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A type of inflammatory bowel disease

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Best podcasts about crohn

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Latest podcast episodes about crohn

Not Your Average Mother Runner Podcast
Surviving & Thriving with Crohn's Disease with Melissa Verga

Not Your Average Mother Runner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 39:14


Meet Melissa Verga, a loan officer with experience in the areas of financial planning, budgeting, and lending.    She resides in Clifton Park, NY with her family and has claimed the title of "Crohn's Thriver."In this episode, Melissa will share her personal healthy journey from Crohn's diagnosis to remission, detailing how she reclaimed her power and become the boss of her own life.   Learning to let go of toxicity (in its many shapes and forms), Melissa has been in remission for 16 years and enjoys speaking with other women who are struggling to cope with their own diagnosis.MELISSA'S TAKEAWAYSYour body will make you pay attention if something is wrong.Crohn's flares can crop up unexpectedly.Take the necessary time to think of yourself as a person with a diagnosis.A diagnosis does NOT have to be a dictating factor in your life.Don't take in emotional toxicity.Things could always be worse.Block out time for yourself during the day and honestly ask yourself what you need.You are allowed to mourn the idea of who you were before your diagnosis.Accept that "the thing" is here, but also be boss of "the thing."You're still the boss of your world and life.CONNECT WITH MELISSALinkedInFacebookWebsite

True Grit and Grace
A New Way of Life Through Healing Your Gut with Lauren Mones

True Grit and Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 53:12


“Let food be your medicine.” That is what the founder of one of my favorite health food brands said to me during our conversation about healing, the power of fermented foods, and where true health comes from. We talk all things fermented, why Kefir is so important, what you can do at home, and why you might want to stop slamming back kombuchas. If you have ever wondered why you may not be healing from a chronic condition you might be surprised in what you learn from today's guest. Lauren Mones is the founder and CEO of Fermenting Fairy. After being diagnosed with Crohn's Disease in 2014, Lauren was told it was something she'd just have to live with. But something told her that just couldn't be true. After reading about the healing powers of fermented foods, Lauren tried sauerkraut from a health food store. She was shocked at how much that pickled cabbage changed her entire world.Lauren shares the magic of the fermentation process with everyone she meets. In less than two years, Mones grew her home-based business selling bottles of kefir outside a yoga studio to a USDA certified organic brand sold in dozens of Los Angeles health food stores and online. In this episode, we talk about Lauren's journey from a healthy life to being diagnosed with Crohn's Disease to discovering the power of fermented foods, building her business, and what happened when she found a new way to live.   Here's what you will learn: What led Lauren to creating products to heal your gut (2:17) How to handle getting a diagnosis of a major disease and the emotional side of illness (9:28) How fermented foods can help a “leaky gut” (15:26) The difference between probiotic supplements and drinks (20:56) Easy ways to reach optimal gut health and why it's so important(26:28) The best ways to use fermented products to help your gut (30:51) Why wild fermentation differs from other methods (35:29) How trials and successes in your business help you find yourself (36:40) Screenshot your favorite part and post to your IG story and tag me @amberlylagomotivation and @fermenting.fairy so we can see and repost to our stories!   Follow Lauren: Facebook Instagram Website   If you are ready to leave your mark by discovering your message and sharing it with the world, you've come to the right place!! Let's work together to build your influence, your impact, and your income! Join the tribe you have been waiting for to activate your highest potential and live the life you deserve!  Another Your Unstoppable Life Mastermind is starting soon!!! Early bird countdown starts now!  JOIN NOW and let us know you are ready for greatness! Read the "True Grit and Grace" book here and learn how you can turn tragedy into triumph!  Thank you for joining us on the True, Grit, & Grace Podcast! If you find value in today's episode, don't forget to share the show with your friends and tap that subscribe button so you don't miss an episode! You can also head over to amberlylago.com to join my newsletter and access free downloadable resources that can help you elevate your life, business, and relationships! Want to see the behind the scenes and keep the conversation going?  Head over to Instagram @amberlylagomotivation! Audible @True-Grit-and-Grace-Audiobook  Website @amberlylago.com Instagram @amberlylagomotivation Facebook @AmberlyLagoSpeaker

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.24.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:01


Popular antioxidant linked to pain relief University of Naples (Italy), November 22, 2021 People with pain of unknown causes who took alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) experienced less pain than a placebo group, a double-blind study in  Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy revealed.1 This most recent trial enrolled 210 nondiabetic men and women with mild or moderate joint pain, neuropathic pain or muscle pain of unknown cause. Participants received 800 mg or 400 mg ALA per day or a daily placebo.  The results? People who received ALA had a significant improvement in their pain after two months of intake, while the placebo group didn't report a difference. ALA was similarly effective for all sources of pain considered. It was also shown to be safe and well-tolerated. (NEXT) Mental Qigong can be just as rewarding as its physical cousin In recent decades modern scientific techniques have fully documented the health benefits of the ancient meditation technique of Qigong. One example of physical Qigong is the technique Wu Qin Xi (five animals play), in which participants sequentially move through poses that represent the form of different animals, holding each pose for several minutes. During each phase individuals seek to regulate their breathing and still their minds. Although this is a challenging endeavor the benefits are significant. Effective Qigong practice can reduce feelings of depression and anxiety, decrease blood pressure and increase feelings of relaxation and attention. This raises the question: do the effects of these two types of Qigong manifest themselves the same in the brain, or differently? This is what the University of Mainz, wanted to find out.  (NEXT) Study links stress to Crohn's disease flare-ups McMaster University (Ontario), November 20, 2021 A possible link between psychological stress and Crohn's disease flare-ups has been identified by a McMaster University-led study. Researchers using mouse models found that stress hormones suppressed the innate immune system that normally protects the gut from invasive Enterobacteriaceae, a group of bacteria including E. coli which has been linked to Crohn's disease. (NEXT) Meta-analysis finds benefits for dietary supplements among breast cancer patients Hallym University (South Korea), November 19 2021 A meta-analysis published in Cancers found associations between improved breast cancer prognosis and the intake of multivitamins and other nutrients. The meta-analysis included 63 studies that evaluated the association between dietary factors and breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer mortality and/or mortality from any cause during the studies' follow- up periods among a total of 120,167 breast cancer patients.  (NEXT) Physical activity may improve Alzheimer's disease outcomes by lowering brain inflammation University of California at San Francisco, November 22, 2021 No one will disagree that an active lifestyle is good for you, but it remains unclear how physical activity improves brain health, particularly in Alzheimer's disease. The benefits may come about through decreased immune cell activation, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (NEXT) Aspirin is linked with increased risk of heart failure University of Freiburg (Germany), November 23, 2021 Aspirin use is associated with a 26% raised risk of heart failure in people with at least one predisposing factor for the condition. That's the finding of a study published today in a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). This is the first study to report that among individuals with at least one risk factor for heart failure, those taking aspirin were more likely to subsequently develop the condition than those not using the medication. (OTHER NEWS NEXT) Plant-derived antiviral drug is effective in blocking highly infectious SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant, say scientists University of Nottingham, November 22, 2021 A plant-based antiviral treatment for Covid-19, recently discovered by scientists at the University of Nottingham, has been found to be just as effective at treating all variants of the virus SARS-CoV-2, even the highly infectious Delta variant. The study showed that a novel natural antiviral drug called thapsigargin (TG), recently discovered by the same group of scientists to block other viruses, including the original SARS-CoV-2, was just as effective at treating all of the newer SARS-CoV-2 variants, including the Delta variant. In their previous studies* the team showed that the plant-derived antiviral, at small doses, triggers a highly effective broad-spectrum host-centred antiviral innate immune response against three major types of human respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. “Together, these results point to the antiviral potential of TG as a post-exposure prophylactic and an active therapeutic agent.” (NEXT) In Memory of JFK: The First U.S. President to be Declared a Terrorist and Threat to National Security (entire article is here) By Cynthia Chung, The Saker Blog, November 22, 2021 In April 1954, Kennedy stood up on the Senate floor to challenge the Eisenhower Administration's support for the doomed French imperial war in Vietnam, foreseeing that this would not be a short-lived war.[1] In July 1957, Kennedy once more took a strong stand against French colonialism, this time France's bloody war against Algeria's independence movement, which again found the Eisenhower Administration on the wrong side of history. Rising on the Senate floor, two days before America's own Independence Day, Kennedy declared: “The most powerful single force in the world today is neither communism nor capitalism, neither the H-bomb nor the guided missile – it is man's eternal desire to be free and independent. The great enemy of that tremendous force of freedom is called, for want of a more precise term, imperialism – and today that means Soviet imperialism and, whether we like it or not, and though they are not to be equated, Western imperialism. Thus, the single most important test of American foreign policy today is how we meet the challenge of imperialism, what we do to further man's desire to be free. On this test more than any other, this nation shall be critically judged by the uncommitted millions in Asia and Africa, and anxiously watched by the still hopeful lovers of freedom behind the Iron Curtain. If we fail to meet the challenge of either Soviet or Western imperialism, then no amount of foreign aid, no aggrandizement of armaments, no new pacts or doctrines or high-level conferences can prevent further setbacks to our course and to our security.”[2] In September 1960, the annual United Nations General Assembly was held in New York. Fidel Castro and a fifty-member delegation were among the attendees and had made a splash in the headlines when he decided to stay at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem after the midtown Shelburne Hotel demanded a $20,000 security deposit. He made an even bigger splash in the headlines when he made a speech at this hotel, discussing the issue of equality in the United States while in Harlem, one of the poorest boroughs in the country. Kennedy would visit this very same hotel a short while later, and also made a speech: “Behind the fact of Castro coming to this hotel, [and] Khrushchev…there is another great traveler in the world, and that is the travel of a world revolution, a world in turmoil…We should be glad [that Castro and Khrushchev] came to the United States. We should not fear the twentieth century, for the worldwide revolution which we see all around us is part of the original American Revolution.”[3] What did Kennedy mean by this? The American Revolution was fought for freedom, freedom from the rule of monarchy and imperialism in favour of national sovereignty. What Kennedy was stating, was that this was the very oppression that the rest of the world wished to shake the yoke off, and that the United States had an opportunity to be a leader in the cause for the independence of all nations. On June 30th, 1960, marking the independence of the Republic of Congo from the colonial rule of Belgium, Patrice Lumumba, the first Congolese Prime Minister gave a speech that has become famous for its outspoken criticism of colonialism. Lumumba spoke of his people's struggle against “the humiliating bondage that was forced upon us… [years that were] filled with tears, fire and blood,” and concluded vowing “We shall show the world what the black man can do when working in liberty, and we shall make the Congo the pride of Africa.” Shortly after, Lumumba also made clear, “We want no part of the Cold War… We want Africa to remain African with a policy of neutralism.”[4] As a result, Lumumba was labeled a communist for his refusal to be a Cold War satellite for the western sphere. Rather, Lumumba was part of the Pan-African movement that was led by Ghanaian President Kwame Nkrumah(who later Kennedy would also work with), which sought national sovereignty and an end to colonialism in Africa. Lumumba “would remain a grave danger,” Dulles said at an NSC meeting on September 21, 1960, “as long as he was not yet disposed of.”[5] Three days later, Dulles made it clear that he wanted Lumumba permanently removed, cabling the CIA's Leopoldville station, “We wish give [sic] every possible support in eliminating Lumumba from any possibility resuming governmental position.”[6] Lumumba was assassinated on Jan. 17th, 1961, just three days before Kennedy's inauguration, during the fog of the transition period between presidents, when the CIA is most free to tie its loose ends, confident that they will not be reprimanded by a new administration that wants to avoid scandal on its first days in office. Kennedy, who clearly meant to put a stop to the Murder Inc. that Dulles had created and was running, would declare to the world in his inaugural address on Jan. 20th, 1961, “The torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans.” La Resistance Along with inheriting the responsibility of the welfare of the country and its people, Kennedy was to also inherit a secret war with communist Cuba run by the CIA. The Bay of Pigs set-up would occur three months later. Prouty compares the Bay of Pigs incident to that of the Crusade for Peace; the Bay of Pigs being orchestrated by the CIA, and the Crusade for Peace sabotaged by the CIA, in both cases to ruin the U.S. president's (Eisenhower and Kennedy) ability to form a peaceful dialogue with Khrushchev and decrease Cold War tensions. Both presidents' took onus for the events respectively, despite the responsibility resting with the CIA. However, Eisenhower and Kennedy understood, if they did not take onus, it would be a public declaration that they did not have any control over their government agencies and military. Further, the Bay of Pigs operation was in fact meant to fail. It was meant to stir up a public outcry for a direct military invasion of Cuba. On public record is a meeting (or more aptly described as an intervention) with CIA Deputy Director for Plans Richard Bissell, Joint Chiefs Chairman Lyman Lemnitzer, and Navy Chief Admiral Burke basically trying to strong-arm President Kennedy into approving a direct military attack on Cuba. Admiral Burke had already taken the liberty of positioning two battalions of Marines on Navy destroyers off the coast of Cuba “anticipating that U.S. forces might be ordered into Cuba to salvage a botched invasion.”[7] (This incident is what inspired the Frankenheimer movie “Seven Days in May.”) Kennedy stood his ground. “They were sure I'd give in to them,” Kennedy later told Special Assistant to the President Dave Powers. “They couldn't believe that a new president like me wouldn't panic and try to save his own face. Well they had me figured all wrong.”[8] Incredibly, not only did the young president stand his ground against the Washington war hawks just three months into his presidential term, but he also launched the Cuba Study Group which found the CIA to be responsible for the fiasco, leading to the humiliating forced resignation of Allen Dulles, Richard Bissell and Charles Cabell. (For more on this refer to my report.) Unfortunately, it would not be that easy to dethrone Dulles, who continued to act as head of the CIA, and key members of the intelligence community such as Helms and Angleton regularly bypassed McCone (the new CIA Director) and briefed Dulles directly.[9] But Kennedy was also serious about seeing it through all the way, and vowed to “splinter the CIA into a thousand pieces and scatter it to the winds.” * * * There is another rather significant incident that had occurred just days after the Bay of Pigs, and which has largely been overshadowed by the Cuban fiasco in the United States. From April 21-26th, 1961, the Algiers putsch or Generals' putsch, was a failed coup d'état intended to force President de Gaulle (1959-1969) not to abandon the colonial French Algeria. The organisers of the putsch were opposed to the secret negotiations that French Prime Minister Michel Debré had started with the anti-colonial National Liberation Front (FLN). On January 26th, 1961, just three months before the attempted coup d'état, Dulles sent a report to Kennedy on the French situation that seemed to be hinting that de Gaulle would no longer be around, “A pre-revolutionary atmosphere reigns in France… The Army and the Air Force are staunchly opposed to de Gaulle…At least 80 percent of the officers are violently against him. They haven't forgotten that in 1958, he had given his word of honor that he would never abandon Algeria. He is now reneging on his promise, and they hate him for that. de Gaulle surely won't last if he tries to let go of Algeria. Everything will probably be over for him by the end of the year—he will be either deposed or assassinated.”[10] The attempted coup was led by Maurice Challe, whom de Gaulle had reason to conclude was working with the support of U.S. intelligence, and Élysée officials began spreading this word to the press, which reported the CIA as a “reactionary state-within-a-state” that operated outside of Kennedy's control.[11] Shortly before Challe's resignation from the French military, he had served as NATO commander in chief and had developed close relations with a number of high-ranking U.S. officers stationed in the military alliance's Fontainebleau headquarters.[12] In August 1962 the OAS (Secret Army Organization) made an assassination attempt against de Gaulle, believing he had betrayed France by giving up Algeria to Algerian nationalists. This would be the most notorious assassination attempt on de Gaulle (who would remarkably survive over thirty assassination attempts while President of France) when a dozen OAS snipers opened fire on the president's car, which managed to escape the ambush despite all four tires being shot out. After the failed coup d'état, de Gaulle launched a purge of his security forces and ousted General Paul Grossin, the chief of SDECE (the French secret service). Grossin was closely aligned with the CIA, and had told Frank Wisner over lunch that the return of de Gaulle to power was equivalent to the Communists taking over in Paris.[13] In 1967, after a five-year enquête by the French Intelligence Bureau, it released its findings concerning the 1962 assassination attempt on de Gaulle. The report found that the 1962 assassination plot could be traced back to the NATO Brussels headquarters, and the remnants of the old Nazi intelligence apparatus. The report also found that Permindex had transferred $200,000 into an OAS bank account to finance the project. As a result of the de Gaulle exposé, Permindex was forced to shut down its public operations in Western Europe and relocated its headquarters from Bern, Switzerland to Johannesburg, South Africa, it also had/has a base in Montreal, Canada where its founder Maj. Gen. Louis M. Bloomfield (former OSS) proudly had his name amongst its board members until the damning de Gaulle report. The relevance of this to Kennedy will be discussed shortly. As a result of the SDECE's ongoing investigation, de Gaulle made a vehement denunciation of the Anglo-American violation of the Atlantic Charter, followed by France's withdrawal from the NATO military command in 1966. France would not return to NATO until April 2009 at the Strasbourg-Kehl Summit. In addition to all of this, on Jan. 14th, 1963, de Gaulle declared at a press conference that he had vetoed British entry into the Common Market. This would be the first move towards France and West Germany's formation of the European Monetary System, which excluded Great Britain, likely due to its imperialist tendencies and its infamous sin City of London. Former Secretary of State Dean Acheson telegrammed West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer directly, appealing to him to try to persuade de Gaulle to back track on the veto, stating “if anyone can affect Gen. de Gaulle's decision, you are surely that person.” Little did Acheson know that Adenauer was just days away from signing the Franco-German Treaty of Jan 22nd, 1963 (also known as the ÉlyséeTreaty), which had enormous implications. Franco-German relations, which had long been dominated by centuries of rivalry, had now agreed that their fates were aligned. (This close relationship was continued to a climactic point in the late 1970s, with the formation of the European Monetary System, and France and West Germany's willingness in 1977 to work with OPEC countries trading oil for nuclear technology, which was sabotaged by the U.S.-Britain alliance. The Élysée Treaty was a clear denunciation of the Anglo-American forceful overseeing that had overtaken Western Europe since the end of WWII. On June 28th, 1961, Kennedy wrote NSAM #55. This document changed the responsibility of defense during the Cold War from the CIA to the Joint Chiefs of Staff and would have (if seen through) drastically changed the course of the war in Vietnam. It would also have effectively removed the CIA from Cold War military operations and limited the CIA to its sole lawful responsibility, the collecting and coordination of intelligence. By Oct 11th, 1963, NSAM #263, closely overseen by Kennedy[14], was released and outlined a policy decision “to withdraw 1,000 military personnel [from Vietnam] by the end of 1963” and further stated that “It should be possible to withdraw the bulk of U.S. personnel by 1965.” The Armed Forces newspaper Stars and Stripes had the headline U.S. TROOPS SEEN OUT OF VIET BY '65. It would be the final nail in the coffin. Treason in America “Treason doth never prosper; what is the reason? Why, if it prosper, none dare call it treason.” – Sir John Harrington By Germany supporting de Gaulle's exposure of the international assassination ring, his adamant opposition to western imperialism and the role of NATO, and with a young Kennedy building his own resistance against the imperialist war of Vietnam, it was clear that the power elite were in big trouble. On November 22nd, 1963 President Kennedy was brutally murdered in the streets of Dallas, Texas in broad daylight. With the assassination of Ngo Dinh Diem, likely ordained by the CIA, on Nov. 2nd, 1963 and Kennedy just a few weeks later, de facto President Johnson signed NSAM #273 on Nov. 26th, 1963 to begin the reversal of Kennedy's policy under #263. And on March 17th, 1964, Johnson signed NSAM #288 that marked the full escalation of the Vietnam War and involved 2,709,918 Americans directly serving in Vietnam, with 9,087,000 serving with the U.S. Armed Forces during this period. The Vietnam War would continue for another 12 years after Kennedy's death, lasting a total of 20 years for Americans, and 30 years if you count American covert action in Vietnam. Two days before Kennedy's assassination, a hate-Kennedy handbill was circulated in Dallas accusing the president of treasonous activities including being a communist sympathizer. On November 29th, 1963 the Warren Commission was set up to investigate the murder of President Kennedy. The old Congressman Hale Boggs of Louisiana was a member of that Warren Commission. Boggs became increasingly disturbed by the lack of transparency and rigour exhibited by the Commission and became convinced that many of the documents used to incriminate Oswald were in fact forgeries. In 1965 Rep. Boggs told New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison that Oswald could not have been the one who killed Kennedy.[15] It was Boggs who encouraged Garrison to begin the only law enforcement prosecution of the President's murder to this day. Nixon was inaugurated as President of the United States on Jan 20th, 1969. Hale Boggs soon after called on Nixon's Attorney General John Mitchell to have the courage to fire J. Edgar Hoover.[16] It wasn't long thereafter that the private airplane carrying Hale Boggs disappeared without a trace. Jim Garrison was the District Attorney of New Orleans from 1962 to 1973 and was the only one to bring forth a trial concerning the assassination of President Kennedy. In Jim Garrison's book “On the Trail of the Assassins”, J. Edgar Hoover comes up several times impeding or shutting down investigations into JFK's murder, in particular concerning the evidence collected by the Dallas Police Department, such as the nitrate test Oswald was given and which exonerated him, proving that he never shot a rifle the day of Nov 22nd, 1963. However, for reasons only known to the government and its investigators this fact was kept secret for 10 months.[17]It was finally revealed in the Warren Commission report, which inexplicably didn't change their opinion that Oswald had shot Kennedy. Another particularly damning incident was concerning the Zapruder film that was in the possession of the FBI and which they had sent a “copy” to the Warren Commission for their investigation. This film was one of the leading pieces of evidence used to support the “magic bullet theory” and showcase the direction of the headshot coming from behind, thus verifying that Oswald's location was adequate for such a shot. During Garrison's trial on the Kennedy assassination (1967-1969) he subpoenaed the Zapruder film that for some peculiar reason had been locked up in some vault owned by Life magazine (the reader should note that Henry Luce the owner of Life magazine was in a very close relationship with the CIA). This was the first time in more than five years that the Zapruder film was made public. It turns out the FBI's copy that was sent to the Warren Commission had two critical frames reversed to create a false impression that the rifle shot was from behind. When Garrison got a hold of the original film it was discovered that the head shot had actually come from the front. In fact, what the whole film showed was that the President had been shot from multiple angles meaning there was more than one gunman. When the FBI was questioned about how these two critical frames could have been reversed, they answered self-satisfactorily that it must have been a technical glitch… There is also the matter of the original autopsy papers being destroyed by the chief autopsy physician, James Humes, to which he even testified to during the Warren Commission, apparently nobody bothered to ask why… This would explain why the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB), reported in a July 1998 staff report their concern for the number of shortcomings in the original autopsy, that “One of the many tragedies of the assassination of President Kennedy has been the incompleteness of the autopsy record and the suspicion caused by the shroud of secrecy that has surrounded the records that do exist.” [emphasis added] The staff report for the Assassinations Records Review Board contended that brain photographs in the Kennedy records are not of Kennedy's brain and show much less damage than Kennedy sustained. There is a lot of spurious effort to try to ridicule anyone who challenges the Warren Commission's official report as nothing but fringe conspiracy theory. And that we should not find it highly suspect that Allen Dulles, of all people, was a member and pretty much leader of said commission. The reader should keep in mind that much of this frothing opposition stems from the very agency that perpetrated crime after crime on the American people, as well as abroad. When has the CIA ever admitted guilt, unless caught red-handed? Even after the Church committee hearings, when the CIA was found guilty of planning out foreign assassinations, they claimed that they had failed in every single plot or that someone had beaten them to the punch, including in the case of Lumumba. The American people need to realise that the CIA is not a respectable agency; we are not dealing with honorable men. It is a rogue force that believes that the ends justify the means, that they are the hands of the king so to speak, above government and above law. Those at the top such as Allen Dulles were just as adamant as Churchill about protecting the interests of the power elite, or as Churchill termed it, the “High Cabal.” Interestingly, on Dec. 22nd, 1963, just one month after Kennedy's assassination, Harry Truman published a scathing critique of the CIA in The Washington Post, even going so far as to state “There is something about the way the CIA has been functioning that is casting a shadow over our historic position [as a] free and open society, and I feel that we need to correct it.”[18] The timing of such a scathing quote cannot be stressed enough. Dulles, of course, told the public not to be distressed, that Truman was just in entering his twilight years. In addition, Jim Garrison, New Orleans District Attorney at the time, who was charging Clay Shaw as a member of the conspiracy to kill Kennedy, besides uncovering his ties to David Ferrie who was found dead in his apartment days before he was scheduled to testify, also made a case that the New Orleans International Trade Mart (to which Clay Shaw was director), the U.S. subsidiary of Permindex, was linked to Kennedy's murder. Col. Clay Shaw was an OSS officer during WWII, which provides a direct link to his knowing Allen Dulles. Garrison did a remarkable job with the odds he was up against, and for the number of witnesses that turned up dead before the trial… This Permindex link would not look so damning if we did not have the French intelligence SDECE report, but we do. And recall, in that report Permindex was caught transferring $200,000 directly to the bankroll of the OAS which attempted the 1962 assassination on de Gaulle. Thus, Permindex's implication in an international assassination ring is not up for debate. In addition, the CIA was found heavily involved in these assassination attempts against de Gaulle, thus we should not simply dismiss the possibility that Permindex was indeed a CIA front for an international hit crew. In fact, among the strange and murderous characters who converged on Dallas in Nov. 1963 was a notorious French OAS commando named Jean Souetre, who was connected to the plots against President de Gaulle. Souetre was arrested in Dallas after the Kennedy assassination and expelled to Mexico, not even kept for questioning.[19] What Does the Future Hold? After returning from Kennedy's Nov. 24th funeral in Washington, de Gaulle and his information minister Alain Peyrefitte had a candid discussion that was recorded in Peyrefitte's memoire “C'était de Gaulle,” the great General was quoted saying: “What happened to Kennedy is what nearly happened to me… His story is the same as mine. … It looks like a cowboy story, but it's only an OAS [Secret Army Organization] story. The security forces were in cahoots with the extremists. …Security forces are all the same when they do this kind of dirty work. As soon as they succeed in wiping out the false assassin, they declare the justice system no longer need be concerned, that no further public action was needed now that the guilty perpetrator was dead. Better to assassinate an innocent man than to let a civil war break out. Better an injustice than disorder. America is in danger of upheavals. But you'll see. All of them together will observe the law of silence. They will close ranks. They'll do everything to stifle any scandal. They will throw Noah's cloak over these shameful deeds. In order to not lose face in front of the whole world. In order to not risk unleashing riots in the United States. In order to preserve the union and to avoid a new civil war. In order to not ask themselves questions. They don't want to know. They don't want to find out. They won't allow themselves to find out.” The American people would do well to remember that it was first John F. Kennedy, acting as the President to the United States, who was to be declared a terrorist and threat to his country's national security. Thus is it not natural that those who continue to defend the legacy of Kennedy should be regarded today as threat, not truly to the nation's security, but a threat to the very same grouping responsible for Kennedy's death and whom today have now declared open war on the American people. This will be the greatest test the American people have ever been confronted with, and it will only be through an understanding of how the country came to where it is today that there can be sufficient clarity as to what the solutions are, which are not to be found in another civil war. To not fall for the trapping of further chaos and division, the American people will only be able to rise above this if they choose to ask those questions, if they choose to want to know, to want to find out the truth of things they dared not look at in the past for fear of what it would reveal. “Whenever the government of the United States shall break up, it will probably be in consequence of a false direction having been given to public opinion. This is the weak point of our defenses, and the part to which the enemies of the system will direct all their attacks. Opinion can be so perverted as to cause the false to seem true; the enemy, a friend, and the friend, an enemy; the best interests of the nation to appear insignificant, and the trifles of moment; in a word, the right the wrong, the wrong the right. In a country where opinion has sway, to seize upon it, is to seize upon power. As it is a rule of humanity that the upright and well-intentioned are comparatively passive, while the designing, dishonest, and selfish are the most untiring in their efforts, the danger of public opinion's getting a false direction is four-fold, since few men think for themselves.” -James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851( We must dare to be among the few who think for ourselves. (NEXT) VAERS Data Reveals 50 X More Ectopic Pregnancies Following COVID Shots than Following ALL Vaccines for Past 30 Year Health Impact News, November 22, 2021 While the latest data dump into the government's Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) showed 2,620 fetal deaths, which are more fetal deaths than are reported following ALL vaccines for the past 30 years in VAERS, one “symptom” that is tracked in VAERS that it did not account for is an ectopic pregnancy which also results in a fetal death. Ectopic pregnancy, also called extrauterine pregnancy, is when a fertilized egg grows outside a woman's uterus, somewhere else in their belly. It can cause life-threatening bleeding and needs medical care right away. I performed a search in VAERS for ectopic pregnancies following COVID-19 shots for the past 11 months, and there have been 52 cases where a woman received a COVID-19 shot and then was found to have an ectopic pregnancy. Next, I performed the exact same search but excluded COVID-19 “vaccines” and it returned a result of 30 cases where a woman received an FDA-approved vaccine and then reported an ectopic pregnancy following ALL vaccines for the past 30+ years, which is about 1 per year. That means that following COVID-19 injections into child-bearing women for the past 11 months has seen a 50 X increase in ectopic pregnancies compared to child-bearing women receiving vaccines for the past 30+ years. (NEXT) Massive study reveals editorial bias and nepotism in biomedical journals University of Rennes, November 23, 2021 Scientific journals are expected to consider research manuscripts dispassionately and without favor. But a study published in the journal PLOS Biology reveals that a subset of journals may be exercising considerable bias and favoritism. To identify journals that are suspected of favoritism, the authors explored nearly 5 million articles published between 2015 and 2019 in a sample of 5,468 of biomedical journals indexed in the National Library of Medicine. Their results reveal that in most journals, publications are distributed across a large number of authors, as one might hope. However, the authors identify a subset of biomedical journals where a few authors, often members of that journal's editorial board, were responsible for a disproportionate number of publications. In addition, the articles authored by these “hyper-prolific” individuals were more likely to be accepted for publication within 3 weeks of their submission, suggesting favoritism in journals' editorial procedures. Why would this matter? Such “nepotistic journals,” suspected of biased editorial decision-making, could be deployed to game productivity-based metrics, which could have a serious knock-on effect on decisions about promotion, tenure and research funding. (NEXT) Hurricanes expected to linger over Northeast cities, causing greater damage More storms like Hurricane Sandy could be in the East Coast's future, potentially costing billions of dollars in damage and economic losses. Rowan University, November 22, 2021 By the late 21st century, northeastern U.S. cities will see worsening hurricane outcomes, with storms arriving more quickly but slowing down once they've made landfall. As storms linger longer over the East Coast, they will cause greater damage along the heavily populated corridor, according to a new study. The new study analyzed more than 35,000 computer-simulated storms. To assess likely storm outcomes in the future The researchers found that future East Coast hurricanes will likely cause greater damage than storms of the past. The research predicted that a greater number of future hurricanes will form near the East Coast, and those storms will reach the Northeast corridor more quickly. The simulated storms slow to a crawl as they approach the East Coast, allowing them to produce more wind, rain, floods, and related damage in the Northeast region. The longest-lived tropical storms are predicted to be twice as long as storms today.

