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  • 51PODCASTS
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  • May 23, 2022LATEST

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If Then Podcast
If You Have Decision Fatigue, Then Try This

If Then Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 14:41


In this episode, I go into detail about how I overcome burnout in my creative endeavors. I call it the 2:2 Method, inspired by Kobe Bryant's insane work ethic. GIVEAWAY DETAILS: If you want to share the podcast, I've been giving away 2 free 1 month Audible gift cards every week this May. This isn't sponsored by Audible, but because I know most everyone has done their free trial already, I wanted a way for you to get another free audiobook. This is a gift card that will still work even if you already have an account! You'll get a free credit for an audiobook of your choice + 1 month access to their Plus catalog which includes thousands of audiobooks with no credits needed. All you have to do to enter to win is take a screenshot of this podcast and share it on your Instagram while tagging the account @ifthenpodcast in the post or story. And, also, be sure to follow @ifthenpodcast on Instagram to find out if you're the winner each week. If we get 100 shares by the end of the month, each of you will be entered to win a pair of AirPods.  WEBSITE: https://www.ifthenpodcast.com CREDITS: Kobe Bryant Ted Talk: https://youtu.be/9_tYXFbgjZk?t=841 (14:03-15:16) Dr. Benjamin Hardy's book "Personality Isn't Permanent": https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08157LXPY?ref_=cm_sw_r_cp_ud_dp_5MPBJTFKHZNGA9C128YG TRANSCRIPT: My name is Jordan Taylor, and welcome to the If Then Podcast. Our brains our a conglomerate of if/then statements, like in computer code, and oftentimes new lines of code are hard to write in our mind when we're trying new things, for example if I want to play basketball, then I need to learn to shoot. Sitting down and coding that particular if then statement could take years of dedication, but when we do sit down and create new then statements for a complicated if, it feels freaking amazing. This podcast is your weekly motivation, and mine, to get uncomfortable and write some neurological code. “It's easier to hold to your principles 100% of the time, then it is to hold to them 98% of the time.” — Clayton Christensen When I was thinking of creating a podcast, I had no time. It was everything I could do to keep up with everything else in my life already: 2 Youtube channels, house renovations, a free range chicken farm, friends and family. Everything was already falling apart as it was, and adding another full time obsession I would inevitably burnout on was, in a sick way, hilarious. How could I write even MORE if then statements in a day when my brain was already burning up from the complicated programs I was currently running. But I felt like I had a good idea for a podcast, and I just had to try to balance everything. I had to find a way. See, even though I always felt busy, like I was working all the time, I never felt like I worked enough, cause I was eternally behind, and so I never felt I deserved to take a true break. The weird thing though and honestly the problem, was that I was taking breaks, lots of them—hundreds of micro breaks a day with every app opened, every notification clicked, oh that's a funny reel, ehh…what's this next one? Time just kept ticking, and projects just kept piling on and on. Now I would get everything done……. mostly, I mean I was playing the Dope Game from episode 2 after all, so I was getting pretty good at focusing doing projects at random times, but I had no structure to my work life and so I would inevitably be on my phone when I knew I should probably be working *notification sound* Oh, by the way I got the Wordle in 3 today, I wonder how people on Twitter faired. I needed to plan my day somehow with the reality that I'm a human being in the 21st century and I'm going to look at my phone 3 hours per day one way or the other. Months ago, during one of these micro breaks, a video popped up. It was of Kobe Bryant giving a TED Talk in Shanghai, talking about his absurd work schedule. He sucked the air out of the room when he said the insane: {Kobe Bryant clip https://youtu.be/9_tYXFbgjZk?t=841  14:03-15:16} Quote “So if your job is to try to be the best basketball player you can be, to do that you have to practice, you have to train, right? You want to train as much as you can, as often as you can. So if you get up at 10 in the morning. Train at 11. 12? Say 12? Train at 12. Train for 2 hours—12 to 2. You have to let your body recover, so you eat, recover, whatever. You get back out. You start training at 6. Train from 6 to 8, right? And now you go home; you shower; you eat dinner; you go to bed; you wake up; you do it again, right? Those are two sessions. Now imagine you wake up at 3:00 you train at 4:00. So 4 to 6. Come home. Breakfast, relax, da da da. Now you're back at it again. 9 to 11. right? Relax and now you're back at it again 2 to 4. Now you're back at it again. 7 to 9. Look how much more training I have done by simply starting at 4? So it makes sense to get up and start your day early because you can get more work in.” Unquote I felt I already woke up pretty early, between 5 and 6, but I definitely didn't start work until later than that. But 4? Like, come on. Initially, I was just intrigued by his idea of how to split a day up between focused work and focused recovery. When I was thinking of starting my podcast, adding another obsession to my plate, his plan for life came back to mind, and this time maybe starting work earlier was what I needed to make this podcast thing work. Maybe that was the key. Maybe 4:00 was doable, at least for weeks I had a heavy work load. I knew my phone use was a weakness of mine, though. So I didn't want to just start work at 4 without a proper plan going in. If, realistically, 3 hours of screen time was inevitable, could I use that to my advantage somehow? I asked myself a question that changed everything: Which is better, deciding to 100% commit to mindlessly scrolling on my phone for an exact 3 hour slot of time and then the rest of the day 100% commit to projects while fasting from my phone, OR an entire day only 2% committed to scrolling on my phone, while always 98% committed to projects—the same 3 hours of screen time is spent but, this time, interspersed throughout the day? In Dr. Benjamin Hardy's book, “Personality Isn't Permanent,” he answered my question by saying quote “When you're only 98% committed to something, then you haven't truly decided. As a result, you're required to continue making decisions in every future situation you're in. Weighing, in every instance, whether this particular situation falls into the 2% of exceptions you've allowed yourself. In every situation you're in, you're not actually sure what the outcome will be in terms of your behavior and decision making. This lack of decision leads to identity confusion and a lack of success. Becoming 100% committed to what you want is how you succeed. Making serious and sometimes hard decisions rather than deferring them for bad situations leads to enhanced confidence and progress.” Unquote 5:35 In other words, a life 98% committed leads to what he calls “decision fatigue,” and maybe this was my problem the entire time. I thought about it, and if I'm only 98% committed to work like I had been, the computer of my brain will bog down quickly with decisions. Every piece of laundry folded, could lead to a decision. Now is it ok to find a new YouTube video to watch? This video seems cool. Wait, what's this other one? Every single time I feel the need for a dopamine hit, another decision needs to be made. Does this time fall into the 2% of exceptions? Is this time ok to get on Instagram? By not deciding to 100% commit to phone time or 100% to work time, I'm leaving my brain having to decide literally every minute if this is the time it's ok to watch some reels. It was like my brain was hacked with windows constantly popping up. (Typing) Every time I would start to get into a rhythm of work—“click here to accept your prize!” Hhh… close. (click) Alright, where was I? (typing) “Don't miss out on your prize!”  Grr… close. (click) (typing) “This is your last chance for the prize!” How could I ever get anything done when half my time was spent closing these annoying pop ups? And then…what happens if I decide to accept the “prize.” What happens then? Welcome to the age of the smart phone. By Kobe Bryant 100% committing to focused work for 2 hours, 4 times a day. And then, 4 times a day, 100% committing to relaxation and recovery, mindlessly scrolling if he wanted to, he became one of the best basketball players in history. We both might be spending the same amount of hours on our phones, but the time's he's not on his, he's 100% focused on the job at hand, and that makes all the difference. So I decided to try it. After all, it seemed kind of fun to be able to guilt-free scroll through my phone for 3 hours if I wanted after working hard. But instead of waking at 3 though, I would wake up between 3:30 to 3:45, and hyper-focus on my podcast for 2 hours starting at 4am and then instead of taking a 3 hour break between sessions like Kobe, I would take a 2 hour break because I wasn't doing anything physically demanding. If I did happen to go over 2 hours though because I was in the middle of something with family, that was allowed. But I would stay on my 2 hour work schedule after that. What I realized is, 2 hours of intensely focused work, with no distractions, pushes you juuuust to the edge of frying your brain without actually ever hitting that point. Anything after 2 hours, however, and that's just plain risky. Your brain starts to short circuit. Things get amplified after that. Small problems you face start to feel like a potential nuclear war—threatening to blow up your entire mental state. Why did I even start this dumb podcast in the first place? Nothing is going to work like I want. I'm terrible at this. Why is it so hard for me? Even right now, writing this script, I have to walk away cause my brain is about to fry as I'm hitting 2 hours. Give me a little bit. Hang on. (Stand up, deep breathing) It's amazing what a strategic 2 hour break can do for a brain. It's the same feeling as when you go to sleep on a problem, and then after waking, you somehow have the solution at the forefront of your mind. Your brain figured it out for you by just resting—like a computer updating to the latest version while in sleep mode. But instead of one time, you're getting that phenomenon 4 times a day. 4 updates fixing bugs. That rest time is critical. You feel it. You're using it to your advantage and there's no guilt at all. Work and rest: it's a beautiful symbiotic relationship. Both equally important, both impossible without the other. I call this work schedule the 2:2 Method, and the cool thing I've realized now, after following it for a few weeks, is that instead of wanting to mindlessly scroll every rest time, I find myself often inspired to actually do things in those 2 hours that I had been putting off, that I felt I had no time for. I found myself painting the trim in the downstairs bedroom I've been meaning to finish, I was prioritizing my family more by going with them to the mall. I took my wife Sara out on a date, and even folded a bunch of laundry. That didn't take as much time as I thought. And one of the biggest things I noticed was that I wasn't burning out on my new passion for podcasting, like I was worried would happen. By forcing myself to slow down and rest, I found I could manage my effort better—instead of passionately sprinting with inspiration as my fuel until I quit from physical and mental exhaustion, I was walking freely, and even resting when I needed in order to make the long journey. And that's why I broke up If Then into seasons, to further manage my effort by resting. I wouldn't suggest waking at 3:30AM and only getting 6 hours of sleep as a longterm lifestyle choice. In my experience, that should be done only when necessary, but when implemented, it works. Season 1 has been the story of me getting uncomfortable and learning how to podcast—next week being the final episode. Season 2, date pending, will be its own complete story, just like this one, and the 2:2 Method will be, again, what makes it possible. In following the 2:2 Method, by 6:00PM I've worked extremely focused for 8 hours without feeling overwhelmed with exhaustion because I had also rested strategically for 6 hours as well. By 6 o'clock I can relax completely with my wife Sara, resting in the fact that I have accomplished so much. By 9PM I'm asleep, and I do it all over again the next day. Like Kobe Bryant, by committing to either 100% focused work or 100% rest, I'm finding I'm able to get more done with peace and ease than I could have ever imagined, and I'm curious how much more I can put on my plate and feel this exact same way. Time, in a way, almost feels limitless instead of limiting. So I'll leave you with this: “It's easier to hold to your principles 100% of the time, then it is to hold to them 98% of the time.” — Clayton Christensen Thank you so much for listening to the third episode of the If Then Podcast. If you have feedback you want to give me or if you have anything you want to say, email me at contact@ifthenpodcast.com. And if you would, leave me a 5 star review if you found this podcast valuable. It really helps the podcast to get seen by other people like yourself. We reached #26 for Education on all of Spotify, and I have you to thank for that. We're almost at 200 reviews on Apple Podcasts and 350 on Spotify. And as an extra bonus, for those of you who help me spread the word, I've been giving away 2 free 1 month Audible gift cards every week this May. Last week, Seth and Tabitha won a free credit for an audiobook of their choice + access to their Plus catalog which includes thousands of audiobooks with no credits needed. And if you win this week, don't worry the gift card is available to you even if you already have an Audible account. All you have to do to enter to win is take a screenshot of this podcast and share it on your Instagram while tagging the account @ifthenpodcast in the post or story. If you shared any of the last episodes, you can also share this one too to be entered to win again. And, also, be sure to follow @ifthenpodcast on Instagram to find out if you're the winner this week. If we get 100 shares by the end of the month, each of you will be entered to win a pair of AirPods. We're 3/4 of the way there, VERY close, so keep sharing! Thank you so much for listening, my name is Jordan Taylor, and what if/then will you write today?

