Podcasts about visually

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Best podcasts about visually

Latest podcast episodes about visually

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes answer your questions on a Potluck episode of Syntax. Prismic - Sponsor Prismic is a Headless CMS that makes it easy to build website pages as a set of components. Break pages into sections of components using React, Vue, or whatever you like. Make corresponding Slices in Prismic. Start building pages dynamically in minutes. Get started at prismic.io/syntax. Retool - Sponsor Retool is the fast way to build internal tools. Visually design apps that interface with any database or API. Switch to code nearly anywhere to customize how your apps look and work. With Retool, you ship more apps and move your business forward—all in less time. retool.com/syntax LogRocket - Sponsor LogRocket lets you replay what users do on your site, helping you reproduce bugs and fix issues faster. It's an exception tracker, a session re-player and a performance monitor. Get 14 days free at logrocket.com/syntax. Show Notes 00:11 Intro 01:10 Watching movies with kids 02:49 How do you protect images on your website? 07:21 How did you guys learn Typescript? 13:26 Should I worry about learning Typescript now or stay focused on mastering JS first? 18:16 Sponsor: Prismic 20:03 How do you decide what to learn? 26:26 I want to become full stack and learn a backend language, which one should I choose? 28:07 Do Svelte components not support media queries? 29:30 Any advice or suggestions on how to approach Auth or Payment? 32:53 Sponsor: LogRocket 33:59 Any experience working with a team on a different time zone? 42:49 Do you have any experience or recommendations for introducing prettier late in a project? 48:57 What are your thoughts on monorepos? 52:57 Sponsor: Retool 55:14 What does it mean to know JS? 59:39 What would you do if you had to start over? 03:49 Sick Picks 07:09 Shameless Plugs Paw Patrol Movie Encanto Luca Tweet: When should a JR dev learn typescript? Typescript Handbook Selling and Shipping T-Shirts with Typescript Svelte Kit Remix Height Clocker iState Menus Turborepo Nx ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Learning Differently Wes: Truff Hot Sauce Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course - Sign up for the year and save 50%! Wes: All Courses - Black Friday sale! Psychology of Devx Gitpod Community Workshops as Code Ghuntley.com Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1327: 38 EVs To Watch Out For in 2022

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 34:27


Show #1327 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Saturday 1st January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Audi Q6 E-Tron Following up the e-tron GT will be the Q6 e-tron. PPE platform the same as Porsche Macan, it's sister/cousin car.  BMW i4 the i4 is decidedly mainstream in appearance and specification. The BMW i4 will have two versions available—The eDrive40 will have 335-horsepower and rear-wheel drive, with estimated to have a range of 300 miles from an 80.0-kilowatt-hour (kWh) battery pack. The all-wheel-drive M50 with a maximum of 536-horsepower is the performance version with a zero to 60-mph acceleration in under 4 seconds and a lower range of 245 miles. The price will be around $55,000. £74,845  if you spec it properly for the M50 with the 20” Bicolour Jet Black double-spokes, and BMW blue metallic paint - BMW iX1 With the i3 not getting an immediate replacement, the iX1 will become BMW's entry-level electric car when it arrives in 2022. Essentially an electric version of the X1, in the same way the iX3 (shown above) is an electrified X3, the new car is expected to be offered with battery size options of 38 and 74kWh, producing a respective range of approximately 120 and 240 miles. Original Source : https://www.t3.com/features/17-top-evs-to-get-excited-about-in-2022 - BMW iX xDrive50 - The iX is coming with dual-motor AWD, 516 HP, 0-60 mph in 4.4 seconds  and over 300 miles of range. BMW have shared a lot of charge curve charts and it can add 90 miles of range in just ten minutes at over 200kW charge speed. - BMW iX M60 Whilst some countries don't have the iX yet, there's already a spicy version on the way. The M version will have uprated suspension, less weight, possibly carbon ceramic brakes and aero tweaks Production will start in March, expect 600 hp and 4 seconds to 60 mph. - Bollinger B1 - It's boxy, it's unique, and you can remove parts of it to turn it from a cab truck to an SUV. There's a huge 142-kWh battery which somehow only does 200 miles but the performance from the dual motors is strong at 614 hp. - Citroen Ami - This will arrive in the UK in spring, tops out at 28 mph and had 42 miles of range and yet it already has a small army of fans. But will they part with £6,000 for a 2 seat city car. Expect the cargo version to follow later in the year, and possibly a subscription option too like France. - Cupra Born - We've already reviewed the Cupra Born ahead of its arrival early next year and we were impressed by the looks, the battery range, the finish and the chassis set-up. It's let down somewhat by a below-par infotainment system, the fact that maximum power is only available for 30 seconds at a time and that, so far, it's only available in rear-wheel drive.  -The Born will come with 45kWh, 58kWh and 77kWh battery options, giving a maximum range of 335 miles in the top-of-the-line versions. · Original Source : https://www.investors.com/news/10-hottest-electric-cars-trucks-suvs-of-2022/ - Fisker Ocean - 17.1-inch infotainment display is a point of difference, as it can rotate from landscape to portrait, and we love the styling. As for specs, expecting 18 minute 80% charge on a 350kW HPC. They promise "vehicle to load" as the new Hyundai group cars do. - Ford F-150 Lightning - “563 hp and 775 pound-feet of torque are provided by dual electric motors. Two battery options offer 230 miles of range from the standard pack and 300 miles for the Extended Range model. You also get a huge “frunk” (front trunk), thanks to the lack of an engine, the ability to tow up to 10,000 lbs, and the Pro Power Onboard system, which provides up to 9.6 kW of power for all manner of tools, electronics, microwave ovens, and other appliances via 11 outlets spread across the cab, bed, and front boot.” · Original Source : https://www.wired.co.uk/article/18-best-evs-coming-in-2022 - Genesis GV60 - The third car to roll out on the e-gmp platform, this will be up again the Audi e-tron, BMW iX3 and iX, I-PACE, Merc EQC and VW ID.5.  Cameras for mirrors work well, the large 77.4-kWh battery, RWD spec gets 228-hp 280 miles.  But get the performance version for sub-4 second 0-60 times. - Genesis Electrified G80 As the name suggests, this is a battery-powered version of the G80, which comes from Genesis, a new luxury brand from the Hyundai Motor Group. Visually almost identical to a petrol-powered G80 that launched in 2020, the electric model has a claimed range of over 300 miles and an 800-volt system architecture that enables super-fast charging of up to 350kW. Original Source : https://www.t3.com/features/17-top-evs-to-get-excited-about-in-2022 - GMC Hummer EV - Triple motors, 1,000hp, 200kWh pack and 11,500 lb-ft of torque. Also, WTF mode hits 60 mph in three seconds. Due to that huge pack the range will be 350 miles per charge, and on a 350kW HOC expect to add 100 miles in 10 minutes. - Hyundai Ioniq 6    - Lucid Air - A bit of a cheat here because the Air Dream Edition is already on sale and in customers hands, but that's really only the first 520 buyers paying $169,000. - Next up we'll get the more affordable trim level and for me that's the real start of Lucid.  - Lotus Evija - “The first British all-electric hypercar sports a preposterous quad-motor powertrain (two per axle) that outputs some 2,000 hp—yes, two thousand—and can go from standstill to 186 mph in under nine seconds. That's five seconds quicker than a Bugatti Chiron. 215 miles on a single charge. The cost of such performance is £2 million, and only 130 cars will be made. Rivian R1S The seven-seat SUV sibling to the R1T starts at $70,000. Four motors (one on each wheel) provide a combined 750 hp from the electric drivetrain, while drivers can enjoy supercar-like speeds of 0-60 times in three seconds and an estimated 316 miles range - Maserati MC20 - All we know at this stage is the car will come in 2022 and be a proper Maserati supercar, so in excess of 700 hp and enough to put the fossil versions of their cars to shame. Tri motors, with two on the rear and using the front for more performance. Do you need to do 60mph in 2 seconds? Probably not but that's what they're promising. - Mercedes-Benz EQE - The Mercedes EQE will be to the E-Class what the EQS is to the S-Class — a high-tech, aerodynamic electric equivalent with a class-leading battery range. A large 90kWh battery should give the EQE a range of over 400 miles between charges. Along with its approximate price-point of £60,000 will make it a strong and direct rival for the Tesla Model 3 and BMW i4 Original Source : https://www.driving.co.uk/news/new-cars/nine-of-the-most-exciting-new-cars-arriving-in-2022/ - NIO ET5 - In 2022, this electric vehicle will join the previously announced ET7 as a second sedan offering from NIO.  NIO promises 1,000 km (~621 mi) of (CLTC) range.  Other features include LiDAR technology to support NIO Autonomous Driving (NAD), NIO Aquila Super Sensing, and NIO Adam Super Computing, allowing the new EV to gradually achieve safe autonomous driving in scenarios such as highways, urban areas, parking, and battery swaps. - Nissan Ariya Nissan's second electric car, and to be the flagship of the range, the Ariya is due out in 2022. Up to 310 miles of range is on offer, while a performance model will produce 389bhp. The Ariya will go up against the Volkswagen ID.4 and prices are to start from just under £42,000. - Battery capacity options include 63kWh and 87kWh Original Source : https://www.t3.com/features/17-top-evs-to-get-excited-about-in-2022 - Ora Cat The Ora Cat from China is tipped to be one of the cheapest electric cars of 2022 (Citroen Ami notwithstanding). A compact hatchback, the Cat is to be priced from just £25,000 in the UK, yet promises an impressive range of 209 – or around double that of the similarly priced Mazda MX-30, or the pricier Honda e and Mini E. - A £28,000 version of the Ora Cat, equipped with a larger 63kWh battery, promises 261 miles of range. Both cars can charge at up to 80kW Original Source : https://www.t3.com/features/17-top-evs-to-get-excited-about-in-2022 - Polestar 3 - Expect this SUV to be priced around Porsche Cayenne levels at $75,000. This will share parts with the Volvo XC90 all electric, rumoured to be called Embla.  We're thinking range just under 400 miles and 20 minutes for 80% full charge.  Porsche Macan EV As mentioned with the Audi Q6 e-tron this will be on the PPE platform, but expect more sports performance and tuning. Plus will sell better than a Taycan. - Renault Megane E-Tech - Tesla Cybertruck - When will this arrive? Some say it's weeks away from test builds in Austin, some say none will appear in 2022. It's certainly a new production ramp for the stainless steel. - Pricing has now disappeared from the website so good luck with that $39,900 price. They still say it can tow 14,000 lbs and will go up to 500 miles with a sub 3 seconds 0-60mph. Don't write off Tesla, but equally, don't expect anything soon. It's all about their custom made 4680 cells. - Volkswagen ID.5 Following on from the ID.3 and ID.4, Volkswagen's third purpose-built electric car will land in 2022. The ID.5 is VW's largest EV to date, taking on a family-friendly, mid-size SUV form and to be priced from around £47,000. A 77kWh battery pack offers a claimed range of up to 323 miles, while a maximum charge rate of 135kW will see a charge to 80 percent completed in under 30 minutes. Volkswagen ID.Buzz Volvo C40 Recharge Volvo XC90 XPeng G9   Also: Aptera Solar EV – 1000 miles of range Arrival Van Audi Q4 e-tron and Sportback in USA Chevrolet Bolt & EUV on sale again Ford e-Transit Renault 5 Tesla Model Y RHD for UK Tesla Model 2 / Model Q QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Returns in 2022.  Email me a suggestion for a possible question and I might pick yours!  hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Video Marketing For Business Podcast
EP39: Influencersoft makes monetization simple

Video Marketing For Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 20:05


Influencersoft makes monetization simple. Turn your website visitors into customers and unlock sustainable, recurring revenue. In this Video Marketing For Business Podcast, Tamara is joined by Jesse Doubek, CEO of InfluencerSoft. As Co-Founder and CEO of Doubek Digital Media, his agency has worked with some of the greatest online entrepreneurs in the world (including NYT Bestselling Authors like Brendon Burchard, Chalene Johnson, and Sonia Choquette) and driven a documented $10M+ in sales. What's unique about Influencersoft is it's a one-stop shop for multiple features including Sales Funnel Building Marketing Automation Learning Management System E-commerce Visually map out your entire business in one place then build it, analyze it, and scale it. Learn about the inside of Influencersoft and how it can work for your business with Jesse's FREE 6 weeks Influencer Challenge. Register for the FREE below. https://influencersoft.com/challenge?utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=broadcastyourauthority 

Outside/In
How to Embrace Winter (like Norwegians do)!