stars western new york canada bay university california american mexico america americans life new orleans louisiana french south africa british texas france president delta san francisco nottingham cold war peace vietnam war united states nazis treason washington bern security medicine church cancer opinion helms cia fbi east coast stripes africa pigs independence day african northeast trail wwii popular oss washington post cuba senate cuban fda republic montreal james fenimore cooper garrison navy algiers shortly great britain american revolution rising belgium churchill vietnam switzerland col britain air force soviet truman oswald commission threats declared scientific joint chiefs marines frankenheimer participants western europe castro communists frank wisner algeria anglo american rowan university assassins congo national library ala john f kennedy rennes lumumba nato armed forces crusade terrorists qigong crohn patrice lumumba seven days johannesburg naples italy fidel castro alzheimer's disease researchers fontainebleau bloomfield mainz algerian incredibly west germany treaty hurricane sandy generals national security district attorney gaulle adenauer iron curtain jim garrison clay shaw nsc maj opec zapruder cia director plos biology boggs acheson dulles tg murder inc former secretary mcmaster university pan african dwight eisenhower john f franco german special assistant future hold oas harry truman european society dallas police department gary null ectopic united nations general assembly angleton nikita khrushchev common market warren commission dave powers cia deputy director prouty challe enterobacteriaceae freiburg germany sars cov allen dulles atlantic charter french algeria covid-19 edgar hoover
Because We Are Strong
INTERVIEW: Christine Rich & Chronic

Because We Are Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 37:43


Christine Rich is an award-winning marketing executive, retired spin instructor, speaker, mentor, mama, advocate, and author.She is passionate about raising awareness about the intersection of chronic illness and mental health and advocating for better support for patients and physicians.She serves on the board of directors of the Northeast Ohio Crohn's & Colitis Foundation, is a support group facilitator and also volunteers on the national Crohn's & Colitis Foundation's Patient Advisory Task Force.Imagine the collective power if every person with a chronic illness spoke candidly about how mental and emotional health affects their physical symptoms.I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease at a young age and spent many years trying to hide from and deny the fear, anger, and sadness I felt because of my illness. I recently published a book called "Chronic" about how a serious health scare in my late twenties caused me to reevaluate and change her focus to wellness and self-love rather than illness and fear.Through raw and personal stories and insights, I share my journey of living with and befriending my less-than-glamorous, often times invisible, chronic illness called Crohn's disease.These insights include:How women insist they're “fine” even when they aren't.Why physicians should consistently discuss mental health with their patients.What the power of radical acceptance and self-love can provide.Chronic encourages readers to shift their perspective of chronic illness from one of shame or fear to one of acceptance and love. Throughout her book, I give readers reasons to feel empowered and to know they are not alone.Connect with Christine:Instagram: @christinerich_authorWebsite: www.christinemrich.comAmazon: https://www.amazon.com/Chronic-Christine-M-Rich/dp/1636764827/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=chronic+christine+rich&qid=1633886322&sr=8-1________________________This Episode is sponsored by: That's why the BC Schizophrenia Society has launched a brand new podcast, called Look Again, Mental Illness Re-examined. Host Faydra Aldridge talks to doctors, families, and people with lived experience about how to recognize mental illness, and the specific treatments that can help. Check it out. They'll really challenge you to“look again” at what you think you know about mental illness. Support the show (https://www.patron.com/findyourrare)

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
The Main Causes Of Autoimmune Disease And How To Reverse It

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 43:25


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and InsideTracker.Autoimmune disease is an extremely common and growing issue in our global population, affecting millions of people worldwide. Autoimmune diseases vary in symptoms and severity, but they all have one thing in common: the body is attacking itself. Typically, when someone has one autoimmune disease, it's likely they have more than one. Examples of autoimmune diseases are type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and Crohn's, Hashimoto's, and Graves'. In this episode, Dr. Hyman sits down with Dhru Purohit to discuss the five main root causes of autoimmune disease—toxins, allergens, microbes, diet, and stress—and the Functional Medicine approach to treating them. Dr. Hyman also answers several commonly-asked questions about autoimmunity.Dhru Purohit is a podcast host, serial entrepreneur, and investor in the health and wellness industry. His podcast, The Dhru Purohit Podcast, is a top 50 global health podcast with over 30+ million unique downloads. His interviews focus on the inner workings of the brain and the body and feature the brightest minds in wellness, medicine, and mindset.This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and InsideTracker.Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. Check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account here. If you're curious about getting your own health program dialed-in to your unique needs, check out InsideTracker and get 25% off here. In this episode, Dr. Hyman and Dhru discuss (audio version / Apple Subscriber version): Five causes of autoimmune disease (0:30 / 1:00) Autoimmune disease: the single biggest threat (3:43 / 2:34) Using the Functional Medicine matrix to treat patients (4:52 / 5:26) The difference between conventional vs. Functional Medicine treatment (7:34 / 7:49)The tie between inflammation and autoimmune disease (13:03 / 13:32)How to start right now to heal yourself at home (16:48 / 17:18)Recommended supplements for autoimmune conditions (24:21 / 24:56) The importance of high-quality sleep (27:47 / 28:12) Questions from the community on allergies, alcohol consumption, celiac disease, and more (29:05 / 29:47) Diet, lifestyle, and supplement tips to start healing right now (35:10 / 35:33) Additional Resources:Sleep MasterClass | 10-Day Reset See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Get Fit Babe
Healing Crohn's Disease

Get Fit Babe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:37


None of the information in this podcast and links associated are intended to treat or heal anyone. All claims within this podcast are my personal testimony. I am not a medical professional. Protocol Here --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/herrisingself/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/herrisingself/support

Kratom Science
65. Claudia Merandi, Pain Patient Advocate and Author

Kratom Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:05


Hulu’s final episode of Dopesick aired yesterday. “I cancelled my Hulu account,” says my guest, Claudia Merandi. “I called it Dopesickening. Hollywood had to profit off the pain community… I refuse to watch.” Claudia Merandi has suffered from Chrohn’s disease since she was a child, as documented in her book Crohn’s: The Other ‘C’ Word: … 65. Claudia Merandi, Pain Patient Advocate and Author Read More » The post 65. Claudia Merandi, Pain Patient Advocate and Author first appeared on Kratom Science.