If Then Podcast
If You Want to Succeed, Then Slow Down

If Then Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 17:00


My whole life, I've struggled with sprinting through and, inevitably, killing my newly found passions, instead of slowing down and embracing the long, slow journey of learning. This episode tells, in story, how the fast, obsessed method of passion-based learning will fry your brain's computer every time. Maybe there's a better strategy to long-term success. This is Part 2 to Episode 1 of the If Then Podcast. Listen to Episode 1 first: https://youtu.be/ryv8BHh_MIc GIVEAWAY DETAILS: If you want to share the podcast, I've been giving away 2 free 1 month Audible gift cards every week this May. This isn't sponsored by Audible, but because I know most everyone has done their free trial already, I wanted a way for you to get another free audiobook. This is a gift card that will still work even if you already have an account! You'll get a free credit for an audiobook of your choice + 1 month access to their Plus catalog which includes thousands of audiobooks with no credits needed. All you have to do to enter to win is take a screenshot of this podcast and share it on your Instagram while tagging the account @ifthenpodcast in the post or story. And, also, be sure to follow @ifthenpodcast on Instagram to find out if you're the winner each week. If we get 100 shares by the end of the month, each of you will be entered to win a pair of AirPods.  WEBSITE: https://www.ifthenpodcast.com CREDITS: Jordan Taylor as the traveler. Matt D'Avella's YouTube video about the journey to the South Pole: https://youtu.be/xY0tJAkukWc?t=375 Transcript: Just a heads up, this is kind of a part 2 to episode 1, so listen to that first if you haven't already. Link in the show notes. My name is Jordan Taylor, and welcome to the If Then Podcast. Our brains our a conglomerate of if/then statements, like in computer code, and oftentimes new lines of code are hard to write in our mind when we're trying new things, for example if I want to play piano, then I need to read music. Sitting down and coding that particular if then statement could take years of dedication, but when we do sit down and create new then statements for a complicated if, it feels freaking amazing. This podcast is your weekly motivation, and mine, to get uncomfortable and write some neurological code. “It's not about having the right opportunities. It's about handling the opportunities right.” — Mark Hunter After episode 1 of If Then, we all started to walk. We all embarked on our own personal journeys to find the ocean, with no understanding of where it was or which way to go, but realizing the importance of just choosing a direction, without having any frame of reference, and just moving. Logically, in so doing, we'll ALWAYS eventually hit the ocean, no matter which way we turn. Maybe initially we were a mile from the beach without knowing, and started walking in the opposite direction, all the way through the middle east and asia, only hitting the East China Sea years later. But who cares, I argued in episode 1? At least we got there. We'll always get there if we just start walking. Well, what I realized this week on my journey, is that that's not the full story. There's more to this dangerous adventure than I led on. See on my own personal route to the ocean, I realized that I had a serious, serious problem—a problem that left me withered, injured, cracked… and I was worried it might get even worse. ——— “Alright, do I have everything. Water, backpack, Phone. Check, check, check.” *Phone beeps signifying video recording* “Alright, Day 1 of my journey to the ocean. I'm not sure which way to go, but that's not the point. I'm just gonna start walking, and I'll have to find it. That's the beauty. So I'll pick this way. Here we go.” *Phone beeps again. Recording stops. Phone keyboard typing* “Post…toooo Instagram. And the journey beeegins.” ——— The day I started was a beautiful day, conditions pristine. A mindset recharged. After all, I listened to the first episode of If Then, and I mean it was pretty good. I even gave it a 5 star review AND shared about it on Instagram to maybe win those AirPods at the end of May. I heard listeners already won free audiobooks. That would be cool too. That first day, I walked 35 miles. I wanted to get to the ocean as fast as possible, so I pushed as hard as possible. And I was amazed with how much a new mindset could push me to do something so noteworthy. Something I'd never in my wildest dreams imagine I could do. Well over a marathon in one day. This new mindset I carried with me, it was somethin' special. ——— *Crickets* *Phone record beep* “35 miles in one day. Anything is possible. If I can do it, you can too! Get out there and crush those miles.” *Phone beep* “Aaaand post.” “Alright, set up camp.” *Wood drop* *Fire strike*  *Groans* “My feet are sore…” ——— The next day I woke up, and it was surprisingly scorching for that time of year. And I was even more sore than I thought I'd be after a good nights sleep. I reflected on how I had just walked 35 miles the day before which is pretty insane, I mean, not many people have even tried that. I made so much ground that it was totally acceptable to rest my body up for the next big push the next day. The weather forecast seemed to be favorable then too, which would help with my next big goal. ——— “I wonder if I can go 40 miles tomorrow. *Groans* My leg's still sore, but this isn't supposed to be easy, ehhhh I think I can do it. Gotta keep moving. Get there as fast as I can.” ——— Morning came, perfect conditions as promised. I actually woke up at 5:00 AM to get an early start—I was sure to post about that too, and accomplished my goal: 40 miles—an impressive feat. My achilles started to ache around mile 35 though, but..I mean, I had to get 40. So I rested for a day or two. Alright it was five, but I had made some good progress, and the rain had also settled in, so the timing honestly couldn't be better. ——— *Phone picture takes* *Typing* “75 miles down. Push through the pain and anything can be achieved.” *Beeping sound signifying posting* “Ouch, my feet. I didn't know they could blister like that. *exhales as sits* I'm really gonna have to take a break. Wow… I'll rest up and then try hit it hard again next week.” ——— I was surprised and a little embarrassed with how exhausted and beat down I was when the sun rose, not just physically, but mentally as well after just a week of walking. ——— *Tent rustles as Jordan exits and grunts* “Yeah…not walking today, or most likely tomorrow.” ——— How many more hundreds of weeks will this go on? How many years could potentially go by? I honestly feel… kinda terrible and this is only week 2. Like, what? I found myself resting on the hot days, by a fire on the cold days, and under a tarp on the rainy days. Every step a dull pain, and so I could hardly be blamed for the lull in pace. Very few days were spring like perfection, and so very few days had forward progress. On the perfect days, then, I found myself sprinting, traveling all day all out with an urgency built up from days of idling. ——— *Jordan breathing heavy. Trying to pull it together to film. Phone record beeps* “35 miles again today. Big, big push. Follow your dreams and you can do big things too.” *Phone beep. Then typing. Sound of post goes through while Jordan still breathes heavy* “Where is it? Maybe I got lucky and picked the close route. That's all I can hope. That's all I can hope.” ——— A month went by. And then another. And then another. And then hills formed and flattened. Those were hard enough. And then… are those mountains in the distance? My legs ached more than I thought possible. Mentally, being out in the elements day in and day out with injuries and such little promise of any sign of an ocean was debilitating. And then the mountain. And then it got serious. I sat at base camp for two weeks in the shade of the peaks. The shadows cast matched my darkened spirits. Trying everything to heal and recover my legs, feet, my entire body. I just needed one week of perfect conditions to get over the top. Everyday it rained and I sat, I just had the hope “Tomorrow will be better” as the rain pelted the tarp. Another post to Instagram. I wonder why I only got a few likes on that one. Does no one care I'm out here anymore, doing what they won't even try? Then the morning came, and the mud took over, but it had been too long, and I just had to start no matter what. This was getting ridiculous. I got up and trudged. After a few sinking steps, I paused, my boots slurped from the sticky mud as my feet sank—my backpack shifted. ——— “hhhhh….Tomorrow will be better.” ——— I backtracked. Setup camp. The phone again. Another post. More likes this time. Good. They do care. Another night fell. Another day under the looming mountain. “Tomorrow will be better.” Late morning came. I woke up. ——— “Why does it keep being so cold? It's not even that late in the year, and it's still a little wet. I really don't want to get sick. Like, not now. Tomorrow will be better.” *Phone picture takes* *Typing* “Take some time today for your mental health. Today is dedicated to marshmallows and recovery.” *Beeping sound signifying posting* “Wait, is that Jeremy? We left at the same time, how did he—-how did Jeremy get to the ocean so fast??? What??? No…wait he really did. That makes no sense. I saw his posts, I was waking up earlier, I was pushing harder. Like seriously harder. This is ridiculous. Guh…so st—that's so dumb.” ——— Camp. Another fire. Another post. An Instagram story. Not many views. They don't care. This is probably all just stupid. Then the next day comes. Wait…there's a nice breeze.  The first in weeks. Wow, perfect temperatures. Perfect… everything! Maybe I can do this. I think I can make it over the top. ——— “This is it. This is the day I've wanted. Finally! Here we go.” *Phone record beep as Jordan walks* "Alright, it's the BIG day, starting the big climb. What mountain in your life do you need to climb? We all have one. Send me a message with what yours is and then just star—” *Trips and falls while walking* "OWW!!! owww my ANKLE! THIS IS STUPID!!!! I'M DONE! I CAN'T DO IT ANYMORE! I'm done. I quit.” ——— And I really did. I quit that day. And can you blame me? I broke my ankle. Like I physically couldn't walk. I couldn't take another step even if I tried. It would be smart to go on. After 3 months, and not as many miles as I had hoped, I slunk home. It's understandable, but the hard thing to suggest to someone at that point, is that maybe it was their own fault, and not anything else—not the weather, mud, the fall, just yours. Maybe I should have taken a different approach altogether from the very first day, and then none of that would have mattered or happened. I heard a story last month about the men who raced to the south pole on Matt DUHvella's YouTube video “The problem with most productivity advice.” There were two groups who wanted to be the first humans to ever reach the South Pole. One group's strategy was exactly mine, As Greg Mckeown put it in that video quote “they walked with an insecure overachiever approach…. They would walk all out on the good weather days, and then on the bad weather days be so exhausted they would make no progress at all and felt the psychological burden of not making even an inch of progress forward.” Sometimes they would travel as much as 50 miles in a day. The other group took the exact opposite approach. They did the thing honestly harder to do. They limited themselves. They committed to 15 miles a day every single day no matter the conditions, no matter what the moral, no matter anything. On bad days, 15 miles. But more notably, on good days, they would simply walk 15 miles even if they felt fresh and could go further. They purposefully held a consistent sustainable pace. For the first group, the fastest way, in their mind, was to go all out every single good weather day. They complained and complained about the situation and the weather all while the other team, slow and steady, progressed daily. 15 miles no matter what, they kept that steady pace. In the end, what happened? Well, they got there 30 days ahead of the insecure overachievers and all even safely made the long journey home. Mckeown points out how the biographer miraculously described them: Quote“They progressed every day without particular effort.” Unquote. One of the hardest tasks humans had ever done in history, done “without particular effort.” Meanwhile the other team? They tragically died from their effort. Recently I've come to grips with the fact of why all my hobbies seem to die in the tundra—on the journey. Every single time I get into something new and begin the long process of writing new if then statements in the computer of my brain, I go all out. I get impatient. I overachieve. 24/7 it's all I think about. Literally, it's all I do. I write huge neurological programs in an incredibly short amount of time, like Neo learning kung fu, more code than most people would be willing to write in that span, and I take pride in that. But then predictably… my computer fries from the workload and burns up, and the people I thought I was better then, slowly pass up my programs with more lengthy, advanced, clean pieces of working code in their minds. And I never finish my program. I never reach my ocean while they're all on the sand. I don't want to make the same mistake again. My newest venture is what your listening to. This podcast. And I've been actively working to slow down. To pace myself. To find my 15 miles a day, and slowly chip away. Consistently. Sustainably. And I think I really found something that works incredibly well. Next week I'm excited to share that secret strategy I've been following to get a ton done without burning out all while leading a very tight schedule. So I'll leave you with this: “It's not about having the right opportunities. It's about handling the opportunities right.” — Mark Hunter Thank you so much for listening to the third episode of the If Then Podcast. If you have feedback you want to give me or if you have anything you want to say, email me at contact@ifthenpodcast.com. And if you would, leave me a 5 star review if you found this podcast valuable. It really helps the podcast to get seen by other people like yourself. We reached #26 for Education on all of Spotify, and I have you to thank for that. We're almost at 200 reviews on Apple Podcasts and 300 on Spotify. And as an extra bonus, for those of you who help me spread the word, I've been giving away 2 free 1 month Audible gift cards every week this May. Last week, Tabita and Johnathan won a free credit for an audiobook of their choice + access to their Plus catalog which includes thousands of audiobooks with no credits needed. And if you win this week, don't worry the gift card is available to you even if you already have an Audible account. All you have to do to enter to win is take a screenshot of this podcast and share it on your Instagram while tagging the account @ifthenpodcast in the post or story. If you shared the last episode, you can also share this one too to be entered to win again. And, also, be sure to follow @ifthenpodcast on Instagram to find out if you're the winner this week. If we get 100 shares by the end of the month, each of you will be entered to win a pair of AirPods. We're over half way there, so keep sharing! Thank you so much for listening, my name is Jordan Taylor, and what if/then will you write today?

Scale-up with PK!
In a World that's Seemingly Complex, How Do I Simplify?

Scale-up with PK!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 2:14


As leaders, we need to simplify. When we simplify, things get done. Anything complex, clouds visibility; thrashes initiative; impairs motivation; and in effect, Complexity stymies action. As a leader therefore, it's essential to simplify; so that visibility improves, initiatives thrive, and motivation sustains. When we simplify, appropriate action happens, and things get done. When we simplify, we are effective, more productive, less stressed, more efficient. Steve Jobs once said - Simple can be harder than complex. You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it's worth it in the end, because once you get there you can move mountains. Unquote. In a world that's seemingly complex and distractive, how do I simplify? How do I unpack my complexities? Some of the ways are to: Minimise - Cutting things down to its essence, Rooting out extra steps, Figuring out (absolute) priorities, and saying no to other things, Thus, focusing on what's (really) important, Breaking down massive-looking things in to (consumable) smaller pieces, and Seeking Clarity at every level, for ourselves. As leaders, we need to simplify. When we simplify, things get done. My name is PK Narayanan, wishing you the best! Thank you --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pk-narayanan/message

RECORD ALL MONSTERS!
S2E8: Gamera Vs Viras with Parker and Q!

RECORD ALL MONSTERS!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 37:23


Parker and Q are back, and that can only mean we're covering a Gamera movie! This time, Gamera is fighting an outsized squid who whizzes through space in a ring of bumble bees. Our game touches on a different kind of formula than the Gamera movies have come to rely on.... Find us online! Hear us on Unquote! Find today's Movie!