Outside/In

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 42:58


Gasp! Once again, the Outside/In team find themselves plunged into (a very predictable) darkness as winter descends on the northern hemisphere. In this episode, our second annual friluftsliv special, we turn to Norwegian culture for inspiration on how best to approach the coldest quarter of the year.  The team offers our 2021/22 tips on how to enjoy the outdoors in inclement weather, and cozy (and not so cozy) indoor recommendations for those days when the wind is howling, the digits are single, and you simply can't even. Featuring Jim Staples. SUPPORTOutside/In is made possible with listener support. Click here to become a sustaining member of Outside/In. Subscribe to our newsletter.Follow Outside/In on Instagram and TwitterJoin our private podcast discussion group on Facebook  'FRILUFTSLIV' GEAR TIPSInterested in microspikes? Check out this review of various winter traction devices. How to sell a parka: Fast Company calls the Canada Goose “cold room” the best retail experience of the year. Everything old is new again: The LA Times on how the disposable camera is making a comeback among millennials and Gen Z.  'KOSELIG' TV RECOMMENDATIONSJessica: 100 Foot Wave. A seminal big-wave surfing documentary, complete with staggering visuals, intense score, and larger-than-life personality. Follows extreme surfer Garrett McNamara's journey as he pioneers new methods for taking on the world's biggest waves. HBO Max.Rebecca: Dark. At first, this cerebral time-travel story feels like a German take on Stranger Things - but Dark, frankly, is much weirder than that. Get hooked by the surprising twists, stay for the stellar performances from its ensemble cast. Perfect for a February binge-session. Netflix.Taylor: Alone. Most reality TV relies on human interaction in order to create drama  - this one is just the opposite. Contestants film themselves as they try to survive the longest in harsh wilderness conditions without friends, family, or even producers around to see them do it. Hulu and Netflix.Justine: The Great. An “occasionally true” look back at the reign of Catherine the Great, the devotee of enlightenment ideals who oversaw Russia during one of its most prosperous eras. Visually, it's a great period piece - but what sets it apart is the raunchy, smart, laugh-out-loud humor. Hulu. NON-SCREEN 'KOSELIG' IDEASTaylor: Put together a puzzle unlike any other. Rebecca: Keep yourself cozy with a rubber hot water bottle. Jessica: Make yourself some glogg.Justine: Throw a fantastic winter banquet, with the help of How to Eat a Peach by Diana Henry. Justine's bonus recommendation (excellent on its own or paired with The Great): The Dawn of Everything by David Graeber and David Wengrow, a book about freedom, the Indigenous influence on the Enlightenment, and what on Earth our ancient human ancestors were up to for hundreds of thousands of years.  CREDITSProduced and mixed by Taylor QuimbyExecutive producer: Rebecca LavoieAdditional editing: Justine Paradis, Jessica Hunt, and Rebecca LavoieTheme: Breakmaster CylinderAdditional music by Blue Dot Sessions

New Books in Communications
Vanesa Rodríguez-Galindo, "Madrid on the Move: Feeling Modern and Visually Aware in the Nineteenth Century" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 53:01


In her new book Madrid on the Move: Feeling Modern and Visually Aware in the Nineteenth Century (Manchester UP, 2021), Vanesa Rodríguez-Galindo explains how the modernization of this great city shaped and was shaped by print media and mass culture. A growing population, industrial immigration, mass connection with the wider world (making it both smaller and bigger), and the twilight of an empire shaped the Madrileños, their sense of identity, and their feelings of being modern and visually aware. A history of print media—and itself an example of print media—the book shows how people adapted to the dawning of a transnational, information age (perhaps a timely and familiar topic for today's listener?) and presents a remarkable ‘glocal' history of this event. Vanesa Rodriguez Galindo is a cultural and visual historian, working in urban studies, print cultures in Spain and Latin America, transnationalism, and women's studies. She holds an MA in Metropolitan History from the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, and a PhD in History of Art from UNED, Madrid. Krzysztof Odyniec is a historian of the Spain and the Spanish Empire, specializing in sixteenth-century diplomacy and travel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books Network
Vanesa Rodríguez-Galindo, "Madrid on the Move: Feeling Modern and Visually Aware in the Nineteenth Century" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 53:01


In her new book Madrid on the Move: Feeling Modern and Visually Aware in the Nineteenth Century (Manchester UP, 2021), Vanesa Rodríguez-Galindo explains how the modernization of this great city shaped and was shaped by print media and mass culture. A growing population, industrial immigration, mass connection with the wider world (making it both smaller and bigger), and the twilight of an empire shaped the Madrileños, their sense of identity, and their feelings of being modern and visually aware. A history of print media—and itself an example of print media—the book shows how people adapted to the dawning of a transnational, information age (perhaps a timely and familiar topic for today's listener?) and presents a remarkable ‘glocal' history of this event. Vanesa Rodriguez Galindo is a cultural and visual historian, working in urban studies, print cultures in Spain and Latin America, transnationalism, and women's studies. She holds an MA in Metropolitan History from the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, and a PhD in History of Art from UNED, Madrid. Krzysztof Odyniec is a historian of the Spain and the Spanish Empire, specializing in sixteenth-century diplomacy and travel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in European Studies
Vanesa Rodríguez-Galindo, "Madrid on the Move: Feeling Modern and Visually Aware in the Nineteenth Century" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 53:01


In her new book Madrid on the Move: Feeling Modern and Visually Aware in the Nineteenth Century (Manchester UP, 2021), Vanesa Rodríguez-Galindo explains how the modernization of this great city shaped and was shaped by print media and mass culture. A growing population, industrial immigration, mass connection with the wider world (making it both smaller and bigger), and the twilight of an empire shaped the Madrileños, their sense of identity, and their feelings of being modern and visually aware. A history of print media—and itself an example of print media—the book shows how people adapted to the dawning of a transnational, information age (perhaps a timely and familiar topic for today's listener?) and presents a remarkable ‘glocal' history of this event. Vanesa Rodriguez Galindo is a cultural and visual historian, working in urban studies, print cultures in Spain and Latin America, transnationalism, and women's studies. She holds an MA in Metropolitan History from the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, and a PhD in History of Art from UNED, Madrid. Krzysztof Odyniec is a historian of the Spain and the Spanish Empire, specializing in sixteenth-century diplomacy and travel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in History
Vanesa Rodríguez-Galindo, "Madrid on the Move: Feeling Modern and Visually Aware in the Nineteenth Century" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 53:01


In her new book Madrid on the Move: Feeling Modern and Visually Aware in the Nineteenth Century (Manchester UP, 2021), Vanesa Rodríguez-Galindo explains how the modernization of this great city shaped and was shaped by print media and mass culture. A growing population, industrial immigration, mass connection with the wider world (making it both smaller and bigger), and the twilight of an empire shaped the Madrileños, their sense of identity, and their feelings of being modern and visually aware. A history of print media—and itself an example of print media—the book shows how people adapted to the dawning of a transnational, information age (perhaps a timely and familiar topic for today's listener?) and presents a remarkable ‘glocal' history of this event. Vanesa Rodriguez Galindo is a cultural and visual historian, working in urban studies, print cultures in Spain and Latin America, transnationalism, and women's studies. She holds an MA in Metropolitan History from the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, and a PhD in History of Art from UNED, Madrid. Krzysztof Odyniec is a historian of the Spain and the Spanish Empire, specializing in sixteenth-century diplomacy and travel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

William's Podcast
A Focal View of Culture A Way Of Life © 2021 ISBN 978-976-96768-8-6 PODCAST135

William's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 18:16


A Focal View  OF Culture  A Way Of Life © 2021   ISBN 978-976-96768-8-6PODCAST 135Revision theory is a subfield of philosophical logic. It consists of a general theory of definitions, including (but not limited to) circular and interdependent concepts.  The aforesaid ethos creates the locale to introduce  the focal view of culture since its primary function in this conversation is to focus on the social behaviour and norms found in human societies, as well as the knowledge, beliefs, arts, laws, customs, capabilities, and habits of the individuals in these groups. Overall Humans acquire culture through the learning processes of enculturation and socialization, which is shown by the diversity of cultures across societies. William  Anderson Gittens,Author, Cinematographer Dip.Com., Arts. B.A. Media Arts Specialists' License Cultural  Practitioner, Publisher,CEO,Editor in Chief of Devgro Media Arts Services Publishing®2015WORKS CITEDCameras: Understanding Field of View (FOV) and lenses | LOREX Support   (lorextechnology.com)  Cavalli-Sforza, L. L., & Feldman, M. (1981). Cultural transmission and evolution: A quantitative   approach. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar  Culture Shapes Eye Movements for Visually ... - NCBI  Field Of View And Focal Length Explained (photographytalk.com)  Forbes, “The Metaverse is Coming And It's very Big Deal”, Forbes, Jul 2020  Gittens,William AndersonAuthor, Cinematographer, Dip., Com., Arts. B.A. Media Arts  Specialists'  Editor-in-Chief  License Cultural Practitioner, Publisher, Student of Film, CEO   Devgro Media Arts Services®2015  Global culture contents, Vol. 26, pp. 209~226, Feb 2017.  photo.stackexchange.com/questions/5917/what-is-angle-of-view-in-photography     reality technology”, Journal of the Korea Convergence Socity, Vol. 8, No. 5, pp. 137-143, May   2017.  Gupta and Belnap (1993)  Gupta and Belnap (1993, 277)  Gupta and Belnap (1993, 278)  Hee-Soo Choi, Sangheon Kim, “A research on Metaverse Content for History Education”,   Heritage Applications”, Recording, Modeling and Visualization of Cultural Heritage, 2006,    pp.419-430.http://anthroengineer.blogspot.com/2010/08/how-cultures-influence-of-our-    worldview.html  http://kolibri.teacherinabox.org.au/modules/en-   boundless/www.boundless.com/management/concepts/observable-culture-0-3921/index.html  http://kolibri.teacherinabox.org.au/modules/en-   boundless/www.boundless.com/subjects/index.html  https://clinicalteaching.pressbooks.com  https://courses.lumenlearning.com/  https://courses.lumenlearning.com/culturalanthropology/chapter/familial-culture/  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_fear  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_unsolved_problems_in_philosophy  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revision_theory  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov › articles › PMC3153738 https://www.yalescientific.org/   https://genevasolutions.news/climate/barbados-prime-minister-wins-un-top-environmental-   honour  https://hbr.org › 2012/07 › cultural-change-that-sticks  https://link.springer.com/  https://socialsci.libretexts.org › Sociology › 03:_Culture  https://socialsci.libretexts.org/  https://www.apa.org/monitor/feb06/connection  https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/find/newsLetter/The-Photographic-Eye.jsp  https://www.coindesk.com/author/athurman  https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2017/05/30/how-a-tiny-island-could-give-cryptocurrencySupport the show (http://www.buzzsprout.com/429292)

Mornings with Jeff & Rebecca
Welcome To The Future With Jay Allen: The Smart Cane

Mornings with Jeff & Rebecca

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 2:27


This innovative cane includes built-in speakers, voice assistance, Google Maps, a Bluetooth system that makes syncing to other devices possible, and high-end sensors that alert the user through vibrations when above chest level obstacles are within proximity—something a regular cane cannot provide.

2 Black Girls, 1 Rose: A Bachelor Podcast
Ep. 8: Joe Is Doing It For Us...Visually

2 Black Girls, 1 Rose: A Bachelor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 20:57


Tuesday's episode of The Bachelorette was historic, dynamic, and engaging. But we need a moment for HOW FINE @jcole3 looked last night in them prom pics. On this episode featuring Traci from The Stacks Podcast we talk about: Traci's Bachelor obsession The experiences of four very different black men The one moment that received ALL THREE signature 2 Black Girls, 1 Rose accolades …AND MORE! To join us every week for Bachelor Franchise recaps, click the link in our bio! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Andrew Price Podcast
#19: Q&A - Conflicting art feedback, go niche or broad, and whether to learn Python

The Andrew Price Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 52:19


In this episode, I answer user-submitted questions including: 0:00 - Intro 1:01 - When to listen to feedback. 11:09 - Learn everything for just niche. 18:57 - When is an artwork finished. 27:34 - Is Python required. 34:42 - Visually impaired animation 39:35 - Where to ask quick Blender questions. 43:17 - How to improve perspective drawing. 46:20 - Publish more or less renders. Send in your video question: https://www.blenderguru.com/podcastquestion Listen to The Andrew Price Podcast: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3iQrZmxF18bDcou2ZpN0R9 Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/the-andrew-price-podcast/id1543110518 Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8zYTk2NDM3OC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== Anchor: https://anchor.fm/andrew-price-podcast Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/the-andrew-price-podcast Pocket Casts: https://pca.st/g63tah31 RadioPublic: https://radiopublic.com/the-andrew-price-podcast-8QQnak ----------------------------------------------- Follow me: Twitter: https://twitter.com/andrewpprice Instagram: http://instagram.com/andrewpprice Facebook: http://facebook.com/blenderguru ArtStation: http://artstation.com/artist/andrewprice

Blind And Visually Impaired Life Hacks
Common Blind Person Missconceptions!