Gut Check Project
Brain.FM Dan Clark & Kevin Woods, #64

Gut Check Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 79:02


Eric Rieger  0:00  Hello gut check project fans and KB MD health family, I hope that you are having a great day. It is now time for a new gut check project episode and guess what? Brain FM is in the house. That's right. Brain FM ceo dan Clark and chief scientist, Kevin Woods. Join us on the show today to talk about an incredible application of sound improving your life solving anxiety, sleep issues. Focus just an incredible tool that I can personally say I've used now for well over a year so as my family so as kids who has kids family, and so have several of our patients, they love brain FM so I don't want to spoil a single thing is an awesome, awesome episode. So let's get to our sponsors and get straight to talking to Dan and Kevin. We of course are always sponsored by atrantil. My co host Kenneth brown discovered, formulated and created atrantil to give to his patients to solve issues that are similar to IBS to give them all the polyphenols that they need for their daily lives whether they be athletes or they have gut issues or they just want to stay healthy. Go to love my tummy.com That's love my tummy.com Pick up your daily poly phenols today and of course unrefined bakery, let me just say some unrefined bakery. My wife is gluten free eater. She's got celiac disease. So I stopped by there and I picked up from unrefined bakery for my wife's birthday. I nice pumpkin pie. It was delicious. You would have no idea that was a gluten free product. It just tastes like awesome pumpkin pie. So go to unrefined bakery.com If you've never ordered from there before use code gut check and save 20% off your entire first order they deliver to any of the connected 48 and or you can you can just stop by go to unrefined bakery.com If you happen to be in the north Texas Metroplex area, and I think they have four locations. So just check them out and they got awesome stuff cupcakes, breads, various snacks that otherwise you may think I have to remain keto or I have to remain gluten free now. I can't have these awesome foods. That's just not true. Check out unrefined bakery.com today use code gut check for 20% off and last but not least go to KB MD health.com. And soon we will be featuring the signature package of course which includes atrantil CBD and of course you can also get not only CBD and atrantil there you can also pick up so if you're feigns That's right, Brock elite and broccoli pro exclusively available from physicians and guess what my co host he's a physician so we get to sell it and we bring it to a cost that you can't get anywhere else. So check out KB MD health.com Today Alright, let's get to some brain FM right now.Hello Gacek project fans and KB indie Hill family welcome to episode number 64. I'm your host Eric Rinker, joined by my awesome co host, Dr. Kenneth Brown. And honestly you got a an awesome intro to make here for everybody.Ken Brown  3:52  Yeah, so we're super excited. This is something I'm extremely passionate about because we have the CEO and the lead scientist for a product that I believe in. I love I have my patients use. I have my staff use I have all my family use, and it is called Brain FM, this if you have any trouble focusing if you have any trouble sleeping, if you have any trouble with anxiety, there is a really, really cool way to correct this. And we've got the owner and CEO, Dan Clark here, and Kevin JP woods, Ph. D. Super smart, and they're going to explain to us why well quite honestly why it's so effective on me why it's so effective on my patients. And one of the most exciting things we've been trying to do this for quite a while now pre pandemic, we realised Eric and I realised that when we tried this on a few patients at the endoscopy suite, not only did patients have a better experience, they were calm going into it. They woke up quicker and almost you vigorously every patient loved without question. And so I'm so excited because they're here in town visiting from New York because we're going to end up actually doing an official study where I think it's going to be groundbreaking. I think we're going to be able to change how people feel about outpatient procedures like colonoscopies decrease the anxiety. And it's not just anecdotal. It's because there's science behind it. There is a growing movement with this, and I am just absolutely thrilled episode 64 is probably going to be our biggest episode, ever to date.Eric Rieger  5:33  I would imagine so and I don't want to take away time from you all feeding in but just so that y'all know, this is 20 months in the making, I mean, Coronavirus, COVID hit, and derailed all of our effort to really we should, we should be 20 months further down the road of actually implementing this. And it's really for patient benefit, which is what we talk about here all the time. This will enhance the experience, I believe, for people who come through and have procedures. So, Dan, Kevin JP, what's happening?Unknown Speaker  6:02  Yeah, glad to be here. Thanks for having us.Eric Rieger  6:04  Well, thanks for coming all the way down to Texas. How's Dallas, amazing, amazing. NotUnknown Speaker  6:09  my first time in Texas, everything is enormous. The streets are three times as wide as they are in New York. I tried across the street, and I just keep on walking. Keep on walking.Eric Rieger  6:19  Well, awesome. So yesterday was your first time to join us at the GI suite? And for honestly, I don't want to steal anything. But what was your impression that you thought you might see on an application of your technology? And then how do you see it fitting in kind of how Ken and I have been trying to experience it ourselves?Unknown Speaker  6:39  Yeah, sure. So first, let's maybe tell everyone what the technology is. And then we can talk about how we jumped in and started this whole process. The backstory is actually interesting. So basically, brain FM, we make functional music designed to help people focus, relax, or sleep better. And mostly, we have a consumer product, where we have 2 million people that use us to jump into focus or switch into relax, or help them sleep. And we've been having really great success there. We have papers and some things in review in nature, which we're really excited about. So it's evidence and science backed. There's some really novel ways which we use music to basically switch you into that state. And I'll let Kevin, jump into that maybe come back to that and some of the science. But what's interesting is while we're chugging ahead on that, what my girlfriend actually she starts going to get a tonsillectomy. And she's signs her life to me, we're dating for six months, I now know we're in a serious relationship. And, and I realised that I'm terrified, and I'm not even getting surgery. And she's very scared. She's never been under before. And I realised at that point that we can use the same things that we're using science to advance on our consumer angle, we can use it in relax in a medical grade setting. Remember calling up Kevin and saying, Hey, can we do anything? And he starts looking at the literature, he starts looking at other things. He goes, Yes, I actually think we can improve it a lot. I pitched that to you guys. When we met. Yeah, like I think we met probably three months later. Just a coincidence. And you'd love the idea. And that's when we became here. So it's really cool. It's been definitely long time in the making. But it was amazing. When we were doing it some some yesterday. And then one gentleman woke up. And he was so he was so he was almost emotional. He was so happy. He's like, every single time I wake up, this is like the worst or most traumatic thing that can happen. And I was using this music and I woke up. And it was it was it was fine.Unknown Speaker  8:46  And I've done this several times before without music. Yeah.Unknown Speaker  8:49  And that's the thing that we're trying to do is how do we help people relax into surgery, and then wake up, non groggy alert, and in being able to get on with their lives without, you know, making this traumatic, because a lot of people are so scared. And I know for me personally, it was really cool to see you guys doing the art form that you have, because I was able to see that it isn't scary. There's this there's this almost like divider between people that are non medical and medical have and for being able to cross over it and bring a bridge, using some of our music, I think is really what we're set up to do.Eric Rieger  9:27  So it's interesting that that, honestly, it was really awesome. I think that the first person that y'all got to see feedback from was somebody who was so engaged and immediately wanted to tell you all about it. And I only just want to just so the audience understands exactly what Dan's describing because it was awesome. So kid, I saw this multiple times before they even got here when we use brain FM as an experiment, but essentially this particular patient, he wasn't high high anxieties per se for him his singular case, but he had a history of waking up erratic very emotional, hard to console, not very comfortable in his surroundings as he was emerging. He even told you all, he feared how he was going to wake up. Yeah. How would you describe that you saw him wake up.Unknown Speaker  10:12  My goodness, he was he was happy. He looked straight in the eyes. And he thanked us on a personal level. And that meant so much. And just knowing that he had those prior experiences, and that he saw such an enormous difference, and I remember him saying, How can I recommend this to people? How can I tell people? Whoa, hold up, we're not ready for that quite yet. But yeah, he was ready to tell the world he was just so excited. And theEric Rieger  10:38  credit, the greatest thing is, it's non invasive, meaning that I don't have to inject a new drug brand doesn't have to use a new scope tip or something new, gigantic piece of equipment. I mean, this is something that we can apply. It's practical. And it's gave us real results in appreciable results. AndUnknown Speaker  10:57  it's enjoyable to absolutely. And that's the thing about music is it is familiar to people, they understand it. And yet we have this music with a scientific twist on it. Right? We have a dive into the science later. But you know, it's not exactly the music that you know, but it still is entertaining and fun to listen to. And as something that can distract you, while you're you know, lying there maybe worrying about the procedure you're about to undergo. So, you know, it's art and science coming together in a really special way. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  11:25  yeah. And I think what's cool about it is, to Kevin's point, people for 1000s of years have always used music, right to be able to control their environment, right. And, you know, there's been people that have tried with this in medical settings. But it's, it's always lacking some of the results, some of the things that are proven in science that this can make a better experience, what we're really trying to do is combine both worlds between, you know, auditory neuroscience with Kevin's background, and with a product that can be brought into these experiences that isn't, is more than a placebo. It's something that is shown to have an effect, and it makes everything better. So it's a win for the patient. It's a win for the the clinic, it's a win for everyone involved, because everything just becomes a little bit easier with something that everyone's already used to, which is music.Eric Rieger  12:20  Again, I know that whenever you've had to had conversations with patients before they come in for their very first colonoscopy, the level of fear and anxiety for somebody who simply has never even endured a procedure before it can be very real, and oftentimes occupies a lot of the time in the clinic for either you or Megan, or one of the nurses or the MA's to really kind of talk them off the ledge. So what have you seen incorporating something like brain FM so far?Ken Brown  12:46  Alright, so my personal experience, before we even get to the patients, I would say that, but what I really liked is that my day begins. Every every morning, I start my day, I switch from the evening brain FM sleep, because I go to sleep with it. So my day begins was switching it to focus. I come down, I do my French press, which I say French press because Eric gifted me this French class, he's like, dude, quit, quit using drip coffee. It's like French press is the way to go. That's why boil the water, I have my brain FM on, I'm in the focus mode, I put that in focus, because I know within five minutes that my brain is ready to really do this, I'm put the coffee on. I do the French press fire up the computer. And then I start looking at my chart. So within 15 minutes, I am literally ready to roll. Because there's a lot of stuff I have to do. I then go to work to go work out, do whatever I do in my day. And then when I come home, then my wife and kids know this. And everybody has. We all use brain FM we all use it for the exact same things. My kids use it to study, I use it to get my day going, and I use it to put myself down. So I'm such a big believer. And then when we had our first what 30 People that we did at the endo centre, yeah. It's very easy to say, hey, trust me on this. I've experimented with it. All my employees use it. I use it, my family uses it. And what, just like you said being on the other side of this medical experience, even will today Nasreen was talking to these guys. And she said, even though I've scheduled 10s of 1000s of these when it was my turn to do it, I was nervous. And we gave her brain FM to do and she said to you guys, that immediately I calmed down. And now she's had several different procedures since then, and she doesn't care at all. She's like, I know, I'm gonna get in there. I know, I'm gonna wear this, I'm going to calm down. I know I'm gonna go to sleep, and I'm going to wake up and it's going to be refreshing and I'm going to feel good. So she can now tell my patients that she's like, Don't worry about a thing. Because one of the things that really and you and I talk about this all the time and we've had several podcasts, colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Colon cancer comes from colon polyps, we have a cure. And you saw that yesterday you are with us, we have a cure. So you and I have this urgency that if you're anxious about having a done, if you're scared, if you know somebody that had colon cancer, if you know somebody that complained about their colonoscopy, anything to get you into the clinic to get those polyps removed, because it saves your life. So now, when we have this opportunity to offer something, to make it a more, a more pleasant experience, not only more pleasant, because we're going to get into the site, we keep saying we're going to get into the science because that's coming the thing, that's the coolest thing. And I'm I want to thank both envision healthcare and and search, that they're being open minded about this. I'm really excited to get all my partners in G IA, looking at this, because I really kind of feel like this is a win win win win. We spoke with Dr. Ackerman, who's been co host, multiple, multiple times, when we spoke with Dr. Ackerman. He said it he's like, yeah, he's like, you just it's it's a no brainer, it's zero risk, potentially might help. And this is somebody who hasn't used it yet. When he realises he's like, Oh, when I said potential, I should have changed that word. He's like, it'll help. And that's what we're gonna end up trying to figure out. So what I love about it is it is just a way to say, look, get it done. Any worries you have, I'm gonna take one layer of that away, the second you show up. And that's what I'm excited about. Because ultimately, it's just a way, if you're worried about it, just make the appointment. We'll handle everything else. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  16:45  I think it's it's interesting, too, because a lot of people that at least from my experience, right, the first time you're going to something like this, you focus on these negative thoughts. So you're trying to push out of your head by using music, which we're used to. And again, we'll get on the science last time we hear that, but it's something that we can focus on something else. So instead of the fears or something else, we can focus on the music that we're listening to, and know that we're in really good hands at a centre that's willing to invest in technology, and try new things. For better patient experience.Ken Brown  17:20  I would like to just comment on that right there a centre that's willing to invest in technology. You're exactly right. Because when you've been meeting with people, they're saying, you know, we would like to be the Apple version of delivering health care like this.Unknown Speaker  17:33  Yeah. I mean, well, it's interesting, because if you look at Apple, right, why, why do people want to be Apple, it's because they do things more, they're not the first to do things always. But the first to do things extremely well and extremely thought through. So they take their time. They they're not, you know, first to market sometimes, but other times they are and they when they are they're the dominant factor. And I think it comes down to really finding solutions that truly do work that truly do make a difference. And that are long term solutions rather than the not right. And when we're talking to other people that are looking to be the apple of healthcare, it does take an investment, it does take a chance, like a leap of faith into trying something new. But I think that the the return on that are exponential in patient satisfaction and repeat visitors, people that are actually showing up for appointments because they're less scared because we have a solution for that. But but more with with all the other things that we're learning on as byproducts like efficiency and helping so that's the stuff that we're really exciting, because it's still focused on patient experience first, but there's so many other things that come from patient experience being better. Let meKen Brown  18:49  get your take on this real quick. Since you guys did see this from the other side. Yeah, you saw what happens with me and my partners with the staff with the camaraderie how everyone there really is there for one ultimate goal and that's to take care of people to help in any way we can, meaning that we can fix diseases. I just want your take on the how the patients felt and where they came through. And certainly when we started using the technology, because people do need to hear it's easy for a doctor to say oh go go get this done because you should but I love that you're like this is the first time I've seen this and it's it's it's beautiful to watch how you guys as a team. Yeah, everyone.Unknown Speaker  19:32  Well, I think it really comes shines through that that's true and everyone it has a great teamwork. I went from my perspective, it looks like everyone's there because they're like we have to be a players because we're saving people's lives. And that comes in from the RNs that we saw from the people in the lobby from from how you guys are showing up and and giving great bedside manner joking around everyone's having a good time. because you guys are in a great line of work where you're, again, saving people's lives, and even just talking to some of the the nurses there in our ends, you know, they're not just trying to make the experience where they're processing people, I thought that was really great. Where it's not like, oh, let's get this person with an IV and all these other things as fast as possible. It's like, no, like, Okay, you're sensitive, you've never gotten a needle or an IV or whatever. Let me figure out how to make it. So it's less obtrusive, or less intense. And I thought that was really great. And that's when why we're so excited. We're trying to say, hey, we're gonna add this brain FM thing into it. And they're like, that's gonna make our job even easier. And that was, that was really fun to say,Eric Rieger  20:43  I love the fact that that's what you said, because what I see brain FM being, I know that it's for the patient, but truly, the person who's going to see the benefit repeatedly is going to be the nurse who's already trying to be exactly what you said, to make sure that it's not a cattle call for the GI centre, or really any surgery centre. Yep, that wants to be appealing to the patient, but at the same time, allow their staff to all be really really good at not everybody is great at talking or, or joking appropriately with a patient and make them come down at ease. But if you could have something that was somewhat of an equaliser, yes, yes, that's been proven and tested, etc. That looks to me like something like brain FM could easily fit that mould really decreasing the burden on the staff that's checking.Unknown Speaker  21:31  Absolutely. And we were talking earlier about the fellows that we saw yesterday that had this great experience coming out and said that, you know, in previous cases, that he'd come out crying and distress and you think, not only the stress on him, but the stress on the nurses that would have to, you know, deal with them in that situation and calming down, and how that loads day after day on nurses that have to deal with that. Right. And, you know, to be able to relieve some of that burden is just absolutely enormous. And by the way, and what I saw at the centre yesterday was, you know, not only the nurses clearly care about people, but also just extremely efficient, and how quick the process was people with people going through, you know, and I had never been to a GI centre like that before, did not know what to expect. We were struck out. Yeah, how fast the whole thing was, it was amazing.Unknown Speaker  22:17  Yeah, I think investing, you know, in something like this is investing and also your employees, you know, they see that we were talking to believe it was Alexis. And she's like, this is ice 1000 People wake up a week. And I'm just today I can tell you that those people are waking up faster. And that's, that's something which, when, especially now trying to hire people in the in the world that we live in right now, you want to work at a company that is leading the charge and is something that you can feel really good about working there, because not only are they taking care of you, but they're taking care of everyone else. And I think that that really shone through yesterday as well.Eric Rieger  22:56  I think we're really lucky honestly can have G IA in this position to help us do this. Because it seems to me like this this lot. And we've talked about this on the show before but this company wants to be a an innovator, not just some big Gi Group. They want to help establish what should be some some good norms instead of some of the the throwaway old norms they want to be the ones that emerge southern think this is this is only going to pay a compliment to that.Ken Brown  23:23  Yeah. And I want to point something out when you're talking about the efficiency and all that, you know, let's what you did see is the efficiency in the preoperative and post operative, but you saw in the room that it was consistent, it was Eric and I focused. My technician, Mackenzie, we you guys saw that. It's just it's right there. It's the same process. And so by not worrying about the patient's concerns, or the concerns are alleviated when they come in, and I know that they're going to wake up in competent hands, I get to focus 100% on taking care of what I'm looking at with the endoscope. Eric gets to focus 100% on making sure that that patient is sedated and I work as a team and you saw how that is that the the flow of the room. And that's what's beautiful about the centre there. We're at that, although it's the efficiency sometimes people think oh, well, that that feels like you're moving too fast. No, the spot where we slow down is in that route.Unknown Speaker  24:22  Right? Yep. Yeah, we definitely saw that. Yeah, by efficiency. I just meant as a as somebody coming into the centre for procedure, I would be out of there in less than an hour, which was amazing to me. I always thought that outpatient procedures and you know, my take all afternoon I'd be sitting around all day, did not see any of that. It was really amazing.Eric Rieger  24:41  Yeah, it is a whole nother dynamic. Beyond that and why this is a good setup. But I do think it's a great setup because we huge exposure for something like brain FM so we can really prove this concept. So let's get into it. What in the world is brain FM? How does it work? He's rubbing his hands together.Unknown Speaker  25:00  Here we go, here we go. All right,Ken Brown  25:02  before you even get into this, let's at least can I, I love being around I love being the stupidest person in the room. And yesterday, I'm by far, I just felt like I'm just like playing catch up with Kevin all day long. It's just that you are wicked smart, and certainly have the credentials to prove it. And the way your passion towards this you the whole story. So before we even get into the science, oh, I was out last time.Eric Rieger  25:35  I was trying to follow the flow here.Ken Brown  25:38  How in the world? Did you become a PhD in this? Like, what is the path?Unknown Speaker  25:43  Sure, sure. Well, let's see. I was first interested, I think in the study of consciousness, I want to understand subjective experience. Why it is the case that we should experience anything at all rather than nothing? Why isn't it the case that humans are simply zombies with nothing on the inside, but you know, objects in the world, that kind of thing? Well, it turns out, it's hard to make a living as a consciousness research researcher. But it is possible to make a living as an attention researcher. And of course, attention and consciousness are very closely linked, at least in the sense that you tend to be conscious of what you're paying attention to. So I went into attention research in neuroscience. And within attention, I went into Auditory Research. Being a lifelong musician, just interested in sound in general, there's something magical about sound, right? It's ephemeral, you don't see it, it's in the air. And yet, it's so important to our daily lives, as you're experiencing right now. And so there's this magic about it. And I want wanted to understand, you know, the principles of how do you attend to sound in the world, right. And often, we're in these situations where we're trying to listen to the person talking to us in front of us, but there are other people talking around us, right? Or maybe we're on a busy street corner. Or say we're listening to a piece of music and just trying to hear the guitar part, but ignore the drums. And so there's this notion of a spotlight of attention in listening to things, right. And with the eyes, it's simple to understand how that happens, because you can move your eyeballs around, and you can point your eyes and things right? Well, we don't point our ears at things. We do that with our brain, right? And so if I'm sitting at the dinner table, and I want to listen to the person next to me, instead of the person in front of me, I don't have to turn my head to do that. I do something in my brain, right, that changes the spotlight of my attention so that I'm eavesdropping, right? And what is that process? How does that work? So I became very interested in that. I studied it in undergrad and then then went on to grad school, and did my dissertation on something called The Cocktail Party Problem, which is exactly the problem I've just described. And again, you know that the eyes being a two dimensional sheet, objects already arrived on the retina separated, right, but the eardrum is not a two dimensional sheet that your drum is a one dimensional receiver where you just get pressure over time, sounds mix in the air before they arrive at the ear. And it's the brains problem to unmix those sounds right? This is absolutely fascinating computational problem. So I study that for seven years. And in the process of doing that, I developed some methods to do online auditory experiments, which hadn't been done before. And long story short, you know, the, the old guard in auditory computational neuroscience would have said, Oh, I have have to bring people into my sound attenuated chamber, I have to make you wear my calibrated headphones. And therefore I can only run two subjects a day. Well, it turns out that if you do things online and use the right methods, you can collect 100 participants that day. And the date ends up being roughly the same, you know, with a few more participants, you can even out the noise that's otherwise introduced, but slightly messy online methods. It turns out, it's a massively more efficient way to run experiments. And one day, by chance in the supermarket, I ran into an old colleague of mine, so excited about these methods, I went on and on and on. And she had just hooked up with brain FM. And in that she was a consultant for them. Wow, bright brain FM, this, you know, wonderful company, they're doing functional music. And they really need somebody to, as you know, as a team of one to run lots of lots of experiments, behavioural experiments to figure out, you know, what is the ideal background music for doing, you know, XYZ. And I jumped on that immediately. I started consulting for brain FM, even before I defend what yours is,Eric Rieger  29:27  do you think, Oh, thisUnknown Speaker  29:28  would have been 20? Nothing? No, no, no, no. 1819 2018 Oh, yeah. Yeah, bless. Yeah. Say I defended in 2018. Yep. And so six months before that, I was I was consulting with Brian FM and, and I remember the day that I defended my dissertation, I signed the employment contract with Brian. Nice, very, very happy day.Unknown Speaker  29:49  snagging right out.Ken Brown  29:51  any room at all? And theUnknown Speaker  29:53  rest? Yeah, the rest is history. And it was gone to do some really incredible things. We got a grant from the National Science Foundation to look into music for ADHD. Out of that has come a this beautiful piece of work that has behavioural experiments has fMRI brain scanning and has EEG, and another method of looking at brain physiology. And we combined all of these methods to essentially show how our focus music works. Yeah, the results are really great. The papers currently in peer review at nature. We're really excited to see how that goes. Yeah, so that's currently currently where we're at with brain FM. Super excited to explain how it actually works. But maybe, since Yeah.Eric Rieger  30:41  We have to round out and ask Dan. Dan, you mentioned maybe on this podcast, my memory is already fuzzy, but you didn't found brain FM but you hopped on it. The moment that you saw there was an opening so why don't you to go over how you got here?Unknown Speaker  30:56  Yeah, so I have a very interesting story that's different than Kevin so I, I started making websites when I was 13. I loved it. I thought it was like a nother kind of video game that you could play. And I am a sucker blackbelt. So I made martial arts websites made the first one for my school, and they went from getting 30 leads to 130 leadsKen Brown  31:19  sorry, somebody that's done martial arts his whole life. What second degree and what? Mixed martialUnknown Speaker  31:23  arts so it concentrated in jujitsu? Krav Maga, Muay Thai and Cuba.Eric Rieger  31:28  Sweet. Yeah, Lucinda Drew.Unknown Speaker  31:32  So yeah, so I did that for a while. And I went to make martial arts websites because I made it for one person. He's like, can you make it for all my friends. And before I was out of high school, I had 20 clients were dropped out of high school, ended up having, you know, 40 clients at one time. And so my first business when I was 20, travel the world and came back and I said, I wonder if I can do this again. Maybe I got lucky. And I started working with businesses and bringing them online and building lead generation businesses and started doing more and more complicated things like POS systems, I started doing digital advertising became digital director of a company at a like 24 years old. And from the outside, I made it you know, I was making more money than my parents, you know, like travelling around the United States selling million dollar contracts. But I didn't I hit this point where I didn't feel like I was as really like helping people like I did when I was teaching martial arts. Because we used to use martial arts as a vehicle to take a kid from being not really confident or sure of himself into a leader into being someone and I'm I'm an effective that I was really shy, I got bullied on mercilessly in fifth grade. I was a little chubby and, and martial art transformed me. So even though I made success, you know, financially, I didn't really find success success personally. And, you know, I had this life or death situation, which is a whole nother podcast to talk through. And I realised I need to quit my job, quit my job, I came across brain FM, like three months later, when I was looking for what I should do, I knew I wanted to work in tech, again, to help people. I remember using it the first time and being blown away. Because I used to work from 10pm to 4am, because that's where I could find my flow state, right. Like, I could find that magic zone where I could just jump into things. And I remember taking my headphones off the first time and being like, this is too good to be true. This is no way this is working. I was super speculative. And I was I was this is just music, right. And I remember trying I save 24 hours and then used it still worked. My diet still worked. And it was it was perfect. Because it was something that allowed me to switch into focus whenever I wanted to. And from then I was like this is going to be something that changed the world. I called the people that created the company like 12 times, I actually started working for free and absurdly the tech team becoming CEO and then purchasing the company. So wild ride, never never intended to do that. But along the way, you know, obviously Kevin, Kevin and I are together as well as a lot of other great team members. We're really trying to use brain FM as a tool to help people be their best self, their best best version of themselves. And while we are doing that consumer you know now we get to do it in the medical space and help people have best health that they can have. And that's something that's we're really excited about isEric Rieger  34:40  awesome stories it y'all linked by passion, which I find really endearing for the process.Ken Brown  34:46  So we're doing so at at atrantil and certainly with the practice and everything we really like to discuss what is the what is our collective why what is my why? What is the the companies Why if we're all on the same way, what I'm just hearing, I'm just writing little notes here. I'm like, wow, both you guys driven by the Why have you have this knowledge, Kevin, that you are like, wow, this could really, it's so I come from this music background and I understand this and I can do this. And Dan, you have this incredible like, this is where I came from I, I need to I'm it's not a money thing. It's a The why is how do we get everyone else on the same page. And we hooked up because we're in that car that one day, we were being shuttled to the to the meeting we're going to and the why was wow, that sounds like that could really help my patients and you're like, the more I think about I think I can and I like when the y's align. And you can move that forward and get more people doing it. The beauty of brain FM is that you can teach people that they are capable of their Why suddenly they can unleash that. So when I meet with so many people that have irritable bowel syndrome, and which is associated or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, Crohn's, ulcerative colitis where they're kind of consumed by negative thoughts and anxiety. And there's that brain gut access, that Kevin's nodding, because he's like, that's definitely the cool part. So I want to affect the brain by protecting the gut. Kevin knows so much about the brain that we realised we're kind of meeting there were so I think that this collective why if we could expand this circle of why into okay, we now know that am Serge and envision is getting the why they're like, yes, we can do this. And now we can get the why going with the doctors going, we all can have this collective why, which is one thing, how do we get more people to have a better experience in healthcare and ultimately, collectively improve the health of everyone? You guys are doing it to the brain? I'm trying to do it through the budget.Unknown Speaker  36:58  So yeah, well, that's.Ken Brown  37:03  So I love hearing that story. I didn't know that. I mean, we've talked to me for hours and hours. I did not know that's a really, really cool story.Eric Rieger  37:10  Just a brief primer on, on how we all linked up there, because you just barely hinted at it is we you and I had met in snow skiing together, you have snowboarding on snow skiing, had a great time. And then we decided to ride together for the summer meeting. Yep, to the same group and share a shuttle. No pretence at all, we just got hopped into conversation about how are things going. And it probably took about 10 miles or a 70 mile ride. Before we determine, wait a second, there's something there is something here. Yeah. And so anyway, that's that's just my short version on how I showed up here today.Ken Brown  37:49  I love it a lot.Unknown Speaker  37:50  So I guess without further ado, should we talk about what's here and talk about some of the science?Unknown Speaker  37:54  Yeah. Finally, all right,Ken Brown  37:57  now we're gonna get into some cool stuff. All right, this is if you are, if you're listening to this, get a pen and a piece paper out because this is cool, cool, cool stuff. This is not just listening to music, I love that.Unknown Speaker  38:09  And so the trick with this is always to make it you know, straightforward and understandable. And hopefully, you won't need pen and paper to understand what's going on here. So simply put, a lot of neural activity activity is rhythmic, right? These rhythms, slow, fast, everything in between. And the rhythms in the brain support, perception, cognition, and action, essentially, those three things that the brain does. One that you may have heard of, are delta waves when you're sleeping, that's probably you know, the most common widely known one. But their rhythms are all sorts of different speeds that support pretty much you know, anything that you're doing in your daily life. And the idea behind brain FM, is, it's music that's specifically engineered to drive these rhythms in the brain called neural oscillations, or if you'd like brainwaves to drive your brainwaves in targeted ways, right? To support whatever you need to be doing, right. And so for example, we know what brainwaves in the focus brain look like? They're at particular speeds in particular regions. And so what we do is we say, okay, let's use the odd, let's use the auditory system as input for neuromodulation. Right? And so how can we use an auditory input to drive your brainwaves into the state that we know supports focus, right? And so we figured out that out and that's what we have our paper that's coming out shortly on, but because the principle is using the auditory system as a neuromodulator it's not just a one trick pony, right? So we can support focus, we can support relaxation, we can support sleep, and now we're discovering that we can, you know, support people going under and waking up from anaesthesia as well. So it's really it's a delivery method for you know, driving your brain into whatever state you need for, for what you need to be doing. Right. And so again, this is, you know, it's what we call functional music, which we'd like to make the distinction between that and, you know, what you might call art music with a capital A. Right? Which is that, you know, in modern times with artists and albums, there's a conception of music as something that primarily exists for self expression and for beauty and to connect to your audience. Well, things haven't always been that way, right. And if you go back 500 years, 1000 years, it's not about artists and albums. It's about music that is designed to do things for people, for example, you know, a lullaby a lullaby is a perfect example of ancient functional music. Because the point of a lullaby is not to sound beautiful. Maybe you also want that, but the point of a lullaby is to put a baby to sleep. Right? And similarly, you know, you have music that was used to help people do physical labour, right? Or music to march to if you're in an army, right? And the point of marching music is not to sound beautiful is to make people walk in lockstep, right. Another good example is dance music, right? And dance is a perfect example of this principle of rhythms in the brain and rhythms in the world. Which by the way, is called entrainment. That's a concept that you may be familiar with, which is, rhythms in the brain reflect rhythms in the world?Ken Brown  41:22  Yeah, what threw me off a little bit. Sorry.Eric Rieger  41:24  Just to catch up on everyone on on the vocabulary. I want to hear your just brief explanation of neuromodulation Sure, I've entrainment is another might have been one more, but just just to keep everybody on the same? Sure.Unknown Speaker  41:35  Sure. Sure. So neuromodulation is just a broader term that refers to, you know, inducing a change in the brain through an external stimulus, right. It could be a magnetic field, it could be electrical currents. But it could also be sensory stimulation, right? In this case, auditory system. And treatment is a form of neuromodulation, where you're providing a rhythmic input to induce a rhythmic response from the brain, right. And so you have this oscillating system, neural circuits of the resonance frequencies. And so you're basically pushing on this neural circuit in a rhythmic way and a response in a rhythmic, rhythmic way. And because the brain has this property of training to things around it, then you can drive the rhythms in the brain to help support what you need to do. Okay, which is, yeah, we're where I started. Yeah, it's pretty straightforward and simple example of that coming back around as dance, right? That's one that everybody understands. You hear the rhythm and the music and your body moves to that. And that's entrainment and what's called the auditory motor system, right? And also, by the way, if you want to know, how quickly does it take for brain FM to kick in, which is a question that we always get asked, I asked back, Well, how long does it take between when you hear dance music? And when you want to dance? Yeah, right? The answer is, it depends on how closely you're attending to the music, right? It depends on how intense the beats are. And all that's true for brain FM as well. But you know, the real answers, maybe 30 seconds, maybe a minute, if you're not really listening, if you're in the right mood, maybe 10 seconds, right. But that's the sort of timescale and ballpark timescale when you're talking about rhythmic entrainment in the auditory system. And interesting thing about dance music, right, is that the functional properties of dance music are completely dissociated from the aesthetic properties of dance music, right? Yes, you can listen to music that sounds terrible, and still makes you want to dance. And that's a perfect demonstration of functional versus art in music, right? And so what we've done in brain FM is we've said, okay, you know, we know entrainment is the thing, but instead of, you know, relatively slow rates that you will bounce to, you know, you can actually drive the brand very fast rates that support focus, or very slow rates that support sleep. And that's anything in between, and everything in between. And that's the principle.Unknown Speaker  43:47  What's really cool about it as well is in addition to all the things that Kevin is saying, we're also able to do it through sound, where it's something that is not obtrusive, or it stops you from what you're doing. So for example, in focusing, it's it's not something that you have to watch, or like meditation, you meditate, and then you focus this is as long as you are doing the activity. So what's nice about it is usually our work is visual, to why adding music to it, it's allowing us to focus better and work like we normally would. And the same thing in hospitals, right? And in the clinic that we were just at is this is music that you put on top. And it doesn't take away from the experience. People can still you know, hear what you're saying instructions, it's not something that they're putting over their eyes. One interesting thing about music compared or sound compared to light is what like one out of 18,000 people are epileptic,Unknown Speaker  44:47  right, the light can occasionally induce epilepsy, but music will not. Yeah, sound induced epilepsy is not only extremely rare, but it's also not due to rhythms. It's triggered by you know, things that have to do with your past. So the sound of a car crash or something might trigger trigger epilepsy for sound. Whereas with light, it's a very automatic thing where once you hurt once you hit a certain frequency of light flashing, you know, if you have that kind of photosensitive photosensitive epilepsy, it'll set you off. Not so with music, so it's extremely safe. Yeah, so,Unknown Speaker  45:19  so sound is really this perfect medium to apply to things that we're already doing, whether it's relaxing, sleeping, or going through surgery, but it's also something that's incredibly safe. Because we have all of these things that we've evolved to have that protect us from sound, the worst thing that can happen is maybe it's too loud. That that's, you know, very, that's, that's actually not even probably going to happen because of the way commercial headphones are made. You know, it's a very safe thing to add to your regimen.Eric Rieger  45:51  So what do y'all call this particular technology? And then how did you arrive at this technology? Because I know it's not the first iteration of utilising sound, you've even said, you know, it's been years ago from the lullaby to now. So what's this call that we're bringing in uses? Sure.Unknown Speaker  46:06  Well, I think we like to call it brain FM. It's it Yeah, it is. It is unique. We have, you know, patents on the process that we use to make this music because it is so unique, you know. Let's see. There are other methods of training the brain for example, you could flashlights that people like we were just saying, but you can't get your work done. If you're having lights flashed at you. Right? There's there's a conflict there. So Sam is really a great way to do it. Yeah, I don't think we have a really good name for the technologyKen Brown  46:40  there. Let me ask you a quick question. So I'm somebody that I own a different centre someplace else, like, oh, yeah, I heard this podcast you know what we're gonna do? I love Coldplay, so I'm gonna make everybody listen to Coldplay as they get in there. Because Coldplay does it for me. Explain the difference?Unknown Speaker  46:55  Yeah. So before we do that, I think so obviously, brain FM as a company, you know, we do have patents like, like Kevin saying, I would just say that every time we the reason why we call it brain FM is because every time we learn more, we actually grow and build and change brain FM. So it's an ever evolving thing, where brain FM was five years ago, and where it is now. And our understanding of the brain and even the music we produce different. As far as this of what we're making for health care. This is really brain health, that we're really focusing on as a pursuit, and it is different than our consumer product. And Kevin can share some of the things that we arrive to it. And it actually it's funny, because Coldplay was one of the control groups that we did that dimension. So when you when we first started talking about, hey, I think this is something that we could do. I think I share that story of my girlfriend. We were saying, I remember telling Kevin, I was like, Hey, can we make relax? We just play a relaxed music. And he's like, Yeah, we could but let me check to check. And he started finding all this free search, which I'll just like Kevin say, but it was just incredibly exciting. Because from that start, we were able to eventually build a product that blew the wall to off everything that existed so far, we can see that with science.Eric Rieger  48:14  So that's that's kind of where I was going. So I when you and I very first got engaged with this topic and what brain FM was. I think one of the first questions that can ask is how does this compare to some someone utilising binaural? Beats? Yeah, and then that that's really kind of what I was getting at is that that is more or less in, correct me if I'm wrong, but static in where it is. And just as you described, y'all have been evolving and finding new applications for brain FM proprietary applications. Whereas by neuro is a great discovery. However, y'all are evolutionsUnknown Speaker  48:55  on Yeah, I'll start and then I'll give it to Kevin. So you know, this, like we were saying before, it has been tried to be done forever. Sure, functional music lullabies those existed for 1000s of years. And then a lot of people are familiar with music that they they play to elicit a response. So when you go to spas, you hear the waterfalls and the relaxing, you know that because you're trying to have a relaxing experience. What we've done is we've taken that to another level. Now, to your point, binaural beats isochronic tones, those have existed for a long time. And that's when for anyone that hasn't heard about this is when you play one frequency in one year and one frequency in the other. And they basically combined in your brainstem, right? And that creates entrainment in your brain. But it's not as precise as what we're looking for. It still has effects but they're diminishing or they're not. They're not as rigorous as we'd like to know that this is 100% effective. So when we were creating brain FM, it was well this is something that's there but how How could we make it more effective? And Kevin, I'll share in a second, but the difference between is instead of modulating frequencies, we actually modulate amplitude. Mm hmm. Kevin, you want to explain that?Unknown Speaker  50:12  Sure. Yeah. So I can talk about by now binaural beats specifically. And Dan is absolutely right, you have two different frequencies coming in the two different ears. The difference between those frequencies creates beating in the brainstem, essentially, that if you were to take two sine waves of slightly different frequencies, sum them together, what you would end up with is amplitude modulation, basically interference between two very similar assignments. So for example, I've 400 hertz and one year 410 Hertz in the other ear, in the brainstem, I'm creating a 10 hertz amplitude modulation, okay, right dude with some of those things. Now, the issue? Well, there's several issues. One is that the brainstem was limited and how strongly it can pass those modulations up to the cortex, right, the cortex has a high level of the brain where all the interesting stuff happens. So even if you have, you know, it doesn't matter how loud those frequencies are in your two years, the the level of modulation created in the brainstem will cap out at a certain amount. But if you put that modulation directly in in each ear, instead of relying on the brainstem to produce it, you can get a much stronger response from cortex, right. So in terms of the strength of entrainment, and binaural beats is also about entrainment right? It's about producing this modulation, that then in trance cortex, the strength of that entrainment is much less than binaural beats because it is produced, because modulations produced by the brain instead of existing in the sound signal, right? A practical issue is that with binaural beats, you're limited to listening to tones. So when you listen to binaural beats, what you're hearing is, and one year and and the other year, I love that song. Exactly. No one loves that. Right? And so what we've done in brain FM is we found a way to insert modulation into music, right? So that it's enjoyable, and you get those effects as well. Right?Unknown Speaker  52:04  Yeah. And we can we can send over a demo if you want to stitch it to the end of this podcast so people can see here. Well,Eric Rieger  52:11  that's honestly one of the coolest parts is is the fact that y'all can y'all can put the effective portion of brain FM inside the genre that anybody wishes to listen to. That's right. It's one of the coolest things because I was even asking you when you were first describing Oh, is it? Is it country to go to sleep? And is it hard rock to wake up? And he said, actually, it's whatever you want, for anything that you want. And I thought that was the coolest explanation, because you're not limited to some type of genre, just simply because that's how you need to feel.Unknown Speaker  52:42  Absolutely. And to be clear, you know, most music is rhythmic, and therefore most music has amplitude modulation in it. But it's not targeted in the way that brain FM is, right. It's it's a byproduct of the artists doing their thing. So if you're listening to Coldplay, right, they have a mix of whole notes and half notes and whatever, you know, musical things are going on and do that they have amplitude modulation at all sorts of different frequencies happening, right? If they're at, you know, 120 BPM and they're playing whole notes, then they have, you know, one hertz or whatever it is maybe two hertz. But with brain FM, what we're saying is, okay, we know the frequency that we want the brain to hit. So we're going to directly insert amplitude modulations, at exactly 16 hertz, or, you know, whatever it happens to be, and make those the dominant modulation frequency in the brain. Whereas with music, you have all these overlapping frequencies. And you know, the, the target is to make it sound beautiful not to drive the brain into a certain solitary state. Right. And so, by the way, with Coldplay, we did this very large online study, we had 200 participants in this, we gave them a standard questionnaire called the profile of mental states looking at, among other things, tension and relaxation. And we had Coldplay as a control. We had brain FM, we also had another piece of music very fascinating. That was made by music therapists and was hailed as the most relaxing song in the world, it was used in multiple studies, it was shown to reduce blood pressure to similar extent as benzodiazepines to for people undergoing surgery. And we found that we beat that would be called Les by a mile. And we beat that song as well. You know, error bars were small relative to the difference between them highly, statistically significant. So that was very cool to see.Ken Brown  54:21  So the last part again, one more time, because it's based on science. And what I said Coldplay, kind of jokingly because I like Coldplay, and that didn't realise that they actually studied that. And so this was compared to a scientifically or supposedly scientifically derived music considered the most relaxing music in the world and I guess you paid yourself you like you went you just went immediately to the deepest water you could findUnknown Speaker  54:46  that's exactly right. We we did the hardest tests, we always try to give ourselves the hardest test. By the way, it's a track called weightless by Marconi union is extremely Google will you'll find it was CNR CNN article written about it, and we said okay, if this is the king of the hill, We're going to beat it. And we did. Wow.Unknown Speaker  55:03  Yeah. And we do that from some of the things that Kevin was talking about earlier, which were there's online experiments. So think about it, you know, we can actually test 1000s of people, and we know all the knobs to play. So not only are we doing these neural phase locking these amplitude modulation, we actually do other things in music, like 3d sound. So when you're in some of our relaxing music, we actually shift some of the sound from right here to left here, almost like you're in a hammock, sometimes, we have different BPM rates, different kinds of genres specific to make you feel more relaxed. And as we learn more about you, and what you prefer, we can actually have even a better response. And, you know, getting back on track on some of the stuff that we're doing with you guys, and hopefully more people in the future. We started looking at this from a science based procedure and saying, Okay, this is what the world says is the most relaxing music in the world. Let's beat it. And I believe it would be like, like 50 50% or 5%. It's a pretty pretty demonstrable, especially compared to,Ken Brown  56:08  just to clarify that was like, first iteration, you guys continually improve what you're goingUnknown Speaker  56:13  Oh, yep, yep. And now it just comes down to so we have improved sense and now it's comes down to doing clinical trials with real people to say okay, we've improved as much as we can outside the environment. Now let's make it better in the environment and continually testEric Rieger  56:29  one or something else that that you mentioned, Kevin, that I feel like is, is maybe even just glossed over as we're talking about comparing it to Coldplay or or waitlist, is you said benzodiazepines also. So now you're talking about comparing sound to a drug and a bit of die as a pain, of course, is what we use, if you're curious, that's verse said, that's out of and that's value. These are things that people religiously take for, as an analytic try to stop that. So the fact that you didn't just go to the deepest water and sound, you went straight to the heart of what we use and anaesthesia, chemically to allow people to alleviate their anxiety, and that's quite measurable.Ken Brown  57:11  Alright, so let's bring that up because you said religiously tape. But the reality is, is that benzodiazepines have an extremely addictive potential as well. Correct. So people that suffer from anxiety and using those medications to try and get through that there are tremendous rich,Eric Rieger  57:27  so in before we hit on that just just the array of benzo and benzo like drugs. I mean, it doesn't just stop with those three, you're talking also about Xanax, Ambien, senesce, those, all of those fit at some level to be maximum GABA agonist. So when you say that what you have by comparison is something that's effective. We don't know this today. But potentially y'all could be unlocking a way for people not to be dependent upon taking these drugs to to get better sleep to alleviate their anxiety, etc. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  58:02  I mean, this is definitely a road that we see could be possible. Obviously, there's a lot of work to be involved involved right now. But we do have testimonials of users that, like reach out and they say, Hey, I haven't slept well in 10 years. And I tried brain FM a lot last night, and I've been on Ambien, I've been on Lunesta, and I slept better than any drug I've ever taken. Right. And now we're I'm not here saying that this is a cure or treatment. Yeah. But this could be an alternative approach where maybe you can take less trucks, or you can do this before you try drugs, or, you know, whatever. And, you know, I think that gives someone more control and freedom.Ken Brown  58:41  As someone who tries to incorporate different lifestyle modulations to improve my life to try and incorporate these different things with my patients. When we talk about let's talk about benzodiazepine addiction, we can get into the fact that benzos works similar to alcohol. So I work with a lot of patients with liver disease, and we try and get over that. Well, the beauty that I really like about this is that just like you said, when you meditate to try and focus, you are meditating, and then you're going to try and have focus. What I love is I'll actually stack this kind of stuff. I will and Eric's a big sauna fan also. And so I will put my brain FM on I will go into the sauna, and I will do breathing exercises all at once. And I love is absolutely you know, it's I'm, I feel like I'm focusing on my breath. I know that I'm getting that neuromodulation that's going to happen anyways and start stimulating that area to try and do that. And I'm getting the benefits of the sauna that's there. And so just we're not saying that one thing does something or other but when we start on my lifestyle modifications, this is like one of the easiest as the other stuff you need a sauna like when I tell my patients I'm like you know sauna therapy is good. I don't have access to it. Okay, do you let's do some breathing and some meditation. I can't I'm super busy and whatever. Okay, how about just putting some headphones on? Yeah. How about that? Let's start with that and see what happens.Unknown Speaker  1:00:11  And it's something that, you know, one of the reasons why I was so attracted to the company in the beginning was, it isn't just for, you know, people that it is for everyone. It doesn't actually matter if you speak English or not, none of our none of our music is created with lyrics. And one thing I think we glossed over is actually we have in house composers that are makeup, that's gonna be my next question. Yeah. So we have people that have toured with some of the greatest bands ever, which, you know, I don't know if we can disclose, but some really great talented musicians. And they're, they're taking this in making this from a functional approach, where it's music that sounds great, it's music that has all the scientific effects, and all the knobs turned the right way to have the effect we're trying to, you know, get for the user. But it's also not necessarily music, that is going to be your favourite song. Because that's not the goal, right? The goal is to make an effect that can be measured in your brain, and is not just sometimes it's every time, whether you're trying to relax, you're trying to sleep, you're trying to focus,Unknown Speaker  1:01:13  and it's music that will sit comfortably in the background. So for example, with our focus music in particular, you know, a lot of people don't realise that. If I'm a music producer, normally, my job is to grab your attention. My job is to make music punchy, and make you sit up and distract you from whatever you're trying to do. Right. And so we've we've flipped the script on that, and we say, Okay, well, we know the tricks they're using to make music punchy and grabbing your attention. Let's do the opposite. You know, what can we do to make music still sound good and be entertaining, but help you work by not distracting you? Right? And because we have a different target than everybody else who ended up making different music than everybody else.Eric Rieger  1:01:50  So figuring this out, you some people say they're an audio file, I would say that You are the supreme audio file doctor. Yeah, no, no. But not not only that, you also play guitar. And we talked about this briefly yesterday. So when you have when when y'all team up with your composers to come in house to build stuff? Just just how does it happen? How do y'all know what sounds good for it to match together? And you're like that that'll work here? I mean,Unknown Speaker  1:02:19  absolutely well about it. They're much better musicians than I am. For starters, my job is to annoy the heck out of our musicians by saying, that's a bit too good. That's, uh, you know, that that melody that you made, it's too catchy, you know, oh, that that percussive part as normal music, it would be totally awesome. Yeah, right now, you know, we're not trying to grab people's attention. And so just sort of to remind them of the science and the target and that kind of thing. But,Eric Rieger  1:02:47  so what was the session? Like for them? Are they there for like, four hours, and they're cutting one track? Or?Unknown Speaker  1:02:52  Oh, they make enormous quantities of music. They're so good at it. In terms of a session, so they work in Ableton, you know, okay, yeah. So they have DAWs we have proprietary software that plugs into Ableton that helps us layer the science on top of music, essentially, that's what what's happening. And the principles of composition they use from the ground up, are meant meant to support whatever mental state right? So, you