Dungeons and Dayjobs podcast

Transcript of The First Kato, a short biography of Raymond Tokutaro Muramoto: [Play Flight of the Bumblebee from 1m27s of The Green Hornet radio episode “Citizenship Insurance Racket,” broadcast 5 May 1938.] January 31st, 1936. When the first episode of The Green Hornet aired on WXYZ radio in Detroit, the voice of Kato was Tokutaro Hayashi1. [Clip of Reid talking, followed by Kato. Citizenship Insurance Racket 13m40-14m.]The station's Dramatic Director James Jewell “renamed him Toyo.” That's according to Wyxie Wonderland: An Unauthorized 50-Year Diary of WXYZ Detroit by Dick Osgood. In ads and newspaper articles, the actor was billed as Raymond Hayashi or Raymond Toyo. Six years later, he was credited as Raymond Muramoto in this item:“Kato of the fascinating radio program, ‘Green Hornet' of Station WXYZ is here in person among us colonists. He is none other than Raymond Muramoto, a Seattlelite, formerly of Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Muramoto who portrayed Kato was brought to the limelight by Mr. James Jewel, director of the program, while managing the Parkstons Hotel. After numerous radio tests, he was selected by Mr. George Trendle, president of the station. Mr. Muramoto was the only Japanese besides Hize co-EE-kay (Koike), opera singer, who was under contract to N.B.C. for six years. He also served as assistant sound technician on The Lone Ranger program for the past four years.” That's from the May 30th, 1945 edition of Information Bulletin, published by prisoners in the Tulelake, California concentration camp where he was held during World War Two.The “Coming Marriages” column in Billboard magazine on July 29th, 1939, began with “Raymond Toyo, actor on station WXYZ, Detroit, who plays Kato in The Green Hornet, and Tsuruko Kuranishi, … of Auburn, Washington.” They were married on August 3rd in Seattle.The 1940 census lists a Ramon Hayashi, born in Japan in 1902, living on Prentiss Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. Others in Household: Tsuru Hayoshi, 27 years old, Female.What nationality was the character Kato? Why did it change over the years? My guess is that the rich, white men who created and adapted The Green Hornet didn't invest as much thought in it as later fans might have. They didn't make the hero's servant Japanese out of concern that representation matters. They were filling in blanks on a formula. WXYZ had succeeded with The Lone Ranger, a masked crime fighter in the Wild West. When they were brainstorming a name for his Native American sidekick, one of the brainstormers looked at a map of Arizona and saw the Tonto Basin1. When the same execs decided to write a modern story about a rich playboy who fought crime in a mask, they wanted a Tonto for him. According to Dick Osgood in Wyxie Wonderland, they settled on a Japanese servant as The Green Hornet's sidekick. Dramatic director James Jewell wanted a Japanese actor and ignored suggestions that they use a Chinese actor instead. Narration in the first two episodes called Kato “oriental.” In the third episode and for a few years of the series, he was introduced as [clip of narrator saying “Kato, his faithful Japanese valet” from Citizenship Insurance Racket, 2m39s-2m41s].2 The show started describing him as “Oriental” again in January 1938, presumably because Japan had begun attacking China and the US was on the side of China. A broadcast on June 21st, 1941, several months before Pearl Harbor, labeled Kato Filipino. His nationality wasn't mentioned again until January tenth, 1942: [Narrator from The Green Hornet episode “Poor Substitutes for a Prison, 40s-47s. “With his faithful Filipino valet Kato, Britt Reid, daring young publisher, matches wits with racketeers and saboteurs…”]2The timing may have led to the rumor that his Japanese nationality was dropped immediately after Pearl Harbor.In the 1940 and 1941 film serials, Kato was played by Keye Luke and described as Korean. Bruce Lee starred as Kato in The Green Hornet TV show from 1966-1967, where he was described as Chinese. And in the 2011 feature film, they joke about it, maybe using Britt Reid's ignorance as a stand-in for the historical confusion over Kato's nationality. Jay Chou as Kato says he was born in Shanghai. Reid says, “Yeah, I love Japan.”3 What else do we know about Tokutaro Hayashi, or Raymond Toyo, or Tokutaro Raymond Muramoto? He arrived in the US in 19204. He ran a restaurant when he was recruited by the Jam Handy Organization to act in commercial films. But he didn't switch careers completely. He continued to manage the restaurant. He was good at playing pool. While at WXYZ, he beat the best player in the studio and taught some of his coworkers how to play1.From Wyxie Wonderland1, quote:“Raymond had first worked in Detroit for a prominent automotive executive who had given him the financial backing for his Japanese restaurant. By the time he was sent to Jewell he was prosperous. He was having so much fun  playing Kato on the radio that he forgot to collect his paychecks. They did not amount to much, of course, but they did pile up. Finally Jewell …. forced him to take the checks.“Then, without warning, he just didn't show up. Inquiries at his restaurant revealed that he had gone to Seattle to greet some girls from Japan. One he married; the others he brought back with him to be waitresses in his restaurant.“Another actor managed to fake Kato until Raymond's return. Jewell explained firmly to the … man that actors had a responsibility to be present when required. To make amends, Raymond invited the entire cast to his restaurant and served them a Japanese dinner of many courses–with sake.” End quote.He convinced Al Hodge (the voice actor behind Britt Reid) to have his wife Tsuruko work unpaid as a maid in Hodge's two-room apartment until she could find another job. Tokutaro asked another WXYZ staffer to join him in buying a car wash. They didn't go through with it1.At some point after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Tokutaro was informed the government would send him to Japan. He asked his colleague Dick Osgood to intervene. An occasional voice actor and quiz master, Osgood had been broadcasting a series tied in with the war effort called March to Victory. Scripts for the show were supposedly vetted by six departments in Washington. Tokutaro might have thought Osgood had some influence but he couldn't help. In his book, Osgood says Tokutaro “disappeared, presumably to a concentration camp in the west. No one at WXYZ ever saw Raymond again.”1Raymond Tokutaro Muramoto is the name on a draft card registered February 15th, 1942. Place of birth is given as Kanazawa, Japan, February 11, 1900. His residence is listed as Seattle, Washington. Muramoto's father-in-law, Masaichi Kuranishi is listed as next of kin5. Muramoto arrived at the Tule Lake “War Relocation Center” in California on May 27, 19426. He was involved in theater there and put in charge of a Radio Drama Division at the camp. They presented a mock radio broadcast “to give persons practical experience in the radio field as artists, announcers, commentators and sound effects technicians.”7Muramoto left the concentration camp on October first, 19456.Information about his life after that is sparse. Raymond Muramoto lived in Seattle according to city directories from 1951, 1953 and 1982. Airplane passenger manifests show a Raymond Muramoto flying from Honolulu to LA in 1957, and from Tokyo to Seattle in 19588.A petition for naturalization, October 12, 1955 gives a snapshot of his life at that time. “My full, true and correct name is – Raymond Tokutaro Muramoto. My occupation is – truck driver. … The name of my wife is Tsuruko Muramoto. … One child, Florence Reiko, female, born October 8, 1937.” His petition was approved9.The main writer of The Lone Ranger, Fran Striker, appeared on the tv game show “To Tell the Truth” in 1960. If Muramoto had appeared on the show, we might know more about his life. Or at least his real name.After scouring databases of newspaper articles, census records, airplane passenger manifests, marriage records, and other information, the puzzle is still incomplete. The surname “Toyo” was assigned to him by James Jewell out of QUOTE convenience UNQUOTE1. When he arrived in the US at age twenty, he probably picked the common American name “Raymond.” Most official documents call him Tokutaro Muramoto. It's only the 1940 census and the promotional materials and articles about his radio work that list his last name as “Hayashi.” If his life were an episode of The Green Hornet, Britt Reid might speculate he had changed names in order to hide from the law or gangsters. Maybe he just picked Hayashi as a stage name before the radio station gave him another name.Raymond T. Muramoto died July 26, 1988 in King County, Washington, at the age of 8810.[Pause]You've been listening to “The First Kato,” a short biography of Raymond Tokutaro Muramoto, by Robert Thomas Northrup. For credits and a poorly formatted bibliography, visit http://DayjobsPodcast.blogspot.com. And go listen to my pulpy superhero podcast at https://ThisGuninMyHand.blogspot.com based on hours of listening to Raymond Muramoto and his colleagues. Thanks.References:1. Osgood, Dick (1981). Wyxie Wonderland: An Unauthorized 50-Year Diary of WXYZ Detroit. Pages 110-184.2. Mikkelson, David. Snopes.com. “Did ‘The Green Hornet' Change Kato's Nationality After Pearl Harbor?” P ublished 16 August 1999. Accessed 11 March 2022.https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/green-hornet-change-kato-after-pearl-harbor/3. Wikipedia. 2022. “Kato (The Green Hornet).” Last modified March 8, 2022. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kato_(The_Green_Hornet)4. Ancestry.com. Washington, U.S., Arriving and Departing Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1965 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006. “Tokutaro Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.5. Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  “Raymond Tokutaro Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.6. Ancestry.com. U.S., Japanese Americans Relocated During World War II, 1942-1946 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2005. “Raymond T. Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.                  7. Cooperman, R. R. (1996). Nisei theater: History, context, and perspective. Pages 208-209.8. Ancestry.com. Washington, U.S., Arriving and Departing Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1965 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006. “Tokutaro Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.9. Ancestry.com. Washington, U.S., Petitions for Naturalization, 1860-1991 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. “Raymond Tokutaro Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.  10. Ancestry.com. Washington, U.S., Death Index, 1940-2017 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2002. “Raymond T. Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.Bibliography:Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. “Ramon Hayashi.” Accessed 11 March 2022.Ancestry.com. U.S., Final Accountability Rosters of Evacuees at Relocation Centers, 1942-1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013. “Tokutaro Raymond Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.       Ancestry.com. U.S., Japanese Americans Relocated During World War II, 1942-1946 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2005. “Raymond T. Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.                  Ancestry.com. U.S., Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 1 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. “Raymond Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  “Raymond Tokutaro Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.Ancestry.com. Washington, U.S., Arriving and Departing Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1965 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006. “Tokutaro Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.Ancestry.com. Washington, U.S., Death Index, 1940-2017 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2002. “Raymond T. Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.Ancestry.com. Washington, U.S., Petitions for Naturalization, 1860-1991 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. “Raymond Tokutaro Muramoto.” Accessed 11 March 2022.       Cooperman, R. R. (1996). Nisei theater: History, context, and perspective. Pages 208-209.“Green Hornet,” Information Bulletin, No. 3 (30 May 1942), Tulelake Colony. Found on Online Archive of California, Accessed 11 March 2022. https://oac.cdlib.org/view?docId=ft600006cv;NAAN=13030&doc.view=frames&chunk.id=d0e83&toc.depth=1&toc.id=&brand=oac4Merchandise-Pipes-General Outdoor: Coming Marriages. (1939, Jul 29). The Billboard (Archive: 1894-1960), 51, 71.Mikkelson, David. Snopes.com. “Did ‘The Green Hornet' Change Kato's Nationality After Pearl Harbor?” Published 16 August 1999. Accessed 11 March 2022.https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/green-hornet-change-kato-after-pearl-harbor/Osgood, Dick (1981). Wyxie Wonderland: An Unauthorized 50-Year Diary of WXYZ Detroit. Pages 110-184.Radio: RICKER PROMOTED. (1936, Jan 29). Variety (Archive: 1905-2000), 121, 38.The public domain Green Hornet radio episodes excerpted in this piece were broadcast 5 May 1938, titled “Citizenship Insurance Racket” (mentioning “Japanese valet”) and 1 Feb 1949, “Poor Substitutes for a Prison” (mentioning “Filipino valet”).

Stiff Crowd with The Boner Sisters
113 - Quote Kinky Unquote

Stiff Crowd with The Boner Sisters

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 32:30


The Boner Sisters chat about the last 3 years and the murder of Charles Pierce. Blog - www.stiffcrowdsisters.com Twitter - https://bit.ly/2XeQR92 Facebook - https://bit.ly/2VSIEpz