Blind And Visually Impaired Life Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 24:32


In this episode, I go over common misconceptions that society places on blind people. These are only a few, but if you'd like to know more, or you feel I've missed some let me know. Bog news! I have a website! If you want to see the latest updates, visit https://blindonelives.com/ for events, updates, news, and the blog, filled with more blind and Visually impaired resources, and more ways to connect with me. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Movie Review Crew
Dune (2021) Is A Layered, Visually Stunning, Yet Incomplete Masterpiece

The Movie Review Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 69:40


Our Score - 8.75/10 (A-) Rotten Tomatoes - 82% IMDB - 8.2/10 Chosen By: Aaron Cronican Dune suffers a bit for only being half a story and it can be dense to those unfamiliar with its universe, but every aspect of it is done masterfully. The visuals are jaw-dropping, the acting is flawless from everyone involved, the soundtrack is unique and impactful, and Denis Villeneuve has never been better as a director. This is an absolute must-see for fans and newcomers alike.

Aftersight
Gail Hamilton: Author, Singer, Speaker, Financial Advisor, Lion, and Visually Disabled

Aftersight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 30:35


Room 77 | Podcast
Ep. 52: How To Sex It With the Visually Intimidating

Room 77 | Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 44:52


We skip the mall to meet this couple, who is way out of our league, at a vanilla resort. Lauren and the girl try casually going topless on a vanilla beach. Richard avoids hotel security, and the woman glaring behind him, at our foursome flirt. Some more #swingerlearning #nightclasses hint, hint, it's folklore about a vacuum and a penis! @BikiniAddiction Bikinis not tested on animals!! And..10% off with promo code ROOM77 Come join us this July 2022 in Antigua! Epic events and make some great friends too. patreon.com/room77 All our gratitude Patreons! #keepitup #morefunthingscomingthismonth

IGN Game and Entertainment News – Spoken Edition
Pearl Abyss Interview: Behind the Engine Powering Visually-Stunning Games Like DokeV

IGN Game and Entertainment News – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:40


The Blackspace Engine arrives.

The Process
313 - We Saw A Polestar 2 In The Wild!

The Process

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 64:45


Industrial Design, Creative Inspiration & Personal Projects! Today, we chat about seeing a Polestar 2 in the wild, the concept collage technique and visually describing what's in your brain. On today's episode of “The Process” we discuss: Eating challenges Polestar 2 in the wild Driving expensive cars Photo bashing Concept collage techniques Visually describing what's in your head Old school collages Battling the blank canvas moment All the links, all the time! Industrial Design, Creativity & Inspiration! For Industrial Design related business inquiries: Big Design Company Website: www.bigdesigncompany.com Big Design Company email: hi@bigdesigncompany.com Follow us on Instagram! @theprocess__podcast https://www.instagram.com/theprocess__podcast/ Zak Watson // LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/zak-watson-48618517a/ Behance: https://www.behance.net/zakwatson Website: https://www.zakwatson.com/ NFTs: Stretched Space Dylan Torraville // LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dylantorraville/ Website: https://dylantorraville.com Portfolio: https://dylanjtorraville.myportfolio.com/ Behance: https://www.behance.net/dylantorraville Send us an email to hi.theprocesspodcast@gmail.com if you have any questions or want to reach out! The Process is a podcast created by industrial designers Dylan Torraville and Zak Watson. Dyl and Zak are picking up microphones to chat about their experiences in design school, personal projects and navigating the creative process. Oh yeah, and there will be some sweet interviews with other designers and friends too.

Python Bytes
#259 That argument is a little late-bound

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:24


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Shortcut - Get started at shortcut.com/pythonbytes Special guest: Renee Teate Michael #1: pypi-changes via Brian Skinn, created by Bernát Gábor Visually show you which dependencies in an environment are out of date. See the age of everything you depend upon. Also, shoutout again to pipdeptree Brian #2: Late-bound argument defaults for Python Default values for arguments to functions are evaluated at function definition time. If a value is a short expression that uses a variable, that variable is in the scope of the function definition. The expression cannot use other arguments. Example of what you cannot do: def foo(a, b = None, c = len(a)): ... There's a proposal by Chris Angelico to add a =: operator for late default evaluation. syntax still up in the air. => and ?= also discussed However, it's non-trivial to add syntax to an established language, and this article notes: At first blush, Angelico's idea to fix this "wart" in Python seems fairly straightforward, but the discussion has shown that there are multiple facets to consider. It is not quite as simple as "let's add a way to evaluate default arguments when the function is called"—likely how it was seen at the outset. That is often the case when looking at new features for an established language like Python; there is a huge body of code that needs to stay working, but there are also, sometimes conflicting, aspirations for features that could be added. It is a tricky balancing act. Renee #3: pandas.read_sql Since I wrote my book SQL for Data Scientists, I've gotten several questions about how I use SQL in my python scripts. It's really simple: You can save your SQL as a text file and then import the dataset into a pandas dataframe to do the rest of my data cleaning, feature engineering, etc. Pandas has a built-in way to use SQL as a data source. You set up a connection to your database using another package like SQL Alchemy, then send the SQL string and the connection to the pandas.read_sql function. It returns a dataframe with the results of your query. Michael #4: pyjion by Anthony Shaw Pyjion is a JIT for Python based upon CoreCLR Check out live.trypyjion.com *to see it in action.* Requires Python 3.10, .NET Core 6 Enable with just a couple of lines: >>> import pyjion >>> pyjion.enable() Brian #5: Tips for debugging with print() Adam Johnson 7 tips altogether, but I'll highlight a few I loved reading about Debug variables with f-strings and = print(f``"``{myvar=}``") Saves typing over print(f``"``myvar={myvar}") with the same result Make output “pop” with emoji (Brilliant!) print("

Fashion Grunge Podcast
103: There's no gene for fate. | Gattaca (1997)

Fashion Grunge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 62:12


I love a good sci-fi dystopian film. It's always spooky season when we're talking about genetic manipulation. Both me and Mikey have never seen this and WOW what a striking film. Visually it's just out of this world and we get into a lot of behind the scenes, architecture, minimalist fashion, and intricate story. Off but also On topic rants include: cloning, space travel, and re-casting movies for fun.--- Get BONUS episode recaps on Freaks and Geeks Season 1 and  currently My So Called Life and to support the show, join us on PATREON! www.patreon.com/fashiongrungeGIVE US A 5 STAR RATING & SUBSCRIBE!Hosts: Lauren @lauren_melanie & Mikey @agentmikey007 Music by Den-Mate @imdenmateFollow Fashion Grunge Podcast on Instagram @fashiongrungepod and fashiongrunge.com

RNIB Connect
1018: Talk and Support's 20th Anniversary

RNIB Connect

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 8:18


This week marks an exciting celebration. Talk and Support, RNIB's befriending service is celebrating 20 years of helping bring adults with sight loss together, to combat loneliness, build friendships and get peer support with other people in a similar situation.  To tells us more about Talk and Support and the positive impact this service has been making over the years, our Paulina Kuchorew spoke with Suzanne Clarke who is one of the Visually impaired co-ordinators of the groups and also by Gill Southgate who has used the service throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. Find out more here: Talk and Support - RNIB - See differently Image shows RNIB logo. 'RNIB' written in black capital letters over a white background and underlined with a bold pink line, with the words 'See differently' underneath.

Cinematic Doctrine
Eternals - Certified Rotten

Cinematic Doctrine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 99:54


MOVIE DISCUSSION: No time wasted. An earthquake in the MCU has taken place: a rotten score! It's sort of all anyone is talking about, and Melvin & Dan take their turns sharing complaints, frustrations and irritations (a la that 2+ hour runtime). Even so, tune in and hear their thoughts through this wildly strange addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Topics: Trying to explain what Eternals is about.Immediate plot issues, such as there only being 10 Eternals versus a planet wide infestation of Deviants who clearly seem extremely powerful, requiring upwards of 3-4 Eternals to kill a single Deviant at a time. Therefore, if multiple cities were attacked by Deviants at once, there is likely no chance the humans would survive or populate at a natural rate.POP QUIZ: Can Daniel name all of the Eternals?Even as the movie came to a close, and set the stage for much anticipation to come, Melvin was still scratching his head trying to figure out what the point of Eternals was in the first place.Marvel movies are character movies, and when Marvel movies want to talk about broad topics, concepts, ideas, or philosophies, it always works best when strong characters are ultimately at the forefront. Eternals swaps the focus from characters to philosophy, which seriously brings down the excitement of the film.If Eternals are not allowed to interfere much in human affairs, but Druig's power doesn't seem to work on Deviants... then what purpose does Druig satisfy by being a part of the team?For a film that wants to have a humanistic subtext, Eternals has a very juvenile perspective of humanity.Diving into spoilers regarding the deep lore of EternalsEternals tries to cover so many bases but never lets on that it has a comprehension of what makes those things so interesting.There are countless similarities between Dune and Eternals when it comes to themes and tone, as well as the inspiration Chloe Zhao received from Dennis Villeneuve's work. While imitation can be flattering, it can also be pandering.Most of the comedy doesn't land except for Kingo and his valet. Also, people quoted the line about the table in Daniel's theater which was extremely cringy.How does insurance work in the Marvel Cinematic Universe?But... is Eternals the worst movie in the MCU?Visually speaking, Eternals is kind of ugly and washed out, which is a serious disappointment considering the marketing.Despite the Celestials, Kang the Conqueror still seems like the most dangerous and powerful villain in the MCU.Recommendations: Steven J. Lawson's "Psalms 76-150: Holman Old Testament Commentary"Jack Stauber's "Opal" (Short Film)Poorly Drawn Lines (Animated Show)Support on Patreon for Unique Perks! Early access to uncut episodes Vote on a movie/show we review Social Links: TikTok Twitter Website Facebook Group Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/CinematicDoctrine)

Andrea Unger Academy - EN
191. Simple Code to Visually Compare the Equity Lines of Trading Systems

Andrea Unger Academy - EN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 6:26


Click here to register for my FREE Masterclass: https://autc.pro/TSSeng-pod?sl=POD-47389180

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer
Photographer Mark Edward Harris—capturing images of the Japanese Olympics and ten-year odyssey chronicling Tōhoku tsunami's aftermath

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 31:47


Visually chronicling the XXXII Olympiad and aftermath of the Tōhoku tsunami

MTR Network Main Feed
Eternals - Movie Trailer Reviews

MTR Network Main Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 42:16


One of the things that has made the Marvel Cinematic Universe so successful is how accessible the movies are. Kevin Feige has managed to balance telling comic accurate stories that please existing fans and comic readers while also making the films still make sense to newcomers. It's one of the most amazing feats of the franchise. And with that they've been able to get weirder and bigger and more out there each year. The problem is while Eternals definitely goes big, it also leaves the audience behind a bit. Even the after credit scenes, a staple of Marvel films, are super deep cuts to the lore that are going to leave the average fan wondering “what?”    That's not to say this is a bad film. No, there is a lot to like about Eternals. Chloé Zhao's signature is all over this film. Visually, it is absolutely stunning. If there was any concern about Zhao making the journey into shooting big action scenes, Eternals should put that to rest. The action scenes are fantastic and are probably some of the best the MCU has done in a while.    The cast is also fantastic for the most part. Richard Madden's Ikaris is basically what if Superman wasn't a boy scout and didn't have a cape. Lauren Ridloff's Makkari is probably the best visualization of a speedster that either Marvel or DC has done on screen. But beyond just the use of their powers, the actors themselves are great in the roles Angelina Jolie does a great job as Thena. She's not the lead in this film and doesn't overshadow the rest of the cast but still plays her part and role perfectly.    Salma Hayek is the one cast member that could be replaced without feeling like something is lost. She's not bad but also doesn't stand out. Some of the biggest problems with the film revolve around her scenes as well as the editing for her scenes seem to be what really drag this film out. The editing of doesn't Eternals any justice. There are definitely times where audiences will questions why things were cut and placed the way they are. The script struggles to tell its big story without getting lost in it. At times it feels like the film lingers too long in some areas but not enough in others. It's a very weird and frustrating feeling for a film that breaks 2 hours and 30 minutes in runtimes. Eternals could have used the Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 1 treatment, where the story is made a big smaller in order to introduce the characters and waited for a second film to get deeper. Instead the film tries to do a lot in one sitting and the result is too many loose ends. Of course this is the MCU and so those threads will be followed up eventually, but it leaves this film feeling incomplete.   The biggest let down in Eternals is the end. This is where it feels like Marvel Studios failed to heed the tail of Icarus (or should I say Ikaris) and flew too close to the sun. As mentioned before, one of the greatest things Marvel Studios has done is craft stories that take the audience along with them. But in Eternals the audience is clearly left behind. There's so much going on that needs to be explored and just isn't. The only reason this isn't a completely catastrophic shortcoming is that we know that Marvel Studios isn't abandoning the story any time soon so at some point we will get answers. But the result is a film that just feels like it ends just when it was getting good.   It's fitting timing with Eternals coming out shortly after WB's Dune. There are a lot of similarities between the two, especially when it comes to where they fall short. Both are visually pleasing and will work very well for their own niche, super hardcore fanbases. But both seem to have forgotten that adaptations work best when you have something for everyone. Yes, you want fan service but you also need to not go so deep you lose a new audience.    At the end of the day, Eternals is still worth watching. But when judging it against other Marvel offerings, it's clear that changes will need to be made in the next film...

