$
The Playbook: Software Engineering Ft. Olufemi Okanlomo

ScholarChip$

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 43:43


About Femi:Grounded in the fact I am the 1st Generation American of parents from Barbados & Nigeria. Growing up on the northwest side of Milwaukee.  I've never been scared to start over.  I've seen hardship and even through hard times expectations remained high.  Employing many lessons learned in integrity & tenacity in tandem with unwavering curiosity, creativity and grit; I navigated the challenges of being a black male growing up in Milwaukee and emerged to become a successful Computer Engineer.  Demonstrating success working in computer software development, software Consulting and now Sales Engineering. Tap in with Femi @0luvizion across all social media platforms."The Playbook" is a series of episodes that are geared toward providing specific step-by-step instructions on how to pursue a given career path. Please note that "The Playbook" series is separate and apart from our regularly scheduled content.Welcome to the ScholarChip$ Podcast hosted by Tone Gaines and Larry Alexander. Larry is a transactional attorney at a Fortune 100 Company. Tone is a Corporate M&A attorney at a large law firm in Chicago. But more importantly, both Larry and Tone are Black men from the inner city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The duo started the ScholarChip$ podcast in hopes of inspiring the next wave of scholars. Discussions in this podcast are for general information and entertainment purposes only and should not be considered legal advice. Always consult a lawyer for your individual circumstances.

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#229 From Chocolate Selling to Selling with Love

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 53:47


Jason Marc Campbell is the author of the upcoming book Selling with Love. He interviews thought leaders from around the world on topics of leadership, team building, communication, productivity and so much more. He is a public speaker who's shared the stage with the likes of Gary V, Jason Silva, Vishen Lakhiani, Lisa Nichols, and more. You'll quickly recognize him through his high energy and passion for making a positive impact in people's lives. https://wethesalesengineers.com/show229

Telarus
31. Security Detection and Response Part 1 – Bob Greenough

Telarus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 24:27


This week we explore Security Detection and Response, with special guest Bob Greenough, Director of Sales Engineering at Telarus.

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#227 Picking the Amazing Brain of an SE Veteran

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 44:33


Anthony Campanale is currently the Senior Solutions Consultant at Cheetah Digital. He has worked as a principal, SaaS, presales, associate, internet marketing, and technical consultant and analyst for the past 2 decades for different companies. He revealed that his interest was not in delivering the solution, has been curious about how technology can solve problems because of the Apollo 11 Space Mission when he was Seven, and being a hybrid didn't work for him. Full show: https://wethesalesengineers.com/show227

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#226 Scripting Your Way to Closing More Opportunities

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 52:14


Brian Geery is a Badass Software Demo consultant who has helped countless companies, including well-known brands up-level their demo game. He is the managing partner of SalesNv for over 30 years now. SalesNv is a demo coaching company to improves a team's win rate by turning good software demos into blockbusters. This is the third time that he will be interviewed by Ramzi, and he said he is willing to do a demo audit free of charge. Full show: https://wethesalesengineers.com/show226

Embracing Digital Transformation
Pre-Cog Cyber Attack Path with XM Cyber #99

Embracing Digital Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 34:10


Intel's Darren Pulsipher, Chief Solutions Architect, and Paul Giorgi, Director of Sales Engineering, XM Cyber, discuss how XM Cyber technology can help organizations uncover attack paths and reduce risk. Blog: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/government/podcasts/embracing-digital-transformation-episode99.html Video: #EDT99 #EmbracingDigital #Security #AI #Prevention

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#224 Enable A Learning Culture To Empower an Innovative Presales Sherpas

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 66:39


Tanner Howell is the head of the sales engineering organization at a cybersecurity upskilling company, RangeForce. He is an experienced IT Professional with a demonstrated history of working in the security industry and a research environment. He also has a Bachelor's Degree in Computer Engineering. Rather than doing implementations in SaaS solutions, their company is more about knowledge of their space. Different types of cybersecurity professionals, and being able to converse with them.   Full show: https://wethesalesengineers.com/show224

Cybersecurity Heroes
Why search and delete is the wrong approach to phishing incident response

Cybersecurity Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 37:51


Search and delete is a common response to phishing emails, but it's not the best approach.  It's inefficient, ineffective, and with the sheer volume of phishing attacks, it's not feasible as a standard practice. The only thing search and delete truly provides is a false sense of security.   In this episode, IRONSCALES' Senior Director of Sales Engineering and Information Security, and former email administrator, Stephen Kowski talks us through what to do instead. **Show Links** Connect with J. Stephen Kowski on LinkedIn or Twitter Follow IRONSCALES on LinkedIn or Twitter Connect with Brendon Rod on LinkedIn  -------We're stronger together. CyberSecurity Heroes is brought to you by IRONSCALES.  An email security platform powered by AI, enhanced by thousands of customer security teams and built around detecting and removing threats in the inbox.  We offer a service that is fast to deploy, easy to operate and is unparalleled in the ability to stop all types of email threats, including advanced attacks like BEC, ATO and more.  Learn more at ironscales dot com

Tattoos, Code, & Data Flows
Transitioning from Being a Web Developer to Becoming a Sales Engineer w/ Sean Casey, Director of Sales Engineering at Checkmarx

Tattoos, Code, & Data Flows

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 21:22


In Episode 20 of Tattoos, Code, and Data Flows, Matt Rose interviews Sean Casey, Director of Sales Engineering at Checkmarx. Sean Casey has had 13 years of experience as a Web Developer working with numerous companies in the security world. Sean later transitioned into the Sales Engineer world for the last 6 years, and has been crushing it ever since. In 2019, he received the 2019 CEO Employee Excellence award for North America! Sean and Matt talk about: ↳ The responsibilities of a successful sales engineer ↳ Supply Chain Risks vs OWASP Top 10 Risks ↳ The rise of the Site Reliability Engineer ↳ The problems with auto-remediation today And so much more. Be sure to listen to this episode, and so many of our other great episodes by hitting the follow button. Make sure to like and subscribe to the episode. We hope you enjoy it!