Healthy Runner Podcast
Ali on the Run on Healthy Runner Chatting all things Running and Life with Ali Feller

Healthy Runner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 71:13


Oh my… do I have a special treat for you today!!!  I have listened to about 100 of her episodes during my runs and during this episode, I had the opportunity to actually sit down and chat with the one, the only, Ali Feller!  Ali is the host of one of the leading running podcasts in the world, the Ali on the Run podcast and creator of the Ali on the Run blog.  Ali is a podcast host, blogger, freelance writer and editor, race announcer, runner, and probably most importantly a mom!  Ali is most known for asking her guests the questions people really want to know about what they were thinking when they made that move to take a lead in a race or those unusual things runners experience.   It is such an honor to talk with Ali about all things running, podcasting, and just things that we do in everyday life as runners!  We also chatted about so much more including:   Memories of our college days at Quinnipiac Growing up as a dancer How dancing has made Ali a more mentally tough and confident as a runner Ali's early training mistakes that led to injuries some hip bursitis and shin splints How Ali ran a half marathon PR at age 36 after over a decade Ali's journey managing a chronic inflammatory disease and running through Crohn's Disease and...of course Celine Dion, the NYC marathon, and what's next for Ali! She is truly an inspiration within the running community and I know you will just love our conversation.   After tuning into this episode go ahead and subscribe to the Ali on the Run Podcast like I do so you can get her energy and positivity in your running listening queue during your runs.      This Episode is brought to you by:  Healthy snacks from UCAN.  Healthy snacks enhanced with the revolutionary ingredient SuperStarch, allow you to fuel smarter at breakfast and curb cravings anytime while maintaining blood sugar and boosting energy. Learn more about how SuperStarch unlocks and sustains optimal output, reducing fatigue without spikes or crashes and is backed by science. We've got a special offer for you where you can save 20% by using the code HEALTHYRUNNER.  Just head to: https://ucan.co and use the code HEALTHYRUNNER at checkout to save 20%!     Connect with Ali: Ali's Instagram: @aliontherun1  Ali on the Run blog: https://aliontherunblog.com/ Ali on the Run Show “Let's All Be Best Running Friends” Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/509827249645825/ Ali on the Run Twitter: https://twitter.com/aliontherun1 Ali on the Run Strava: https://www.strava.com/athletes/13333410  

Closer Mentality
Ep. 41: Crohn's Disease and the Paralympic Games with Ali Jawad

Closer Mentality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 35:59


Episode 41 welcomed Paralympian Ali Jawad on to talk about his experience being born without legs and choosing a sport like powerlifting through which to excel. We work through each of his run-ins with the Paralympic Games and what it finally felt like to reach the podium. This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Get 10% off of your first month at https://betterhelp.com/closermentality Closer Mentality UNCENSORED: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJuZfwIP9ny-WIqpcUaQnWA Accessercise App: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/accessercise/id1542340631?irgwc=1&aosid=p239&cid=aos-us-aff-ir&irchannel=13631&irpid=221109&clickid=Vq9xPJ0KZxyIRXJ2Aj3fJVK6UkGxWZ1NzWXN1M0&ircid=7613 Listener Survey: https://forms.gle/zxArh8MpqHTTTJUL9