Movie Trailer Reviews
Movie Review: Eternals

Movie Trailer Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 42:16


One of the things that has made the Marvel Cinematic Universe so successful is how accessible the movies are. Kevin Feige has managed to balance telling comic accurate stories that please existing fans and comic readers while also making the films still make sense to newcomers. It's one of the most amazing feats of the franchise. And with that they've been able to get weirder and bigger and more out there each year. The problem is while Eternals definitely goes big, it also leaves the audience behind a bit. Even the after credit scenes, a staple of Marvel films, are super deep cuts to the lore that are going to leave the average fan wondering “what?”    That's not to say this is a bad film. No, there is a lot to like about Eternals. Chloé Zhao's signature is all over this film. Visually, it is absolutely stunning. If there was any concern about Zhao making the journey into shooting big action scenes, Eternals should put that to rest. The action scenes are fantastic and are probably some of the best the MCU has done in a while.    The cast is also fantastic for the most part. Richard Madden's Ikaris is basically what if Superman wasn't a boy scout and didn't have a cape. Lauren Ridloff's Makkari is probably the best visualization of a speedster that either Marvel or DC has done on screen. But beyond just the use of their powers, the actors themselves are great in the roles Angelina Jolie does a great job as Thena. She's not the lead in this film and doesn't overshadow the rest of the cast but still plays her part and role perfectly.    Salma Hayek is the one cast member that could be replaced without feeling like something is lost. She's not bad but also doesn't stand out. Some of the biggest problems with the film revolve around her scenes as well as the editing for her scenes seem to be what really drag this film out. The editing of doesn't Eternals any justice. There are definitely times where audiences will questions why things were cut and placed the way they are. The script struggles to tell its big story without getting lost in it. At times it feels like the film lingers too long in some areas but not enough in others. It's a very weird and frustrating feeling for a film that breaks 2 hours and 30 minutes in runtimes. Eternals could have used the Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 1 treatment, where the story is made a big smaller in order to introduce the characters and waited for a second film to get deeper. Instead the film tries to do a lot in one sitting and the result is too many loose ends. Of course this is the MCU and so those threads will be followed up eventually, but it leaves this film feeling incomplete.   The biggest let down in Eternals is the end. This is where it feels like Marvel Studios failed to heed the tail of Icarus (or should I say Ikaris) and flew too close to the sun. As mentioned before, one of the greatest things Marvel Studios has done is craft stories that take the audience along with them. But in Eternals the audience is clearly left behind. There's so much going on that needs to be explored and just isn't. The only reason this isn't a completely catastrophic shortcoming is that we know that Marvel Studios isn't abandoning the story any time soon so at some point we will get answers. But the result is a film that just feels like it ends just when it was getting good.   It's fitting timing with Eternals coming out shortly after WB's Dune. There are a lot of similarities between the two, especially when it comes to where they fall short. Both are visually pleasing and will work very well for their own niche, super hardcore fanbases. But both seem to have forgotten that adaptations work best when you have something for everyone. Yes, you want fan service but you also need to not go so deep you lose a new audience.    At the end of the day, Eternals is still worth watching. But when judging it against other Marvel offerings, it's clear that changes will need to be made in the next film...

Action and Ambition
Dusty Folwarczny Empowers Businesses to Visually Communicate By Putting Ideas to Life

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 22:59


Welcome to the Action and Ambition Podcast. Dusty Folwarczny is the CEO of Ink Factory, a group of artists who work with businesses to help with visual communication. They are the leaders in visual note-taking, the art, and the science of converting discussions into real-time drawings that help people digest and remember information. They have decades of experience in corporate advising, strategic visioning and planning, and creative problem-solving. The Ink Factory's work, centered on the following fundamental values: To create an excellent job, they aim to learn, embrace creativity, and support innovation continuously–all to produce the finest work possible for clients. They value each other and make it a priority to assist one another. They foster team wellness and willingly collaborate, their clients and the community. Finally, they find time to enjoy the fantastic work they get to do and the wonderful people we get to work with. They take pride in creating a culture that welcomes fun. Tune in to this episode to know more!  

The Hollywood Outsider
Dune, Cliffhangers in Movies, Rust Tragedy, and Netflix's Dave Chappelle Walkout

The Hollywood Outsider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 68:31


On this episode of The Hollywood Outsider podcast, Dune and the concept of cliffhangers in film. Denis Villeneuve's Dune is truly only half of the story as the film builds right up to an understated cliffhanger, therefore the majority of this film is setting up the characters and the story for what's to come. Villeneuve has a plethora of talent to pluck from, as there is not an actor present not bringing their A-game to the occasionally confounding vernacular inherent to this world. Visually stunning, but is it a great film? Take a listen as we dissect the overall film, as well as debate the concept of ending your film on a bonafide cliffhanger. Also this week: we discuss the recent walkout in response to Dave Chappelle's Netflix special, The Closer, and the absolute tragedy that took place on the set of the independent film, RUST, where a senseless accident claimed the life of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. Discussed on this episode (0:00 – 7:42) Opening | Sequels and Remakes since the 90s (7:43 – 31:51) Rust Tragedy | Netflix's Dave Chappelle Walkout (31:52 - 54:34) Dune Review (54:35 - 1:08:30) From the Outside In: Cliffhangers in Movies Please support The Hollywood Outsider and gain immediate access to bonus content, including Patreon exclusive podcast content like our Bad Movie Night by visiting Patreon.com/ TheHollywoodOutsider Be sure to join our Facebook Group Do your shopping via our Amazon Link!

The 80's Hour
Legend: A twisted delightful tale

The 80's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 23:27


This week is dedicated to the movie, "Legend". Starring Tom Cruise, Tim Curry and Mia Sara. Visually and kinesthetically it is well remembered and was well received upon release.

Go With The Energy Flow
074: Feminine & Masculine Desires

Go With The Energy Flow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 18:55


Behind every intention and desire there exists two main categories of energies. Our feminine and our masculine.  When we go about bringing anything into our reality, we embody both of these energies without even realizing it. Anything that is being created, or shifted, or coming into our existence, requires energy output. Feminine energy output looks like; the dreaming, the vision, the attracting. It is collaboration, the journey, the nurturing, the release. I have a quote on my mirror that encapsulates the feminine aspect of manifesting, “give your ideas and inspirations the space, attention, and nourishment they require.” On the other hand, masculine energy output looks like; the pursuit, the decisions, the solving, the result. Visually to me, this looks like the masculine observing the feminine's vision which is wisdom, intuition, and love, but may look like a bunch of floating, moving parts to the material world because she works so much in the unseen world, and the masculine takes these moving parts and grounds them into something material and tangible.   Every water body has a container, it is held by earth, whether it's by borders, banks, slopes, rocks, etc. The masculine is the materializer, the implementer, the structure in which the feminine is held. The feminine is the oracle, the flow, the water. Without the feminine, the masculine's life is dry. Without the masculine, the feminine's life is chaos.   The masculine is the container that holds the vision, the flow, the feminine. your confidence, your consistency, is the masculine container in which the spiral is created from.  Your vision is the energy flowing up that spiral and giving it LIFE. The force behind it and the container is the masculine force. The feminine is the feeling, the color, the life. These energies co-exist with and within each other. As the feminine births life into this reality, you are birthing your vision into reality. you showing up daily is giving structure to your vision, your flow is being held by this masculine container. Once the vision is pollenated (as the masculine does), and birthed into existence, it requires less action and more flow, as you've built the crystalline structure in which the energy travels in. The structure is natural and secured in reality. At the same time, your vision and intuition IS direction. The yin and yang – both energies exist within each other and respect and honor the other when one wants to show up more prominently in your life or your day. That's why it's called the divine dance of the feminine and masculine, they allow each other to take the lead when its time for them too. If these aspects of us are unhealed, one side will dominate the other due to lack of trust in their vision or direction, and either our intentions and desires do not come to fruition, or when they do there is a big imbalance and they do not last.   Music by www.purple-planet.com // IG @gwtefpodcast // Email gwtefpodcast@gmail.com

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard
Apple Pay hacking warning for iPhone users

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 6:42


Cyber scientists from Birmingham and Surrey Universities claim to have found a tap-to-pay flaw they say could allow hackers to make unlimited contactless payments - all paid for by you. Volcano latest: University College London scientist on La Palma eruption after danger zone visit. Can this ‘super cycling suit' help cyclists beat the clock using F1 technology? Actress ‘settles TikTok lawsuit over voice used without her permission' on viral text-to-speech feature. How ‘furious floods' shaped the surface of Mars. You could soon pop to cinema to catch Games of Thrones on silver screen, says Vue boss. Visually-impaired former X-Factor contestant uses smart glasses to see daughter's face in HD for first time. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Journaling With Nature
Episode 55: Ayoka Kaiser – Say It Visually

Journaling With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 66:51


Ayoka is a visual trainer and information illustrator. She uses the tools and techniques of sketchnoting to simplify and communicate information. Combining sketchnoting with her gratitude practice, Ayoka has invented a new form of creative expression - GratiDoodling!Listen to hear more about:Ayoka's early nature experiences, tagging along  in the field with her zoologist parents. The amazing “coincidence” that led Ayoka to find sketchnoting.What is meant by a visual vocabulary.How Ayoka started turning her hobby into a career.The power of using sketchnoting in speech therapy.Why combining words and pictures together deepens communication and understanding. How choosing simple materials can free you of art anxiety.The similarities and differences between sketchnoting and nature journaling and how they can be combined.Ayoka's concept of GratiDoodles and her new Skillshare classYou can learn more about Ayoka on her website: https://sagsvisuell.deTake Ayoka's Skillshare class using this link: Let's GratitDoodle! A Joyful Approach to Building a Creative Practice-----------------Sign-up for Journaling With Nature's Newsletter to receive news and updates as well as the Nature Journaling Inspiration List each month! You can support Journaling With Nature Podcast on Patreon, Your contribution is deeply appreciated.Thanks for listening! 