The Bledsoe Show
High Leverage Habits

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 67:51


00:00.00 mikebledsoe Welcome to Monday morning with Mike and max and today we're gonna be talking about high leverage habits and addictive actions and one of the things that inspired this conversation is I got to work with a friend over the weekend to help improve his mental and physical health and I realized. Man lifestyle is really the problem here and we had to do the work to figure out what was gonna be the most high leverage habits that he could instill that was gonna move the needle and that's how I like to work with all of my clients. That's how I like to look at my own life. So I'm excited that that. Talk about this with max because um, he you're also somebody who you've done a good job of instilling habits over time and and I find that we just lifestyle is not something that you just do all at once. It's. You implement 1 thing one month in the next month maybe you add a little something else change something here and there and you've done a really good job of stacking your habits in a really positive way. 01:07.16 Max Shank Well thank you for that I I really appreciate that I think one of the smartest things I ever did was actually 1 of the easiest projects I've ever done which was 5 minute flow and really what it did is it gave people permission to. Start with less and when you start with something smaller. It feels a lot more manageable and getting people out of the idea that you have to do an hour workout for it to count is really big just the same way that lao -tzu says the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step ah same kind of thing. However I I would as a counterpoint say that one of the most interesting things about human beings is that we can radically change our lives when we adopt. 01:49.91 mikebledsoe O. 02:02.20 Max Shank A new self-image or if we adopt a new mission or a new role and just to introduce the key point which is motivation and a lot of synonyms for motivation are hunger and pain. So There's a fire that is fueling that behavior change and if you don't want to Change. You can't Change. You know they talk about that in like those interventions like you have to be ready to change like you have to want to change yourself. So I think that? um yes, tiny. Tiny tiny bets are much more manageable generally speaking. But when you have a really clear mission or purpose or Motivation Hunger pain. Whatever you're capable of radical transformations. Especially as it relates to. Transformation of your self-image and your selfimage is going to guide your subconscious action because it's really hard to be acutely conscious all the time and I think you know it is sort of like. 03:14.94 mikebledsoe In. 03:19.71 Max Shank Want to say in Buddhism or maybe hinduism I can't remember it's 1 of the isms. Maybe it's in b here now Ram Das talks about like it's like a fish jumping out of the water and that's your moment of consciousness and then you go back into the. The see of the unconscious so selfimage if you change your selfimage your role your mission. You can have a radical change across the board. Otherwise it is way more manageable to have. Ah. Little changes and everything you do is basically a bet that it will be better than doing nothing. 04:00.17 mikebledsoe Yeah I like that I like that frame I I like to tell people that I they asked me what I believe and I like to try on beliefs oh I believe if I do this then my life will improve in this way. So I try it out. Check in a couple weeks later and if it's true then I go oh okay I'll keep this belief until you know something better comes along what I you know just have touch on a few points that came up that I want to that you you were making is just the idea being. Focused on the process versus the result and I think for when I look at my history and I look at the times in which I actually made slower progress was when I was not present with the process I didn't actually. I I wanted the results really bad but I was unwilling to be with what it was going to take to get there and so I just did a bunch of stuff that I didn't slow down I only did the stuff that was on the surface to try to get there and you know in athletics it results in injury. Um. And business it. It may result in being able to make a bunch of money but then don't know how to keep it going. Um there's there's all these all these things that I've learned that becoming more present with the process really is a practice and being. And practicing being with the process so spending 5 % of my time on the vision of what I want to be different in the future and 95% of my attention going into into just the execution of the thing and learning to enjoy the process of doing it because. This is where the a lot of people get stuck is they have conditional happiness they say I won't I can't be happy until I achieve this result and so what they do is they basically punish themselves until the result they want is true and that doesn't help you achieve. 05:58.63 Max Shank A. 06:14.36 mikebledsoe Result at all. In fact, that it probably diminishes your ability to get there and so one of the things I've really been working towards is practicing being in the process and and one of the things that has really been highlighted as I've taken on that practice is that. So much of the process when I'm doing I'm doing you know the same things I've been doing for 20 years which is taking care of my health building my business that these are not being in a relationship with a woman. These are all things that I have been continually striving to improve. And the more that I've gotten involved in the process of how I'm actually gonna move towards this this result that is really a moving target at times is to to when I'm more present with the process I actually understand what it takes to get there and I think. That most people and for myself I really didn't want to hear what it was going to take to get there and I think sometimes if we knew everything it was going to take to get the result we want. We wouldn't do it but we like I hear from entrepreneurs all the time you know if I knew what it was going to take to be successful. Um, would have never started. But once you get into it. You can't stop. It. So really as I've gotten older getting really ah present to what actually has to happen and being okay when something new pops Up. It's like okay. 07:32.67 Max Shank Third. 07:49.92 mikebledsoe I think I think I know what steps 1 through 10 are but after I complete step 2 I realized that there's 5 steps between 2 and 3 oh this is going to take longer than I thought and if you're if you're present with the process you look at that when that appears you go? Oh okay. 07:58.54 Max Shank Oh. 08:07.85 mikebledsoe And I think just knowing that that's going to happen. Always. It's always going to Happen. You never know what the step is what the next step is going to be until you take the next step and then the next step reveals reveals itself now if it's something you have a lot of practice with things become more predictable. But when you don't know much about what it is that you're doing then it's not predictable and and so it's ah it's actually been really enjoyable to step into something and go Oh I think I know what I need to do here and it actually works and I go oh that was predictable I. Actually know what I'm doing in regard to this thing right now. But I'm also open at any moment for something new to pop up to say oh this is the next obvious Step. You should be taking don't don't do this yet. Do this. 08:53.93 Max Shank Um, yo I agree with some of what you said a great majority of it in fact and I have some comments ah number one. So it's gonna be. 09:07.20 mikebledsoe Perfect. 09:13.18 Max Shank Ah, greed craftsmanship discount tire and entrepreneurial tenure and I'm going to explain how those all go together. So the first one is greed you want the result but you're not willing to pay the price and that's what hurts you athletically. That's what hurts you entrepreneurially and I think that a lot of a lot of problems people cause for themselves stem from greed and it's usually based on comparison with someone else. So then you end up doing things. You don't really love the process of doing. Just to get this result that won't ultimately satisfy you anyway. So we have greed the second one is craftsmanship so craftsmanship is what where greatness really comes from. You certainly need a desire you need like a. A role where you're like okay my my role is I make clay pots for example and you just focus everything you can do into making the best clay pot there is or like Jiro dreams of sushi. You just focus on making the best sushi boom suddenly you're like the only. You know 5 diamond or whatever the heck rated sushi restaurant on the planet and the the idea of retiring is painful to him. He's like why would I retire this is this is my identity. This is my role. This is my self image. This is just what I do. He's not doing it to try to get somewhere else. He's like I do this. You have grade you have craftsmanship you have discount tire and the reason I say discount tire is as I understand it, you cannot jump into the company like leapfrog your way into a high standing position. You have to work your way up from the bottom. So you have to understand the process from the very bottom all the way up. So everybody they promote has been on the floor they they may have you know changed a few tires. They may have made a few sales. They understand the process of how everything works. And I think the intimate knowledge of the process really makes it a lot better and then the last one is ah entrepreneurial tenure and and tenure is like the worst idea ever because it's just another example of how desperate we are to secure the future. And I understand the desire we do it with relationships like we get married so we can securitize our relationship in the future. We have social security so we can securitize the future. We even call stocks securities because we're trying to secure our wealth for the future. 11:55.30 mikebledsoe Um. 12:03.60 Max Shank And the same thing is true for the entrepreneurs you're trying to quickly get some sort of security like I got to make 5000000 I got to make ten million I got to get whatever and then I'll be happy like you are saying. It's very conditional when I achieve this when I achieve this result. Then I will be happy and it's like dude the people who do stuff like that they will come up with a new target. Maybe before they even hit the first one like it's not going to be a lasting like ah I am now swimming in an ocean of nirvana. 12:34.47 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 12:42.91 Max Shank Now that I have made $5000000 yes, no, you're going to look at bigger houses and bigger boats and you're going to have different goals and it's it's hardly going to be a pit stop on the road trip of your entrepreneurial life. So we're trying to like lock in. That success but like you said it takes us away from the process. So I think those are definitely things that you want to consider and it does relate back to the identity. You know James clear. That's his like main angle with habits my main takeaway. Ah, from his work is that it ends psycho cybernetics same thing. It's all about your identity and self-image and what role you are actively choosing like I am this therefore I do this and once you get clear on that everything is. Pretty much derivative of that it doesn't become about greed for a specific result. It doesn't become about like securing securing the future in some way and I think that's a really good way of looking at it so you need the desire but also the. The desire to embody the identity or the character. 13:59.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, and and you've got to know who that character is I mean when we think about identity. There's you know there's there's archetypes you could if you're an entrepreneur you could say have the identity of a Ceo and what that. 14:16.32 Max Shank I'm the fool. 14:19.28 mikebledsoe What that what? that means what that means to you is maybe different than what it means to somebody else and so if you're going to take on the identity of something which I've done before but didn't actually know what it meant and then you get around people who were performing so you want to be a Ceo you want to get around other ceos. Performing at the level that you want to perform and that's how you understand oh this is how this type of if I'm embodying this archetype if I'm embodying this identity. This is how these people think this is how they behave these are these are the things they do. And these are the things they don't do so I'm in agreement like that that identity is likely the quickest way to be able to create new habits because it's such a core piece of it's it's who we are and so if. I am running my company and I go you know what? I'm ah I a hundred million dollar company Ceo and someone comes to me with a problem or somebody's slacking at work. Well what does a hundred million dollar Ceo do well he probably fires that person and then brings in somebody else who's who can do it or whatever it is. But. A lot of people they they're not holding that identity they may they may shrink in that that situation and and then may go you know maybe I don't want to have that identity. It. It requires ah myself to do things that I don't like or it's not me and. And that's the absolute truth if you're trying to take on an identity and you go I'm not like that. It's like that's why you're not that person you have to be like that person. So I I think identity spot on. That's that's the quickest way to to creating a lifestyle life. That's good. And then or that you want if it's good. You could take on thedent identity of a criminal but then there's purpose. You know you're that's right, you got the why you know it's it's the reminder There's there's so many hard days for me. There's. 16:15.27 Max Shank Got to hang out with a bunch of evil people. 16:28.98 mikebledsoe There's days where I don't feel like you know, taking care of my health or days that I I may not want to work when when my people need me to do it. But I have deep? Yeah, ah. 16:39.40 Max Shank Um, what fraud he's a fraud you're not on all the time fraud I'm calling it. Ah. 16:46.76 mikebledsoe Ah, and and yeah, yeah, sorry sorry to break the rain on your parade there max? Yeah, and I think the the. 16:49.87 Max Shank But I thought you had to be on all the time to be successful was I wrong about that first. My bubble. Ah. 17:05.73 mikebledsoe The deeper Why the purpose is the thing that that does get you through those moments of doubt you know I had doubt over the weekend I had ah there's a mixture of things that all happened at the same time and and I'm like why am I doubting myself and then I realize oh well I had these 3 different events. Each one of them by themselves probably wouldn't bother me that much but because there's a combination of these things happening at the same time you know I I have ah a day where you know, kind of freak out man and then wake up the next morning then laugh at myself for being so ridiculous. But. What helped me keep it together is knowing my why you know it's it. It. It helped it helped me through that hard time doesn't mean I was performing at my best in that moment. But I definitely I was able to to stand help myself in that way. 18:00.92 Max Shank I can't remember who said it but it was a man with a strong enough. Why can bear almost anyhow was that vi frankl or yeah I I feel like someone else said it like young or something too might have been like Carl young. 18:08.51 mikebledsoe Um, think that was victor frankel. Yeah yeah. 18:18.29 mikebledsoe He might have gotten it from him who knows. 18:20.14 Max Shank But um, yeah, maybe but it's like you have the why and you have the who so that's that's like my little joke Simon Sene has it starts with why and James clear is like it starts with who and so you said it rightly so you got to be so. 18:27.75 mikebledsoe Yeah. 18:39.73 Max Shank Selective with who you associate with because it's the 5 monkey rule you become most like the 5 people that you spend most time with and there's ah you know concentrations to it if you spend like 99% of your time with 1 person you're going to. 18:40.86 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah. 18:58.20 Max Shank Have a lot of feedback and become most like that person so you have to be very selective in who your friends are and who you choose as a mentor also and a person doesn't even have to necessarily mentor you um, personally. It's just if you are trying to mimic them in some way. So if they are the role model man you got to be so careful and you have to know like what it's actually like for them and if it really matches your personality type if that's what you really want like I think a lot of us Chase. Ah. You know, false ideas of better because that's the only reason we do anything is we think it'll be better if we do it than if we do nothing but I think a lot of people get caught. Um I think it's called worshiping false idols right. 19:50.94 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah I Um, you know there's been people who I have become enamored with that. They're older and I go oh I want to be more like that person and then I get to know them better I get close to them and I realize that oh they. Really healthy. But holy shit. They're poor as fuck like they totally terrible with money and business and and all this and then I meet someone who's really good at business I'm like okay and then I realize that you know they spend all their time in analysis in front of their computer and I go Well I don't want that either. 20:16.65 Max Shank Um, yeah. 20:29.50 Max Shank Ah, they're on their fifth. The ex-wife or something like that. It's. 20:29.89 mikebledsoe So You know there's ah yeah, that too. Yeah and so I go you know you got to be careful about who you choose to to emulate and I. You know sometimes I hang out with someone who's really wealthy and you know I just pick some stuff up and for me, it's I don't think there's ever been one person I'm like I I want to take on the identity ah similar identity to that person. It's more of. You know I'm gonna take this piece from this guy and this piece from this other guy and this piece from this other guy and and I'm gonna do my best to be me while while leveraging you know what I can learn from those people. But yeah I mean if you if you really hung out with a wealthy person. 