Smart Digestion Radio
SDR 287: Food Enzyme Deficiencies

Smart Digestion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 10:16


Regain your freedom from Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, constipation and more in 12 weeks or less without harmful drugs or surgeries. To book a free call and to learn more about working with Dr. Christine, visit: www.bit.ly/gutcall  To purchase Dr. Christine's DEAL: www.BigBundle2021.com

A Tale of Two Hygienists Podcast
305 Gut Deep Into Gastrointestinal and Oral Health with Jennifer Fijor, ARNP

A Tale of Two Hygienists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 62:44


Please Leave a Review!   On this episode of A Tale of Two Hygienists Michelle and Andrew bring on Jennifer Fijor, ARNP to talk about the medical dental connection specifically as it relates to gut heath. Jennifer dives into the details about Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease and more.  Special thank you to Paradise Dental Technologies for sponsoring the CE portion of this podcast so that we can provide you with FREE CE! Take the CE quiz for this episode here. Be sure to view your state guidelines to ensure this CE is applicable in your State. You can view all episodes with Free CE here.  Interview Starts: 06:41.426   Episode Highlights Symptoms  Diet Periodontitis/IBD Overlap  Oral Lesions Treatment Journey Patient Conversations   Quotes   “You can be the first line defense in detecting some of this stuff.”   “They can go to the bathroom anywhere from a few times a day, to 20 times a day with urgent diarrhea.”    “Diet plays a role but it is not the only thing that is involved.”    “Gut bacteria starts in the mouth.”    “If you are someone with poor oral health you might be someone with poor gut health as well.”    “It is so hard to live a normal life with some of these auto-immune disorders.”    Links    Jennifer on Instagram/TikTok: Gutgalz Inflammatory bowel disease and oral health | BDJ Team    Could the Cure for IBD Be Inside Your Mouth?    Inflammatory bowel disease and oral health: systematic review and a meta-analysis    A Tale of Two Hygienists Podcast   A Tale of Two Hygienists homepage   AToTH on Facebook   AToTH on Instagram   AToTH on LinkedIn  

PodcastDX
COVID with Crohn's Disease

PodcastDX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 26:47


We are welcoming back Myisha Malone-KING.  As you may recall Myisha spoke with us in season 7 about Crohn's Disease and just last week about her daughter's severe asthma.  Myisha is a passionate dedicated advocate she's received proclamations from states for recognition of her advocacy and IBD awareness.  Besides her challenges with Crohn's, she ended up catching COVID last year!! ​ Having Crohn's doesn't make you more likely to get exposed to the new coronavirus. But it may make you more likely to have a harder time with it if you do catch it. Certain people are more likely to become very ill if they get COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus. That includes people who take medications that suppress, or weaken, their immune system. ​Many things can lower your immunity, including chronic illness, recent surgery, or medication. Any of those things might apply to you. Some, but not all, Crohn's drugs suppress your body's immune response. So far, experts haven't done any specific research on COVID-19 and people with Crohn's. ​Doctors are still learning about the new coronavirus. But there's already some expert advice for people with inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's. ​

EAT THIS with Lianne
Eat This With Lianne: No Prisoner To Your Genetics (EP 94)

EAT THIS with Lianne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 59:48


So, if your Mom suffers with Crohn's disease, does that mean you're predetermined to face the same challenges in your life? Or, maybe cancer is prevalent in your family history. Does that put you in cancers crosshairs just because you share the same genes? Over the past decades or more, medical advancements have allowed us to delve deep into our genetic make-up from generations gone by to help us formulate our plan to combat any possible weakness and ailments that are intertwined throughout our family tree. Can genetic testing be like the crystal ball of health science?! Are we A PRISONER to our own genetics!? Or do we possess the power to take control and change through lifestyle and diet? On this episode of Eat This With Lianne, we're joined by fan favourite Dr "B" and his own intellectual pool of genetics to help us all understand the worlds of genetics, epigenetic, and so much more!

Smart Digestion Radio
SDR 286: Black Friday Big Bundle

Smart Digestion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 13:09


To purchase the Black Friday Bundle: www.bigbundle2021.com Regain your freedom from Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, constipation and more in 12 weeks or less without harmful drugs or surgeries. To book a free call and to learn more about working with Dr. Christine, visit: www.bit.ly/gutcall   

About IBD
Living With Ulcerative Colitis as an Air Force Pilot

About IBD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 28:29


Did you know that being diagnosed with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease is a disqualifying condition to serve in the United States military? However, it seems that it's not always an automatic reason for discharge. Lt Colonel Joshua Nelson was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis and needed to have ileostomy surgery. It cast into question his future as a pilot in the Air Force Reserve. Learn his story of how he worked with his medical team in order to keep doing the job he loves, his advice for others like him, and tips on flying that any ostomate can use. Concepts discussed on this episode include: Pseudopolyps in IBD

Ali on the Run Show
441. Ask Ali!

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 48:36


"I don't 'have it all.' I have toilet paper in my pocket for Crohn's disease emergencies." Welcome to Ask Ali, a twice-a-month series where I answer all of your questions. This time around, we've got listener questions about "having it all," wedding planning, early morning races, podcast sponsorship, and more. Thanks to everyone who called in for this one. Enjoy! If you want to be part of a future “Ask Ali” episode (yay!), call 917-947-9699 — introduce yourself, and ask whatever's on your mind! I can't wait to hear from you! SPONSOR: goodr. Click here and use code ONTHERUN15 for 15% off your entire goodr order! You asked: On the topic of “having it all” (6:10) All about wedding planning (16:25) All about the 2022 Clearwater Running Festival (24:30) How would I pick the marathon world teams? (30:50) My must-haves for a one-year-old child (34:40) How to prepare for an early race start (39:50) What does it mean when a podcast episode is sponsored? (42:55) Check out: Clearwater Running Festival (Use code ONTHERUN for 20% off all distances!) Sheraton Sand Key Resort Fast Women newsletter Stacking cups Fisher-Price walker Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

Ambition is Critical
Episode 162: Jack Jones

Ambition is Critical

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 175:49


The boys are joined by Trampolene front man Jack Jones and talk about him being 2 years sober, being a decent footballer as a kid, growing up in the same neck of the woods as Ryan and moving to London. Jack talks about his love for poetry, watching Artic Monkeys play the Olympic stadium on his own, being best mates with Pete Doherty, supporting Liam Gallagher and Crohn's disease plus much much more…..

The Rheumatoid Solutions Podcast
Reducing Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms And Biologic Frequency

The Rheumatoid Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 46:52


Esther has had rheumatoid arthritis for 32 years, and is now able to reduce her medications intake with the Paddison Program, reversing Crohn's Disease as well! For the transcription and for more helpful information visit http://www.rheumatoidsolutions.com Paddison Program for Rheumatoid Arthritis http://www.paddisonprogram.com/ra Rheumatoid Support - http://www.rheumatoidsupport.com

Rising Moms Podcast
How to Get the Kids to Help with Chores with JoAnn Crohn

Rising Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 19:02


Not long ago, I posted a picture of my children washing dishes on Instagram. And I was astounded by the amount of backlash that describe it as “child slavery” or something similar. But we're actually doing our kids a disservice by not teaching them household responsibilities. Because how are they going to build and take care of their own homes when they grow up? Join me and JoAnn for some awesome tips on how we could get our children on board! Other life-changing lessons in this episode… How to ‘negotiate' chores with your family Factoring in age-appropriate chores Method for teaching kids how to do the task How to make it consistent Why focusing on one chore at a time is important Building your kid's confidence  Don't forget to subscribe so you never miss out! And let's build a community of rising moms by sharing it with a friend too! Head over to www.renaefieck.com/podcast/kidshelping to tune into the whole episode!

Ali on the Run Show
439. Dr. Abby Bales Takeover Edition

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 84:21


"You're honestly doing a really good job. I know all you see is all the ways you think you're failing. But I promise, you're doing OK, and no one has it all figured out, despite what you see on Instagram! Stop scrolling. Read a book." In 2019, I interviewed Dr. Abby Bales — a pelvic floor physical therapist and the owner and founder of Reform Physical Therapy — as part of the Ali on the Run Show's Motherhood Mondays series. Ever since, Abby has asked when I would be willing to flip the script; when I would be willing to hand over the microphone so I could answer her questions. And today is that day. Welcome to the Dr. Abby on the Run Show! On this episode, Abby is in control, asking me questions about Crohn's disease, motherhood, life with a chronic illness, running, career stuff, and how they all intersect. (Listen to Dr. Abby's previous conversations on the Ali on the Run Show here, here, and here.) SPONSOR: The AGA IBD Parenthood Project — Follow the link for resources and support on your own journey navigating parenthood and life with an inflammatory bowel disease. What you'll get on this episode: Why now? (4:40) My Crohn's disease story (7:45) On Crohn's and the decision to have children (10:45) My experience with postpartum anxiety… (16:00) …and my decision to finally start therapy (20:45) On having a support system (29:30) Do I worry about Annie getting Crohn's? (36:15) Talking to Annie about feelings (48:20) How having a chronic illness has made me more resilient, and helped me better relate with people (52:00) How Crohn's disease has affected my career (58:00) How living in New Hampshire has helped my health (1:01:15) What goals now seem possible? (1:06:00) Follow Abby & Reform Physical Therapy:  Instagram @reformptnyc Facebook Twitter @reformptnyc Website Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

Editor Knows Best
Meet Stephanie

Editor Knows Best

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 30:08


Stephanie A. Wynn, Author, Crohn's Survivor, and Philanthropist is a native Floridian, Stephanie has owned several successful businesses in the past, establishing her first business at the age of 23. In addition to being an entrepreneur, Stephanie has worked for one of the largest financial institutions, JP Morgan Chase, and former broker-dealer INVEST Financial, working side by side with successful financial advisors and business savvy investors. Stephanie has a strong desire to help others, which inspired her to write her groundbreaking book Readi-Set Go! A Simple Guide To Establishing A Successful Small Business. She is eager to share all she has learned over the years about business ownership and hopes to inspire others to follow their dreams as well. Stephanie believes giving back to the less fortunate is a key component of success. Stephanie understands the challenges of starting a business and finds joy in assisting those who don't know where to begin or are afraid to take that important first step. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/editorknowsbest/support

RICE CAKES AND PEARS
Living Life Despite Uncertainty With Kristen Doornbos

RICE CAKES AND PEARS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 32:55


Kristen Doornbos is a 30 year old business woman, runner, and massage therapist. At first glance, you would not know the adversity she faces on a daily basis... Kristen has gone through many diagnoses throughout her life, which include Crohn's disease, Gastroparesis, and Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Unfortunately, even though she has been diagnosed, there are still question marks regarding what is going wrong, even today... Kristen also has a feeding tube due to not being able to fully digest and absorb nutrients properly. We talked about a range of topics regarding life with a feeding tube, dating, running, business, and more! What I️ loved about our interview, is that Kristen lives her life the best she can, despite so much uncertainty! I️nsta: @kristendoornbos Check out her greeting card business too!! Insta: @papertrailsgreetingco

Smart Digestion Radio
SDR 285: CBD Is The Next Amazon

Smart Digestion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:24


Regain your freedom from Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, constipation and more in 12 weeks or less without harmful drugs or surgeries. There has never been a better time to create your own income stream.  www.myhemp.business to join Dr. Christine's private fb group. To purchase Dr. Christine's custom formulations: www.OmegaDigestion.com

PowerBanking
Social Engineer for Change: Charmika Placide

PowerBanking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 35:38


Today's episode meets at the intersection of Tech, Public Health, and Legislation. Our guest is Charmika Placide. Charmika Annatisha Placide currently serves as an IT Business Systems Analyst and Public Health Consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Charmika is tasked with ensuring oversight and governance to over 30 public health IT systems. Prior to this role Charmika worked as a Public Health Analyst and Consultant to CDC. As a consultant she completed The 2019 CDC Field Epidemiology Manual, a tool used globally for epidemics. Prior to her work at CDC, Charmika was an IT Project Coordinator with McKesson where she helped implement the first cloud e-procurement system throughout the enterprise. Leveraging her business and analytical skills to solve complex problems, often collaborating across functional areas. Entrepreneurial minded she managed her own contract with a nonprofit for women and children who were victims of sexual abuse; managing web traffic, social media and volunteer logistics, as well as creating inter-office systems. In her spare time, Charmika volunteers with Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) Georgia chapter to advocate for people with disabilities. Recently, Charmika served as a panelist at CCFA's inaugural women's education event to discuss health equity and advocacy. Ms. Placide has held positions with community organizations nationally and locally as a fellow, advisor, and committee member geared specifically towards inclusion to build pipelines for people of color. She holds a bachelor's degree in Managerial Sciences from the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University. Charmika is passionate about helping her community and loves working at the intersection of public health, technology and legislation to provide a greater impact. Connect with Charmika Placide on LinkedIn and Instagram @Mika_Inspires --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/winningseason/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/winningseason/support

Mostly Balanced
88. SYDNEY WEBB on Surviving Cancer and the Healing Power of Adaptogens

Mostly Balanced

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 62:25


Welcome back! Today we are joined by Sydney Webb, founder and CEO of vegan, superfood cookie dough company, Toto. As a junior in high school, Sydney was diagnosed with severe Crohn's disease and it changed the path of her life. A few years later, she was diagnosed with colon cancer, and this diagnosis is what led her to discover the healing power of adaptogens. She shares the story of her diagnoses, how she dealt with them, and how they have impacted her life. She answers our questions about the process of starting her own company, and the advice she would give to her younger self. You can find Sydney on Instagram @sydneyoliviaaah and head to @totofoods to shop her delicious superfood cookie dough. Highly recommend the seasonal pumpkin spice! What we're trying this week: Carleigh's Pick: @wemetatacme singles mixers in NYC Mia's Pick: What Happened, Brittany Murphy? As always, find us on Instagram @mostlybalancedpodcast and on our website. Thanks for joining us and please leave a rating or review if you enjoyed the episode! Shop our Favs: Sakara Life - use code XOBALANCED for 20% off meal programs and clean boutique items Nuzest Protein Powder - Code MOSTLYBALANCED

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit
How to Prevent and Reverse Autoimmune Disease Using The Power of Food (Minisode #51)

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 32:25


How to Prevent and Reverse Autoimmune Disease Using The Power of Food | This episode is brought to you by Joovv and HigherDOSE.Autoimmune diseases are an increasing issue in our country, with over 80 million Americans dealing with some form or another. Type 1 diabetes, Hashimoto's, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, colitis, and Crohn's disease are just some of the more than 70 identified forms of autoimmunity that leave people feeling sick, lost, and powerless. By identifying the specific type of immune dysfunction that's occurring (autoimmune doesn't always equal overactive) we're able to identify the best course of treatment for optimal results. That can even mean remission. In today's mini-episode, Dhru speaks with Dr. Elroy Vojdani and Dr. Terry Wahls about why there is an explosion of autoimmune diseases, and how to prevent and treat autoimmune conditions. Dr. Elroy Vojdani is the founder of Regenera Medical, a boutique Functional Medicine practice. Dr. Vojdani has co-authored over 20 articles in the scientific literature and continues an integral role in research related to autoimmune, neurodegenerative, and autoinflammatory conditions. He is also the co-author of a medical textbook entitled Food Associated Autoimmunity. Dr. Terry Wahls is an Institute for Functional Medicine Certified Practitioner and a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa. Dr. Wahls was diagnosed with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, and was confined to a tilt-recline wheelchair for four years. She didn't buy into the limits defined by her diagnosis and restored her health using a diet and lifestyle program she designed specifically for her brain, and now pedals her bike to work each day. She is the author of The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles, and the cookbook The Wahls Protocol Cooking for Life. For more on Dhru Purohit, follow him on Instagram @dhrupurohit, and on YouTube @dhrupurohit. Text Dhru at (302) 200-5643. This episode is brought to you by Joovv and HigherDOSE.I use the Joovv light every night religiously to support my mitochondria and keep my circadian rhythms running optimally. For a limited time, Joovv is offering all my listeners an exclusive discount on your first order. Go to Joovv.com/dhru and apply my code DHRU for $50 off. Some exclusions do apply.Sauna use can reduce inflammation, stress, and improve detoxification and energy production down to the cellular level. But sometimes we can't break the bank to make this happen. So when I was introduced to the portable HigherDose Infrared Sauna blanket, I got super excited because it's actually an affordable way to get all of the benefits of sauna use including increased blood flow, better sleep, a calmer nervous system, and way more. Right now, you can save $75 off a HigherDOSE Infrared Sauna Blanket. Go to https://higherdose.com/pages/dhru today and use my exclusive promo code DHRU75 at checkout. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Grand bien vous fasse !
Toutes vos questions sur les maladies inflammatoires de l'intestin

Grand bien vous fasse !

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 51:52


durée : 00:51:52 - Grand bien vous fasse ! - par : Ali Rebeihi - Ce sont des pathologies qui compliquent la vie et souvent taboues qui infligent une double peine. Quelles sont les symptômes des maladies inflammatoires chroniques de l'intestin ? Comme la maladie de Crohn ou la rectocolite hémorragique… - réalisé par : Claire DESTACAMP

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Doctors Reveal How They Healed Their Autoimmune Disease

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 86:14


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Athletic Greens.As a whole, autoimmune disease affects over 80 million Americans and five percent of the population in Western countries. They include type 1 diabetes, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, colitis, Crohn's disease, and dozens of others. While your body is designed to fight off harmful things like infections, toxins, allergens, or a stress response, with autoimmune issues the body directs a hostile attack on its own joints, brain, skin, and more.In this episode, Dr. Hyman speaks with Dr. Cynthia Li and Dr. Terry Wahls about their personal stories of working through autoimmunity and how it led them to help others using Functional Medicine. They also dive into the underlying triggers of inflammation such as stress, hidden infections, food allergies or sensitivities, toxic exposure, genetic predisposition, nutrient deficiencies, and leaky gut. Dr. Cynthia Li received her medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. She's practiced as an internist in many settings, including Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, San Francisco General Hospital, and St. Anthony Medical Clinic serving the homeless. She currently has a private practice in Berkeley, CA and is the author of, Brave New Medicine: A Doctor's Unconventional Path to Healing Her Autoimmune Illness.Dr. Terry Wahls is an Institute for Functional Medicine Certified Practitioner and a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa where she conducts clinical trials. In 2018, she was awarded the Institute for Functional Medicine's Linus Pauling Award for her contributions in research, clinical care, and patient advocacy. Dr. Wahls was confined to a tilt-recline wheelchair for four years. She restored her health using a diet and lifestyle program she designed specifically for her brain and now pedals her bike to work each day. She is the author of The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles, and the cookbook The Wahls Protocol Cooking for Life.This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Athletic Greens. Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. You can check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. Right now, Athletic Greens is offering my listeners 10 free travel packs of AG1 when you make your first purchase. Just go to athleticgreens.com/hyman to take advantage of this great offer. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

My Immune System Hates Me!
Crohn's Disease with Lauren

My Immune System Hates Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 33:51


Lauren's website is laurencunningham.co and you can find her ebook directly here. Follow her on Instagram @laur_cunningham.Check out our new website, myimmunesystempod.com, where you can get in contact with Chelsey, listen to old episodes, learn about the RA Warrior Group, buy a signed copy of Chelsey's upcoming book, and apply to be a guest on the show.Don't forget to rate and review the show, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @myimmunesystempod***Any information discussed in this podcast is strictly my opinion and those of my guests and are for informational purposes only. We are speaking from our personal experiences and you should always consult with your doctor or medical team.