Learn About SCP Foundation: All SCP Archives in Order
SCP-041 - Thought-Broadcasting Patient

Learn About SCP Foundation: All SCP Archives in Order

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 8:48


Visually, SCP-041 appears to be in a persistent vegetative state. However, observers in the presence of SCP-041 begin to realize that their thoughts, along with everyone else's in about a 10-meter radius from SCP-041, are broadcast in a semi-audible fashion. Subscribe for more SCP Foundation Files. Now on YouTube! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHvwHFhZlVsf-0YWULKVxAg Secure, Contain, Protect - SCP Foundation http://scp-wiki.wikidot.com Robotsradio.net Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 128: What It Takes to Become a Master Goldsmith with Master Goldsmith, Kent Raible

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 38:07


What you'll learn in this episode: Why every introverted artist should have a partner or patron to help them promote their work How Kent developed a line of reproduced pieces while maintaining his artistic passion and integrity Why young jewelers must have experience doing handwork and not just designing with CAD Why it's important that jewelers make time to play, even if it won't generate income How Kent has maintained his enthusiasm for the craft for decades About Kent Raible  Master goldsmith and jewelry designer Kent Raible first started working metal in 1973 in a high school jewelry class, and has since become one of the leading studio goldsmiths in the country. Largely self-taught, Kent sought out talented teachers over the years to learn different aspects of jewelry making, and also went abroad in the 1980s for two years of study in Germany. He always worked in his own studio, never apprenticed under a master, and over time developed a unique style of fabrication using eighteen karat gold, fabulous colored gemstones, and the ancient technique of granulation. His work has won many national and international awards, and has been featured in two important national exhibitions. The major neckpiece named Floating City is part of the permanent collection of the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian's American Art Museum, and his object called Pregnant Chalice was included in The Art of Gold, a survey of the work of eighty contemporary American studio goldsmiths that toured the country throughout 2005. Since the 1980s, Kent has also been teaching his craft through workshops at various institutions such as the Penland school of Arts and Crafts in South Carolina and the Revere Academy in San Francisco, California. Kent currently resides in Washington state with his wife and partner, Lynn. Additional Links: Website 1stDibs Instagram Facebook Photos: Captured Universe AJDC Theme project Tension Cosmic Clam Ring 2004 AJDC Theme project Hidden Treasure Floating City 1991 Permanent Collection American Art Museum, Smithsonian Floating City Closeup Crystal Sky City 2020 AJDC Theme project Secret Garden Floating City 2002 From the Deep Side view showing clasp From the Deep 2015 Saul Bell Award 1st place winner Transcript: Kent Raible is living proof of the adage that it takes 10,000 hours to master a skill. He's spent nearly all his life honing his talents as an award-winning goldsmith, favoring ancient techniques and creating jewelry that inspires him rather than jewelry that's trendy. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how he learned his skills, why his wife and business partner Lynn was crucial for the development of his business, and why he encourages young jewelers to keep practicing their craft even when pieces don't turn out as expected. Read the episode transcript below. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is award-winning goldsmith Kent Raible. Kent has been a goldsmith for 50 years. In addition to compiling a roster of awards, he occupies several unique niches. He's a master in the ancient art of granulation and is known throughout the industry for the classes he holds both in person and online. We'll hear more about his jewelry journey today. Kent, welcome to the program. Kent: Well, thank you, Sharon. I am very happy to be here. Sharon: So glad to have you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. Were you creative as a child? Is this something that everybody expected of you, what you're doing today? Kent: Well, it was all kind of serendipitous events that brought me through this journey, but I was raised in a family of artists. Both my parents were painters. My father made his living from teaching art at the junior college level in Marin County, California, which is where I grew up. My mother was also a painter. They met in art school at the California College of Arts and Crafts, at the time, in Oakland, California. They were both Bohemian types, and they were very open-minded and were always supportive of anything creative that I might want do as I was growing up, and the same with my one sister. She went on to become a very successful doctor. Both the kids went on separate paths, but they were very supportive in whatever we chose to do. From an early age, I was very aware that I had abilities that other people didn't have, musically and artistically, and my parents were always open to me becoming a musician or an artist. There was never any question that that was a possibility, because I grew up in a situation where there were successful artists all around me. My dad taught for many years, and some of his students went on to become very successful artists. I got to meet them and see their workshops. Some of them were painters; some of them were sculptors. My dad had a very broad base of experience in crafts and in art. He actually dabbled in jewelry and gave me his first set of jewelry tools, which was a ring mandrel and a soft frame, which I still use today, and some of the basic tools he got while he was doing his class at the College of Arts and Crafts in the 50s or maybe even in the 40s. I took my first jewelry class in high school at the behest of my girlfriend. She said, “Kent, take a class with me.” I said, “Oh, I don't know. Jewelry wearing, you know.” My first jewelry teacher was a former student of my father. He was teaching the high school jewelry class and we hit it off. I was a sophomore; I was 15 when I took my first class. By my senior year, I was taking two periods of jewelry a day as my electives, one before lunch and one after lunch, and I worked through lunch. I was getting three hours a day. I was a lab assistant, so I was in the back room there, and I could do pretty much whatever I wanted. I was having a blast.  Then I went on to the college at Marin, which is where my dad was an art professor. He had just hired a young guy named Glenn Miller. He just passed recently. This was 50 years ago, so this is all ancient history, but Glenn Miller—he wasn't a jeweler himself; he was more of a sculptor. But he was very much involved in getting things right, craftsmanship, design and integration of clasps and things that went into design rather than just as an add-on. These were concepts he was hammering into me early on, and that's how I started. I had many interests as a young person. I wanted to be a rock star. I've been playing guitar longer than I've been making jewelry. I'm pretty good at that, but I didn't devote my life to that as much as I have to making jewelry. At some point in my early twenties, I made the big decision to make that my livelihood. I was maybe 19 or 20 and I decided to go for it, so I started doing craft shows. It was hard to put my work out there; that was really the hardest thing. Making it and designing and having fun making things was easy, but when it came to stepping out into the world, because I was very shy, that was the hard part for me. I struggled with that for a number of years. I won my first national award at the age of 22 with the National Sterling Silversmith's Guild of America Annual Competition for College-Level Silver Design. I made a sculptural piece; I actually have it here, but since this isn't usual, I'm not going to pull it out. Sharon: We'll post a picture if you'd like.  Kent: You can post pictures. It was a silver waterpipe. I was taking hollow ware and bringing it into the 20th century, basically making a silver bong. That won me a national award. At that point, at 21, 22, I thought, “Well, I could actually do this.” I was getting a lot of support from my family and from my teachers. Then I got my first teaching job at the College of Marin, teaching in adult ed. I didn't have a college degree, but I could teach in adult education. I started teaching at the age of about 23, 24, teaching casting and basic jewelry techniques. I hadn't really gotten into granulation at that point, but I was very adept at fabrication, soldering and casting, so that's what I taught my students. That gave me a foothold into the realm of teaching, which I have done my whole career. Not in a big way; I'm teaching more now than I probably ever have, but that's how I got started in the teaching realm. There are a couple of major things that happened in my life that made the biggest differences to my career. The first was in 1982; I went to Germany. My girlfriend broke up with me and I was devastated, so I sold all my possessions to raise money. I took my bicycle and started riding from Frankfurt, Germany. The first place I went, of course, was Idar-Oberstein, which is a good, long, one-day ride from Frankfurt. I went there and looked at all the gem museums; I visited stonecutters and things like that. From there, I rode through the Black Forest down to Pforzheim and went to the Schmuckmuseum, the jewelry museum in Pforzheim. I puttered around for about four or five months, but serendipitously, right before I left from America with my bike, I met a couple of goldsmiths who were visiting from Germany. They said, “Why, don't you come see us when you're here if you're in our area?” When it started to rain and I'd ridden through seven or eight countries, I was in France and the weather just turned bad; it was October. So, I called them and they picked me up. They had a little Volkswagen Bug, and I stuck my bike on the top and they drove me to their place in Stuttgart. They were very kind to me. They let me stay with them for six weeks. In the process of that period, they invited me to come check out the school where they had studied, which is in a little town called Schwäbisch Gmünd of about 60,000 people. Sharon: Would you repeat that? Kent: Yeah, Schwäbisch Gmünd. It's about 50 kilometers east of Stuttgart, a beautiful location in the hills. The hochschule there, which is basically a state-run trade school, had been teaching jewelry there for 250 years or something. They were in the process of phasing out the jewelry program, but they introduced me to the head instructor who could speak English because I had very little German. He introduced me to the goldsmithing teacher who didn't speak any English, and he invited me to stay as a guest. So, it was a free year of education. I had only to buy health insurance. That was it, $30 or month or something. That was my only cost. I didn't have a lot of money at the time, and that is where I learned my granulation technique.  I buckled down. I had six weeks before the semester started, so I learned as much German as I could. I bought a big, thick dictionary and learned every word pertaining to jewelry; I learned how to put sentences together as best as I could, so I could communicate with the goldsmithing teacher. They showed me a list of things I could study, and on the list was granulation. He basically took me through a series of exercises in silver and then we moved into gold. I had some gold that he taught me how to alloy. I started using a rolling mill. I'd do all these basic things that I had never done before in fabrication. The wizard was handing me the key; I just took off from there. I loved the technique he taught me so much that I pretty much designed my whole career around this one technique. It involves—well, I'll go into more detail about that.  I want to go over the one thing that made the most important difference for me in my career, and that is when I met my wife, Lynn. She was a jewelry buyer—this was in 1985, 86. It was a couple of years after I had returned from Germany. I was making beautiful jewelry. I had reached a level of mastery after 20 years. This was about at the 20-year mark. I was in my early to mid-thirties, and I had reached a level of mastery by then and I had my own look; I had a feeling. I was very excited about the complexity of the things I could make. I'd really gotten good at stone setting and other skills, not just granulation. I was still having trouble getting myself out there and presenting my work, but one day, I walked into this store in Big Sur, California, and there was a new jewelry buyer there. I'd gone there before, but the old jewelry buyer did not bite. But Lynn was there, and she bought my work, and not only did she buy it, she was selling it like there was no tomorrow. That's not why I became attracted to her—I mean, it might have had something to do with it—but over the year, we became friends. Then we were both in a situation where we weren't in relationships and I asked her out. That was 32 years ago, and we decided to create a partnership. We both came into the relationship with similar levels of assets and liabilities and those types of stuff, so we came in and said, “Let's share everything and do this as a team, 100%.” And dang, it worked out! We've been doing this for 30 years. Lynn had a natural sense of marketing. She used to run clothing stores; she was into fashion. As a jewelry buyer at the Phoenix Shop in Big Sur, she knew how to deal with galleries, what they were looking for and how we could present ourselves to them in a way that made them more likely to buy. That was hugely important for me as a shy person. I had my heart and soul invested in my work, and I needed somebody who could be removed a little bit from that and help me do what I needed to do to make it work, as far as being able to make a good living from it.  We started doing tradeshows, which I would have never considered doing. I saw my work as art rather than a manufactured item. We did Las Vegas; we did a lot of the biggest shows. The Design Center in Las Vegas was just happening in the 90s, and that's when we started doing shows like this. That enabled us to get our work out to a much wider audience. We were showing in galleries all over the country, and it helped us develop a clientele, some of whom are still buying to this day. That was the other major thing that made the difference for me: having a partner I could totally trust. That's probably the main thing that's helped me actually have a successful career. That aside, of course I have always loved making jewelry. Now I can let you ask me questions. Sharon: So, you and Lynn established Golden Sphere Studios?  Kent: That was more the teaching arm of the online classes. Golden Sphere Studios is the evolution of Kent Raible Jewelry. We sell our work online. We also sell our work through 1stDibs and of course privately.  We don't show a lot in galleries anymore, but we're thinking of doing that again, although I am semiretired now. I'm not producing like I used to. Right now, I'm making pretty much just what I want to make. I'm not designing so much for the marketplace as much as I am for myself.  What Lynn got me to consider more was doing repeated items so I could make things without the labor and time involved. With a one-of-a-kind piece, the time involved is largely in the building of the piece, not even in the granulation. But the time involved in creating a one-of-a-kind piece can be cut down dramatically if you mold a piece, cast duplicates of it and then granulate them, and that's what we did. We came up with a line we could sell at a much lower price point and then presented that to the galleries. Also along with that, we had one or two really nice, one-of-a-kind pieces they could sell to their higher-end clientele. Sharon: Are your one-of-a-kind pieces mostly custom for people who know you already? Do they come to you and say— Kent: I do commissions once in a while, but mostly I prefer to make what my heart's telling me to make. I'll get ideas and go, “Oh, got to make that one.” They all come out of the blue. I never know what's coming next, and now I've got such a wide repertoire of techniques and ideas. Things combine in different ways now that I would have never guessed 10 or 20 years ago. Now I've gotten into stonecutting, which is a whole other ball of wax. Cutting my own stones; that's a lot of fun. Sharon: Is that something where you said, “O.K., I've mastered this aspect, so I'm going to move onto stonecutting”? Kent: That's part of it. This is a field where you can spend three or four lifetimes and there's still more to learn. I like working the old-fashioned way; I'm not really into the new technologies that are coming out. I'm not into CAD. I'm not into laser welding and all that stuff. I'm still the old-fashioned, dinosaur jeweler that does things the very old-fashioned way. What I do is 3,000 years old. You don't get much more old-fashioned than that. I'm doing things that have been done for thousands of years, but I'm trying to do them in a new way. The fun part of cutting stones is working consecutively—I shouldn't say consecutively, but working simultaneously in both metal and stone. I can alter things as I'm working. I wasn't able to do that with gems before or with shapes or forms of stones. I'm only doing very simple cab forms at this point, but I can fine tune a form I probably couldn't buy, or if I need to change it as I'm working, I can do that.  Right now, for our 30th anniversary and her 60th birthday, I'm making her a pair of earrings. I cut some rose quartz bullet tongue shapes, but they're so precise and they're very well matched. On top of them, I'm putting this incredible apricot precious topaz. The combination of the light, translucent pink background with the topaz over the top, it makes the topaz pop out. Then, the translucent background—it's very feminine and lovely. It's her colors, so I can't wait to see them on her. They're about halfway done now, but the cutting of the stone required that I carve out a notch in the back so the culet of the topaz could fit into the stone so that it's compact. It brings it in together. There are things like that I can do now with stonecutting that I would have had to order from a lapidarist, which I have done in the past, but this way I can cut as I'm going. You don't know exactly how deep you need to cut or what the exact shape is going to be. Now, I can do that to a limited degree with stones as I'm working in gold or platinum, whatever I'm working in. That's a big design. It opens up a whole new possibility for me. That's pretty exciting, that I can get that excited about something 50 years into my career. Sharon: I can understand that, because we're in a time where you can't stop learning or you can be left behind, whether it's learning how to use a computer or whatever. But how do you feel that passion for decades? How do you keep it going? Kent: That is a very good question, and I really don't know. There's a part of me that just has to do this. Not so much now; like I said, I'm semiretired. I have other things I'm doing. I'm got a huge vegetable garden, and that takes up a lot of time. I love growing plants. I like doing things that take time. But I also have the most beautiful workshop in the world right now. I love going out there and hanging out, and I have this whole lapidary setup in the back. I have it set up so it's a beautiful space, so that keeps me interested. The other that keeps me going is my students. I like sharing what I know. Watching other people progress is also inspiring to me. When I see what I can make and I go, “Wow, I made that,” that's part of what keeps me going. Sometimes I have a vision in my head that's like, “Wow, I could probably make that.” I'm always trying to challenge myself a little bit as I go, not a lot. It's an evolutionary process, making jewelry. Every time you make a piece you learn something, and then you take what you learn and then you make something else and you add something, like, “This is what I learned. This is what I don't want to do next time. This is what I want to try next time.” Slowly, over the decades, you become adept at a lot of different things. The excitement comes when I'm able to combine things I've never done before or put things together in a way that's unique or new. I recently did a major piece for the American Jewelry Design Counsel. Are you familiar with the AJDC? Sharon: Oh, yes. Kent: Every year we do a theme project. We did one last year that is to be displayed in conjunction with the opening of the new Gem and Mineral Museum in Tucson. It isn't open to the public yet, but it will be opening in—I'm not sure if they have an opening date, but by the next Tucson show I'm pretty sure it will be open. Anyway, I did a floating city. The first floating city I did was in 1991 or 1992, which is now in the Smithsonian at the Renwick Gallery. I've done different versions of this theme over the years. This time, I put it together in a whole different way than I've ever put it together before. I'm not 100% satisfied with how it came out, but I am very excited with the possibilities of what I've learned from putting things together in that way. It's a very complex fabrication, so it was a learning process. I also cut a lot of the stones that are in the piece. It's successful in some ways, and in other ways, I go, “Well, I'm going to do it different next time.” That's how I work. I try different things. Sometimes they're successful; sometimes they're not as successful as what I see in my head, but that's part of the creative process. You have to be willing to try things and have it not be—I'm rarely 100% satisfied with anything I make. Sharon: Would those be some words of wisdom to younger jewelers? Kent: Oh, definitely. You have to give yourself room to play. You have to be willing to fail, and you have to be willing to have a meltdown every once in a while. But the main thing you need to do is always make time. I know money is always an issue if you're trying to make a living from it, but even so, you have to have time to do things that may not make you any money. You have to make things for the sheer joy of doing them and for the exploration involved. That's my number one piece of advice to anybody doing anything creative; you have to have time to play and enjoy the process. Jewelry making is a thousand different processes that you can combine in infinite ways. R&D time is really important for the artistic expression. If you want to do something that's unique, it's imperative. Sharon: You joined forces with Lynn, so did you assign her the external part?  Kent: No, we collaborated. She is the one that got me to move away from one-of-a-kind to move into the marketplace. We had a child together, so we needed to support a family. It was a monetary decision. There was a little bit of a push and pull between my artistic side the wanting to make money side. There was a realty involved. I didn't want to compromise my artistic sensibilities and I did my best to do that. What I came up with, what we call line pieces, the reproduced or the limited-edition series pieces, they're all really beautiful. I'm still adding to that collection every once in a while, but it was a decision on my part that we needed to make money, so let's move into this different type of production. In this way, I could actually hire help, too. I could have eight pieces cast and have people work on the castings rather than fabricate from scratch, which is very difficult to train. Sharon: Yeah, especially if you're trying to— Kent: Although I have trained people that have done very well for me. Sharon: I know so many artistic people face challenges showing their work and selling their work. How would you advise getting past that? Kent: Well, if it's something that's not innate for you, you need to find help. That's what I did. I really had to push myself because, as a very shy person, it was very uncomfortable for me to go out into the public eye. What I did after I got back from Germany and found myself in tears because I wasn't able to get out and sell my work, I started taking personal growth workshops. I took all kinds of different stuff where I had to get into my discomfort zone and put myself out there and be uncomfortable. If I hadn't done that, I probably wouldn't have been able to see what I needed in a partner. It's really hard to make it as an artist on your own. You have to have somebody supporting you, whether it's a gallery owner or a patron, whatever. You need people that believe in you, and you need to believe in yourself first. Your work has to be good, but you need to have help getting you to the marketplace, I think. That is very important if it's not something innate. For some artists it is innate, marketing, and I think it's more the exception rather than the rule. Sharon: From what I've heard you say, yes. I give you a lot of credit. You have a lot of personal work.   Kent: Oh yeah, when you have a dream and it's a big one—the work in itself is very small things, but if you look at my work up close, they're huge. Visually, in scope, they're really big. It's like I try to cram as much hugeness into the smallest space possible. My vision is a lot larger than the actual pieces. That's kind of an interesting part of what I do. Sharon: Yes, your work is so complex and intricate that it takes a big scope, even though it's so small. Kent: As I'm making them, I'm working very close up, but in my mind these things are huge. That's how I can get into so much detail, because I see it as a much bigger thing than it actually is. Sharon: What would your advice be? You've won so many awards, like the American Jewelry Design Counsel. I presume they come to you and say, “We're here. Can you do something for us?” What is your advice? Do you think that's something emerging jewelers should consider, entering contests? Kent: Oh, of course. I started doing that in my early twenties; I started entering or doing shows and I started winning awards. It gave me a lot of self-confidence. If you don't win, it's O.K. You need to see what's winning and ask yourself why. You have to be honest with yourself: “Is my work up to this level, and what do I need to do to get there?” It's mostly about putting in the hours. I put in my first 10,000 hours probably by the time I was in my early twenties because I was so into it. I never had a job—well, that's not true; I worked at a recycling center on weekends and at minimum wage for a number of years, but in those days, you could work minimum wage and pay your rent and buy food. Then my father allowed me to have a workshop in his garage. That's how I started. I didn't own a car. I rode my bike everywhere. I would ride to work and I would just make, make, make, make, make. I would take classes.  I went to the College at Marin for three or four years so I could use their shop, but I also took evening classes with an artist in the East Bay whose work I saw at the Palace of the Legion of Honor. His name was William Clark. He's a sculptor and a jeweler, but what he was able to do with metal so inspired me. I heard he was giving an evening class once for a week for six months. I hopped on that, and I learned things there I never would have learned anywhere else. I don't know. I kind of got off my train of thought there. Time for another question. Sharon: You have a very inspiring story. I'm sure you've inspired, besides teaching, legions of people in the field. What other pieces of advice would you have for people who are on the cusp of saying, “How do I become you?” Kent: Well, you know what I did: I just started learning different techniques. I'd focus on one at a time until I achieved a certain level of mastery. The first thing I learned was casting because you can do so much with casting. Nowadays of course you have CAD, but I highly recommend for people getting into jewelry now not to devote themselves too much to CAD. You need to have actual experience doing handwork, because that's the basis of solid jewelry knowledge and design knowledge. You can't just design on CAD. You can do some beautiful things, but you're not going to have the overarching experience of having handwork behind your belt. I see a lot of CAD stuff being done, but unfortunately it all looks the same. You need to have a broad variety of techniques under your belt.  What I did was study casting. I went into forging, raising, tube forming. I started doing repoussé, learning how the plasticity of metal can be used to create interesting forms, relatively quickly if you're good at it. There's something about working spontaneously in metal that is so different than anything you can do on the computer. It's great to have that broad understanding of what the metals can do, not just with casting, but with forging, forming, learning how to make your own stock; I mean, making your own sheet in wire, tubing. I do a whole class that's just based on tubing online. It's very successful. People love it. If you want to learn how to fabricate or do things that have moving parts or even for stone setting, being able to make a tube is a huge thing. It has unlimited applications in design. I would say there are so many incredible techniques out there. I've only touched the surface myself, but pick the ones that make your heart sing and focus on them. Bring your own flavor, your own heart into it so it's unique.  That's how I did it. I started doing granulation when my father showed me a picture of John Paul Miller's work. If you're not familiar with John Paul Miller, he was one of the first American granulators in the 20th century. He started doing beautiful granulated enamel pieces in the 50s and 60s. It was his work, among others, but mostly his work, that inspired me to learn granulation. His technique is very different than mine, but I made the technique my own just by doing it, playing with it and learning how to fabricate without solder so I could granulate really intricate, fabricated forms. Sharon: It's a very inspiring story. I really appreciate your being here today, Kent. Thank you so much. Kent: Oh yeah, my pleasure. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