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#223 Selling the Dream then Making Sure it Becomes a Reality

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 52:37


Kris comes back to dig into more details about what he means by serving the process, not the salesperson.   Show notes: https://wethesalesengineers.com/show223

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#222 Revealing the Pain of a Situation, Then Guiding to the Dream

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 48:04


Kris Meulemans the Global Head of Customer Operations in Materialize. He is a Presales Leader with years of experience in multiple industries. He also shared tips and tricks on how to gain the trust of the customers to tell their pain points.   Full show: https://wethesalesengineers.com/show222

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#221 8 Years of Progress in the Sales Engineering Profession

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 45:05


Mastering Technical Sales is THE Book that every sales engineer should read. The 3rd edition, and the one that I've read, came out 8 years ago. But things have changed significantly over the last 8 years. They changed enough to warrant a 4th edition of that book which includes many updates.   John Care, the author of the book, comes by the show to discuss what those changes are. John has been on the show a couple of other times, so check out those episodes as well when you're done.   Full Show: https://wethesalesengineers.com/show221

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#220 From One Product Sales Engineer to Multi-Solution SE

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 50:00


Is it easier to have only one product to sell? What happens when the company grows, either organically or through acquisition? Does it get harder or easier? Is it any different? These are all questions that I tackle with my guest David Ledger.   David Ledger is a Regional VP of Sales Engineering and a Sales Enablement provider. He is a strong proponent of learning and improving. As the organization grows, the portfolio grows with it and so should the Sales Engineer's skills.    Full show: https://wethesalesengineers.com/show220

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#217 Building a Criteria Matrix to Uncover Great SEs

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 59:35


When looking to hire a sales engineer, experienced or rookie, there are certain criteria that leaders look for. In this episode, I discuss that with Jimmy Barens, Head of Solution Engineering at Yext.   Full show: https://wethesalesengineers.com/show217

We The  Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers
#216 The Benefits of Being Called Solutions Engineer

We The Sales Engineers: A Resource for Sales Engineers, by Sales Engineers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 56:19


Are you still doubting what to pursue between post-sales and pre-sales? Do you want to know the difference between the two? In this episode, you'll get to know a former technical expert who shifted to sales engineering and became a vice president even after having an unsatisfied buyer and making a mistake worth $30,000 in his early years in the field. Come and join the rollercoaster journey of Paul Vidal towards his current position!Paul Vidal is the Vice President of Customer Success at Reprise. He has more than 15 years of experience in data management, technical, and sales. He is a Technical Expert and has two master's degrees in Computer Science. He started in post-sales but changed to presales after he realize he loves to design solutions.  He also considers sales engineering as one of the best professions because it combines puzzle-solving and people skills.

The CyberWire
Defining the intruder's dilemma. [CyberWire-X]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 33:55 Very Popular


For this Cyberwire-X episode, we are talking about the failure of perimeter defense as an architecture where, since the 1990s when it was invented, the plan was to keep everything out. That model never really worked that well since we had to poke holes in the perimeter to allow employees, contractors, and partners to do legitimate business with us. Those same holes could be exploited by the bad guys, too. The question is, what are we doing instead? What is the security architecture, the strategy, and the tactics that we are all using today that is more secure than perimeter defense? In the first part of the show, Rick Howard, the CyberWire's CSO, Chief Analyst, and Senior Fellow, talks with Jerry Archer, the Sallie Mae CSO and CyberWire Hash Table member, and, in the second half of the show, the CyberWire's podcast host Dave Bittner talks with Mike Ernst, episode sponsor ExtraHop's Vice President of Sales Engineering, to discuss Software Defined Perimeter and intrusion kill chain prevention strategy.

Outcomes Rocket
The Cybersecurity of Medical Devices with Pascal Podvin, CRO and Jeremy Haltom, VP of Sales Engineering at Ordr & Jim Brady, CISO and VP of Information Security at Fairview Health Services

Outcomes Rocket

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 25:32


One of the biggest challenges is securing connected devices, including medical devices. Welcome back to part two of our chat with Pascal Podvin and Jeremy Haltom from Ordr inc.; we also introduce Jim Brady, the CISO for Fairview Health Services, to the conversation on cybersecurity and healthcare. The three of them discuss the challenges that Healthcare Delivery Organizations face and what assessments they could do to increase the security of their devices to take care of patients. No one can protect anything without knowing what the threats are, so identifying them is a specific step in the process, and taking action will then make it fruitful. Technology is only one part of the equation; the other one is a great team that is constantly working on increasing the cybersecurity of the organization. Be sure to listen to the previous conversation with Pascal and Jeremy before listening to this episode! Click this link to the show notes, transcript, and resources: outcomesrocket.health