Pushing The Limits
Address Your Trauma and Start Mental Healing with Dr Don Wood

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 69:10


How do you handle stressful situations? Everyone's built a little different — some people can take their hits on the chin and come out smiling. But not everyone can take those hits. The pandemic has taken its mental toll on so many people. Others might still be struggling with past traumas and dealing with anxiety. Their situation keeps them in a state of constant worry and hypervigilance. That state of mind doesn't only harm their mental and emotional health — it can make them sick and more prone to physical diseases. More than ever, it's time to begin mental healing from past traumas, so we can better cope with our daily stresses.  Dr Don Wood joins us again in this episode to talk about the TIPP program and how it facilitates mental healing. He explains how our minds are affected by traumas and how these can affect our health and performance. If we want to become more relaxed, we need to learn how to go into the alpha brainwave state. Since mental healing is not an immediate process, Dr Don also shares some coping strategies we can use in our daily lives.  If you want to know more about how neuroscience can help you achieve mental healing, then this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Learn how trauma can put you in a constant state of survival and affect your performance and daily life.  Understand that it's not your fault. Achieving mental healing will require you to learn how to go into an alpha brainwave state.  Discover healthy habits that will keep you from entering survival mode.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness! Listen to other Pushing the Limits episodes:  #183: Sirtuin and NAD Supplements for Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova  #199: How Unresolved Trauma Prevents You from Having a Healthy Life With Dr Don Wood Check out Dr Don Wood's books:  Emotional Concussions: Understanding How Our Nervous System is Affected By Events and Experiences Throughout Our Life You Must Be Out Of Your Mind: We All Need A Reboot   Connect with Dr Don Wood: Inspired Performance Institute I Facebook I LinkedIn     Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity, or want to take your performance to the next level and learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, then contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful third party-tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of aging while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Episode Highlights [06:05] The Pandemic-Induced Mental Health Crisis The pandemic forced many people into a state of freeze mode, not the typical fight or flight response.  As people get out of freeze mode, there will be a rise in mental health issues.  Teenagers are robbed of the opportunity to develop social and communication skills during this time.  [08:24] How Dr Don Wood Started Studying Traumas Dr Don's wife grew up in a household with an angry father who instilled fear. He used to think that she would be less anxious when they started to live together, but she struggled with mental healing.  She had an inherent belief that misfortune always follows good things. Her traumas and fears also led to a lot of health issues.  She also was hyper-vigilant, which she used as a protective mechanism. However, this prevented her from being relaxed and happy. A person's environment can dictate whether they go into this hyper-vigilant state, but genetics can also play a factor.  [15:42] How Trauma Affects the Brain Trauma is caused by a dysregulation of the subconscious. If your brain is in survival mode, it will access data from the past and create physiological responses to them. These emotions demand action, even when it is no longer possible or necessary. This dysregulation prevents you from living in the present and initiating mental healing.  In this state, people can be triggered constantly, which interferes with their day-to-day life.  [21:07] The Role of the Subconscious Your conscious mind only takes up around 5%, while the subconscious takes up 95%. Your subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between real and imagined.  In survival mode, people will keep replaying the past and think about different scenarios and decisions.  You're left stuck because the subconscious mind only lives in the now. It does not have a concept of time.  This process is the brain trying to protect you. [25:04] What Happens When You're Always in Survival Mode Being in survival mode will take a physical toll since it's constantly activating the nervous system, increasing cortisol and adrenaline. When you're in this state, your body and mind cannot work on maintenance and recovery. It is more focused on escaping or fixing perceived threats. Over time, this will affect your immune system and make you sick.  To truly achieve mental healing, you need to get to the root cause of your problems.  However, you also have to develop coping strategies to manage your day-to-day activities.  [30:18] Changing Your Brainwave State Traumatic events are usually stored in a beta brainwave state. Changing your response to traumatic events starts with going into an alpha brainwave state.  The beta state is usually from 15 - 30 hertz, while the alpha is lower at 7 - 14 hertz. Anything below that is the delta state, usually when you're in deep meditation or sleep. People who have trouble sleeping are usually in that beta state, which keeps processing information.  It's only in the delta state that your mind and body start the maintenance phase. This phase helps not only with mental healing but also physical recovery.  Learn more about Lisa and Dr Don's personal experiences with these brainwave states in the full episode!  [34:30] Mental Healing and Physical Recovery Starts with the Brain Recovery is about genetics and the environment. In sleep, your mind will always want to deal with the threats first. It can only get to the delta state once it finishes processing these dangers. Your risk for developing sickness and depression rises if your brain can't do maintenance. Living in the beta state will make it difficult to focus.  [41:40] It's Not Your Fault If you have a lot of trauma, you are predisposed to respond in a certain way. It's not your fault.  There's nothing wrong with your mind; you just experienced different things from others.  Dr Don likened this situation to two phones having a different number of applications running.  Predictably, the device that runs more applications will have its battery drained faster.  [44:05] Change How You Respond Working on traumas requires changing the associative and repetitive memory, which repeats responses to threats. You cannot change a pattern and get mental healing immediately—it will take time.  That's the reason why Dr Don's program has a 30-day recovery phase dedicated to changing your response pattern.  Patterns form because the subconscious mind sees them as a beneficial way of coping with traumas.  This function of your subconscious is how addictions form.  [47:04] Why We Can Be Irrational The subconscious lives only in the present. It does not see the future nor the past.  It will want to take actions that will stop the pain, even if the actions are not rational.  At its core, addiction is all about trying to stop the pain or other traumatic experiences.  Survival mode always overrides reason and logic because its priority is to protect you. [50:57] What to Do When You're in Survival State In this survival state, we're prone to movement or shutting down completely.  The brain can stop calling for emotions to protect you, and this is how depression develops.  When in a depressed state, start moving to initiate mental healing. Exercise helps burn through cortisol and adrenaline.  Once your mind realises there's no action required for the perceived threats, the depression will lift.   [53:24] Simple Actions Can Help There's nothing wrong with you.  Don't just treat the symptom; go straight to the issue.  Don't blame genetics or hormonal imbalances for finding it hard to get mental healing. Find out why.  Also, seek things that will balance out your hormones. These can be as simple as walking in nature, taking a break, and self-care.  [56:04] How to Find a Calming Symbol Find a symbol that will help you go back into the alpha brainwave state.  Lisa shares that her symbol is the sunset or sunrise, and this helps her calm down. Meanwhile, Dr Don's are his home and the hawk.  Having a symbol communicates to all parts of your brain that you're safe.  [59:58] The Power of Breathing  Stress may lead to irregular breathing patterns and increase your cortisol levels and blood sugar. Breathing exercises, like box breathing, can also help you calm down because the brain will take higher oxygen levels as a state of safety.  If you're running out of oxygen, your brain will think you're still in danger.  Make sure that you're breathing well. It's also better to do nasal breathing.    7 Powerful Quotes ‘The purpose of an emotion is a call for an action. So the purpose of fear is to run.' ‘People who have a lot of trauma have trouble sleeping. Because not only is their mind processing what it experienced during the day, it's also taking some of those old files saying “Well, okay, let's fix that now. Right. Let's get that.”' ‘I was getting maximum restorative sleep. So an injury that I would have that could heal in two or three days, my teammates would two or three weeks. Because they were living in these, which I didn't know, a lot of my friends were dealing with trauma: physical, emotional, sexual abuse.' ‘There's nothing wrong with anybody's mind. Everybody's mind is fine except you are experiencing something different than I experienced so your mind kept responding to it, and mine didn't have that.' ‘That dysregulation of the nervous system. That's what we want to stop because that is what is going to affect health, enjoyment of life, and everything else.' ‘I talked about addiction as a code. I don't believe it's a disease. Your mind has found a resource to stop pains and your subconscious mind is literal. It doesn't see things as good or bad, or right or wrong.' ‘If there's a survival threat, survival will always override reason and logic because it's designed to protect you.'   About Dr Don Dr Don Wood, PhD, is the CEO of The Inspired Performance Institute. Fueled by his family's experiences, he developed the cutting-edge neuroscience approach, TIPP. The program has produced impressive results and benefited individuals all over the world.  Dr Wood has helped trauma survivors achieve mental healing from the Boston Marathon bombing attack and the Las Vegas shooting. He has also helped highly successful executives and world-class athletes. Marko Cheseto, a double amputee marathon runner, broke the world record after completing TIPP. Meanwhile, Chris Nikic worked with Dr Wood and made world news by becoming the first person with Down Syndrome to finish an Ironman competition. Interested in Dr Don's work? Check out The Inspired Performance Institute. You can also reach him on Facebook and LinkedIn.    Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can learn steps to mental healing. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Transcript Of Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com.  Lisa Tamati: Hi, everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits. Today, I have Dr Don Wood who, you may recognise that name if you listen to the podcast regularly. He was on the show maybe a couple of months ago, and he is the CEO and founder of The Inspired Performance Institute. He's a neuroscience guy, and he knows everything there is to know about dealing with trauma and how to get the mind back on track when you've been through big, horrible life events or some such thing. Now, when we talked last time, he shared with me his methodology, the work that he's done, how he can help people with things like addictions as well and depression, and just dealing with the stresses of life, whether they be small stressors or big stressors.  We got to talking about my situation and the stuff that I've been through in the last few years, which many of you listeners know, has been pretty traumatic. From losing babies, to losing my dad, to mom's journey. So I was very privileged and lucky to have Dr Don Wood actually invite me to do his program with him. We share today my stories, how I went with that, and he explains a little bit more in-depth the neuroscience behind it all and how it all works. So if you're someone who's dealing with stress, anxiety, PTSD, depression, if you want to understand how the brain works and how you can help yourself to deal with these sorts of things, then you must listen to the show. He's an absolutely lovely, wonderful person.  Now, before we get over to the show, I just love you all to do a couple of things for me. If you wouldn't mind doing a rating and review of the show on Apple, iTunes or wherever you listen to this, that would be fantastic. It helps the show get found. We also have a patron program, just a reminder if you want to check that out. Come and join the mission that we're on to bring this wonderful information to reach to people.  Also, we have our BOOSTCAMP program starting on the first of September 2021. If you listen to this later, we will be holding these on a regular basis so make sure you check it out. This is an eight-week live webinar series that my business partner, my best buddy, and longtime coach Neil Wagstaff and I will be running. It's more about upgrading your life and helping you perform better, helping you be your best that you can be, helping you understand your own biology, your own neuroscience, how your brain works, how your biology works. Lots of good information that's going to help you upgrade your life, live longer, be happier, reduce stress, and be able to deal with things when life is stressful. God knows we're all dealing with that. So I'd love you to come and check that out. You can go to peakwellness.co.nz/boostcamp.  I also want to remind you to check us out on Instagram. I'm quite active on Instagram. I have a couple of accounts there. We have one for the podcast that we've just started. We need a few more followers please on there. Go to @pushingthelimits for that one on Instagram, and then my main account is @lisatamati, if you want to check that one out. If you are a running fan, check us out on Instagram @runninghotcoaching and we're on Facebook under all of those as well. So @lisatamati, @pushingthelimits, and @runninghotcoaching.  The last thing before we go over to Dr Don Wood, reminder check out, too, our longevity and anti-aging supplement. We've joined forces with Dr Elena Seranova and have NMN which is nicotinamide mononucleotide, and this is really some of that cooler stuff in the anti-aging, and longevity space. If you want to check out the science behind that, we have a couple of podcasts with her. Check those out and also head on over to nmnbio.nz. Right. Over to the show with Dr Don Wood.  Hi, everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits. Today, I have a dear, dear friend again who's back on the show as a repeat offender, Dr Don Wood. Dr Don Wood: I didn't know I was a repeat offender. Oh, I'm in trouble. That's great.  Lisa: Repeat offender on the show. Dr Don, for those who don't know, was on the show. Dr Don is a trauma expert and a neuroscientist, and someone who understands how the brain works, and why we struggle with anxiety, and depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. We did a deep dive last time, didn't we, into the program that you've developed. Since then, everyone, I have been through Dr Don's pro program. He kindly took me through it. Today, I want to unpack a little bit of my experiences on the other side, s the client, so to speak. Talk about what I went through.  Dr Don, so firstly, welcome to the show again. How's it all over in your neck of the woods? Dr Don: Well, it's awesome over here in Florida. COVID is basically non-existent. Oh, yeah. Well, in terms of the way people are treating it, that's for sure. Very few people you see in masks now, everything is pretty much wide open. You can't even get reservations at restaurants. It's unbelievable. The economy is exploding here. There's so much going on. Yeah, I know the rest of the country, a lot of different places are still struggling with whether they're going to put mask mandates back on and all this kind of stuff but Florida seems to be doing very well.  Lisa: Well, I'm very glad to hear that because any bit of good news in this scenario is good because this keeps coming and biting everybody in the bum.  Dr Don: I know. Especially down there. You guys are really experiencing quite severe lockdowns and things, right? Lisa: Yeah and Australia, more so. Australia has gone back into lockdown. I've got cousins in Sydney who are experiencing really hard times in Melbourne and we've stopped the trans-Tasman bubble at the moment. Trans-Tasman was open for business, so to speak, with Australians being able to come to New Zealand without quarantine, but it's been shut down again. So yeah, we're still struggling with it, and the economy is still struggling with it but actually, in our country, we've been very lucky that we've managed to keep it out because they've had such tight controls on the borders. But yes, it's a rocky road for everybody, and it's not over yet, I think. Dr Don: Looks like it's going to continue, and that's creating a lot of stress.  Lisa: Oh, yeah, perfect.  Dr Don: This is what I've said. I think we're coming up to a tsunami of mental health issues because a lot of people have gone into freeze mode as opposed to fight or flight. Some people are in fight or flight. You're hearing about that on airlines: people just losing it, and getting mad, and fighting with flight attendants and passengers, and you see a lot of that. But I think that's obviously not the majority. I think most people are in that mode of just get through this, do what they ask, don't cause any waves, and just get this over with. So that's a freeze mode, and I think when people come out of freeze, you're going to start to see some of these mental health issues.  Lisa: Yes, I totally agree and I'm very concerned about the young people. I think that being hit very hard especially in the places that have the hardest lockdowns. If you're going through puberty, or you're going through teenagehood, or even the younger kids, I think, they're going to be affected massively by this because it's going to be a big before and after sort of situation for them.  Dr Don: And just the social. When we were teenagers, social was everything, I suppose. Learning how to communicate, and talk, and get along with other people, and good and bad. There were always struggles in school with learning how to get along with everybody but that is just sort of squashed. It's going to be fascinating to see when they do a study on the real true results of this pandemic. It's going to be a lot different than many people think.  Lisa: Yes, and I think the longer you ignore stuff, is we're going to see it's not just the people are unfortunately dying and being very sick from the actual COVID, but the actual effects on society are going to be big. That's why talking about the topic that we're talking about today, dealing with anxiety, and dealing with stress, and being able to actually fix the problem instead of just managing the problem, which I know you're big on.  So let's dive in there, and let's recap a little bit. Just briefly go back over your story, how you got to here, and what your method sort of entails in a helicopter perspective. Dr Don: Yeah, basically how I developed this was really because of the life that my wife led first and my daughter. My wife grew up in a very traumatic household with a very angry father that created tremendous fear. So everybody was... Just constant tension in that household. When I met her, I just realised how this was so different than my life. My life was in the complete opposite: very nurturing, loving. So I didn't experience that. I thought when she started moving in and we got married at 19, we were very young, that this would all stop for her. Because now, she's living in my world, my environment, and it didn't.  She just kept continuing to feel this fear that something was going to go wrong and nothing is going to go right. She struggled with enjoying things that were going well. I would say to her, 'We've got three beautiful children. We've got a beautiful home. Everything's going pretty good; nothing's perfect. You have your ups and downs, but it's generally a pretty good life.' She couldn't enjoy that because as a child, whenever things were going okay, it would quickly end and it would end, sometimes violently. So the way she was protecting herself is don't get too excited when things are going well because you'll get this huge drop. So that was what she was doing to protect herself. I just had a lady come in here a couple months ago, who very famous athlete is her husband: millionaires, got fame, fortune, everything you want, but she had a lot of health issues because of trauma from her childhood. When I explained that to her, she said, 'That's me. Your wife is me. I should be enjoying this, and I can't get there. I want to. My husband can't understand it.' But that's really what was going on for her too. Lisa: So it's a protective mechanism, isn't it? To basically not get too relaxed and happy because you've got to be hyper-vigilant, and this is something that I've definitely struggled with my entire life. Not because I had a horrible childhood. I had a wonderful childhood but I was super sensitive. So from a genetic perspective, I'm super sensitive. I have a lot of adrenaline that makes me code for, for want of a better description, I'm very emotionally empathetic but it also makes me swung by emotional stimuli very much. So someone in my environment is unhappy, I am unhappy. I'm often anxious and upset. My mum telling me she took me to Bambi. You know the movie Bambi? From Disneyland? She had to take me out of theatre. I was in distraught.  That's basically me. Because Bambi's mother got killed, right? I couldn't handle that as a four-year-old, and I still can't handle things. Things like the news and stuff, I protect myself from that because I take everything on. It's even a problem and in our business service situations because I want to save the world. I very much take on my clients' issues. I'm still learning to shut gates afterwards, so to speak, when you're done working with someone so that you're not constantly... So there's a genetic component to this as well.  Dr Don: Absolutely. So yours was coming from a genetic side but that's very, very common amongst people who have had a traumatic childhood. They're super sensitive.  Lisa: Yes. Hyper-vigilant.  Dr Don: Hyper-vigilant. That was my wife. She was constantly looking for danger. We'd come out of the storage and go: 'Can you believe how rude that clerk was?' 'What do you mean she was rude? How was she rude?' ‘You see the way she answered that question when I asked that, and then the way she stuffed the clothes in the bag?' And I'm like, 'Wow.' I never saw her like that. She was looking for it because that's how she protected herself because she had to recognise when danger was coming. So it was protection, and I hadn't experienced that so that made no sense to me; it made perfect sense to her.  Lisa: Yeah, and if someone was rude to you, you would be just like, 'Well, that's their problem, not my problem, and I'm not taking it on.' Whereas for someone your wife and for me... I did have a dad who was  a real hard, tough man, like old-school tough. We were very much on tenterhooks so when they came home, whether he was in a good mood today or not in a good mood. He was a wonderful, loving father but there was that tension of wanting to please dad. Mum was very calm and stable, but Dad was sort of more volatile and just up and down. It was wonderful and fun and other times, you'd be gauging all of that before he even walked in the door. That just makes you very much hyper-vigilant to everything as well.  Then, you put on, on top of that, the genetic component. You've got things like your serotonin and your adrenaline. So I've got the problem with the adrenaline and a lack of dopamine. So I don't have dopamine receptors that stops me feeling satisfaction and... Well, not stops me but it limits my feeling of, 'Oh, I've done a good job today. I can relax.' Or of reward. And other people have problems, I don't have this one, but with a serotonin gene, which is they have dysregulation of their serotonin and that calm, and that sense of well-being and mood regulation is also up and down. While it's not a predisposition that you'll definitely going to have troubles because you can learn the tools to manage those neurotransmitters and things like nutrition and gut health and all that aspect. Because it's all a piece of that puzzle, but it's really just interesting, and it makes you much more understanding of people's differences.  Why does one person get completely overwhelmed in a very trivial situation versus someone else who could go into war and come back and they're fine? What is it that makes one person? Then you got the whole actual neuroscience circuitry stuff, which I find fascinating, what you do. Can you explain a little bit what goes on? Say let's just pick a traumatic experience: Someone's gone through some big major trauma. What is actually going on in the brain again? Can we explain this a little bit?  Dr Don: Yeah, this is one of the things that... When I did my research, I realised this is what's causing the dysregulation: is your subconscious your survival brain is fully present in the moment all the time. So everything in that part of our brain is operating in the present. which is what is supposed to be, right? They say that that's the key, that success and happiness is live in the present. Well, your survival brain does that. The problem comes in is that only humans store explicit details about events and experiences. So everything you've seen, heard, smelled, and touched in your lifetime has been recorded and stored in this tremendous memory system. Explicit memory.  Animals have procedural memory or associative memory. We have that memory system too. So we have both. They only have procedural, associative. So they learn through repetition, and they learn to associate you with safety and love, but they don't store the details about it. But we store all the details about these events and experiences. So this is where this glitch is coming in. If you've got the survival brain, which is 95% of everything that's going on, operating in the present, accessing data from something that happened 10 years ago because something looks like, sounds like, smells like it again, it's creating a response to something that's not happening. It's looking at old data and creating a physiological response to it, and the purpose of an emotion is a call for an action. So the purpose of fear is to run, to escape a threat. But there's no threat. It's just information about the threat. That disrupts your nervous system and then that creates a cascade of chemical reactions in your body because your mind thinks there's an action required. Lisa: This is at the crux of the whole system really, isn't it? This is this call for action to fix a problem that is in the past that cannot be fixed in the now. So if we can dive a little bit into my story, and I'm quite open on the show. I'm sharing the good, the bad, and the ugly. When I was working with Dr Don, I've been through a very, very traumatic few years really. Lost my dad, first and foremost, last July, which was the biggest trauma of my life. And it was a very difficult process that we went through before he died as well. And there's a lift, as you can imagine, my brain in a state of every night nightmares, fighting for his life, he's dying over, and over, and over, and over again.  Those memories are intruding into my daily life, whereas in anything and at any time, I could be triggered and be in a bawling state in the middle of the car park or the supermarket. Because something's triggered me that Dad liked to to buy or Dad, whatever the case was, and this was becoming... It's now a year after the event but everything was triggering me constantly. Of course, this is draining the life out of you and interfering with your ability to give focus to your business, to your family, to your friends, every other part of your life. I'd also been through the trauma of bringing Mum back from that mess of aneurysm that everyone knows about. The constant vigilance that is associated with bringing someone back and who is that far gone to where she is now, and the constant fear of her slipping backwards, and me missing something, especially in light of what I'd been through with my father. So I'd missed some things, obviously. That's why he ended up in that position and through his own choices as well.  But this load, and then losing a baby as well in the middle, baby Joseph. There was just a hell of a lot to deal with in the last five years. Then, put on top of it, this genetic combination of a hot mess you got sitting before you and you've got a whole lot of trauma to get through. So when we did the process, and I was very, super excited to do this process because it was so intrusive into my life, and I realised that I was slowly killing myself because I wasn't able to stop that process from taking over my life. I could function. I was highly functional. No one would know in a daily setting, but only because I've got enough tools to keep my shit together. so to speak. But behind closed doors, there's a lot of trauma going on.  So can you sort of, just in a high level, we don't want to go into the details. This is a four-hour program that I went through with Dr Don. What was going on there. and what did you actually help me with?  Dr Don: So when you're describing those things that were happening to you, what was actually happening to your mind is it was not okay with any of that. It wanted it to be different, right? So it was trying to get you into a state of action to stop your father from dying: Do it differently. Because it kept reviewing the data. It was almost looking at game tape from a game and saying 'Oh, had we maybe run the play that way, we would have avoided the tackle here.' So what your mind was saying 'Okay, run that way.' Well, you can't run that way. This is game tape. Right? But your mind doesn't see it as game tape. It sees it as real now, so it's run that way. So it keeps calling you into an action.  And especially with your dad because you were thinking about, 'Why didn't I do this?' Or 'Had I just done this, maybe this would have happened.' What your mind was saying is, 'Okay, let's do it. Let's do that.' What you just thought about. But you can't do that. It doesn't exist. It's information about something that happened but your mind sees it as real. That's why Hollywood have made trillions of dollars because they can convince you something on the screen is actually happening. That's why we cry in a movie or that's why we get scared in a movie. Because your mind, your subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between real or imagined. So that's actually happening.  You were just talking about the movie with Bambi, right? When you were little. 'Why is nobody stopping this from happening?' So your mind was not okay with a lot of these things that were happening, and it kept calling you to make a difference. That's what I never understood my wife doing. That before I really researched this, my wife would always be saying, 'Don't you wish this hadn't have happened?' Or 'Don't you wish we hadn't done this?' What I didn't understand at the time, because I used to just get like, 'Okay, whatever.' She'd go, 'Yeah, but wouldn't it have been better?' She wanted to get me into this play with her, this exercise. Lisa: This is going on in her head. Dr Don: Because it's going on in her head, and she's trying to feel better. So she's creating these scenarios that would make her feel like, 'Well, if I had just done that, gosh that would have been nice, thinking about that life.' And her mind seeing that going, 'Oh, that would be nice. Well, let's do that. Yes.' So she was what if-ing her life. And it was something that she did very early as a child because that's how she just experienced something traumatic with her father. In her mind, she'd be going, 'Well, what if I had to just left 10 minutes earlier, and I had have escaped that?' Or 'What if I hadn't done this?' So that's what she was doing. It made no sense to me because I hadn't experienced her life, but that's what she was doing. Her mind was trying to fix something. It's never tried to hurt you. It was never, at any point, trying to make you feel bad. It was trying to protect you. Lisa: Its job is to protect you from danger and it sees everything as you sit in the now so it's happening now. I love that analogy of these... What was it? Two-thirds of the car or something and... Dr Don: So goat and snowflake? Lisa: Goat and snowflake. And they're going off to a meeting and they're late. And what does the goat says to snowflake or the other way around? Dr Don: So snowflake, which is your conscious mind, your logical reasonable part of your mind, there's only 5, says the goat 95%, which is your subconscious mind. Who runs into a traffic jam says, 'Oh, we're going to be late. We should have left 15 minutes earlier.' To which goat replies 'Okay, let's do it. Let's leave 15 minutes earlier because that would solve the problem.'  Lisa: That analogy is stuck in my head because you just cannot... It doesn't know that it's too late and you can't hop into the past because it only lives in the now. This is 95% of how our brain operates. That's why we can do things like, I was walking, I was at a strategy meeting in Auckland with my business partner two days ago. We were walking along the road and he suddenly tripped and fell onto the road, right? My subconscious reacted so fast, I grabbed him right, and punched him in the guts. I didn't mean to do that but my subconscious recognised in a millimeter of a second, millionth of a second, that he was falling and I had to stop him. So this is a good side of the survival network: stopping and falling into the traffic or onto the ground.  But the downside of it is that brain is operating only in the now and it can't... Like with my father, it was going 'Save him. Save him. Save him. Why are you not saving him?' Then that's calling for an action, and then my body is agitated. The cortisol level's up. The adrenaline is up, and I'm trying to do something that's impossible to fix. That can drive you to absolute insanity when that's happening every hour, every day. Dr Don: Then that's taking a physical toll on your body because it's activating your nervous system, which is now, the cortisol levels are going up, adrenaline, right? So when your mind is in that constant state, it does very little on maintenance. It is not worried about fixing anything; it's worried about escaping or fixing the threat, because that's the number one priority.  Lisa: It doesn't know that it's not happening. I ended up with shingles for two months. I've only just gotten over it a few weeks ago. That's a definite sign of my body's, my immune system is down. Why is it down? Why can that virus that's been sitting dormant in my body for 40-something years suddenly decide now to come out? Because it's just becoming too much. I've spent too long in the fight or flight state and then your immune system is down. This is how we end up really ill.  Dr Don: We get sick. I was just actually having lunch today with a young lady and she's got some immune system issues. And I said, 'Think about it like the US Army, US military is the biggest, strongest military in the world. But if you took that military and you spread it out amongst 50 countries around the world fighting battles, and then somebody attacks the United States, I don't care how big and strong that system was, that military system was. It's going to be weakened when it gets an attack at the homefront.' So that's what was happening. So all of a sudden, now that virus that it could fight and keep dormant, it lets it pass by because it's like, 'Well, we can let that go. We'll catch that later. Right now, we got to go on the offensive and attack something else.' Lisa: Yeah, and this is where autoimmune, like your daughter experienced... Dr Don: About the Crohn's? Yep.  Lisa: Yep. She experienced that at 13 or something ridiculous? Dr Don: 14, she got it. Then she also got idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis which is another lung autoimmune disorder where the iron in the blood would just cause the lungs to release the blood. So her lungs just starts filling up with blood. They had no idea what caused it, that's the idiopathic part of it, and they just basically said, ‘There's no cure. She just needs to live close to a hospital because she'll bleed out if she has another attack.' Only 1 in 1.2 million people ever get that. So it's very rare so there's no research being done for it. They just basically say, ‘If you get it, live close to a hospital.' That's the strategy. Lisa: That's the way of fixing it.  Dr Don: And so both of those are autoimmune, and ever since we've gone to the program, she's hasn't had a flare-up of either one of those. Because I think our system is directly now able to address those things.  Lisa: Yeah, and can calm down. I think even people who haven't got post-traumatic stress like I've had or whatever, they've still got the day to day grind of life, and the struggle with finances, and the mortgage to be paid, and the kids to feed, and whatever dramas we're all going through. Like we talked about with COVID and this constant change that society is undergoing, and that's going to get faster and more. So this is something that we all need to be wary of: That we're not in this. I've taught and learned a lot about the coping and managing strategies, the breathing techniques, and meditation, the things, and that's what's kept me, probably, going. Dr Don: Those are great because they're... Again, that's managing it but it's good to have that because you've got to get to the root of it, which is what we were working on. But at the same time, if you don't have any coping, managing skills, life gets very difficult. Lisa: Yeah, and this is in-the-moment, everyday things that I can do to help manage the stress levels, and this is definitely something you want to talk about as well. So with me, we went through this process, and we did... For starters, you had to get my brain into a relaxed state, and it took quite a long time to get my brainwaves into a different place. So what were we doing there? How does that work with the brainwave stuff?  Dr Don: Well, when we have a traumatic event or memory, that has been stored in a very high-resolution state. So in a beta brainwave state because all your senses are heightened: sight, smell, hearing. So it's recording that and storing it in memory in a very intense state. So if I sat down with you and said, 'Okay, let's get this fixed.' And I just started trying to work directly on that memory, you're still going to be in a very high agitated state because we're going to be starting to talk about this memory. So you're going to be in a beta brainwave state trying to recalibrate a beta stored memory. That's going to be very difficult to do.  So what we do is, and that's why I use the four hours because within that first an hour and a half to two hours, we're basically communicating with the subconscious part of the brain by telling stories, symbols with metaphors, goat and snowflake, all the stories, all the metaphors that are built-in because then your brain moves into an alpha state. When it's in alpha, that's where it does restoration. So it's very prepared to start restoring. And then, if you remember, by the time we got to a couple of the traumatic memories, we only work on them for two or three minutes. Because you're in alpha, and so you've got this higher state of beta, and it recalibrates it into the same state that it's in. So if it's in alpha, it can take a beta memory, reprocess it in alpha, takes all the intensity out of it.  Lisa: So these brain waves, these beta states, just to briefly let people know, so this is speed, and correct me if I'm wrong, but it's the speed at which the brain waves are coming out. So in beta, like you'd see on ECG or something, it's sort of really fast. I think there's a 40 day... Dr Don: It's 15 to 30 hertz. Lisa: 15 to 30 hertz and then if you're in alpha, it's a lot lower than that? Dr Don: 7 to 14. Lisa: 7 to 14, and then below that is sort of when you're going into the sleep phase, either deep meditative or asleep. Dr Don: You're dreaming. Because what it's doing in dreaming is processing. So you're between 4 and 7 hertz. That's why people who have a lot of trauma have trouble sleeping. Because not only is their mind processing what it experienced during the day, it's also taking some of those old files saying, 'Well, okay, let's fix that now. Right. Let's get that.' That's where your nightmares are coming from. It was trying to get you into a processing to fix that. but it couldn't fix it. So it continues, and then when you go below 4 hertz, you go into delta. Delta is dreamless sleep and that's where the maintenance is getting done.  Lisa: That's the physical maintenance side more than the... Dr Don: Physical maintenance. Yeah, because that's not processing what it experienced anymore. What it's really now doing is saying, 'Okay, what are the issues that need to be dealt with?' So if you're very relaxed and you've had a very... Like me, right? I played hockey, so I had six concussions, 60 stitches, and never missed a hockey game. The only reason now that I understand I could do that is because I'm getting two or three times more Delta sleep than my teammates were. Lisa: Physical recuperative sleep.  Dr Don: Yeah, I was getting maximum restorative sleep. So an injury that I would have that could heal in two or three days, my teammates would two or three weeks. Because they were living in these, which I didn't know, a lot of my friends were dealing with trauma: physical, emotional, sexual abuse. I didn't know that was going on with my friends. Nobody talked about it. I didn't see it in their homes, but they were all dealing with that.  Lisa: So they are not able to get... So look, I've noticed since I've been through the program. My sleep is much better, and sometimes I still occasionally dream about Dad. But the positive dreams, if that makes sense. They're more Dad as he as he was in life and I actually think Dad's come to visit me and say, ‘Hi, give me a hug' rather than the traumatic last days and hours of his life, which was the ones that were coming in before and calling for that action and stopping me from having that restorative sleep.  I just did a podcast with Dr Kirk Parsley who's a sleep expert, ex-Navy SEAL and a sleep expert that's coming out shortly. Or I think by this time, it will be out, and understanding the importance, the super importance of both the delta and... What is the other one? The theta wave of sleep patterns, and what they do, and why you need both, and what parts of night do what, and just realising...Crikey, anybody who is going through trauma isn't experiencing sleep is actually this vicious cycle downwards. Because then, you've got more of the beta brainwave state, and you've got more of the stresses, and you're much less resilient when you can't sleep. You're going to... have health issues, and brain issues, and memory, and everything's going to go down south, basically.  Dr Don: That's why I didn't understand at the time. They just said 'Well, you're just super healthy. You heal really fast.' They had no other explanation for it. Now, I know exactly why. But it had nothing to do with my genetics. It had to do with my environment. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on here. It's been a public service free for everybody, and we want to keep it that way but to do that, we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com.  We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. So we are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us. Everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com, and thanks very much for joining us.  Dr Don: That's, at the time, we just thought it was all, must have been genetics. But I realised now that it was environment as well. So maybe a genetic component to it as well, but then you take that and put that into this very beautiful, nurturing environment, I'm going to sleep processing in beta what I experienced that day and then my mind basically, at that point, is 'What do we need to work on? Not much. Let's go. Let's start now doing some maintenance.' Because it wants to address the top of item stuff first. What is it needs to be taken care of right now? Right? Those are the threats.  Once it gets the threats processed, then it can then start working on the things that are going to be the more long-term maintenance. So then it'll do that. But if it never gets out of that threat mode, it gets out for very little time. Then, if you're getting 30 minutes of delta sleep at night and I'm getting two hours, it's a no-brainer to figure out why I would heal faster.  Lisa: Absolutely, and this is independent of age and things because you've got all that that comes into it as well. Your whole chemistry changes as you get older and all this. There's other compounding issues as it gets more and more important that you get these pieces of the puzzle right.  Do you think that this is what leads to a lot of disease, cancers, and things like that as well? There's probably not one reason. There's a multitude of reasons, but it's definitely one that we can influence. So it's worth looking at it if you've got trauma in your life. People were saying to me 'Oh my God, you don't look good.' When you start hearing that from your friends, your people coming up to you and going, 'I can feel that you're not right.' People that are sensitive to you and know you very well, and you start hearing that over and over, and you start to think, 'Shit, something's got real. Maybe I need to start looking at this.'  Because it's just taking all your energy your way, isn't it, on so many levels. The restorative side and the ability to function in your life, and your work, and all of that, and that, of course, leads into depressive thoughts and that hyper-vigilant state constantly. That's really tiresome rather than being just chill, relax, enjoying life, and being able to... Like one of the things I love in my life is this podcast because I just get into such a flow state when I'm learning from such brilliant... Dr Don: You're in alpha. Lisa: I am. I am on it because this is, 'Oh. That's how that works.' And I just get into this lovely learning in an alpha state with people because I'm just so excited and curious. This is what I need to be doing more of. And less of the, if you'd see me half an hour ago trying to work out the technology. That's definitely not an alpha state for me. Dr Don: That's where they said Albert Einstein lived. Albert Einstein lived in alpha brainwave state. That's why information just float for him because there was no stress. He could then pull information very easily to float into. But if you're in a high beta brainwave state, there's too much activity. It has trouble focusing on anything because it's multiple threats on multiple fronts. So when we have a traumatic event, that's how it's being recorded. If you remember, what we talked about was there's a 400 of a millionth of a second gap in between your subconscious mind seeing the information and it going to your consciousness. So in 400 millionths of a second, your subconscious mind has already started a response into an action even though your conscious mind is not even aware of it yet.  Lisa: Yeah. Exactly what I did with rescuing my partner with the glass falling off the thing. I hadn't reached that logically. Dr Don: It's funny because that's one of the things that I talked about ,which is sort of, give us all a little bit of grace. Because if you've had a lot of trauma, you're going to respond a certain way. How could you not? If your mind's filtering into all of that, of course you're going to respond with that kind of a response because your mind is prone to go into that action very, very quickly. So we can give ourselves a little bit of grace in understanding that of course, you're going to do that, right? And not beat ourselves up.  Because you know what I talked about with everybody, there's nothing wrong with anybody. There's nothing wrong with anybody's mind. Everybody's mind is fine except you are experiencing something different than I experienced so your mind kept responding to it, and mine didn't have that. So you had multiple... Think about we have a hundred percent of our energy on our phone when we wake up in the morning, right? Fully powered up. You fire the phone up and eight programs open up, right? And mine has one.  Lisa: Yeah. You're just focusing on what you need to. Dr Don: Then noon comes, and you're having to plug your phone back in because you're out of energy.  Lisa: That's a perfect analogy. You're just burning the battery. My all is a hundred windows open in the back of my brain that is just processing all these things and so now, I can start to heal. So having gone through this process with you, like you said, we worked on a number of traumatic experiences, and I went through them in my mind. And then you did certain things, made me follow with my eyes and track here, and my eyes did this, and then, we pulled my attention out in the middle of the story and things. That helped me stay in that alpha state, brainwave state as I probably now understand while I'm still reliving the experience. That's sort of taking the colour out of it so that it's now sort of in a black and white folder. Now, it can still be shared, and it hasn't taken away the sadness of... Dr Don: Because it is sad that these things happen but that's not the response for an action which is that fear or anger, right? That dysregulation of the nervous system. That's what we want to stop, because that is what is going to affect health, enjoyment of life and everything else.  Lisa: Wow, this is so powerful. Yeah, and it's been very, very beneficial for me and helped me deal. For me, it also unfolded. Because after the four hour period with you, I had audiotapes and things that are meditations to do every day for the next 30 days. What were we doing in that phase of the recovery? What were you targeting in those sort of sessions?  Dr Don: So if you remember what we talked about, we have two memory systems. The explicit memory is what we worked on on that four hours. That's detail, events, and experiences. Once we get the mind processing through that, then we have to work on the same memory animals have, which is that associative repetitive memory. So you've built a series of codes on how to respond to threats, and that has come in over repetition and associations. So the audios are designed to start getting you now to build some new neural pathways, some new ways to respond because your mind won't switch a pattern instantly. It can switch a memory instantly, but a pattern is something that got built over a period of time. So it's like a computer. If I'm coding on my computer, I can't take one key to stop that code. I have to write a new code. Yeah, so what we're doing over the 30 days is writing new code. Lisa: Helping me make new routines and new habits around new neural pathways, basically.  Dr Don: You don't have that explicit memory interfering with the pathways. Because now, it's not constantly pulling you out, going back into an action call. It's basically now able to look at this information and these codes that got built and say, 'Okay, what's a better way? So do we have a better way of doing it?' Or 'Show me that code. Write that code.' If that code looks safer, then your mind will adopt that new code. Lisa: This is why, I think for me, there was an initial, there was definitely... Like the nightmares stopped, the intrusive every minute, hour triggering stopped, but the process over the time and the next... And I'm still doing a lot of the things and the meditations. It's reinforcing new habit building. This is where... Like for people dealing with addictions, this is the path for them as well, isn't it?  Dr Don: Yeah. Because I talked about addiction as a code. I don't believe it's a disease. Your mind has found a resource to stop pains, and your subconscious mind is literal. It doesn't see things as good or bad, or right or wrong. It's literal. 'Did that stop the pain? Let's do that.' Because it's trying to protect you. So if you've now repeated it over and over, not only have you stopped the pain, but you've built an association with a substance that is seen as beneficial. Lisa: Because your brain sees it as medicine when you're taking, I don't know, cocaine or something. It sees it as essential to your life even though you, on a logical level, know that, ‘This is destroying me and it's a bad thing for me.' Your subconscious goes, 'No, this is a good thing and I need it right now.' Dr Don: Because it's in the present, when does it want the pain to stop? Now. So it has no ability to see a future or a past. Your subconscious is in the moment. So if you take cocaine, the logical part of your brain goes, 'Oh, this is going to create problems for me. I'm going to become addicted.' Right? Your subconscious goes, ‘Well, the pain stopped. We don't see that as a bad thing.' I always use the analogy: Why did people jump out of the buildings at 911? They weren't jumping to die. They were jumping to live because when would they die? Now, if they jump, would they die? No. They stopped the death. So even jumping, which logically makes no sense, right? But to the subconscious mind, it was going to stop the pain now.  Lisa: Yeah, and even if it was two seconds in the future that they would die, your brain is going...  Dr Don: It doesn't even know what two seconds are.  Lisa: No. It has no time. Isn't it fascinating that we don't have a time memory or understanding in that part of the brain that runs 95% of the ship?  Dr Don: It's like what Albert Einstein said, ‘There's no such thing as time.' So it's like an animal. If an animal could communicate and you say, 'What time is it?' That would make no sense to an animal. 'What do you mean? It's now.' 'What time is it now?' 'Now. Exactly.' Lisa: It's a construct that we've made to... Dr Don: Just to explain a lot of stuff, right? When something happens.  Lisa: Yeah, and this is quite freeing when you think of it. But it does make a heck of a lot of sense. So people are not being destructive when they become drug addicts or addicted to nicotine, or coffee, or chocolate. They're actually trying to stop the pain that they're experiencing in some other place and fix things now. Even though the logical brain... Because the logical brain is such a tiny... Like this is the last part of our evolution, and it's not as fully...  We can do incredible things with it at 5%. We've made the world that we live in, and we're sitting here on Zoom, and we've got incredible powers. But it's all about the imagination, being able to think into the future, into the past, and to make correlations, and to recognise patterns. That's where all our creativity and everything, or not just creativity, but our ability to analyse and put forth stuff into the world is happening. But in actual, we're still like the animals and the rest of it. We're still running at 95%, and that's where we can run into the problems with these two.  Dr Don: Because you got two systems. You got a very advanced system operating within a very primitive system, and it hasn't integrated. It's still integrating, right? So if there's a survival threat, survival will always override reason and logic, because it's designed to protect you. So there's no reason and logic that will come in if there's a survival threat. It's just going to respond the way it knows, does this Google search, 'What do we know about this threat? How do we know to protect ourselves, and we'll go instantly into survival mode.' Again, there's the reason and logic. Why would you jump out of a building, right? If you applied reason and logic, you wouldn't have jumped, right? People will say, 'Well, but they still jumped.' Yes, because reason and logic didn't even come into the process. It was all about survival.  Lisa: Yeah. When the fire is coming in it was either... Dr Don: 'Am I going to die out now or I'm going to move and not die now?'  Lisa: Yeah, and we're also prone to movement when we're in agitation and in an agitated state, aren't we? Basically, all of the blood and the muscles saying, 'Run, fight, do something. Take action.' Dr Don: That's why when people get into depression, it's the absence of those emotions.  Lisa: Yeah, and people feel exhaustion.  Dr Don: Yeah. The mind kept calling for an action using anger, for example, but you can't do the action because it's not happening, so it shuts down to protect you and stops calling for any emotion, and that's depression. So the key to get out of depression is actions. It's to get something happening. So in a lot of people who are depressed, what do I tell them to do? 'Start moving. Start exercising. Get out. Start doing things.' Right?  Lisa: So I run ultras. Dr Don: Exactly. Perfect example, right?  Lisa: Yeah, because I was. I was dealing with a lot of shit in my life at the time when I started doing ultra-marathons. To run was to quiet the pain and to run was to be able to cope and to have that meditative space in order to work through the stuff that was going on in my life. And I know even in my husband's life, when he went through a difficult time, that's when he started running. So running can be a very powerful therapeutic, because there is a movement, and you're actually burning through the cortisol and the adrenaline that's pouring around in your body. Therefore, sitting still and that sort of things was just not an option for me. I had to move. And it explains what, really. It's calling the movement. Like it was a movement because I couldn't fix the other thing.  Dr Don: That's what they'll tell you to do. To get out of depression is to move. What I say is the way to get out of depression is to get your mind to resolve what it's been asking for. Lisa: It's going a little deeper.  Dr Don: Yeah. So it's going down and saying, 'Okay, why has it been getting you angry and now, it shut down from the anger?' Because it's been trying to get you in your situation. 'Don't let Dad die. Don't let this happen.' Right? So because you couldn't do it, it just shuts down. Makes perfect sense but when we get to the resolution that there is no action required, there's no need for the depression anymore. The depression will lift because there's no more call for an action.  Lisa: I can feel that in me, that call. Anytime that anything does still pop up, I sort of acknowledge the feeling and say, 'There is no call for action here. This is in the past. This is a memory.' So I do remind myself that when things do still pop up from time to time now, as opposed to hourly. I go, 'Hey, come back into the now. This is the now. That was the then that's calling for an action. This is why you're doing thing.' Even that understanding