The Great Battlefield
Helping Organizations Tell Their Story Visually with Josh Nerpel of Graphicacy

The Great Battlefield

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 42:47


Josh Nerpel joins The Great Battlefield podcast to talk about his career from doing advance work for both Hillary and Obama, heading operations for nonprofits and his current role at Graphicacy where they're helping organizations tell their story in visual form.

Humans 2.0 | Mind Upgrade
How Social Anxiety Impacts What You See Visually - Episode 31

Humans 2.0 | Mind Upgrade

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 12:43


If you told me this 5 years ago I would never believe you.Social anxiety or facing just anxiety or depression (long-term) is similar to wearing an involuntary biochemical pair of sunglasses

It Takes 2 with Amy & JJ
Fargo Enters Phase 3 of Residential Water Restrictions

It Takes 2 with Amy & JJ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 8:59


Troy Hall with the City of Fargo joins It Takes Two with details about what Phase 3 means for residents of Fargo and how we can curb our water usage. He also mentions that a list of exceptions will be available - they are in full detail below. The largest use of outdoor water in summer is lawn irrigation. Lawn watering is the primary target of the Phase III water usage restrictions. By observing the one day per week lawn watering restriction, The City of Fargo aims to achieve the targeted 25% City-wide water usage reduction. Automatic sprinkler systems are recommended to operate overnight to limit water losses due to evaporation. The Phase III restrictions are not intended to limit or prohibit any commercial lawn care businesses.   The following are exceptions to the Phase III restrictions: •           Hand-watered flowers and plants. •           Vegetable and flower gardens. •           Newly-planted landscaping, trees and shrubs. •           Newly-planted yards or newly-sodded lawns. •           Water used to control dust or compact soil. •           Using drip irrigation, bubblers, hand watering or other systems that do not propel water through the air. •           According to the Phase III Lawn watering schedule map (located at the end of this release), residents may wash their vehicles at their personal residence on their designated watering day. •           Irrigation necessary for one day only where treatment with an application of chemicals requires immediate watering to preserve an existing landscape. •           Visually-supervised operation of watering systems for short periods of time to check system condition and effectiveness (e.g. winterization of water sprinkler systems). See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Here & Now
How To Spot Planets, The Milky Way And Blue Moon; A Refugee From The Fall Of Saigon

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 41:38


The August night skies are filled with bright stars, planets and even a blue moon — all visible even without a telescope. Sky & Telescope's Kelly Beatty describes some of the celestial sights. And, Southeast Asian refugees from the largest resettlement effort in the history of the U.S. are thinking about the comparisons of the fall of Kabul to the fall of Saigon in 1975. Politically, they are very different situations. Visually, you may see why some find similarities. In 1975, Ngoc Nguyen was a baby when her family escaped Saigon as refugees and restarted their lives in the U.S. She joins us.

