Podcasts about MGS

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Latest podcast episodes about MGS

On the Media
The F Word

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 49:59


Early in the pandemic, weight was named a risk factor for severe covid-19. But what if the greater risk is poor medical treatment for fat people? This week, On the Media dives into the fictions, feelings, and fraught history of fat. Including how sugar and the slave trade laid the groundwork for American beauty standards.  1. Dr. Yoni Freedhoff [@YoniFreedhoff], Associate Professor of Family Medicine at University of Ottawa, on what we do and don't know about the relation of weight and the severity of a Covid infection. Listen. 2. Katherine Flegal [@CeriseFlegal], epidemiologist and former senior scientist at the Centers For Disease Control, on our flawed understanding of the data around weight and death, and Katie Lebesco [@KatieLeBesco], researcher focusing on food, pop culture, and fat activism, on why the "obesity epidemic" is a moral panic hiding behind a thin veil of scientific language. Listen. 3. Sabrina Strings [@SaStrings], sociologist at the University of California, Irvine, on how European attitudes about fat dramatically changed in the 18th century. and set the standards Americans still see today. Listen. Music in this Week's Show:Slim Jenkins Place - Booker T and the MGsEye Surgery- Thomas NewmanString Quartet No. 5 (Phillip Glass) - Kronos QuartetDisfarmer - Bill FrisellLost, Night - Bill FrisellIn the Bath - Randy NewmanThe De Lessup's Dance - Gavin WrightBreakaway - Regina Carter

The Reformed Gamers
Episode 228 - Metal Gear Solid 3 Is Hideo Kojima's Masterpiece

The Reformed Gamers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 112:06


In an effort to course correct from Metal Gear Solid 2, Hideo Kojima goes outside of the box and brings us Metal Gear Solid 3 on the Playstation 2. MGS 3 foregoes the complex sci-fi narrative of MGS 2 to give us a straight forward story about when the lines between duty and honor get blurred. Join us as we deep dive discuss what is quite possibly Hideo Kojima's magnum opus.   Support TRG   As always, if you like what we do here at TRG, consider supporting the show over on Patreon to net yourself perks like early, uncut access to every new episode! Link to our Patreon is below!   Connect With TRG   You can catch up with TRG by following us on Twitter, Facebook, and join our Discord server for community game nights!   Patreon: www.Patreon.com/TheReformedGamers  Twitter: www.twitter.com/TRGPodcast  Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheReformedGamers  YouTube: www.YouTube.com/TheReformedGamers Website: www.thereformedgamers.com  Discord: https://discord.gg/r4g6p4dztC  Check out Sound of the Raign's channel here: https://youtube.com/c/SoundoftheRaign  Time Stamps 0:00 - Intro 3:13 - Housekeeping 7:31 - What We're Playing 24:29 - Topic 39:23 - Spoiler Zone 1:40:52 - Patron Thanks 1:43:09 - Recos #MetalGearSolid3 #HideoKojima #Konami

Scotch and Splenda: An Office Podcast
Michael Scott Season 2

Scotch and Splenda: An Office Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 86:01


What started with an ambitious goal to tackle MGS all the way through season 3 turned to a long loving conversation of season 2. A major turning point for scranton's fearless leader. the depth of the character was really fleshed out. join as we fight the love have of our favorite regional manager.

Heart to Heart Nurses
Heart Failure Management: Health Equity and Access to Care

Heart to Heart Nurses

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 25:47


[CE contact hours--see below.] Health equity issues, including access ot medications, significantly impact patients with heart failure. From pharmacy deserts to non-medical switching and beyond, hear strategies to assist patients in getting the medications they need, from nurses Binu Koirala, PhD, MGS, RN, with the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore, and Kim Newlin, MSN, ANP, FPCNA, of Sutter Roseville Medical Center in Northern California. CE LINK: https://pcna.net/?p=10716&post_type=online-course&preview_id=10716 Access to Innovative Medicines Provider Tools: https://pcna.net/clinical-resources/provider-tools/access-for-innovative-medicines-provider-tools/Medicare State Pharmaceutical Assistance Program: medicare.gov/pharmaceutical-assistance-program/#state-programsExtra Help with Medicare Prescription Drug Care Costss: ssa.gov/benefits/medicare/prescriptionhelp.htmlCoverMyMeds: covermymeds.com/main/Solving Medication Access issues: acc.org/latest-in-cardiology/articles/2020/10/01/01/42/feature-advancing-health-equity-for-heart-failure-patientsNon-Medical Switching: cga.ct.gov/2017/rpt/2017-R-0008.htm#:~:text=%E2%80%9CNon%2Dmedical%20switching%E2%80%9D%20broadly,expensive%20but%20therapeutically%20equivalent%20drugHealth Equity: cdc.gov/chronicdisease/healthequity/index.htmUnderstanding Copay Accumulators: https://infusioncenter.org/understanding-copay-accumulators-who-really-benefits/PACH (Partnership to Advance Cardovascular Health): advancecardiohealth.org/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Heart to Heart Nurses
Heart Failure Management: Lifestyle and Self-Care