Smart Digestion Radio
SDR 284: The Bone Loss Trap

Smart Digestion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 32:08


Regain your freedom from Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, constipation and more in 12 weeks or less without harmful drugs or surgeries. To book a free call and to learn more about working with Dr. Christine, visit: www.bit.ly/gutcall  To purchase Dr. Christine's custom formulations: www.OmegaDigestion.com

Smart Digestion Radio
SDR 283: The Carb Symptoms

Smart Digestion Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 8:10


Regain your freedom from Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, constipation and more in 12 weeks or less without harmful drugs or surgeries. To book a free call and to learn more about working with Dr. Christine, visit: www.bit.ly/gutcall  To purchase Dr. Christine's custom formulations: www.OmegaDigestion.com

The Health Design Podcast
Sneha Dave, creator of the Health Advocacy Summit (HAS)

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 23:52


Sneha graduated from Indiana University in May 2020 where she majored in chronic illness advocacy as well as journalism. She created the Health Advocacy Summit (HAS) and its program the Crohn's and Colitis Young Adults Network (CCYAN) with support from foundations such as the Helmsley Charitable Trust to create support systems for adolescents and young adults with chronic medical disabilities across the U.S. and internationally. She is proud to work with a team composed entirely of young adults with chronic medical disabilities and also to keep the HAS and CCYAN and independent from the pharmaceutical and insurance industries. Sneha has completed an undergraduate research fellowship in health policy at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She has also interned at numerous places such as Pfizer Global Headquarters in health economics and outcomes research for Inflammation and Immunology. Sneha has spoken on Capitol Hill, featured nationally on C-SPAN, and is a past contributor for U.S. News and World Report. She has served on the Democratic National Committee Disability Policy Subcommittee and recently joined the Midwest Comparative Effectiveness Public Advisory Council, an independent appraisal committee of the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review. Sneha was awarded two academic fellowships with the Association of Health Care Journalists. She was previously a national policy fellow at RespectAbility and now serves as the youngest director on the board for the national nonprofit. Sneha has spoken at the Democratic National Convention, Stanford Medicine X, the National Academies of Medicine, and other major avenues. For her work, Sneha was selected as one of the most influential teenagers in 2018 by the We Are Family Foundation and was recognized as an American Association of People with Disabilities Emerging Leader in 2020.