Thrive: Mental Health and the Art of Living Free
Counselor On-Call : Being Mindful :: [Episode 66]

Thrive: Mental Health and the Art of Living Free

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 10:12


On this episode of Counselor on Call, we will continue the conversation from last week's episode. We talked with Ginger Sache about finding wonder and chasing joy. She talked with us about the practice of tuning in to the present and how this created more meaning and purpose in her everyday life. Are you finding yourself distracted, scattered, or stressed? If so, it may be because you're living in your head and missing out on living your life. You may find yourself worrying about the future. This can be anything from imagining worst-case scenarios (i.e., “I'm going to get fired,” “we are going to break up,” etc.) or getting stuck in the past, ruminating on what I shoulda, woulda, or coulda done differently. These thoughts are likely snatching you away from what you could be experiencing in the present. I've heard clients say, “I don't remember much; it's like I wasn't even there.” Can you relate to this? If so, mindfulness is a powerful tool that will help you slow down and connect to the moment. Mindfulness is simply being aware of what you are experiencing as you are experiencing it. Benefits of mindfulness: Reduced ruminating thoughts Reduction of stress Increased focus Less emotional reactivity Increased emotional satisfaction Here are a few simple ways to practice mindfulness. And it really is a practice. These are simple tools, but don't overlook them because of their simplicity. Often the simplest tools are what we forget the soonest in times of stress and chaos. As you practice these, they can become a habit and, therefore, what your brain does automatically. Here are some great ways to begin practicing mindfulness: Mindful breathing Start by breathing in and out slowly. Breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Let go of your thoughts. Let go of things you have to do later today or pending projects that need your attention. Let thoughts rise and fall of their own accord and be at one with your breath. Continue to focus on your sense of awareness the air fills your lungs and then how it feels to exhale. Mindful immersion This exercise intends to cultivate contentment at the moment and escape the persistent striving we find ourselves caught up in daily. Rather than anxiously wanting to finish an everyday routine task to get on with doing something else, take that routine and fully experience it like never before. For example: if you are cleaning your house, pay attention to every detail of the activity. Mindful observation Choose a natural object from within your immediate environment and focus on watching it for a minute or two. This could be something in your office or home. You can also find something in nature like trees or the sky. Don't do anything except notice the thing you are looking at. Relax and watch for as long as your concentration allows. It's okay if you only focus for a few seconds. You may become distracted. Simply take a breath and try again. Visually explore every aspect of the object. I love how God calls himself I AM. Meaning He is in our present. I don't know about you, but I want to experience the opportunities and experiences God is creating for me. Mindfulness creates an opportunity to connect with the present and what God is doing at that moment. Blessings to you, Melissa

Control The Room
David Sibbet: Think Visually

Control The Room

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 49:16


“ If you really listen to people and understand what's happening, if you illustrate an image that they're actually describing in their mind, [while] reflecting back maybe a sketch of what they were trying to say, people love it. People absolutely go crazy being listened to. ” -David Sibbet    In this episode of Control the Room, David Sibbet and I break down his unique career path in consulting and facilitating visual meetings and how individuals can use visual elements  to amplify their learning (whether it's navigating new tools, company projects, collaboration, etc.) . From the installation of his consulting company in the mid-70s to present day, David's focus in design thinking continues to drive him to help companies achieve a “sophisticated level of systems thinking” in company meetings. David reflects on the components of his creation, the Group Graphics tool, and its effectiveness to help teams find focus during workshops.We examine the impact of using “clean language” in the workplace and the ability to have a metaphorical thinking mindset, which he believes can indirectly lead to inclusivity within your organization. David also shares lessons he learned through enduring the peaks and valleys of decision-making when working with past clients. We conclude by taking a closer look at his passion project and non-profit organization, the Global Learning & Exchange Network (GLEN) and the responsibility we must uphold to build a better world for humanity on both local and global levels. Listen in to hear David's perspective on leading with a visual mindset to thrive in your organization.   

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Monday, August 16, 2021 - A Noteworthy Crossword

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 8:50


Monday's are generally regarded as the easiest of the New York Times crosswords, but that doesn't mean that they aren't a lot of fun. This one had a lively theme, the opportunity to misspell 14A, Visually challenged "Mr." of cartoons, MAGOO (Mike thought it was MCGOO for a time), and a clue that's guaranteed to induce a chuckle or three,  45A, One who says that you're not on the ball?, FLATEARTHER. In short, Freddie Cheng has set the bar high for crosswords for the rest of the week, which we'll be reporting on ... for the rest of the week.

Mouse Madness Podcast
Most Visually Beautiful Pixar Sequence (Part 2)

Mouse Madness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 80:20


They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so BEHOLD: Part 2 of our Most Visually Beautiful Pixar Sequence bracket. Did something new and flashy take the crown, or was it an old favorite? - TIME STAMPS OF THESE MOMENTS: https://cutt.ly/PixBeauty - Welcome back to the pod, friend of Pixar animators: Eva - Eva creates a high-effort cocktail for Spoonful of Sugar. - Pull of the Pod - Jumping back into the bracket with the Round of 8. - EVE did chem trails. - WALL-E triggered Chris's 4th grade essay writing trauma. - We Imagineer a Coco attraction (again). - The only moment Inside Out slows down. - Checking Kyle's baseball cred. - Eva met her ancestors? Got a rebuttal? Want to be a tiebreaker host? We'd love to hear from you: Email us at mousemadnesspodcast@gmail.com Tweet us @MouseMadnessPod Follow us on Instagram @MouseMadnessPod Chat with us on Discord: discord.gg/qwpqAWA Join or Facebook Community: fb.me/MouseMadnessPodcast

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career
RFT 525: Eastern Airlines Flight 401

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 12:25


Flight 401 departed JFK Airport in New York on Friday, December 29, 1972, at 21:20 EST, with 163 passengers and 13 crew members on board. The flight was routine until 23:32, when the plane began its approach into Miami International Airport. After lowering the gear, First Officer Stockstill noticed that the landing gear indicator, a green light identifying that the nose gear is properly locked in the "down" position, had not illuminated. This was later discovered to be due to a burned-out light bulb. The landing gear could have been manually lowered, nonetheless. The pilots cycled the landing gear, but still failed to get the confirmation light. Loft, who was working the radio during this leg of the flight, told the tower that they would discontinue their approach to their airport and requested to enter a holding pattern. The approach controller cleared the flight to climb to 2,000 ft (610 m), and then hold west over the Everglades. The cockpit crew removed the light assembly, and Second Officer Repo was dispatched to the avionics bay beneath the flight deck to confirm via a small porthole if the landing gear was indeed down. Fifty seconds after reaching their assigned altitude, Captain Loft instructed First Officer Stockstill to put the L-1011 on autopilot. For the next 80 seconds, the plane maintained level flight. Then, it dropped 100 ft (30 m), and then again flew level for two more minutes, after which it began a descent so gradual it could not be perceived by the crew. In the next 70 seconds, the plane lost only 250 ft (76 m), but this was enough to trigger the altitude warning C-chord chime located under the engineer's workstation. The engineer (Repo) had gone below, and no indication was heard of the pilots' voices recorded on the CVR that they heard the chime. In another 50 seconds, the plane was at half its assigned altitude. As Stockstill started another turn, onto 180°, he noticed the discrepancy. The following conversation was recovered from the flight voice recorder later:Stockstill: We did something to the altitude.Loft: What?Stockstill: We're still at 2,000 feet, right?Loft: Hey—what's happening here? Less than 10 seconds after this exchange, the jetliner crashed:Cockpit area microphone (CAM): [Sound of click]CAM: [Sound of six beeps similar to radio altimeter increasing in rate]CAM: [Sound of initial impact] The location was west-northwest of Miami, 18.7 mi (30.1 km) from the end of runway 9L. The plane was traveling at 227 miles per hour (197 kn; 365 km/h) when it hit the ground. With the aircraft in mid-turn, the left wingtip hit the surface first, then the left engine and the left landing gear, making three trails through the sawgrass, each 5 ft (1.5 m) wide and over 100 ft (30 m) long. When the main part of the fuselage hit the ground, it continued to move through the grass and water, breaking up as it went. The TriStar's port outer wing structure struck the ground first, followed by the No. 1 engine and the port main undercarriage. The disintegration of the aircraft that followed scattered wreckage over an area 1,600 ft (500 m) long and 330 ft (100 m) wide in a southwesterly direction. Only small fragments of metal marked the wingtip's first contact, followed 49 ft (15 m) further on by three massive 115 ft (35 m) swaths cut through the mud and sawgrass by the aircraft's extended undercarriage before two of the legs were sheared off. Then came scattered parts from the No. 1 (port) engine, and fragments from the port wing itself and the port tailplane. About 490 feet (150 m) from the wingtip's initial contact with the ground, the massive fuselage had begun to break up, scattering components from the underfloor galley, the cargo compartments, and the cabin interior. At 820 ft (250 m) along the wreckage trail, the outer section of the starboard wing tore off, gouging a 59-foot-long (18 m) crater in the soft ground as it did so. From this point on, the breakup of the fuselage became more extensive, scattering metal fragments, cabin fittings, and passenger seats widely. The three major sections of the fuselage—the most intact of which was the tail assembly—lay in the mud towards the end of the wreckage trail. The fact that the tail assembly—rear fuselage, No. 2 tail-mounted engine, and remains of the empennage—finally came to rest substantially further forward than other major sections, was probably the result of the No. 2 engine continuing to deliver thrust during the actual breakup of the aircraft. No complete cross-section of the passenger cabin remained, and both the port wing and tailplane were demolished to fragments. Incongruously, not far from the roofless fuselage center section with the inner portion of the starboard wing still attached, lay a large, undamaged and fully inflated rubber dinghy, one of a number carried on the TriStar in the event of an emergency water landing. The breakup of the fuselage had freed it from its stowage and activated its inflation mechanism. Robert "Bud" Marquis (1929–2008), an airboat pilot, was out frog gigging with Ray Dickinsin (1929–1988) when they witnessed the crash. They rushed to rescue survivors. Marquis received burns to his face, arms, and legs—a result of spilled jet fuel from the crashed TriStar—but continued shuttling people in and out of the crash site that night and the next day. For his efforts, he received the Humanitarian Award from the National Air Disaster Alliance/Foundation and the "Alumitech – Airboat Hero Award", from the American Airboat Search and Rescue Association. In all, 75 survived the crash—67 of the 163 passengers and eight of the 10 flight attendants. Despite their own injuries, the surviving flight attendants were credited with helping other survivors and several quick-thinking actions such as warning survivors of the danger of striking matches due to jet fuel in the swamp water and singing Christmas carols to keep up hope and draw the rescue teams' attention, as flashlights were not part of the standard equipment on commercial airliners at the time. Of the cockpit crew, only flight engineer Repo survived the initial crash, along with technical officer Donadeo, who was down in the nose electronics bay with Repo at the moment of impact. Stockstill was killed on impact, while Captain Loft died in the wreckage of the flight deck before he could be transported to a hospital. Repo was evacuated to a hospital, but later succumbed to his injuries. Donadeo, the lone survivor of the four flight-deck occupants, recovered from his injuries. Frank Borman, a former NASA astronaut and Eastern's senior vice president of operations, was awoken at home by a phone call explaining of a probable crash. He immediately drove to Eastern's Miami offices and decided to charter a helicopter to the crash site as the swampy terrain made rescue difficult and Eastern had not heard any news of progress in rescue efforts. There he was able to land in a swampy patch of grass and coordinate rescue efforts. He accompanied 3 survivors on the helicopter to the hospital including a flight attendant and passenger who lost her baby in the crash. Most of the dead were passengers in the aircraft's midsection. The swamp absorbed much of the energy of the crash, lessening the impact on the aircraft. The mud of the Everglades may have blocked wounds sustained by survivors, preventing them from bleeding to death. However, it also complicated the survivors' recuperation, as organisms in the swamp caused infection, with the potential for gas gangrene. Eight passengers became infected; doctors used hyperbaric chambers to treat the infections. All the survivors were injured; 60 received serious injuries and 17 suffered minor injuries that did not require hospitalization. The most common injuries were fractures of ribs, spines, pelvises, and lower extremities. Fourteen survivors had various degrees of burns. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation discovered that the autopilot had been inadvertently switched from altitude hold to control wheel steering (CWS) mode in pitch. In this mode, once the pilot releases pressure on the yoke (control column or wheel), the autopilot maintains the pitch attitude selected by the pilot until he moves the yoke again. Investigators believe the autopilot switched modes when the captain accidentally leaned against the yoke while turning to speak to the flight engineer, who was sitting behind and to the right of him. The slight forward pressure on the stick would have caused the aircraft to enter a slow descent, maintained by the CWS system. Investigation into the aircraft's autopilot showed that the force required to switch to CWS mode was different between the A and B channels (15 vs. 20 lbf or 6.8 vs. 9.1 kgf, respectively). Thus, the switching to CWS in channel A possibly did not occur in channel B, thus depriving the first officer of any indication the mode had changed (channel A provides the captain's instruments with data, while channel B provides the first officer's). After descending 250 feet (76 m) from the selected altitude of 2,000 feet (610 m), a C-chord sounded from the rear speaker. This altitude alert, designed to warn the pilots of an inadvertent deviation from the selected altitude, went unnoticed by the crew. Investigators believe this was due to the crew being distracted by the nose gear light, and because the flight engineer was not in his seat when it sounded, so would not have been able to hear it. Visually, since it was nighttime and the aircraft was flying over the darkened terrain of the Everglades, no ground lights or other visual signs indicated the TriStar was slowly descending. Captain Loft was found during the autopsy to have an undetected brain tumor, in an area that controls vision. However, the NTSB concluded that the captain's tumor did not contribute to the accident. The final NTSB report cited the cause of the crash as pilot error, specifically: "the failure of the flight crew to monitor the flight instruments during the final four minutes of flight, and to detect an unexpected descent soon enough to prevent impact with the ground. Preoccupation with a malfunction of the nose landing gear position indicating system distracted the crew's attention from the instruments and allowed the descent to go unnoticed." In response to the accident, many airlines started crew resource management training for their pilots. The training is designed to make problem solving in a cockpit much more efficient, thus causing less distraction for the crew. Flashlights are now standard equipment near jumpseats, and all jumpseats are outfitted with shoulder harnesses.