Heart to Heart Nurses

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 21:49


[CE contact hours--see below.] Improving quality of life for patients with heart failure can include lifestyle modifications and require successful behavior change strategies. Learn best practices to apply into your clinical setting from nurse providers Colleen McIlvennan, PhD, DNP, ANP, FAHA, FHFSA, of the University of Colorado in Denver, and Binu Koirala, PhD, MGS, RN, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore.CE LINK: https://pcna.net/?p=10717&post_type=online-course&preview_id=10717PCNA Behavior Change mini-certifice (CE course): https://pcna.net/professional-development/online-learning/ "Behavior Change mini-certificate"AHA HF Tools & Resources: heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-failure/heart-failure-tools-resourcesAdherence to Healthy Sleep Patterns: ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.050792?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub++0pubmed&Addressing Social Determinants of Health in Patients with HF: ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000767See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

South Carolina Business Review
SC exporter wins award

South Carolina Business Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 6:02


Earlier this year, the US Small Business Administration held its annual National Small Business Week Awards program with our next guest's company earning recognition as the South Carolina Small Business Exporter of the Year. Mike Switzer interviews Robert Suber, CEO of MGS, LLC in Columbia, SC.

Data Journey Podcast
Ep.15: ¿Cómo aportara a la comunidad desde la Ciencia de Datos?

Data Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 38:20


En este episodio nos acompaña Anderson Castro, economista y Mgs. en Políticas Públicas. Fundador de Ciencia de Datos Ecuador, un crack en el mundo de los datos, quien actualmente se encuentra trabajando como Data Analyst en Banco Pichincha, una la empresa financiera más grande del país. Anderson comparte lo valioso que es el enlace que los datos tejen entre las políticas públicas, las empresas y la sociedad porque cada uno puede apoyarse en evidencia para impactar positivamente en la comunidad. Puedes contactar con Anderson acá. Esperamos que disfrutes este episodio tanto como nosotros grabándolo para ti. Encuéntranos en redes: Esteban Isa Si te gustó el episodio, compártelo para seguir construyendo una comunidad que toma decisiones informadas. Gracias por escucharnos.