21:03.91 Max Shank Her. 21:17.66 mikebledsoe Someone who's great at relationships and someone else who's really healthy and maybe you you split it up in a thirds. You'd probably figure out how to do all of those better than the average person which I think is what most people were going for So I want to move into I want to move into. 21:22.50 Max Shank So. 21:32.00 Max Shank Yeah. 21:36.40 mikebledsoe What do you think I have my idea I'm curious what you think is the highest leverage part of your life to improve first. So what I'd like to do is for us to move through a list max and I going to and discuss what. Habits or what what part of our lifestyles. Ah we should maximize first before moving on to the next one because we really want to get to a place where we're maximizing every aspect of our life. 22:07.44 Max Shank For me, it would have to be preparing for our podcast topics instead of being ambushed by you with this list that we're gonna make up right now. 22:16.15 mikebledsoe Um, pretty sure I told you right before we hit record he doesn't remember folks. He's got poor memory I'll send you some new troics That's not true. 22:23.90 Max Shank Ah don't say that that's not true. It's like a steel trap. Ah so check it out every every type of self-help which is a. Ah, pretty big category of books is based on the same thing its personal responsibility. It doesn't matter if it's ekhart tolly or David Goggins and what's fascinating to me is those guys. Both have a lot of fans. Who are saying like yeah eckhart, you're the man. My man you help me out and other people are like dude David Goggins gave me gave put a little fight in me and I'm just laughing to myself because of how monumentally different the advice is. 23:17.10 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 23:19.16 Max Shank You know the difference between ah there there are no problems. There are only situations and I let them pass through me and you got to conquer your inner Butch bitch and run like ah ten miles a day or whatever. Um. And I know there's more to both of them than that I'm super generalizing but the fact is they both are dependent on personal responsibility and the worst thing you can do is. Assume the identity of a victim of circumstance versus an author or an authoritarian of your own life and take personal responsibility for the good and the bad and everything in between I mean ah if you don't. Take personal responsibility if you don't put yourself into the role of like the creator of your life. Um, basically you're screwed. So I think that's the number one most important thing and that's a psychological foundation that basically every. 24:25.89 mikebledsoe Come. 24:31.21 Max Shank Ah self-help has in common from the tollies to the goggins and the Jockcos It's all taking responsibility for your own life. 24:38.13 mikebledsoe yeah yeah I agree that from a psychological perspective. That's the number 1 thing. Um, you know there's personal responsibility and then I think after that comes self-esteem and self-esteem. House people then create boundaries for themselves and other people. But yeah I think it does all start with personal responsibility and and getting out of that that victim identity. So we have spot on I this is what I love about Ah. Maybe not prepping so much for this because I was thinking more about habits and I love that you said that but I was thinking about all right? So we got personal responsibility on the list and I'm also thinking about daily habits the the most critical thing that I've recognized is. Are you getting good rest are you getting good sleep and to me I think that you know we we put the psychological side apart and we go to lifestyle habits that getting enough sleep is. 25:40.40 Max Shank Ah. 25:54.90 mikebledsoe If you're if you're not getting that. There's really not much else. You can do like you could do so many other things right? But if you're not getting good sleep. It's just not going to matter. 26:07.16 Max Shank I Would agree with that I would also say that it's interesting both personally and anecdotally that if you have more drive toward a specific goal if you're more enthusiastic. If you're more expressive and less depressed people need a little bit less sleep and they do sleep a little bit less but getting inadequate sleep. Whatever that number is for an extended period of time. Ah I mean you're like killing your brain essentially and that's what's going to. Be responsible for a lot of that higher order thinking. So I would agree hydration sleep nutrition Those are those are kind of foundational physiological things that um, they they deserve to be right in there right? After. Ah, personal responsibility and self-image or self-esteem because those are very similar. 27:06.10 mikebledsoe Yeah, the ah the deerration of sleep and the quality of sleep being different. You know I think it's widely known between six and a half and 8 hours of sleep is about the the right target and everybody's different by the way. Um, but I think. I know for myself when I'm in a high high motivation state which means that I'm waking up at the same time you know ready to go I'm doing my morning routine which involves exercise and because I'm on purpose I end up expending way more energy that day than somebody who's not. 27:42.61 Max Shank The. 27:43.39 mikebledsoe Somebody is spending their day distracting themselves on Instagram or watching Tv or or whatever it is that person's going to end their day with. 27:48.93 Max Shank I. 27:57.17 mikebledsoe Without having expended all their their energy and then they're gonna want to you know continue watching Tv and continue being distracted and that person's just not gonna get high quality sleep so they may need to make it up in quantity and of course when you wake up and you don't feel good about what you want to do. There's nothing getting you out of bed because bed is fucking comfortable I like laying around on bed on some days. So um, yeah, it it all does work together because if we're looking at sleep. We go well, you know if you're eating poorly that's going to disrupt your sleep if. You're not exercising that's going to disrupt your sleep. Um, and I think that sleep is you know if you're getting six and a half to seven and a half hours of sleep and you wake up fired up and ready to go and you're tired tired and satisfied at the end of the day with with your work then you're gonna the sleep is indicative of. That you have other habits in order. So there's a few things that are going to impact the sleep which is temperature of the room is it dark did you stop looking at screens for 2 to 3 hours before you attempted to go to sleep. These are all. Unquote sleep hygiene or or making sure you have enough magnesium in in your diet if. You don't have it have magnesium. It's hard to down regulategulate. So these are all things that are directly related to sleep. But again you know if you're not exercising and you're not eating well, that's also going to impact it so I like it as. 29:25.59 Max Shank Most of that stuff's a feedback loop right. 29:28.87 mikebledsoe As a marker. Yeah, it's all feedback loop all of it. But um I think I think quality of sleep is a really good. You can check in with that and if something's off then then there then you can start looking at other places. 29:31.52 Max Shank Yeah, yeah. 29:45.77 mikebledsoe There was a Chinese medicine. Do I used to see in in snitas and he would ask me. You know?? Ah basically are you dreaming? Do you wake up with boners and what's your shit like and those are like the 3 things and I go. Ah yeah, you know what. As a man as you know women don't have boners. Ah,, there's ah as a lady bones. Yeah, as ah as a man if one of those things are off if you're not having dreams. You're not remembering your dreams. It probably means that your sleep architecture is messed up in some Way. Um. 30:09.28 Max Shank They have lady boners. 30:24.51 mikebledsoe Which is fucking up your hormones which isn't going to allow you to wake up with boners and and and then obviously how you're shitting is is how you're primarily. Well let's say it makes up of how you're eating and what kind of stress you're enduring because if you emotional stress being held in the gut will fuck up your digestion. Even if you eat really? Well So Ah these things all again, a lot of that will manifest in basically sheep you look at your sleep and your defecation habit. 30:55.33 Max Shank Yeah, it's kind of like we have neurological housekeeping which is identity self-image personal responsibility and then we have physiological housekeeping which is promoting good sleep. Maybe you have an alarm. In the evenings that reminds you to turn the screens off. Maybe you take a magnesium supplement I mean really even if your routine is total bullshit. It might be better to have one because you're intellectually and psychologically putting energy into the quality of your sleep. You're like okay I have this routine where i. You know I'd swish coconut oil in my mouth and um, you know do eye exercises and massage my hands and feet and do a little stretch like even if it's not a very good routine just having that um psychological investment into it. Can be beneficial and that's like the ah the whole idea is that physiological housekeeping like are you getting enough water are you getting enough nutrients from your food. Are you getting enough exercise and it doesn't have to be any fancy exercise. And then what you said are you know, sort of the markers for how that's going. Ah check the poo. Do you have a boner every morning and are you dreaming and that's really interesting so we have the psychological housekeeping we have physiological housekeeping and then I think from there I would start looking at actual skills I don't know if that makes sense for you. But if we're trying to go for high leverage then really the 2 skills are. Language and movement and language is no question the most high leverage skill There is um I mean mathematics is a language in and of itself sales. And marketing are certainly language-based ah flirting wooing ah dating. That's mostly language-based There's a little bit of physical-based stuff too. So then you know you have language on the one side you have physical skills on the other side which would be like fighting. Ah, moving around with ease I think it's smart to get good at giving massages personally I think that's a really high leverage skill like if you can do ah a 5 minute shoulder foot rub and do it really? well. 33:41.50 Max Shank My god like whatever partner you have is going to feel so loved and so lucky and you know there are love languages and shit like that. But man if you have word skills and physical skills. Ah, that's super high leverage and and really those are the skills. Worth cultivating so from a language standpoint I would say ah probably sales and storytelling is the highest 1 and then also planning and delegating right after that as far as like the high leverage. Language skills are concerned. 34:17.48 mikebledsoe Yeah there's um, there's a book called um, your like the last safe investment and the idea is the the safest investment you can make is in yourself and that. The premise in the book is that you want to make yourself as valuable to other people as much as possible in order to enhance your ability to make money because that's the people who make the most money have figured out how to position themselves in a very high value position. So the way. That they break it down is the low value skills. There's 4 different quadrants 4 different pillars or 4 different categories of skill one being physical labor number 2 being technical labor 3 creative labor 4 interpersonal labor. So. Each one is more valuable generally speaking than the other so physical labor is you know, gardening building houses plumbing electrical. Ah this is but it's also professional athletes. So the 1% of physical labor talent plays basketball. But you know that's as a very rare ah physical labor. Yeah, you get? we get. That's an interesting take on that because yeah, the artists are really left out of this whole thing. Ah if you think it sports performance. 35:37.36 Max Shank I Think that's a I think that's a performer. 35:49.70 Max Shank Ah. 35:53.59 mikebledsoe Art performance. Ah all right? but outside of that and then you have technical labor these are accountants people who are you know, just man I don't even know what else fits in that category. But there's a lot of technical labor out there that is. Mostly these days being outsourced to India by the way because they're so technically oriented and then. 36:18.67 Max Shank It's basically any labor where someone else tells you what to do, but you don't have to sweat very much. 36:21.82 mikebledsoe Yeah, and you just have to you have to like you're probably working on a computer and it's not creative work. It's I'm moving things from over here to over here bookkeeping accounting. You're just following the rules. Not really thinking too much. 36:34.29 Max Shank Maybe even in a factory in like a factory if you're not really like digging ditches but you're moving machinery around and you're manning the loom or something like that. That's a little more technical than digging a ditch. But yeah I follow. 36:39.60 mikebledsoe Right. 36:46.32 mikebledsoe Yeah, and then creative labor that may be copywriting that would be ah writing a book writing music. Whatever it is and then the level above that is interpersonal. That's leadership sales. That's things. 36:53.10 Max Shank Writing a book creating a video series. 37:05.85 mikebledsoe Involve relationships. That's the highest value skills to acquire and so um, it is the hardest skill because it's ah if you think about it. Ah these skills the skills that are most focused on in school. 37:12.90 Max Shank It seems like the hardest skill to me too. 37:25.61 mikebledsoe People are developing is really technical ability and so it's really, you're really being trained to be a worker. Not really someone who's gonna be creative. It's so funny when I hear people you know, be concerned about Homeschool kids not getting the right level of socialization but I look at. 37:27.30 Max Shank Um, if. 37:45.48 mikebledsoe The level relating skills that people have going to public schools fucking shit and it's like I'm like what what do you mean? their social skills. They can't lead. They don't know how to you know they don't know how to date. 37:59.31 Max Shank They can't manage their own emotions. How are they gonna have a chance of managing somebody else's it's absurd. Don't get me started on the school thing. We'll ruin the whole podcast the worst twelve year investment you can make oh god. 38:03.31 mikebledsoe Can't manage their own. Ah. Ah. 38:13.11 mikebledsoe Ah, ah so ah, coming from 1 guy who who went to school another guy who didn't but um, we both agree. Ah yeah, so so I think you know with what you were saying you know there's there's skills. Was it you said Ah, it was movement skills and and verbal. Yeah, so if you look at the interpersonal if you look at the interpersonal which is the highest value you have to communicate. Well it comes down to communication whether you're doing sales or you're in a leadership position. It has to do with. 38:34.71 Max Shank Yeah, it's verbal and physical. Basically yeah. 38:52.10 mikebledsoe Are you able to tell people and have a conversation a you got to be a good listener and then B can you can you? then? what your your output side of the communication is that landing in a way that that is that matches your intention. Because what I find is most people they talk and then the other person completely interprets it in a way that was unintended and neither party knows what to do about it that usually is what results in most conflict. 39:21.49 Max Shank Ah, well I call it a catalytic communication did what you did your communication yield The result that you wanted was it a catalyst for the result that you were after and if you have that it's Amazing. I mean look the average person talks like they're just practicing talking. They don't know like why they're saying what they're saying they like heard something and they're like oh it's my turn to talk for a while now and like I heard about this and like but like catalytic communication like does it yield. 39:42.63 mikebledsoe Oh yeah I think. 39:58.11 Max Shank Result that you had intended that is super high skill and high leverage and if we think about the word leverage we have to be clear about what we mean by that. Do we mean the highest ah result or the highest benefit per unit of time. Do we mean the highest. Ah. Benefit per per per calories because that's another way way we could measure it. That's why language is so crazy because we're all just saving tons of calories. That's why we can like sleep in a big comfy bed instead of hunting will de beastenship and then you also have ah leverage for. 40:31.40 mikebledsoe Fucking Well at least. 40:37.11 Max Shank Money So you have leverage for time leverage for money and leverage for calories and ah language is all of those.. That's why that's what drove the dot Com bubble. That's what has driven um these different softwares because software is language and it is. A series of conditional phrases. Let's call I'm like about to leave my circle of competence here basically but basically um, intellectual leverage is when less explains more or when less can do more. 40:59.49 mikebledsoe Oh. 41:16.54 Max Shank And if you have a really slick piece of software you can perform the work. You can save the calories of you know millions of people having to do the job instead and now it's replaced with a computer program which is just ah rules. Ah, using language that's incredible. 41:37.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, and that's such a good example of how that's being utilized the there's a guy named John Vervaki I think ah, it's it's Dr. John Vervakki's ah he's like a philosopher. Ah, doctor of philosopher philosophy from up in Canada I forget which school he's got a 30 hour series on on Youtube called awakening from the meaning crisis and what's so cool about that series is he is. He walks you through the evolution of consciousness through history and so there's this handoff between basically where the hebrews and the ah like the hebrews and transfers into the greeks and say why like. Up and to that point hebrew culture was at the pinnacle of of ah of consciousness and then the greeks came along and then made a lot of improvements upon it and part of it was was that fluency increased so the style of the language actually became. Easier to understand to the average person and so there's a lot of research that that shows that if you can increase fluency you increase believability and so 1 example of this is if. If you're reading something the fluency of what's written on the page is gonna impact the believability of it so did a study of people that were reading something that was black on white and then they were reading like orange on white and they're reading. So they were tested afterwards because if there's not as much contrast on visually it decreases the fluency. It slows them down all this stuff and the believability of the statements was even when they were not true at all were rated much higher. 43:38.66 Max Shank Oh yeah. 43:48.93 mikebledsoe When there was more contrast and so the and so they've they've done a lot of studies where they're measuring the fluency the ability to Comprehend. What's being said and the faster you can comprehend it the more believable. It is so increasing is just an argument For. Or a suggestion towards increasing your fluency your ability to communicate in a way that others can receive it easily is going to make a huge difference. 44:16.49 Max Shank Man and that speaks volumes to the whole idea of catalytic communication where the goal is to get the other the person on the other end of that communication to take a specific action. So if I'm talking to you I'm doing it for you I'm gonna try to gear it. As much as possible so that you can understand it as well as possible as clearly as possible and that's where stuff like eye relief comes in. You know if you have just this gigantic intimidating block of text. Ah, that's going to reduce the fluence here. That's going to reduce the understandability. Of it if you use a bunch of ah you know, fancy $10 words that's going to be a limiting factor for the other person's ability to understand so it's a big difference between writing for yourself and writing for your audience so they can take a specific action. 