Mouse Madness Podcast
Most Visually Beautiful Pixar Sequence (Part 1)

Mouse Madness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 96:35


Pixar is beauty, Pixar is grace. We break down the most aesthetically awesome moments in the studio's history with the Most Visually Beautiful Pixar Sequence bracket. - TIME STAMPS OF THESE MOMENTS: https://cutt.ly/PixBeauty - Welcome to the pod, Pixar enthusiast: Eva - Debating what Geri drinks during Spoonful of Sugar. - Pull of the Pod - Finally revealing how we really feel about Luca. - Q-Tip to the eye ball is beauty. - Evidence of the Avengers stealing from Brave. - Recapping Eva's Pixar watch party with her coworkers. - Is Cars good? - Luca, The Nemo Cinematic Universe, and The Pixar Theory. - The Fast and the Furious: Radiator Springs Drift - Alternate Carl theories and re-editing Up. - Kyle gets a roller coaster fact wrong, but Chris quickly corrects it. - Eva's connection to an actual Pixar animator. Got a rebuttal? Want to be a tiebreaker host? We'd love to hear from you: Email us at mousemadnesspodcast@gmail.com Tweet us @MouseMadnessPod Follow us on Instagram @MouseMadnessPod Chat with us on Discord: discord.gg/qwpqAWA Join or Facebook Community: fb.me/MouseMadnessPodcast

The Chip Chipperson Podacast

STROBING LIGHTS are STROBIN LIKE A MUUG. If you don't like STROBING LIGHTS then you should just listen to this HALAREOUS episode. Chipperson, Cooms, Xia and Dave Temple star in Chip's first IN STUDIO podacast in a year and a half. Chipperson is looking at studios and Compound Media BEGGED CHIPPERSON to be the first. Visually the coolest podacast of the millenium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jeremiah Show
SN8| Ep391 - Greg + Zara Knight | Founders of Farm Jam | 2021

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 76:08


Three Special Guests - One Special Hour! Farm Jam Founders Greg + Zara Knight + Jazz Vocalist Anaïs Reno! FIRST UP: Anaïs Reno Jazz vocal prodigy and chart-topping vocalist, Anaïs Reno is back! No stranger to the stage, Anaïs has been performing since age 8. After winning the 2016 Forte International Competition's Platinum Award at Carnegie Hall, Anaïs won Second Place at Michael Feinstein's Great American Song Book Academy competition in Carmel, Indiana in the summer of 2018, and First Place at the Mabel Mercer Foundation competition, in New York, in March of 2019. This year, Anaïs released her debut album - - - “Lovesome Thing: Anaïs Reno sings Ellington & Strayhorn accompanied by the Emmet Cohen Trio” which received critical praise across the world, and since appearing on the show last, Anaïs' album peaked at the #6 position on the Jazz Charts! Anais makes her debut at The Cutting Room (44 E. 32nd Street between Park and Madison Aves.) with the Pete Malinverni Trio on Tuesday, August 10th at 7pm. The Cutting Room is a great sounding room where established players spontaneously show up and play and up and comers get heard by the right people. Visually its art meets music. Lady Gaga started out here and Joan Rivers performed here regularly. AN EVENING WITH ANAÏS RENO AND THE PETE MALINVERNI TRIO THE CUTTING ROOM TUESDAY, AUGUST 10 7:00 P.M. Tickets for “An Evening with Anaïs Reno” are $20-$25 and are available at: www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-anais-reno Next up, she is playing the inaugural Jazz on the Narrows Festival in Maryland on August 14. Produced by Muddy Water's daughter, Mercy. (The festival runs from August 13-15). And lastly, another festival in New York, in White Plains (Westchester), “JazzFest White Plains.” Anaïs performs on September 10. The festival runs from September 9-12 Stay with us all the way - - -we're playing Lush Life in its entirety at the end of our show Find Anaïs on web at: www.anaïsreno.com And on Facebook and Instagram: @anaisrenojazz Today we are speaking with the founders and farm owners of the Pacific Northwest's premier independent music festival, Greg & Zara Knight - Together this energetic couple combines their love of their farm and music, spotlighting indie and original music in a major way! Many years ago, Greg Knight and his third-generation farming family shared a dream: To use their farm and the land it sat on to hold a a world-class music festival, with an emphasis based around their strong community values, a love for the land and the agriculture, and for the people who loved the music as much as they did. A LITERAL field of dreams! Once they decided to create the music festival, there was no turning back - - - And to pull it off, they quickly brought on a team of professionals and volunteers to bring the vision to life. An important element in the Knight's vision of their music festival was that everyone involved embracing a team approach to volunteerism, creativity, innovation, and promoting a FREE spirit of marching to your own drum. The goal was to invite music fans to the farm who wanted to engage with their favorite entertainers that make the music they love and the local farmers who grow the food that they eat. And Farm Jam was born! What sprung from that foundation is the Pacific Northwest's premier independent music festival that spotlights indie and original music in a major way. FarmJam® connects music lovers with bands, farmers, ranchers, and the local community. Greg & Zara Knight Present The 2021 FarmJam™ Music & Camping Festival Real Farm - Real People - Real Music Don't miss out! Get your festival and camping passes before they're gone! September 3 - September 5th info@farmjamfestival.com 509.255.3905 Farm Jam partners with the nonprofit Gr8ter Veterans Spokane to help Veterans in Eastern Washington. Follow them on Facebook to get veterans promo codes for discounted FarmJam tickets! m.facebook.com/GreaterVeterans/

ProjectME with Tiffany Carter – Entrepreneurship & Millionaire Mindset
[Digital Marketing Decoded] Five Things to Get more Cash Flowing into your Business RIGHT NOW EP329

ProjectME with Tiffany Carter – Entrepreneurship & Millionaire Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 33:01


If your business is in a slump, we're going to reignite it today.  Did you know, for many industries and niches that July and August are notoriously the slowest months of the year? Slow doesn't need to equal zero dinero, so don't let your ego use this as an excuse to blow off the rest of the summer. In fact, I want my clients to launch in August. When you zig and everyone else is zagging, you will make money!! (As long as you do it strategically). Here's how to set yourself up for a successful August launch: Make your offer timely. What does your ideal client struggle with most during summer months? What are they the most concerned about right now? Build major hype for your launch. Tease it, build anticipation for it, and show your sincere excitement. The more enthusiastic you are the more excited they will be to buy. Show ‘em don't just tell ‘em. Visually show in your content the desired life, outcome, and results that your offer can help create. This social proof shows your IC the life they want is possible, and it will get them feeling extra hopeful and eager to sign up. For 5 more things to get more cash flowing into your business right now , listen to this new podcast episode. You can DM me to thank me later ;-) >Applications are now open for a limited time to my exclusive two-month private Business Coaching Program. To apply you can visit my website at projectmewithtiffany.com under “work with me,” or visit the link in my bio on Instagram @projectme_with_tiffany. Welcome to ProjectME the Podcast with your host Tiffany Carter, who takes the mystery out of making BIG money? A former NBC and CBS TV journalist, turned multi-millionaire entrepreneur, teaching you all things wealth, health, worth, and business. You can follow Tiffany on Instagram @projectme_with_tiffany  on Facebook @projectmewithtiffany and watch her TV episodes on ProjectME TV with Tiffany Carter on YouTube.

The Chip Chipperson Podacast
LIVE FROM HELL!

The Chip Chipperson Podacast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 63:15


STROBING LIGHTS are STROBIN LIKE A MUUG. If you don't like STROBING LIGHTS then you should just listen to this HALAREOUS episode. Chipperson, Cooms, Xia and Dave Temple star in Chip's first IN STUDIO podacast in a year and a half. Chipperson is looking at studios and Compound Media BEGGED CHIPPERSON to be the first. Visually the coolest podacast of the millenium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Let It Ride
EP 98: Tying Blind

Let It Ride

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 50:36


From skydiving to learning how to pitch a baseball, Chris Mathews sees things differently, and tells us what it's like on Let It Ride. What you'll hear about: Visually impaired vs. legally blind How learning a skill without vision can actually be better Getting a haircut when you can't see what she's doing Learning how to pitch a baseball Long hair and confidence *** This episode of Let It Ride is brought to you by Hair Ties For Guys, the finest hair ties in the world. You can find these and other superior products for men with long hair at thelonghairs.us.

The Boss Mom Podcast - Business Strategy - Work / Life Balance - -Digital Marketing - Content Strategy
How to Feel Confident and Comfortable on Camera and Start Sharing Your Brand's Story Visually w/Nicole Anderson

The Boss Mom Podcast - Business Strategy - Work / Life Balance - -Digital Marketing - Content Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 34:28


For most of us, being on camera while we're dealing with personal challenges is the last thing we want to do. However, building a brand requires us to push past the things holding us back, and if we want to make our mark we have to put ourselves out there. How can we stop letting our insecurities get in the way of telling our brand's story more effectively? Is there anything we can do to feel more at-home in front of a camera? How can we bring our A-game to shoots as brand owners and photographers? In this episode, owner of NicoleBRanderson and It's Not Brand Surgery, Nicole Anderson gives us a crash course on brand photography and how to do it right.   3 Things You'll Learn in This Episode How to prepare for a brand photography shoot What do photographers and brand owners need to do ahead of a shoot to ensure we get the best results?    Where to share our brand photos We've had a ton of amazing pictures taken that highlight who we are and what our brands represent. Now, where do we put them?    How to feel more confident on camera What can we do to feel like the best versions of ourselves at a photoshoot?   Guest Bio-  Nicole Anderson is the Nashville-based owner of NicoleBRanderson, where she specializes in working with boss mom run small businesses, and It's Not Brand Surgery, where she trains other brand photographers. She is the wife of an Englishman and the mom to two kiddos, Jack & Olivia! She's seen all the Friends seasons 10 times, enjoys murder shows and will never pass up a charcuterie plate.   To find out more, go to: www.instagram.com/nicolebranderson  www.instagram.com/notbrandsurgery  www.nicolebranderson.com  www.itsnotbrandsurgery.com