General Feed
Week In Nerdom 09-07

General Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 49:08


Music Follow-ups/Corrections Nirvana - The band have won the suit against them from the Nevermind baby. New Music/Video Suicide Silence - You Must Die https://youtu.be/YrhdsMBBjlo all the breakdowns Tours Cannibal Corpse - European Tour with Dark Funeral and Ingested. From March to April. https://blabbermouth.net/news/cannibal-corpse-announces-early-2023-european-tour-with-dark-funeral-and-ingested Rammstein - European tour from May to August. https://blabbermouth.net/news/rammstein-announces-2023-european-stadium-tour Nickelback New single “San Quentin” to be released this week some time. Anthrax Cancel European tour over cost and logistics. Suggests BlackBraid - BlackBraid I Gaming/Tech Follow-ups/Corrections Halo: Infinite - Split screen for campaign NO MORE! Twitter - Finally putting in the work for an edit button. Netflix - Ad Tier now set to launch in November instead of next year. Assassin's Creed: Mirage - Rumor/Leak confirmed. More details to be revealed on Saturday Sept 10 during the Ubisoft Forward event. Microsoft - Activision/Blizzard purchase has hit a snag in the EU Trailers Gotham Knights - https://youtu.be/IhVf_3TeTQE Apple VS Android Apple is now the number one smartphone OS. Splitgate 1047 devs announced through their socials on Sept 2 that they will be stopping active development of their free-to-play arena shooter and moving on to the next game. Sounds like it will be something akin to Splitgate 2. Suggests TMNT - Shredder's Revenge Comic Books/Books Amazing Fantasy #1000 Marvel introduces the Scarecrow into their books… well Conspirition. But a rose by any other name… also it's spiderman's 60th Suggests Diary - Chuck Palahniuk TV/Streaming Follow-ups/Corrections House of the Dragon - Co-Showrunner Miguel Sapochnik exiting due to “exhaustion”. https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/tv/tv-news/house-of-the-dragon-miguel-sapochnik-leaving-1235208276/ Trailers Mighty Ducks: Game Changers - https://youtu.be/uY1o_5LrfK0 Cuberpunk: Edgerunners - https://youtu.be/JtqIas3bYhg NSFW Suggests Sandman Movies Follow-ups/Corrections Joker 2 - Brendan Gleeson has been cast in an undisclosed role. Trailers Attack on Titan: The Musical - https://youtu.be/LjDcw2yZUus The musical will debut at the Orix Theater in Osaka, Japan, on Jan. 7 and run until Jan. 9. The second round of performances will be held at Tokyo's Nippon Seinenkan Hall, taking place from Jan. 14 to Jan. 24. Tickets for the show go on sale for the public starting Nov. 5. Tusk 2 A sequel to one of Kevin Smith's strangest movies.Justin Long confirms to SlashFilm. So much for Moose Jaws? https://www.slashfilm.com/985045/kevin-smith-is-apparently-making-a-sequel-to-one-of-his-strangest-films-exclusive/ Dream Scenario Nicolas Cage is doing another comedy with A24 directed by Kristoffer Borgli and produced by Ari Aster and Lars Knudsen under the Square Peg banner. Other producers on the project include Jacob Jaffke and Tyler Campellone. https://deadline.com/2022/08/nicolas-cage-a24-dream-scenario-ari-aster-producing-1235103769/ Bring it on: Cheer or Die Really?? Syfy horror movie. Trick ‘r Treat Theatrical release 15 years after release. https://twitter.com/trickrtreat/status/1565807633507819520 Suggests Alien Rumor Mill New Sources Silent Hill 2 - Screenshots of the remake leak online. Hulk Bruce the next “Big Bad” in the MCU? Nintendo Wind Waker and Twilight Princess to be part of rumored Nintendo Direct. Android OS Version 13 will feature a built in Satellite connection?? Konami TGS could see a Suikoden and/or MGS collection. TMNT New AAA game title in the works from an undisclosed developer. House of the Dragon Season 2 said to bring in Henry Cavill and Elizabeth Olsen. D23 Henry Cavill, Denzel Washington, John Boyega, Giancarlo Esposito, Jodi Comer, Daisy Edgar-Jones, and John Krasinski all rumored to be coming up on stage during the celebration.