45:11.15 mikebledsoe Yeah I think this is a great place to talk about the people who want more authenticity like I want ah authentic Expression. You know I want to be able to go On. You know I talk to coaches. I Want to be able go on social media and speak my truth and then that's what should bring me my clients. That's what this and that and and I watch it this. This is really big amongst I'd say more often women are are wanting this more than the guys is there's this.. There's this belief that. Authentic expression means saying whatever the whatever you want. However, you want and expecting to get a result from other people and as if that's the best way to communicate and ah and I always challenge people hey authentic. 45:53.10 Max Shank Ah. 46:04.46 mikebledsoe Expression or being sincere or genuine doesn't mean that you say whatever you is come to your mind in it in in a way that you want to be heard and understood Now you're you're speaking So the air the person can receive it so be Authentic. Don't lie be authentic, but keep it inside of the scope of how the person's going to receive that information. That's the best way to be authentic because if they can't receive it then they're not actually experiencing your authenticity. They're just experiencing confusion. And so I think that these are 2 things that need to be helped speak your truth and while also considering and taking the responsibility for how other people are going to receive it because the people who don't do that are really confused about why they may. Be isolated or they feel alone even though they're expressing themselves. 47:01.16 Max Shank Well plus I mean should we really be so attached to this idea of authenticity I mean the older I get I swear every year I just look back and go God I was such a fool like I was an idiot I didn't know anything and. So the audacity of thinking Well I should just be able to talk. However I want to talk and like you said, expect that to convert whether it's like sales or believers or whatever let the authenticity come from your core belief. 47:29.73 mikebledsoe Ah, no. 47:36.83 Max Shank The authenticity is the core belief that hey you should do 5 minutes of exercise every morning boom that's my core belief but then from there don't just talk the way you would at a bar with a bunch of like old sailors or something like if you're. Clear on who your audience is communicate it in a way that will give them the best possible chance of taking the action. The authenticity is in your mission not in your like learned turn of phrase I mean most people learn how to communicate so badly. Like I said they're just waiting for their turn to talk. They just want to make noise and have people listen to it. So ah sometimes it works though sometimes ah people find it really funny or endearing or like oh yeah, that guy you know says the f- word a lot and ah. It's it's funny in a way you know sometimes that happens but man the best leverage communication is when you really understand your audience and you communicate directly to them and the better you understand the avatar of your audience and the more you speak directly to them. 48:41.86 mikebledsoe Um. 48:53.50 Max Shank The more leverage your communication is going to have. 48:54.16 mikebledsoe Yeah, and I also want to point out that a lot of self-expression that I witness when people are are I'm expressing myself is usually a wound that is expressing itself. Yeah, it's not. It's not them. It's like yeah if it was you that was expressing yourself. 49:06.81 Max Shank It's pain body. Yeah, totally. 49:14.47 mikebledsoe We'd You'd be coming it sound a lot more like Love. We'd be experiencing love when you spoke but ah it and and it it could be something. But if you're speaking like absolute truth a lot of people aren't ready to hear that type of thing. But. Most people who are that I hear that are really are valuing self-expression of a high degree. Usually yeah, it's their pain Body. It's a wound.. It's an emotional wound from their childhood that that's wanting to speak up and you can spot it because they actually act like a child. 49:33.35 Max Shank Ah, yeah. 49:49.95 mikebledsoe You know they they might stomp around they hoff and puff they may throw something. Ah you know they they they're acting like things aren't Fair. You know all you know kids do behave differently but you can now that people hear this. When you watch people interact and they get emotional just watch how childlike their behavior becomes and that's how you can spot if it's a wound or if they're coming from Love and these are you know a wound is just going to fracture love and it's and it's going to be make it unrecognizable. Um. So you know on um, on one side you have the crowd that's got self-expression as a high value on the other side and when we we cycle between the two as we develop the other one is self-sacrificed. 50:33.64 Max Shank How about value as a high value how about values and value. You know that's what we talked about this in the school episode. You know what you want to teach someone is values and what you want to teach them how to create is value. 50:48.59 mikebledsoe Right? um. 50:50.44 Max Shank And if you're focused on delivering value then the last thing you're going to do is bring your own emotional garbage and baggage into it that you've accumulated over the years I mean look most adults are still children. They're old and they don't move as quick. But they they don't act any different than a child What they know a few more words. Ah and their their lives are like a little worse I mean I I get it like I I totally understand. But if you are focused on like crying out for attention rather than delivering value. 51:09.37 mikebledsoe I I agree. 51:28.45 Max Shank The person on the other end of that communication. Don't be surprised that you don't get as good a result as the person who is trying to be a catalyst for that audience. It's like ah yeah, don't be surprised. 51:44.80 mikebledsoe Yeah there's ah one of my mentors I was ah ah went to one of his ah weekend workshop with him about six months ago and he said on a post it on his on his monitor. The question is what is value. And he said meditate on that and always keep that in mind it's ah it's very deep and what is value changes over time and or changes depending on situationally you know what's what's value bull. What is value. 52:21.52 Max Shank It's bottled water at the north pole or bottled water at Coachella on the third day I mean that's that's how you figure out what value is. 52:29.85 mikebledsoe True that I think I spent about fifty bucks one day on water at Coachella it was that yeah those mushrooms those mushrooms made me thirsty man who. 52:35.93 Max Shank Um, and it was worth every penny wasn't it because you're still here and alive. 52:45.15 Max Shank So I think that's a ah good question to meditate on is like what value are you delivering and if you're not delivering value in some way because look exposing like real truth that may be uncomfortable is. 53:03.89 mikebledsoe Oh. 53:04.18 Max Shank Valuable but to the right audience and what's valuable to 1 audience might be worthless or actually destructive to another audience and understanding that value like you said changes based on the situation and based on the individual. 53:18.64 mikebledsoe Yeah, and a lot of things that you may value. No one else values and I see a lot of people out there that are upset that no one values The same thing they value and and can't understand why they're not making money and you. It's usually the starving artist and so you you really really need to think about what's the how do other people perceive value and then not only that I know a lot this. This is so true in the coaching industry I know a lot of coaches that possess. 53:38.36 Max Shank Ah, the. 53:56.67 mikebledsoe And incredible amount of value that never gets exposed to the right people and or to the to enough people and the reason is because they don't know how to communicate their value and they don't know how to connect the value that they can create to the pain and suffering. The people who need it most and there's it's really sad to watch somebody refuse to communicate appropriately and I was coaching a woman yesterday through ah we were going through a 10 year vision exercise and. She's so good at what she does and she goes but I hate sales I go how selfish of you the look on her face the look on her face was like what the fuck did you just say to me and I go wow you you just told me that. 54:40.79 Max Shank Ha ha. 54:52.52 mikebledsoe So many people would benefit from where and you're not willing to meet them where they're at people who need coaching people who need someone to help them out. They are so they have been sitting with this pain. They've been trying to solve this problem for so long. They can't find the solution. They've tried a hundred different things. And you're refusing to come tell them about it and and show them how it could benefit their very specific situation and so we got to turn that one around and ah yeah I hope that anyone hearing this that that strikes a chord for those who need to hear it. 55:26.73 Max Shank I Think that's probably because I've heard that example, a lot the selfishness of not selling your solution and the hilarious part is that you are actually selling her on liking selling. So you are communicating to her in a way that will actually resonate and because usually the people who shy away from selling they they don't want to be greedy right? That's like the last thing they want they they they want to is. 55:58.53 mikebledsoe Well, they don't want to be perceived as greedy. That's different. 56:05.80 Max Shank Exactly right? That's a very good point. Ah, and maybe they're also afraid of being rejected but when you change that frame psychologically I mean look imagine if she puts out twice as many offers from that you know 10 minute conversation whatever it is. Think of the leverage of that 10 minutes because now she's at least doubled and is probably going to have an exponential increase rather than a linear one. So. That's that's what we're talking about is the power of leveraging language so practicing language. That's a ah, high leverage habit I don't think there is a higher one actually you know and do it low tech because we didn't even get into all the stuff that stops you from doing these good things I mean there are a million traps. There are like cute cats and tits on the screen any time that you want them. So it's hard to say no to those that there's alcohol you can get alcohol delivered to the House. You can get drug like different drugs delivered to you. Um, it's insane. Ah. 57:13.33 mikebledsoe Um, anything is possible folks. 57:17.51 Max Shank So I think at least for me. Yeah, if I'm hungry I Just slide my finger across my magic telephone and food arrives Can you imagine describing that to your great-grandparents eating dinner by candlelight. 57:33.50 mikebledsoe My guys. 57:36.75 Max Shank And then me and then me also saying how unfair life is. 57:40.36 mikebledsoe Um I can't believe that you gave me this this place this this world we live in the baby boomers fucked us up. It's like right got pretty fucking good. 57:50.21 Max Shank Ah, yeah, you forgot my extra ranch you son of a bitch. So Anyway, there are a lot of traps and that's why I think with. Language if you can use a pen and paper to contain your ideas in ah like a one- pageish format where you have a big idea you have some arguments of why you have. An explanation of what will happen if you take this good action because we could do a whole episode on how to craft an offer but all communication is basically that so I would go low tech high effect. Avoid the distractions get out the Notebook and a pen. Get clear on who you're sending the message to what the ideas expand on the idea have a specific call to action at the end and practice organizing your ideas that way because that's going to allow you to think better. Most communication is an argument and it's too bad. 58:48.67 mikebledsoe I. 59:06.29 Max Shank Arguments are seen in such a negative light because arguments are actually quite fun. You have a claim and then you have some supporting evidence or supporting ideas and yeah, hopefully or. 59:19.10 mikebledsoe Hopefully. 59:22.66 Max Shank Or here's a big trap that I think I've talked about a million times. The only like 99% of the arguments that you see people make are logical fallacies that only attack or prop up the arguer. And they have nothing to do with the argument. Basically you have appeal to authority which is trust god completely don't even question his argument and then you have ad hom in him attack which is this guy is the Devil. Don't even listen to his argument. And if you look at the things that people argue about that's what it's usually about we trust this guy completely or we hate this guy so much. We're not even going to listen to what this fucker says. So if you can avoid those 2 logical fallacies. No the whole thing like everything everything I mean. 01:00:07.69 mikebledsoe The entire Covid debate. 01:00:16.85 Max Shank If I ever run for office just rest assured that my opponent is a racist pedophile and that will be the only thing I run the whole time. It will just be character assassinational because that's the world that we're living in people are living in their limbic system. They're just like. Ah I hate you? Ah I love you save me and so it it makes arguments not that fun. Ah whereas a good argument with acclaim and supporting points and a back and forth of. Ah, evaluating the ideas. That's why a cooperative argument or discussion is so exciting because instead of 2 people who are just trying to prove themselves right? I don't give a fuck if I'm right I care if we are ultimately right like if you have a great idea. I want to know that your idea is better and profit from that and that's like the the cooperative discussion conversation argument and that's where the real gold is if you get stuck with like I'm just trying to express myself yourself probably sucks I mean mine does most of the time. So. It's better to focus on what is like ultimately the most valuable rather than like just try to support what you already believe. 01:01:38.68 mikebledsoe Love it. Feels like a good ending anything else. You want to add before we roll. 01:01:46.24 Max Shank I Don't know I was I was enjoying yelling there maybe um. 01:01:48.20 mikebledsoe You you're all red you were on the rip. You know what? I'll do my closing dots I'll let you do yours? You know this show is really just an excuse for max and I to get our rants out. To save our our romantic partners from as much pain and suffering as possible. Ah, you know we we walked into this conversation looking at high leverage habits and addictive actions. I only think we got no addictive actions much but high leverage habits for sure and you know the the number 1 thing. 01:02:07.41 Max Shank I. 01:02:24.72 mikebledsoe That ah max and I agreed on which it needs to be done first that is take personal responsibility in anything in which you don't you're not experiencing freedom or power in your life is due to a lack of of taking responsibility for that. So if there's something that's not going the way you like it. Go look at where you can take personal responsibility and from there you can you know work on you know self-esteem and creating boundaries and all that stuff and then on the ah so we kind of. We we did split it up. Max Max did a great job of this is saying there's like psychological and physiological housekeeping so that would be on the psychological side on the physiological we got into you know, sleep being one of the biggest indicators. The quality of the sleep. You're getting what you're how you're waking up. Um. And all that and then oh yeah, the last thing to mention on ah that I want to throw in there to remind everybody that I want that I got out of this conversation is ah when forming new habits really looking at the the who and the why the identity and the purpose those are the things they're gonna. Are high leverage things to ah to use when you're starting new habits. 01:03:42.80 Max Shank Yeah that's great I think of those as the first dominoes like everything else kind of falls into place when you have your mission and identity lined up. Um I don't think I have too much to add. Actually I think you put it together very nicely. The reality is most people will not take the action and that's okay, like you you don't want to think of it as an all or nothing kind of thing if you get 10 % of the people who hear your message to take a better action toward their. 01:04:13.20 mikebledsoe Um. 01:04:21.69 Max Shank Psychological physiological housekeeping and start practicing those high-leverage skills and those are mostly language and then also ah physical like body language and athleticism and things like that. So if anyone tells you it's complicated. Definitely not. Humans are complex creatures but they are ah very tightly organized sometimes their thoughts are a little bit muddled and that makes it very difficult for people. There are unlimited distractions and drugs available to you some of them come through ah a screen full Of. Red Green and blue tiny lights that can show you all kinds of weird stuff. Some people use ah food and different drugs to desensitize ah and as far as that goes. There's ah, there's a quote I heard ah in nor Mcdonald's book. He goes I was at the psychologist psychiatrist and she said that I use gambling to avoid the realities of life and he goes. That's why everyone does everything. 01:05:36.74 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah, that sounds about right I Where can people find you? What do you want to tell people you're up to right now because you're always up to something. 01:05:37.19 Max Shank Ah. 01:05:45.77 Max Shank Um, sometimes I'm up to nothing which is actually a big lesson for this podcast. It's okay to do nothing I feel like that's actually a high level skill now is if you can just sit quietly for 10 minutes how far we've come. 01:05:50.33 mikebledsoe Ah, that's true. 01:05:57.60 mikebledsoe Oh that's and that's ah I think you're right about that that is a high lever skill. 01:06:05.91 Max Shank I'm releasing a new I'm releasing a new e course called how to sit still for 10 minutes. 01:06:11.71 mikebledsoe I'm gonna I'm gonna do a I'm gonna hold a retreat. It's a meditation fasting retreat. We're gonna do and say nothing. Yeah, no, no, it's $10000 well but we we'll do yeah lower lowerhead for me. Ah. 01:06:19.57 Max Shank It's a very low overhead. Oh for you. 01:06:28.63 mikebledsoe We will. We will be in a mansion and we won't enjoy any of it because our eyes will be closed and we'll be just sitting there doing nothing. Yeah. 01:06:34.60 Max Shank I like it. Yeah I got ah I got a few projects I'm working On. Um, if you want something habit related check out Primal Athleticism on my website. It's basically the ultimate in physical housekeeping from an exercise standpoint to. Modular daily practice. It's awesome. Um I got a few secret projects I'm working on so http://macshank.com at Mashank Thanks for listening guys. 01:07:00.47 mikebledsoe Who mystery ah go check out http://thestrongcoach.com/summit I am holding a summit here in Austin Texas March third through seventh and I rented out a summer camp. It's gonna be part burning man part. Summer Adult Summer camp part fitness seminar part business conference I think there's another part in there I'm forgetting about but we're gonna have a really good time and I'm a big fan of creating experiences that are both educational and fun because as if you don't know already. That if you mix play into your education. You can learn up to 20 times faster that came from a peer reviewed research study so you know don't f with me. Love y'all. 01:07:48.87 Max Shank F that peer review f that peer review. Study play is the original form of education later bro. Love you.