Crohn's Fitness Food
Heather Hausenblas, PhD: Mother of a Crohn‘s Warrior and Author (E66)

Crohn's Fitness Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 42:59


In today's episode, Heather Hausenblas, PhD, shares her perspective and story as a mother of a son with Crohn's Disease. Her son, Tommy, was diagnosed three years ago at the age of 16. Heather shares how she helped navigate his health and ultimately chronicled their journey in her new book, Invisible Illness: An Insider's Guide to Eliminating Overwhelm and Rediscovering the Path to Health and Happiness with an Autoimmune Disease. In this episode, she shares tips for parents who have children with IBD, cooking for a family, and journaling to track health and patterns. She is passionate about getting people talking about IBD and being more open to sharing their stories to help prevent others from suffering in silence for so long before seeking help. Learn more about Heather and sign up for her weekly newsletters, including recipes and research, at: https://www.heatherhausenblas.com/ Purchase her book on Amazon at: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09DR7VZS7

March or Die
March or Die Podcast-Guest Treg Spicer

March or Die

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 45:45


How do you maintain your faith when your world is suddenly turned upside down? Although pressing forward (Marching) is never easy, we can learn from those who have done it that pressing forward is possible. Todays guest, Treg Spicer, shares his story of nearly dying due to a massive heart attack and struggling through Crohn's disease while hanging on to his faith. An encouraging story you will want to share! Learn more about Treg Spicer at www.tregspicer.com Follow Me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter: Facebook: https:https://www.facebook.com/jeremystalneckerofficial Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jeremystalnecker/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jstalnecker Also at: https://jeremystalnecker.com/

Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast
More sexy NA beer talk with Partake Brewing

Beer Guys Radio Craft Beer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 43:55


Partake Brewing takes their non-alcoholic brews from the Dragon's Den to distribution Partake Brewing founder Ted Fleming was (is) a huge craft beer fan.  He loves hanging out with friends and sharing a brew.  Unfortunately, after a visit to the doctor diagnosed him with Crohn's Disease he had to ease off the alcohol, and eventually give it up all together. But Fleming wasn't ready to give up sharing a drink with friends.  He did some research on the non-alcoholic beer market and discovered there weren't a lot of great offerings to be had at home in Canada, or in North America in general.  This led him to building a website to offer what he did find, many from Europe.  His website turned into a passionate community and when he finally decided to launch Partake he had a lot of support, even though it meant he would have to give up his website. Partake even visited the Dragon's Den, Canada's version of America's Shark Tank. Fleming got a deal on the show but says they were ultimately not able to finalize it.  He did have a strong backing on a Kickstarter with an IPA and got the ball rolling. Now offering a full lineup of core beers as well as seasonal offerings like Lime (an easy-drinking lager'ish brew with a lime hint) and a Peach Gose. The NA beer market continues to grow, and we are all here for it.  You know we love a good, boozy brew but it's nice for those that can't or don't want to have alcohol to still be able to enjoy a craft brew.  They're popular with health-conscious folks and some of the brews have only 10 calories in a 12-oz can.  Madness. With the Cheers to Adulting campaign Partake Brewing is encouraging everyone to consider Sober October.  With the extravagance of the holidays just around the corner that may not be a bad idea.  Maybe next year.  

The Running Explained Podcast
43: "Runner's Stomach" & GI Issues with Meghann Featherstun, RD (@featherstonenutrition)

The Running Explained Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 61:14


GI DISTRESS!! Why does it happen at the WORST times? How to figure out what's causing the issue? Sports Dietitian Meghann Featherstun (@featherstonenutrition) joins the show to talk about... What happens to our gastrointestinal tract/digestion when we run What are common causes of GI distress when running? Assessing fiber intake The role dehydration plays in GI issues Why osmolality matters in race fueling Different types of run fueling & how they're different GI issues and your menstrual cycler Sugar alcohols Running with IBS or Crohn's "Do I need to go on an elimination diet to figure out the problem?" How to keep a food diary to track GI issues How to carb-load; simple carbs or complex carbs? Get your FREE Carb-Loading Guide! Meghann on Instagram: @featherstonenutrition Meghann Featherstun, MS, RD, is a sports dietitian, wellness coach, runner, wife, mom of two little kiddos, and a full-blown nutrition geek/running freak. Her passion is helping people find their own personal balance of nutrition and fitness in their busy lives. For the last 13 years, she hasbeen working with people to help them find their happy place with nutrition, exercise, body composition and life! Website: featherstonenutrition.com

Quax
Ep. 96 The Best Supplement for Your Colon: IBS, Crohn's, Weight Loss, Autoimmunity, and Depression

Quax

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 23:05


This week's episode is a supplement spotlight on Butyrate This amazing fatty acid can help IBS, Crohn's, Brain Function, Depression, and even help you lose weight (metabolism) It is like a force field for your colon Notes: 7+ Butyrate Benefits + Side Effects & Sources: https://selfhacked.com/blog/butyrate-health-benefits/ List of studies on Butyrate for Depression and Cognition: https://raypeatforum.com/community/threads/sodium-butyrate-functional-anti-depressant.33223/#post-505878 What You Need To Know About Butyrate Supplement Side Effects: https://altmedrev.com/blog/need-know-butyrate-supplement-side-effects/ Sodium Butyrate Benefits: 9 Amazing Ways This SCFA Boosts Health: https://www.nutrishatives.com/sodium-butyrate-benefits/ Picture of different fermentable Fibers: https://raypeatforum.com/community/attachments/1629805573026-png.27003/ Study saying Butyrate causes CRC: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-25965-x Butyrate increases production of serotonin and histamine: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0014482780904553?via%3Dihub Products: Sodium Butyrate: https://amzn.to/2YMD4MV Liquid Sunbutyrate: https://amzn.to/3iYaejO Tributyrin: https://amzn.to/3BIPP9K QUAX WEBSITE: http://www.quaxpodcast.com QUAX YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtXpRH1DhwWwxoIivprk7ww TWITTER: https://twitter.com/QuaxPod FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Quax-Podcast-105724194245591 Music by Jenny Jahlee from Live at KBOO

The Super Human Life
Ep 96: Is Your Gut Making You Sick & Depressed w/ Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum

The Super Human Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:04


Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum is one of the world's leading microbiome researchers and the scientist who named the mycobiome, our body's fungal community. He lectures at many institutions globally, including the National Institutes of Health, on the microbiome and his breakthrough research on probiotics. He's published over 400 papers on his research and has been cited over 20,000 times by other scientists. For over 25 years, he's been funded by the NIH, who've provided Dr. Ghannoum with over $50 million in grant funding. For the last 40 years, Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum, has been one of the leading scientists researching the microbiome. In 2010 he coined the term mycobiome and unlocked the key to total gut health. In 2016 his research on the microbiome of Crohn's patients was groundbreaking and he was the first scientist to identify that bacteria and fungi actually work together in our gut's microbiome.   Book (Total Gut Balance) - https://amzn.to/3apkugn   BIOHM Health - https://www.biohmhealth.com/   ---   Connect with Frank and The Super Human Life on Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thesuperhumanfrank/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/584284948647477/   Website: http://www.thesuperhumanlifepodcast.com/tshlhome   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjB4UrpxtNO2AFtDURMzoKQ  

About IBD
Finding Success with Nutrition Therapy

About IBD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:39


IBD is not a condition that is easy to diagnose or treat. People who live with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis have needs that include guidance on nutrition. Diet is notoriously difficult to study but some research is starting to be done. Dannielle Jascot, MS, CNS, CDN, certified nutritionist and IBD patient talks over the recent results of the DINE-CD study, which compared the Specific Carbohydrate Diet and the Mediterranean Diet. Episode page and transcript: https://bit.ly/2YIaZXk Concepts discussed on this episode include: The Dine-CD Study and discussion of the results Local Crohn's and Colitis Foundation Chapters Buy Tickets to the Bottoms Up Event Find Dannielle Jascot on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. Find Amber J Tresca at AboutIBD.com, Verywell, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. Credits: Mix and sound design is by Mac Cooney. Theme music, "IBD Dance Party," is from ©Cooney Studio.

The Microbiome Report
How Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis Are Wildly Different Than IBS

The Microbiome Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 36:04


Sometimes IBD and IBS get rolled up into one explanation, but the truth is that while IBS can be caused by inflammatory bowel disease, they are wildly different diagnoses. Andrea (@dreeats) talks to Dr. Ilana Gurevich, a licensed acupuncturist and a naturopathic physician, about her struggle with Crohn's, what she sees most commonly in her practice, and how to marry conventional and functional medicine to achieve the best results for remission. Leave Us A Rating And Review! The Microbiome Report is powered by BIOHM Health. Save 15% off at biohmhealth.com with the code POD15.  Find the transcript and show notes for this episode at biohmhealth.com/pages/podcast.  Questions? Ideas? Email us at themicrobiomereport@biohmhealth.com or reach out on Instagram @DreEats or @BIOHMHealth.

Incredible Life Creator with Dr. Kimberley Linert
Achieving Top Performance - Jon Taber Ep 235

Incredible Life Creator with Dr. Kimberley Linert

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 57:32


Jon Taber is an expert in using creativity and transformation strategies to help entrepreneurs, leaders, managers and key decision-makers achieve top performance. He was a key manager in medical, aerospace and electronics companies and then helped launch Unicom Systems which 3 years later was acquired by Rockwell International. He was a speaker for 36 US universities and colleges plus Fortune 500 companies, government agencies and non-profit organizations. Jon went on to be a founder/co-founder and CEO of 17 organizations in 11 fields such as sports health, computer services, software development, wholesale/retail sales, entertainment, and lifestyle. He was also a certified hypnotherapist helping high performers with techniques he and his wife Judy pioneered. Judy earlier won a gold medal in synchronized swimming for the US Olympic team. The techniques helped Jon recover from disabling strokes and Crohn's Disease. He shares his recovery story with stroke survivors through Healings In Motion based in Stockton, CA and on talk radio shows. Today Jon is CEO of PureBeing, Inc., a Health and Wellness Company (https://www.getdetoxinated.com) with an international list of clientele. He is also Managing Partner of DRA Family Office (https://drafamilyoffice.com) and Chairman of BG Acquisitions (https://bgacquisitions.com). Jon is also a business advisor to medical/senior care organizations in addition to coaching people to achieve a more fulfilling personal and business life. All together Jon has helped over 5,000 people achieve their dreams. Jon is the author of “Child's Play” plus co-author of the Amazon Best Seller “BREAKING BARRIERS – Decisions That Elevate People from Ordinary to Extraordinary.” Two additional books by Jon are forthcoming before the end of 2021. Do you want to live an incredible life? Get started now by reading my book: "Visualizing Happiness in Every Area of Your Life" https://amzn.to/2kvAuXU What is your biggest obstacle to creating an incredible life? You can book a free 15-minute mentoring session with Dr. Kimberley Linert. Click on this booking link: https://calendly.com/drkimberley/15min Please subscribe to the podcast and take a few minutes to review on iTunes, Thank you If you have an amazing story to tell about your life and how you are sharing your gifts and talents with the world, then I would love to have you as a guest on my podcast. Contact me via email: incrediblelifepodcast@gmail.com or private message me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/incrediblelifecreator www.DrKimberleyLinert.com

GI Pearls Podcast
GI Pearls Gastroenterology Podcast Episode 50 - September 2021

GI Pearls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 24:38


Show notes for Episode 51 Role of routine second-look endoscopy in patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials-  GIE A Randomized Trial Comparing the Specific Carbohydrate Diet to a Mediterranean Diet in Adults with Crohn's Disease – Gastroenterology Comparative effectiveness and harms of antibiotics for outpatient diverticulitis. – Annals of IM… Continue reading Episode 51 – September 2021 – Gastroenterology Literature Review

Very Happy Stories
36. Coaching Our Kids To Be Accountable For Their Wellness

Very Happy Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 41:04


In this interview, Liza speaks with Tamara Ortegal, health coach and mom. Over ten years ago two of her sons were diagnosed with severe Crohn's disease. Despite their conditions, she was able to collaboratively coach them through their lifestyle changes even at a young age. Today, her sons are thriving and managing their own wellness. Tamara shares the reality of living with chronic illness and how small modifications ensured her sons still had a very fulfilled and normal childhood. Find out how she navigated this journey and empowered her sons.  About Liza's Guest: Tamara Ortegel has worked as a health coach for the past 7 years. In 2009, two of her boys were diagnosed with Crohn's disease. She became very interested in natural ways to support the body. She graduated from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in 2014 and has been helping people identify solutions for wellness ever since. She is an advocate of food-first and recommends Juice Plus+ to all of her clients. Tamara is the host of the Stepping Into Health podcast and enjoys sharing healing stories with her audience. She is pivoting just a bit in September and will be talking on her podcast about Thriving in Midlife. You can find her podcast on Apple and Spotify or connect with via her website http://www.tamaraortegel.com.  Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/tamaraortegel/ *This episode is sponsored by Green Compass CBD.* Liza's favorite CBD brand for her family is Green Compass, which is USDA Certified Organic. Click here to learn more. https://veryhappystories.greencompassglobal.com/ Connect with Liza: Follow Liza and Very Happy Stories on Facebook and Instagram  https://www.facebook.com/veryhappystorieswithLizaBlas https://www.instagram.com/lizasveryhappystories/ Download Liza's free Thrive Guide for more of Liza's best practices on empowerment and happiness. Subscribe to Liza's newsletter at http://VeryHappyStories.com/

Zwift Power Up Cycling Podcast
Cory Greenberg on Training With Colitis

Zwift Power Up Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 47:34


Cory Greenberg talks about his involvement with the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation, and how he lives and trains as a pro cyclist with Ulcerative Colitis. 

Chat with Leaders Podcast
Carson Sweezy: Food as a Vehicle for Nourishing our Mind, Body, and Soul

Chat with Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 18:09


Carson nourishes authentic communities by connecting people through food and entertainment. Crohn's disease forced him to think deeply about life, meaning, and purpose at a young age. After losing 18-inches of his colon, Carson “accidentally” completed a degree from William & Mary and left his career in real estate behind. Choosing instead to pursue his lifelong passion. Carson's goal is to nourish lives and help people indulge in our common ancestral language. Food.  In order to pursue this goal, he founded SweezEats amidst the pandemic in Sept 2020 as a means to build community through their cookie gift boxes. Since then, they've partnered with small businesses to ship signature batch cookie gifts to their clients, donors, and employees. They've shipped a total of over 13,000 cookies to friends and customers… and counting.   What you'll learn How Carson describes food as a language that can empower us to be better humans. Influences in Carson's life that inspired his love for food and his journey into entrepreneurship. Why Carson felt it was important to build and strengthen communities through his cookie gift boxes amidst the pandemic. How he was able to get the world out through social marketing leading to lots of orders coming in. What he learned about the power of simplicity through this experience of launching and maintaining SweezEats that every entrepreneur and business leader should keep in mind.   Follow / Learn More Follow Carson on LinkedIn Follow Carson (and his delicious food) on Instagram Join our LinkedIn community and be part of the ongoing conversations by following Chat With Leaders on LinkedIn We Love Our Community Partners B Local G Georgia: a collection of for-profit companies each dedicated to creating a future where businesses operate as a positive influence on society Inspiredu: Nonprofit Leaders Bridging The Digital Divide AppBarry: Custom Web And Mobile Application Development Classic City Consulting: WordPress Website Development Stratfield Consulting: Consulting, Staffing, Recruiting See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dirobi Health Show
Hitting the Health Reset Button. Detox, Restart, Level Up with Sara Banta!

The Dirobi Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 38:53


Sara Banta is the owner of Accelerated Health Products in addition to the host of Accelerated Health Radio and TV.  She helps her clients and listeners reach their optimal state of health through proper frequency enhanced detox supplements, cutting edge technologies, and modalities.Her journey hit rock bottom about 15 years ago suffering from Crohn's disease, hormonal issues, PCOS and heavy metal toxicity.  After Western medicine couldn't give her answers or solutions, she discovered natural solutions that actually worked.  As she was on her journey, she was hit with her 9 year old son's diagnosis of leukemia.  It was that moment that she knew she had a bigger calling in life; to open people's eyes to the world of natural healing. Fast forward to today where she serves her clients and listeners with cutting edge protocols that combine Scalar frequency-based supplements, Chinese medicine, healing devices and much more to detox, reset and rebuild their Body, Mind and Spirit.See episode links and shownotes at:https://blog.dirobi.comThis show is for informational purposes only. None of the information in this podcast should be construed as dispensing medical advice. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

The Darin Olien Show
How Fermentation Can Heal Your Gut | Lauren Mones

The Darin Olien Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 47:57


When Lauren Mones was diagnosed with Crohn's Disease, she was told she'd always be sick. It wasn't until she read about the healing powers of fermented food and tried sauerkraut for the first time that she believed otherwise. Humans have been using the fermentation process for gut health for thousands of years. It's time we unlearned what we think we know about digestive health and dive back into the basics. || LINKS || www.fermentingfairy.com | Full Show Notes - https://darinolien.com/how-fermentation-can-heal-your-gut-lauren-mones/

Ben Greenfield Fitness
How An Olympic Champion Overcame Near Death, Healed His Gut & Shoulder & Changed The Nutritional World Forever With "Seed Oils": An Interview With Andreas Wecker

Ben Greenfield Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 69:36


https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/seedoils Andreas Wecker, my guest on today's podcast, is a former German gymnast who had a long and successful career. He was European, World and Olympic champion. His greatest achievement was the gold medal on high bar at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. There, he beat gymnasts of such quality as Vitaly Scherbo and Alexei Nemov. In 1989 Wecker was named the last East German Sportsman of the Year. He competed for the SC Dynamo Berlin / Sportvereinigung (SV) Dynamo. Wecker qualified for the German team for the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Just days before his events, he suffered a serious shoulder injury where he tore a bicep muscle in his shoulder, ending his career. Injured and processing the revelation that his career was on indefinite hold, Andreas followed a rigid six-week recovery plan before pushing ahead to tour as a professional gymnastics exhibitionist. Like many other athletes, he found himself dependent on a combination of painkillers, aspirin, and coffee to cope with the lingering pain and get him through practices and performances. In what has become an all-too-familiar story of drug dependence, Andreas' dependence on painkillers went on for 14 years—until he finally stepped away from his athletic pursuits in 2004. When he tried to stop taking the pills, he noted an immediate, rapid deterioration in his health and well-being. Over a six-week period in 2006, Andreas lost 45 pounds and 80 percent of his blood supply. Soon admitted to the hospital, doctors diagnosed Andreas with Crohn's Disease (CD). In the following weeks, he received eight blood transfusions and immediately began a treatment plan, with hopes of reversing his body's decline. After nearly two months in the hospital, Andreas realized that the 33 pills he was taking every single day were not improving his condition. Defeated, he acknowledged that the pills only temporarily alleviated some of the most severe symptoms. Despite struggling with feelings of defeat, Andreas knew this could not be the only cure. The treatment plan was causing his body to rapidly change and progressively weaken. Without some sort of miracle, the next step would be major surgery to remove large portions of his digestive tract. As Andreas saw it, he had three options: -Die from Crohn's Disease-Die from the medications-Find another option entirely He confided in a friend whose family member was also suffering from Crohn's, and this friend mentioned an alternative that involved using fresh-pressed flaxseed oil. Intrigued and desperate, Andreas decided to try it. He began supplementing his prescribed medications with fresh-pressed flaxseed oil. Within a short period of time, he was surprised to find the pain and inflammation notably relieved. He decided to take a chance. At the age of 36, Andreas made the brave choice to check himself out of the hospital and do something drastic to change his life. Armed with flax seeds, coriander, and five seed blend, Andreas began taking this combination of supplements daily. Over the next weeks, as he reduced the number of pharmaceutical pills he took every day and continued taking the flaxseed oils, the side effects from the medications wore off. After three months of supplementing, he stopped taking the prescribed medications for Crohn's Disease entirely. Changes to his diet, combined with the fresh-pressed flaxseed oil, changed Andreas' approach to managing his health problems. The improvements in his condition testified to the flaxseed oil's successful repair work on his body. Today, Wecker is the chairman and founder of Andreas Seed Oils, headquartered in Bend, Oregon and distributed through his office in Germany. Andreas Seed Oils has now been pressing the world's purest oils for over 11 years. Through his proprietary German Cold-Press technology, these oils are pressed at ultra-low temperatures to eliminate oxidation and maintain its molecular integrity. This technology is so delicate yet powerful that each seed's nutritional molecules remain undamaged and intact, resulting in the purest and most effective oils instantly absorbed by the body. Andreas Seed Oils are entirely free of any metals, solvents, pesticides, or preservatives. In today's podcast, we take a deep dive into Andreas's oils, how they are different, how to use them, the difference between seed oils and vegetable oils and much more! During our discussion, you'll discover: -How Andreas was "slowly dying" due to a mysterious CO2 leak in his home...05:40 -How a gymnastics injury led Andreas onto the path of consuming seed oils...08:20 -Problems with the seed expeller at your local Whole Foods...14:30 -How a mechanic (not an engineer) literally changed Andreas' health for the better forever...19:45 -Healing properties of Andreas' flax seed oil on the gut...25:05 -Why Andreas' products are not labeled "certified organic"...36:05 -Benefits of cooking with seed oils...42:00 -The research behind Andreas' oils...46:37 -What's coming down the pike seed oil wise...50:36 -The best oils to begin with if you're unfamiliar with oils...53:10 -And much more... Upcoming Events: Join me and my wife Jessa at Runga for The Gathering. Click here to grab one of the very limited spots we have open to the public for The Gathering at Runga (October 7-9, 2021). Las Vegas Keto Expo (October 15-16, 2021). Ben will be speaking at the Las Vegas Keto Expo along with 13 other keto experts. The first 300 guests to register here will get a free drink chip for the poolside party and a free t-shirt. Keep up on Ben's LIVE appearances by following bengreenfieldfitness.com/calendar Episode sponsors: -Kion Flex -The Boundless Cookbook -Paleo Valley Beef Sticks -Water and Wellness -Seed Daily Synbiotic https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/seedoils