R, D and the In-betweens
Decolonising Research Series: Culture Across Borders

R, D and the In-betweens

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 15:35


This series of podcast episodes will focus on Decolonising Research, and feature talks from the Decolonising Research Festival held at the University of Exeter in June and July 2022. The fifth epsiode of the series will feature Pankhuri Singh from the University of Exeter and her talk 'Culture across borders'.   Music credit: Happy Boy Theme Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/   Transcription 00:09 Hello, and welcome to rd in the in betweens. I'm your host Kelly Preece. And every fortnight I talk to a different guest about researchers development, and everything in between.   00:32 And today I'll be talking about cultural cross borders. Hello, everyone. My name is Pankaj Singh. I'm a second year PhD student in the Department of English and film studies. Now, what exactly is decolonization? decolonization is the process in which a country that was formerly a colony that was colonized by imperialism or by a par, they they go away and they make that country independent and they lose the stop controlling that country and that country becomes independent internal, this is the process of decolonization. Now, India became independent from the British Empire on the 15th of August 1947. Do it became a republic, it decided to be a part of the Commonwealth of Nations. Hence, it did not severe away all the ties from the British Empire by being part of the Commonwealth nations it accepted the honorary monarchy being being a part of the Indian constitution and in I'm sorry, not the Indian constitution, but of the Indian public in in, in the general terms, not talking a little bit about what the history of India and the UK share is, trade was established between two ringland and Mughal India in the 1600s. When elicited when Elizabeth to one granted the newly formed in East India Company Royal Charter by sending precious gifts to the Mughal court, Emperor of Akbar the trend following the Indian rebellion of 1857. When Indian sepoys rebelled against the British officers, the East India Company was dissolved. The assets of the British East India Company was so huge that the British government decided to step in, and after a series of military encounters established British dominion over India. Later, the English sought to consolidate their political control by taking responsibility to improve the lot of the masses by imparting modern Western education. They took over on themselves which is dubbed as the White Man's Burden, they took over that responsibility of making the Indian masses of socially religiously, morally economically, better human beings. A part of this being Lord Macaulay is minute on Indian education, which came out in the 18 clitic farm. He wanted to establish a class of persons Indian and blood and color, but English and taste, opinion, morals and intellect. According to him, these people would act as intermediaries between the British rulers and the masses that they were to. Indians, however, welcome this decision with open arms. They had their own perceived notions that this charter this minute would help them it was not just the freedom fighters, but also the social reformers who saw the benefits of this plan and how it would work in their own favor. reformers like Raja Ram and Ravi and others crap the opportunity to do away with the dogmatic and Orthodox religious rights, when they realized that is new scientific approach would be important to the Indian education and they would realize that these religions rights were dogmatic and not really something that should be followed. Similarly, the freedom fighters to grab this opportunity and part of collaborating with each other, from different parts of the country to to   04:39 to move forward the nationalist independence movement. Now why was that? It was because India was and still continues to be multilingual. It has 22 languages recognized in the HTML of the Indian constitution, and when Broadmoor collies minute came into being ink, then English became the lingua franca and freedom writers from across regions could actually connect and plans that would work for the very downfall of the British Empire that that brought home that had brought this English language into the country. While all of this was going on in the political front, in the literary front, Shakespeare as a playwright began to gain popularity he's his stories of creed, part, revenge and jealousy, the times and the new no borders. Even after independence, Indians continued to like his filmmakers took an opportunity to make films that were based on Shakespeare's plots. And they thought that his plots were timeless and they could actually adapt to them to the Indian culture. This brings me to my research topic, which is how paraglide trans culturally adapted to Elizabeth and drama to the Indian setting. Today, I will be talking about how the Elizabethan drama written by William Shakespeare in 16 104 that is Othello gets adapted into Ankara, which was a film that released in the year 2006. Cannot be bounded by geographical borders, the emotions of discontentment, jealousy, insecurity, are felt by all residing in any part of the world. Ha replied to spank on the Shakespearean play, and takes pride in being associated with the writer who wrote for the teaching, which ruled his country for centuries. The filmmaker however, does not blindly transform the Elizabethton play of Shakespeare into a film. Rather he adds the elements of Indian Ness in it, which makes the adaptation a unique process he adds in Hindu mythic elements and other features that are exclusive to India. The chief point of the play will tell you is that Otello belongs to a different race than Desdemona, the counterpart the female counterpart. This gets trans culturally adapted in the Indian setting, but how to judge many banks on the emotion of jealousy and insecurity. He bases his film on the very inhibition, which also happens to be a very famous Hindi dialogue in the Bollywood cinema, that a girl and a boy can never be just friends. This inhibition was the root cause for Omkara jealousy and the belief that dolly Desdemona might have cheated on him with case that is Casio. While in the play, Iago makes Roger equal believe that Desdemona loves Casio, he says that they have the same appearance and that will tell you is stop that bringing in the disparity of talent between the levels. In the film this gets adapted when dolly and que su are seeing together and they seem compatible, because they share the same educational background. The the, the issue of caste, the issue of column, never find the mention it is because they will educate together that they become compatible, thereby making Ankara jealous and insecure, that he is approved, and therefore, he is not as in par with the case who as he would have been had he been Western or modern educated. The second method of adapting the play is when Bhardwaj reimagined the character of into the Indian counterpart for Amelia, making her vengeful at Carly, who kills her husband Lambert yaki, the Iago figure for the misdeeds he had done. Thus, Bhardwaj birdwatcher takes a significant departure from the text, because while in the play immediate dies at the hands of Thiago and that is how we see that that's how Amelia is not really able to stand up for Desdemona. Into however, becomes the avenging mother who dresses the wrongs done to her.   09:41 Not only her but also broadly, who she thinks to be her younger sister, or her child. The name into means moon and according to the Hindu mythology, the moon protects the inhabitants of the earth in in the night from the evil forces that look in the dark similarly, in the two dresses the drums metadata and Dolly balandra and the scenes take place in the light rail into as a protector of the good forces fight against the evil forces, which here are represented in Lanre and defeats him. You even though Indu is not the female protagonist here, her position in the development of the plot is of significant value. In the film, Iago is called Long long meaning lane, which attributes to another mythological figure, Shang. Shang is a planet that, according to the Hindu mythology, is a slow moving planet that revolves around the sun, and is associated with black collar and walks with a limp. This mythical trigger is associated with bad luck. And that's the drawing influence of lambda in Ankara. Light can be equated to the beginning of Ankara has done for since Shani said to be the God of karma or one's actions, it can be concluded that Ankara is himself involved in his own downfall. As he is unable to see the truth and false through the deceitful plans of flora. Shani is also associated with black color as a tall talked about he walks he can be seen in the film, in the form of long long walks in with a limb in the dark alleys. He is always shot in dim light, and he adds to the mystery which brings about a kind of mystical persona that holds some secrets within his heart, and that alludes to the dark intentions that he has. My argument is that while Iago becomes the green eyed monster in Othello, longer becomes the demonic figure associated with evil and dark horses, and black is the color associated with him. pilotage also seems to have borrowed from Rahman, when adapting Otello to the Indian context, as the basic fact remains that both in the epic so in the plane or in the film, where the main character are misled to distress the loyalty of their respective rights, just as in Roman law drum believes the words of a washer man and things got a Sita was not loyal to him. So does in the film, Ankara believe two words a camera and considers the dolly is having an illicit affair with case behind his back. The words of Brandon Turner who is destined Mona's father pelo. Look, look at have more if thou have eyes to see, she has deceived her father and me she did get an Indian adaptation to the word three archery three, three archery three is a term that is mentioned in MGS. Murthy, which is a religious, religious Hindu text. It refers to the mysterious character of women, which is translated or real translation stands as nobody knows about the character or tendency of a woman.   13:21 It is thus, a critical evaluation of how Shakespeare's plays were translocated and adapted into the Indian setting, along with aiming, rethinking and repositioning Shakespeare in 21st century intends cinematic setting, acting as a cultural bridge, joining the culture of two different countries to get this fighting with the past and thinking that things were different, and they would have been better if they were different. It is better if we see a future that knows no boundaries, and that where where we share and serving and a future where we share the same legacy and making a new history there, all of our cultures collaborate. My larger argument does is if we as New Age, researchers are able to strike a balance between the methods and means by which the old Pinocchio texts are read and analyzed. And that connection is established between the colonizing power not seeing it as a curse, but rather seen is at seeing it as a means of new forms of connection, a call a new area of decolonizing research will develop it will see literature as belonging to all it does not restrict it by borders or by geopolitics, or where the nations or the nationality of the author lies, but rather assimilating and making literature and music accessible to all.   15:03 And that's it for this episode. Don't forget to like, rate and subscribe. And join me next time where I'll be talking to somebody else about researchers development and everything in between.