FNR Football Nation Radio
The State Of Our Football Nation | ft. David Williams & Philip Micallef | 10 February 2022

FNR Football Nation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 66:49


George & Josh chat to an Aussie abroad - ATK striker David Williams - and ex-SBS journo and author of 'Quote, Unquote', Phil Micallef! Willo tells us about life in the ISL bubble, the controversial merger of his club with one of the I-League's biggest teams, how his game has developed later in his career, and his dreams of getting more Indigenous kids involved in elite pathways. Philip shares some of his highlights and standout memories from a long career covering the game, and chatting to some of its biggest personalities - from Diego Maradona, to Alvaro Recoba, to Michel Platini.

FNR Football Nation Radio
Philip Micallef on his new book, 'Quote, Unquote' | 10 February 2022

FNR Football Nation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 19:00


George & Josh chat to ex-SBS and News Corp journo and author of 'Quote, Unquote', Philip Micallef. Philip shares some of his highlights and standout memories from a long career covering the game, and chatting to some of its biggest personalities - from Diego Maradona, to Alvaro Recoba, to Michel Platini.

So what you're saying is...
BBC Radio Legend Quits After 46 years Due To Diversity Quotas & Woke Interference in Much-Loved Show

So what you're saying is...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 38:55


BBC Radio 4's legendary "Quote... Unquote" has entertained audiences since 1976. However, in December 2021, fans were dismayed to discover that the show was at an end. On this week's #SWYSI, Nigel Rees, the creator & host of "Quote... Unquote", explains the events that led him to cancel his own show. He explains how the BBC's diversity quotas for greater representation of women, ethnic minorities and disabled people began to affect the programme and how the BBC's political correctness required him to amend his scripts, preventing the inclusion of familiar and harmless quotations, loved by generations. --------------- SUBSCRIBE: If you are enjoying the show, please subscribe to our channel on YouTube (click the Subscribe Button underneath the video and then Click on the Bell icon next to it to make sure you Receive All Notifications) AUDIO: If you prefer Audio you can subscribe on itunes or Soundcloud. Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-923838732 SUPPORT/DONATE / JOIN OUR MEMBERSHIP SCHEME The NCF Channel is still very new and to continue to produce quality programming we need your support. Your donations will help ensure the channel not only continues but can grow into a major online platform challenging the cultural orthodoxies dominant in our institutions, public life and media. You can join our membership scheme or donate in a variety of ways via our website: http://www.newcultureforum.org.uk It is set up to accept one time and monthly donations. JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Web: http://www.newcultureforum.org.uk F: https://www.facebook.com/NCultureForum/ Y: http://www.youtube.com/c/NewCultureForum T: http://www.twitter.com/NewCultureForum (@NewCultureForum)

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast
Multiples Heatmap Q3 2021: to 12x and beyond

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 30:49


Looking solely at deals announced in Q3, the average multiple paid in PE-backed deals jumped to 12.4x, versus 11.8x in Q2.To help us round up the main highlights of the report, Unquote editor Greg Gille spoke to Marcus Archer, managing partner and head of private equity at Clearwater International, while Unquote reporter Harriet Matthews interviewed David Cannon, managing director of KeyBanc Capital Markets, to discuss how US buyers have been fuelling Europe's red-hot M&A. If that wasn't enough, Clearwater partners Per Surland and Nathaniel Cooper spoke to us to share their thoughts on pricing trends for TMT assets.0:00 – Intro3:00 – Marcus Archer on macro trends12:41 – David Cannon on US investors in Europe19:00 – Per Surland and Nathaniel Cooper on TMT--Click here to download the Q3 Multiples Heatmap report, including detailed breakdowns of pricing and activity trends for Q3 2021 and quarterly pricing movements across the past six quarters.Theme music: ©2012 Kick Up The Fire

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 604 (11-22-21): Canvasbacks Come Back to the Chesapeake as Winter Approaches

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-19-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 22, 2021.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That's the landing sound of a large, distinctive duck that can be found in winter on Virginia's coastal waters.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to some more of this species' sounds, and see if you know this bird.  And here's a hint: the bird's name, and the male's beautiful color, may remind you of a painting.SOUND – ~12 secIf you guessed a Canvasback, you're right!  Canvasbacks breed on water bodies in the prairies of Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in large sections of the U.S. and Mexico, with one concentration in the Chesapeake Bay area.  According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, at one time almost half of North America's Canvasbacks wintered around the Chesapeake, but that number has decreased to about 20 percent because of reductions in Bay submerged aquatic vegetation, or Bay grasses, a valuable winter food for this species.  Canvasbacks are diving ducks, meaning they typically go completely underwater to obtain food and avoid predators.  In winter, Canvasbacks feed largely on plant roots and buds, while in summer they'll add to their plant diet a variety of aquatic insects and other animals.  Predators on adult and young Canvasbacks include mink, coyotes, foxes, owls and other birds, some reptiles and fish, and human hunters, while Canvasback eggs are eaten by various mammals and birds. The Canvasback is considered one of the most distinctive North American ducks.  The following quote from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's “Birds of the World” Web site describes how the bird stands out.  Quote: “This exclusively North American species is considered the ‘aristocrat of ducks.'  The male's striking appearance—rich chestnut-red head and neck, black chest, white back, and long, sloping, blackish bill—along with its large size distinguish it in the field.”  Unquote. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  We close with about 50 seconds of music appropriate for the Canvasback's Chesapeake Bay connection.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 197, 1-20-14, and the sounds segment of Episode 50, 1-24-11. Emily Whitesell helped write this original script for this episode during a Virginia Tech English Department internship in Spring 2011 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. The Canvasback sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 565, 2-22-21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21, on connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – used in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESMale Canvasback (location and date not identified).  Photo by Lee Karney, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/1645/rec/2), as of 11/22/21.Female Canvasback in Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in May 2005.  Photo by Donna A. Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14/rec/9), as of 11/22/21.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CANVASBACK DUCKS The scientific name of the Canvasback is Aythya valisineria. Here are some points about Canvasbacks, excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Canvasback,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949.Physical Description “The adult male has a head that is rusty red, shading to almost black near the bill.  The breast is grayish-black and the sides and back are light gray to white.  The wings and speculum are gray, and the eye is red.  The bill is long and sloping, black, with decidedly long sloping profile that clearly distinguishes it from the redhead. …The adult female head is light brown.  The sides and breast are olive-brown to gray-brown, and the underparts are light gray. The back is gray, finely barred with darker gray, and the wings are grayish brown.  …They have short wings, and a rapid wingbeat.  This species has difficulty leaving the water.  It is one of the fastest flying ducks.  …It is one of the largest ducks.”Breeding “The breeding season is from May to June… This species breeds in Alaska, western Canada, northwest United States, western North America from the prairie provinces of Canada, south into the central and western states and occasionally as far east as Hudson Bay with a few as far north as Alaska.  Spring and early summer they are found in marshes with shallow waters [and in] flooded farmland.  In mid-summer they frequent large marshes and lakes, sloughs, and swampy areas.” Migration and Winter Habitat and Behavior “During migration, they fly in large ‘V' shaped flocks at high altitudes. … They are also associated with larger bodies of water.  …Late migration is in the fall, and early migration in the spring.  This species migrates cross country from the northwestern United States to the Atlantic Coast, principally the Chesapeake Bay.  The migration corridors shift annually, and they have a strong tendency to return to the same breeding ground.  … The heaviest flight is from the Canada pothole country to the Chesapeake Bay. … They arrive at Chesapeake Bay later than most other ducks.  The Chesapeake Bay fall migration is from October 15 to December 15, with a peak from November 15 to December 15.  The spring migration is from February 20 to May 1, with the peak from March 1 to March 30.  They occupy specific and traditional rivers, lakes, and marshes on migratory areas.  … This species winters to Mexico [and to the] Atlantic and Gulf Coast.  ...Virginia is one of best areas for canvasbacks.  …  They are found in lakes, salt bays and estuaries, brackish and alkaline waters near the coast, estuaries and shallow bays, [and] rarely on the open sea. … The optimum in Chesapeake Bay areas is in fresh and brackish estuarine bays with extensive beds of submerged plants or abundant invertebrates, primarily in brackish rather than salt or freshwater areas. … There has been a 53% decline in wintering populations in the United States.  There has also been a decrease in the Atlantic flyway.”  [Population decreases have been caused by several factors, including drainage of breeding marshland, food supplies being depleted by carp and swan, pollution of wintering areas, disappearance of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay, droughts on breeding grounds, oil spills, and illegal hunting and trapping.] Diet “This species dives and obtains food from the bottoms of ponds, lakes, large rivers, open marshes, and muddy bottoms.  Plants are uprooted and the roots are eaten.  This species dives to 20-30 feet. … Important foods include…aquatic plants…, molluscs, insects, caddisfly and midge larvae, dragonflies, [and] small fish.  Chesapeake Bay foods include wild celery, widgeon grass, eelgrass, pondweed, clams and mud crabs.  Juvenile foods include caddisfly larvae, midge larvae, and mayfly nymphs.” SOURCES Used for Audio Mike Burke, “The big, beautiful canvasback: What's not to love?”  Bay Journal, November 2021, available online at https://www.bayjournal.com/eedition/page-43/page_136f4325-b978-5e55-bcec-907f0a04b1fc.html. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all; the Canvasback entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/canvasback. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/.  The Canvasback entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription may be required).  The Canvasback entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/canvas/cur/introduction. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Canvasback entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disas

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The Unquote Private Equity Podcast
Leisure sector cleared for take-off

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 37:38


However, between the vaccine rollout, and the repeal of many public health directives, life has returned to these beleaguered businesses, and private equity firms are presented with clear survivors in need of a capital injection to transform them into consumer stalwarts.Unquote looks back at how the sector has fared, and speaks with Gaëlle d'Engremont, partner and head of the food & consumer team at PAI Partners, about where the opportunities will arise.0:00 – Intro2:46 – Pandemic woes9:27 – Notable deals12:00 – Interview with Gaëlle d'Engremont34:44 – Ongoing processes--Theme music: ©2012 Kick Up The Fire

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast
In Conversation with… Sunaina Sinha, Raymond James Cebile

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 35:19


As Europe's fundraising market continues to bifurcate in favour of the largest GPs, a placement agent worth its salt is increasingly vital for debut-fund managers and investors in the lower-mid-market.Sinha joins Unquote editor Greg Gille to discuss how the role of the placement agent has evolved in a rapidly changing market, if we can expect the current fundraising bonanza to continue, how smaller managers can still stand out, the explosive growth of GP-led secondaries, and more. 0:00 – Intro2:01 – Cebile's tie-up with Raymond James8:50 – State of the market16:21 – Adapting to thrive23:19 – Secondaries updateTheme music: ©2012 Kick Up The Fire

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast
Jersey doubles down on ESG

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:44


In this episode, Unquote speaks with Elliot Refson from Jersey Finance to discuss how the jurisdiction is looking to better understand LP expectations and foster an ESG-focused ecosystem.0:00 – Intro4:41 – ESG in Jersey6:43 – What LPs want11:11 – Championing diversity--Unquote would like to thank Jersey Finance for sponsoring and contributing to this episode of the podcast.Theme music: ©2012 Kick Up The Fire

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Orlando Sentinel News
Orlando Sentinel, October 11, 2021

Orlando Sentinel News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 3:41


The 2021 Come Out With Pride festival returned to Lake Eola Park for its 17th edition after the COVID-19 pandemic made last year's festivities mostly virtual with some in-person events. The main attraction, the pride parade throughout Downtown Orlando, was attended by thousands gathered along miles of sidewalks guiding the parade route. The sound of the whooping crowd and the cacophony of shrieking whistles echoed through the streets, greeting the dozens of rainbow-adorned floats and signs in solidarity with the LGBTQ community. And after coronavirus moved most of last year's events indoors, people who attended appeared more energized than previous years, said Solomon Brooks, who has attended Come Out With Pride Festivals for years. Brooks said QUOTE “It's like we had that break, last year we weren't able to trust ourselves in this way with fellow queers all around us. I've been a part of these maybe four times before — it's all those Prides, quadrupled. The energy is so explosive.” UNQUOTE

In Focus by The Hindu
Behind Imran Khan's defence of the Taliban at the UN | In Focus

In Focus by The Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 25:47


Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan set the cat among the pigeons on September 25 when he said people living along the tribal belt in his country had affinity with the Taliban not because of their religious identity but because of Pashtun nationalism. He claimed that Pakistani Pashtuns had affinities and sympathy with the Afghan Taliban. Mohsin Dawar, a member of Pakistan's National Assembly from North Waziristan, responded in a tweet. Quote: “Just shocked at how the PM of Pakistan can describe Taliban as Pashtun nationalists. The Taliban is a project of Pakistan's generals for decimating Pashtun nationalism”. Unquote. So what's the reality? How true are Prime Minister Imran Khan's claims made in his recent at the United Nations General Assembly? Guest: Dr. Ayesha Siddiqa, Research Associate at the SOAS South Asia Institute in London. A former member of Pakistan's civil service, she is the author of “Military Inc. Inside Pakistan's Military Economy. Host: Amit Baruah, Senior Associate Editor, The Hindu