Comic Talk Today
COMIC TALK TODAY COMIC TALK HEADLINES FOR Sept 7th, 2022 | More Rumors than you can shake a stick at

Comic Talk Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 86:07


 It's time for the Comic Talk Headlines with Generally Nerdy! Attack on Titan is getting a stage production. Kevin Smith has begun work on an unlikely sequel. Joker 2 adds to their cast. All that and MORE!Tune in Wednesdays for the regular show and Saturdays for the re-post of the Friday night LIVE SHOW. Plus, don't forget to subscribe for more fresh content.   TV/StreamingFollow-ups/CorrectionsHouse of the Dragon - Co-Showrunner Miguel Sapochnik exiting due to “exhaustion”. https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/tv/tv-news/house-of-the-dragon-miguel-sapochnik-leaving-1235208276/ TrailersMighty Ducks: Game Changers - https://youtu.be/uY1o_5LrfK0 Cuberpunk: Edgerunners - https://youtu.be/JtqIas3bYhg NSFWSuggestsSandmanMoviesFollow-ups/CorrectionsJoker 2 - Brendan Gleeson has been cast in an undisclosed role.TrailersAttack on Titan: The Musical - https://youtu.be/LjDcw2yZUus The musical will debut at the Orix Theater in Osaka, Japan, on Jan. 7 and run until Jan. 9. The second round of performances will be held at Tokyo's Nippon Seinenkan Hall, taking place from Jan. 14 to Jan. 24. Tickets for the show go on sale for the public starting Nov. 5.Tusk 2A sequel to one of Kevin Smith's strangest movies.Justin Long confirms to SlashFilm. So much for Moose Jaws?https://www.slashfilm.com/985045/kevin-smith-is-apparently-making-a-sequel-to-one-of-his-strangest-films-exclusive/ Dream ScenarioNicolas Cage is doing another comedy with A24 directed by Kristoffer Borgli and produced by Ari Aster and Lars Knudsen under the Square Peg banner. Other producers on the project include Jacob Jaffke and Tyler Campellone.https://deadline.com/2022/08/nicolas-cage-a24-dream-scenario-ari-aster-producing-1235103769/ Bring it on: Cheer or DieReally?? Syfy horror movie. Trick ‘r TreatTheatrical release 15 years after release. https://twitter.com/trickrtreat/status/1565807633507819520SuggestsAlienRumor MillNew SourcesSilent Hill 2 - Screenshots of the remake leak online.HulkBruce the next “Big Bad” in the MCU?NintendoWind Waker and Twilight Princess to be part of rumored Nintendo Direct.Android OSVersion 13 will feature a built in Satellite connection??KonamiTGS could see a Suikoden and/or MGS collection.TMNTNew AAA game title in the works from an undisclosed developer.House of the DragonSeason 2 said to bring in Henry Cavill and Elizabeth Olsen.D23Henry Cavill, Denzel Washington, John Boyega, Giancarlo Esposito, Jodi Comer, Daisy Edgar-Jones, and John Krasinski all rumored to be coming up on stage during the celebration.You can support this show by visiting our merch store, or by leaving us an Apple Podcasts review.

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network
COMIC TALK TODAY: COMIC TALK TODAY COMIC TALK HEADLINES FOR SEPT 7TH, 2022 | MORE RUMORS THAN YOU CAN SHAKE A STICK AT

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 86:07


 It's time for the Comic Talk Headlines with Generally Nerdy! Attack on Titan is getting a stage production. Kevin Smith has begun work on an unlikely sequel. Joker 2 adds to their cast. All that and MORE!Tune in Wednesdays for the regular show and Saturdays for the re-post of the Friday night LIVE SHOW. Plus, don't forget to subscribe for more fresh content.   TV/StreamingFollow-ups/CorrectionsHouse of the Dragon - Co-Showrunner Miguel Sapochnik exiting due to “exhaustion”. https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/tv/tv-news/house-of-the-dragon-miguel-sapochnik-leaving-1235208276/ TrailersMighty Ducks: Game Changers - https://youtu.be/uY1o_5LrfK0 Cuberpunk: Edgerunners - https://youtu.be/JtqIas3bYhg NSFWSuggestsSandmanMoviesFollow-ups/CorrectionsJoker 2 - Brendan Gleeson has been cast in an undisclosed role.TrailersAttack on Titan: The Musical - https://youtu.be/LjDcw2yZUus The musical will debut at the Orix Theater in Osaka, Japan, on Jan. 7 and run until Jan. 9. The second round of performances will be held at Tokyo's Nippon Seinenkan Hall, taking place from Jan. 14 to Jan. 24. Tickets for the show go on sale for the public starting Nov. 5.Tusk 2A sequel to one of Kevin Smith's strangest movies.Justin Long confirms to SlashFilm. So much for Moose Jaws?https://www.slashfilm.com/985045/kevin-smith-is-apparently-making-a-sequel-to-one-of-his-strangest-films-exclusive/ Dream ScenarioNicolas Cage is doing another comedy with A24 directed by Kristoffer Borgli and produced by Ari Aster and Lars Knudsen under the Square Peg banner. Other producers on the project include Jacob Jaffke and Tyler Campellone.https://deadline.com/2022/08/nicolas-cage-a24-dream-scenario-ari-aster-producing-1235103769/ Bring it on: Cheer or DieReally?? Syfy horror movie. Trick ‘r TreatTheatrical release 15 years after release. https://twitter.com/trickrtreat/status/1565807633507819520SuggestsAlienRumor MillNew SourcesSilent Hill 2 - Screenshots of the remake leak online.HulkBruce the next “Big Bad” in the MCU?NintendoWind Waker and Twilight Princess to be part of rumored Nintendo Direct.Android OSVersion 13 will feature a built in Satellite connection??KonamiTGS could see a Suikoden and/or MGS collection.TMNTNew AAA game title in the works from an undisclosed developer.House of the DragonSeason 2 said to bring in Henry Cavill and Elizabeth Olsen.D23Henry Cavill, Denzel Washington, John Boyega, Giancarlo Esposito, Jodi Comer, Daisy Edgar-Jones, and John Krasinski all rumored to be coming up on stage during the celebration.You can support this show by visiting our merch store, or by leaving us an Apple Podcasts review.

Dev Game Club
DGC Ep 319: Far Cry 2 (part one)