Dead America
Terry Tucker

Dead America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 50:36


DisclaimerThe views expressed on Dead America podcast are the views of the person expressing themselves.We are here for entertainment only for any Medical or Mental Health concerns you might have. We always recommend seeking local listings for a qualified provider in your area. We will always consider other points of view on any subject. We do not necessarily agree with our guests all of the time. We value everyone. All of our guests deserve respect and a platform to voice concerns. Make sure you check our giveaway page for some great giveaways. Find them here https://deadamerica.website/giveaways/ (LINK) There is a song that Tim McGraw sings. It's titled, live like you are dying. In that song. Part of the lyrics goes, quote, someday, I hope you get the chance to live like you were dying. Unquote. Today's guest, Terry Tucker. Well, he is what that song quotes. Terry Tucker has terminal cancer and he has to live every day. Like he is dying. The incredible strength that this man just has within himself during each day, knowing the inevitable is soon to approach. It's one of the things that I found fascinating about Terry Tucker. how strong he is facing what he knows is yet to come. We all face death, but not like Terry. In the discussion I had with Terry I found 23 highlights of interest in our topic. Let's cover them. Number one, the introduction of Terry Tucker. Number two, we found out how real Terry is through his introduction. Number three, we found out Terry's father and his grandmother, both died from different types of cancer. Number four, Terry has had many jobs in his life. from working at Wendy's in the marketing department to a SWAT hostage negotiator number five. We found out Terry has a daughter in the military and she is part of the newly formed space force. Number six. We found out Terry had knee surgery at a young age and still played basketball. Being on the varsity team at the same time as being on the JV team. Number seven, we found out Terry played basketball against Michael Jordan and other big names in basketball. Number eight. Terry tells us about his secret and how he keeps going. The way he does this is tried to become 1% better each day. And by the end of one month. You're at least 30% better. Number nine, Terry tells us about his first time knowing about his cancer. Number 10. Terry's doctor informs him that he has never seen this rare type of cancer before in his practice. Number 11 we learn Terry sought treatment from MD Anderson in Houston, Texas for his cancer. Number 12. We learn about the drug Interferon that they placed Terry on. number 13. We found out about how the drug had Terry dealing with a high fever of up to 108 degrees. It even put him in the ICU. Number 14. Terry tells us how important faith family and friends truly are. Number 15 Terry tells us about his family truths. Number 16 Terry lets us know he is not Superman, and he does have his bad days. Number 17 Terry talks about the difference between pain and suffering. Number 18. Terry talked about facing his death and planning for his death upfront. Number 19. Terry tells us he is curious about what is on the other side of this life. Number 20. Terry talks about choosing the right people to be around and the right people to listen to number 21. In the end, it's what you do that matters. Number 22. Terry tells us his parents are the heroes that he truly looks up to. Number 23. Terry talks about his training for SWAT. We talk about so much more in this very interesting interview. Terry Tucker is an amazing man. And I hope you go out and purchase his book, sustainable excellence 10 principles to leading your uncommon and extraordinary life. I do think Terry Tucker for giving me the honor to do this interview with him. I use my 4 Truths to guide the decisions I make in my life. These 4 Truths are: 1. Control your mind, or it will control you. 2. Embrace the pain and suffering we...

Dead America
Terry Tucker

Dead America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 49:46


DisclaimerThe views expressed on Dead America podcast are the views of the person expressing themselves.We are here for entertainment only for any Medical or Mental Health concerns you might have. We always recommend seeking local listings for a qualified provider in your area. We will always consider other points of view on any subject. We do not necessarily agree with our guests all of the time. We value everyone. All of our guests deserve respect and a platform to voice concerns. Make sure you check our giveaway page for some great giveaways. Find them here https://deadamerica.website/giveaways/ (LINK) There is a song that Tim McGraw sings. It's titled, live like you are dying. In that song. Part of the lyrics goes, quote, someday, I hope you get the chance to live like you were dying. Unquote. Today's guest, Terry Tucker. Well, he is what that song quotes. Terry Tucker has terminal cancer and he has to live every day. Like he is dying. The incredible strength that this man just has within himself during each day, knowing the inevitable is soon to approach. It's one of the things that I found fascinating about Terry Tucker. how strong he is facing what he knows is yet to come. We all face death, but not like Terry. In the discussion I had with Terry I found 23 highlights of interest in our topic. Let's cover them. Number one, the introduction of Terry Tucker. Number two, we found out how real Terry is through his introduction. Number three, we found out Terry's father and his grandmother, both died from different types of cancer. Number four, Terry has had many jobs in his life. from working at Wendy's in the marketing department to a SWAT hostage negotiator number five. We found out Terry has a daughter in the military and she is part of the newly formed space force. Number six. We found out Terry had knee surgery at a young age and still played basketball. Being on the varsity team at the same time as being on the JV team. Number seven, we found out Terry played basketball against Michael Jordan and other big names in basketball. Number eight. Terry tells us about his secret and how he keeps going. The way he does this is tried to become 1% better each day. And by the end of one month. You're at least 30% better. Number nine, Terry tells us about his first time knowing about his cancer. Number 10. Terry's doctor informs him that he has never seen this rare type of cancer before in his practice. Number 11 we learn Terry sought treatment from MD Anderson in Houston, Texas for his cancer. Number 12. We learn about the drug Interferon that they placed Terry on. number 13. We found out about how the drug had Terry dealing with a high fever of up to 108 degrees. It even put him in the ICU. Number 14. Terry tells us how important faith family and friends truly are. Number 15 Terry tells us about his family truths. Number 16 Terry lets us know he is not Superman, and he does have his bad days. Number 17 Terry talks about the difference between pain and suffering. Number 18. Terry talked about facing his death and planning for his death upfront. Number 19. Terry tells us he is curious about what is on the other side of this life. Number 20. Terry talks about choosing the right people to be around and the right people to listen to number 21. In the end, it's what you do that matters. Number 22. Terry tells us his parents are the heroes that he truly looks up to. Number 23. Terry talks about his training for SWAT. We talk about so much more in this very interesting interview. Terry Tucker is an amazing man. And I hope you go out and purchase his book, sustainable excellence 10 principles to leading your uncommon and extraordinary life. I do think Terry Tucker for giving me the honor to do this interview with him.  I use my 4 Truths to guide the decisions I make in my life. These 4 Truths are: 1. Control your mind, or it will control you. 2. Embrace the pain and suffering we... Support this podcast

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast
In Conversation With… Adam Turtle, Rede Partners

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 38:25


Amid an increasingly bifurcated fundraising market in which the biggest GPs gather up the vast majority of capital, how can debut funds and smaller private equity managers lure commitments from LPs? How has the role of placement agents evolved, and how can they continue to mature with the market? And how are secondaries helping to redefine PE's attractiveness? Our guest unpacks all this, and more, with Unquote editor Greg Gille.0:00 – Intro8:34 – The evolution of the placement model20:22 – Fundraising's future30:11 – Secondaries update---Theme music: ©2012 Kick Up The Fire

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast
Multiples Heatmap Q2 2021: climb in pricing persists

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 32:06


The record-breaking pace of European PE activity at the start of the year eased back a little in Q2, but only a little: Q2 deal value still reached the second highest level in seven years, while deal volume recorded its third highest total. A slight dip though this may be, entry multiples continued their rise for the fifth consecutive quarter, to reach an average of 11.8x over the last 12 months.Unquote editor Greg Gille spoke with several market experts at Clearwater International to discuss the findings of the report in detail – beginning, as usual, with a macro view with Marcus Archer, Clearwater's managing partner and head of private equity.For a more focused examination, Greg spoke with Clearwater partner Richard Goldsack about the busiest region in Europe, the UK & Ireland; and with Clearwater managing partners John Sheridan and Philippe Guézenec on the trends driving the Food & beverage sector.0:00 – Intro2:33 – Marcus Archer on overarching trends11:11 – Richard Goldsack on the UK & Ireland18:09 – John Sheridan and Philippe Guézenec on the food & beverages sector---Theme music: ©2012 Kick Up The Fire

The MacIver Report: Wisconsin This Week
MacIver News Minute: Afghanistan Disaster

The MacIver Report: Wisconsin This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 1:04


I know you were just as shocked and utterly gutted as I was by the images this weekend from Afghanistan and the airport at Kabul. The video of Afghanis falling thousands of feet to their deaths after trying desperately to hang on to the outside of a plane leaving the country is one that will haunt me forever. Whether you agree or disagree with the decision to leave Afghanistan, we can all agree that President Biden's execution of his plan to leave has been a complete and utter disaster. While the President will attempt to blame others for his incompetence and ineptitude, let's remember what the President had to say just a few weeks ago. Quote “The likelihood there's going to be the Taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely.” Unquote. Unfortunately for the President, the pictures out of Afghanistan tell us everything we need to know.

WHISpers Podcast
Hosanna, ep74

WHISpers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 19:01


My sisters and brothers, our podcast is about, ‘blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, hosanna in the highest', our podcast song is ‘Hosanna'. This song was also part of our original writings, which was used throughout our ministry mission journey, along with our music from ‘Come Receive Me', as part of Catholic Mass Services. This song, ‘Hosanna', is based on Scripture. Looking at Scripture, it is written in both the Old Testament and the New Testament; Quote: “blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord”. UnQuote. And in the Gospels of Matthew chapter 21, verse 9, and Mark chapter 11, verse 9, the scripture verse continues with; Quote: “hosanna in the highest‘. UnQuote. These are verses of praise which the Catholic Church uses in their liturgy. The Church tells us that these verses also add to Jesus as triumphant Messiah. Now this is how this song, ‘Hosanna', was composed: One day, many decades ago, when I was listening to a Sunday Mass Reading on ‘The Entry into Jerusalem', that Scripture reading stayed in my thoughts for many days and into weeks. I didn't know why, not until I heard music from within my soul singing these words over and over; ‘hosanna, hosanna, hosanna in the highest', and again, ‘hosanna, hosanna, hosanna in the highest'! That was when I knew, there was a song being born in me. Yet not that these words have not been sung before through all of church history, for I have heard sung in church many songs with some of the same words. Still, it was new in me. Almost like I was hearing them for the first time. I remember driving my children to practice one day, and I heard in my thoughts as I was driving; ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord'. I wondered, where did that thought come from? Then, my thoughts continued, ‘Come, let your hearts rejoice, sing and dance for the Lord, children everywhere, clap your hands to the Lord'. Now I knew, I knew where these thoughts were coming from, these thoughts were making it's entrance in me and becoming a song. I couldn't hold it back. It wasn't waiting for my return back home, it just kept pouring into my soul. I found a pen and paper in the glove compartment, and I started writing what I was hearing, not while I was driving, of course not, when we got to where we were going. My thoughts continued; ‘Jesus our Prince of Peace, came to bring all of His Love. Jesus our King of kings, has redeemed all of his people. Open oh gates up wide, and receive the King of Glory. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna, Hosanna, Hosanna in the highest.' And now, this song was finished, and I could not stop my heart from singing it. But I did not write this, though the music was in my soul, and these words were written on paper, it wasn't me after all, the Holy Spirit wrote it in me, I was the instrument used. The Scripture verses I read are from the Little Rock Catholic Study Bible, Through God's grace and mercy and the inspirations of the Holy Spirit, this song ‘Hosanna,' is based on Scripture, music and all added lyrics were written in 1979, ©️1980, first time ®️ 2021.

The Unquote Private Equity Podcast

Unquote editor Greg Gille welcomes our reporter Harriet Matthews to delve into the PE landscape, breaking down the data by region, and revealing a promising outlook for almost everyone in the industry.0:00 – Intro1:16 – Hectic H15:01 – But UK flounders?8:17 – DACH delivers11:11 – Scandinavian success12:06 – France forges on14:45 – Fundraising frenzy--Theme music: ©2012 Kick Up The Fire

WHISpers Podcast
Ave Maria Ave Ave

WHISpers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 19:51


My sisters and brothers, our podcast today is about the Holy Mother of God. Our podcast hymn is, ‘Ave Maria Ave Ave'. Many years ago I longed to write hymns for our Blessed Mother Mary. I have loved her since I was a child under 5 years. Our Blessed Mary was always there for me, like Jesus our Lord was always there for me, but as a child, I didn't know. I only knew that our Heavenly Father was part of a prayer called, the Our Father Prayer, which our dad used to teach my brother and me. I knew there had to be a Holy Ghost because that is how our dad taught us to begin our prayers, with the sign of the Cross. You know, In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, Amen. And of course I knew our Blessed Mary's Holy Son is Jesus, but as a child, I only recognized Jesus as her Baby Jesus. Of course since childhood, Blessed Mary has shown me the way to Jesus, Blessed Mary lead me to knowing her Son Jesus. My Blessed Mother Mary brought me to Jesus! Now the Holy Rosary prayers were then and always will be, a big part of my life. However in my young life and in all my life, my Blessed Mother Mary was and is much more than just a part of my prayers. Blessed Mary for me, was my mother in a heavenly way, and came to me through my cries in a most Profound happening, and not only at that young age of almost five years, but in different profound happenings throughout my life. These can be found in my ‘Journey with Trust and Fire Within' book which was published in 2019. Our Blessed Mary is not a requirement that we need to get to heaven or to pray to God, but, my dear friends, our Blessed Mother Mary, is a most treasured gift which has be chosen by God our Heavenly Father, for His Holy Son Jesus, and JESUS from His Cross gave His Holy Mother Mary to be Mother to all the world. Jesus gave His Mother to you and to me. Such a Blessed Gift. Remember in the Gospel of John, chapter 19, in verses 26 & 27. Jesus, from His Cross, looked at His mother and said to her, Quote: “women, behold, your son”, Unquote. and to his apostle John, who was standing there with Mary, He said,Quote: “behold, your mother”. Unquote: Yes, Ave Maria Ave Ave. I pray this hymn brings Glory to God, for when we sing of Mary, we bring Glory to God the Father, Jesus His Only Begotten Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.