Dev Game Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 65:14


Welcome to Dev Game Club, where this week we begin a new series on UbiSoft's 2008 series-establishing classic, Far Cry 2. We set it in its time, and talk a bit about shifting engine wars and attendant publisher/developer drama, before briefly getting into the tutorial. Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary. Sections played: The Tutorial Issues covered: the UbiSoft open world formula, picking your UbiSoft ur-game, engine wars, branched engine work, getting into or out of the engine game, the open world first person shooter, a brief overview of Clint Hocking's career, games of 2008, grindhouse games, commitment to the first-person aesthetic, picking your character, setting their games in fictional countries, embracing African conflict, expositional value, setting up the chaotic situation, the diagetics of the game, mercenaries coming in, malarial effects, showing the systems, fire propagation, wishing they'd lean into the politics, disclaiming the team diversity to avoid political, having your cake and eating it too, tending to avoid modern realistic settings as players, the sales of the historical era, video game tourism, presenting variables, the diagetic map, the implicit simulated world and how the games get away from that, the onboarding, performance and enemy count and music, gatekeeping around what's a game, games where the interactivity shines through or justifies the choice to make it a game, putting clues together, simple choices that personalize, accretion effects, moments of calm, taking your decisions forward, being forced to the golden path. Games, people, and influences mentioned or discussed: SimCity, Xbox 360, UbiSoft, Prince of Persia, Assassin's Creed (series), Ghost Recon (series), Watch Dogs (series), Rainbow 6 (series), Rayman, Beyond Good & Evil, Michel Ancel, CryTek, CryEngine, Dungeons & Dragons, Crysis, Dunia Engine, Hunt: Showdown, Lumberyard, id Software, Epic Games, Unreal Championship, Quake 4, Source Engine, Clint Hocking, Patrick Redding, Splinter Cell (series), Gotham Knights, Fallout 3, Tomb Raider: Underworld, Eric Lindstrom, Harley Baldwin White-Wiedow, Republic Commando, Left 4 Dead, GTA IV, MGS 4, Devil May Cry 4, Condemned 2: Bloodshot, Alien: Isolation, Rock Band 2, Fable II, Gears of War 2, Little Big Planet, Dead Space, Mirror's Edge, Braid, World of Goo, Nintendo Wii, Mario Kart Wii, Super Smash Bros: Brawl, Spore, Army of Two, Kane and Lynch, Wet, BGS/Zenimax, Prince of Persia (2008), Half-Life, The Stanley Parable, Call of Duty (series), Megaman 3, Oliver Uv, mysterydip, Castlevania IV, Final Fantasy VI, Will Wright, Ashton Hermann, The Red Strings Club, Deconstructeam, The Witcher III, Gone Home, Firewatch, The Walking Dead, Uncharted 2, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Mass Effect, June, Dark Souls, Kirk Hamilton, Aaron Evers, Mark Garcia. Next time: More Far Cry 2 Twitch: brettdouville or timlongojr, instagram:timlongojr, Twitter: @timlongojr and @devgameclub DevGameClub@gmail.com

The Real Press Start

This week we are talking MGS remake, Saints Row, Winnie-the-Pooh: Blood and Honey, Hellraiser, Rings of Power review bombed, and a lot more!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/trps/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/trps/support

Necessary Tangents
Episode 122: I Wonder If They Choose Their Weapon Before Or After They Get The Code Name Featuring Kiki

Necessary Tangents

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 37:40


CW: Discussion of sex and libidos, spoilers for Phantasmagoria 2. Kiki and Jo continue the wild weird road that is MGS 1. Intro and Outro by https://the-troubadours.bandcamp.com/ Link to Jo's stream: https://www.twitch.tv/arp1033 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/arp1033/message

Phillydogs Revue
Episode 116: Philly Dogs Revue 08/28/22

Phillydogs Revue

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 118:42


1 Mercy Mercy Booker T. & The MGs 02:37 Soul Dressing2 04 Great Jehovah (Featuring Toots Hibbert) Blue Glaze Mento Band 02:53 3 Things Ain't Right Esther Marrow 03:39 Sister Woman4 Throw A Farewell Kiss Temptations 03:28 Sky's The Limit5 One More Heartache Jim Gilstrap 02:56 Its the same old song6 05 - Grits Ain't Groceries (All Around The World) Maxine weldon 02:25 Right On7 Farther on Down the Road Joe Simon 03:09 Monument of Soul8 Pushover Gloria Edwards 02:52 The Soul Queen Of Texas - Crazy Cajun Recordings9 Your Love Made A U-Turn Jimmy Hughes 02:35 (Volt Unissued)10 I've Lived The Life Marva W. Taylor 03:14 Eccentric Soul: The Forte Label11 Living Stone Sierra Leone's Refugee All-Stars 04:55 Rise & Shine12 On Your Way Down Allen Toussaint 04:01 Life, Love and Faith FLAC13 My Soul Sensation Nicole Willis & Banda Palomita 04:09 My Soul Sensation PERSE00514 Crying Shame The Teskey Brothers 03:54 Half Mile Harvest15 Law Of The Land The Undisputed Truth 04:31 Down To Earth16 More Than A Mouthful Kylie Auldist 03:44 Women of Soul17 Walkin Talkin Boukou Groove 04:44 A Lil' Bouko In Your Cup18 Lucky Lewis Taylor 06:35 Lewis Taylor19 Soundtrack to Life Iyeoka 04:13 Say Yes Evolved20 General Strike The Souljazz Orchestra 04:26 Chaos Theories21 You've Got To Do Your Best Pazant Brothers & Beaufort Express 05:30 (Vanguard LP 79364)22 Lanmbasy Mandingo 07:27 New World Power23 Strut Pee Wee Ellis, Fred Wesley & Maceo Parker 04:18 The J.b. Horns24 Out Of Sight Poncho Sanchez 03:50 Out of Sight25 Plain & Simple Rachel & The Soul Criminals 03:29 Plain & Simple Vinyl26 In the Ride (feat. Amp Fiddler) Will Sessions 03:40 Deluxe27 Witness 4 The Prosecution (Version 1) Prince 04:00 28 Riders on the storm Nils Landgren Funk Unit 05:07 FONK DA WORLD29 Think (About It) Lyn Collins (aka The Femal Preacher) 03:24 James Brown's Original Funky Divas - DISC 230 I Can't Stand Up For Falling Down Sam & Dave 02:44 Sweat 'N' Soul: An Anthology [1965-1971]31 Blue Water Syl Johnson 04:26 The Complete Syl Johnson On Hi Records (Disc 2)

Human Design Academy Podcast
Erfolgreich im Business als MG

Human Design Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 37:21


In dieser Folge des Human Design Academy Podcast spreche ich darüber, was eigentlich wichtig ist, um als Manifestierender Generator im Business erfolgreich zu sein. Als MG verfügst Du natürlicherweise über eine Menge Power. Du hast sowohl die Ausdauer Deines Sakral-Zentrums als auch manifestierende Kraft zur Verfügung, um schnell Projekte in die Umsetzung zu bringen. Diese Fähigkeiten sind im Business super einsetzbar, sie sind aber auch mit Herausforderungen verbunden, wenn es darum geht, nachhaltig erfolgreich zu sein. In dieser Podcastfolge erfährst Du, worauf es wirklich ankommt und was typische Stolperfallen sind, die im Business-Leben eines MGs immer wieder auftauchen. Ich berichte Dir aus meiner eigenen Erfahrung und davon, wie ich den Wechsel vom Angestelltenverhältnis in die Selbständigkeit erlebt habe. Ich gebe Dir Erkenntnisse aus meinen Mentoring-Sessions mit anderen MGs mit auf den Weg und erzähle Dir, was Erfolg für mich bedeutet. Wenn Du Lust hast zu erfahren, worauf auch Du bei Deinem Business-Erfolg als MG achten darfst, dann wünsche ich Dir viel Freude und gute Inspirationen mit der aktuellen Folge und freue mich über Dein Feedback auf Insta unter: humandesign_academy Wenn Du Lust hast, tiefer ins Human Design einzusteigen oder mehr über Deine Energie und Deine Potentiale als MG zu erfahren, dann stehe ich Dir gerne im Rahmen eines Readings, Coachings oder Mentorings zur Verfügung. Mehr Infos erhältst Du hier Zum Intensiv-Kurs 'Human Design & ätherische Öle' mit Kursstart am 08.09.2022 2022 geht es hier: Mehr Infos: Web: human-design-system.com Insta: humandesign_academy Zu unserem Youtube-Kanal geht es hier

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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Data Journey Podcast
Ep. 12: Comparte lo que sabes

Data Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 44:03


Nos acompaña Janeth Castillo, Data Scientist con más de 10 años de experiencia. Janeth se formó como Ing. Estadística, y un paso a la vez, llegó a ser Mgs. en Sistemas de Decisión y hoy por hoy cursa su segundo Máster, ahora en Ciencia de Datos. Janeth nos cuenta que su Data Journey ha pasado por aprovechar las oportunidades de aprender en cada escenario que ha tenido que enfrentar. Hace una reflexión del para qué estudiar una carrera u otra y nos recuerda lo importante que es aprender de la gente que nos rodea y compartir nuestro conocimiento. Puedes contactar con Janeth vía Linkedin o ver sus aportes en su perfil de GitHub. Esperamos que disfrutes de este episodio tanto como nosotros grabándolo para ti. Encuéntranos en redes: Host: @el_teban_data Editora: @venatic_ilustradora Comparte este episodio para que sigamos construyendo una comunidad que toma decisiones informadas. Gracias por escuchar un episodio más del Data Journey Podcast

The Classic Sports Car Podcast
011 The Aston Martin DB4, GT and Zagato

The Classic Sports Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 27:29


In episode 11, we'll look at some of the highlights of the upcoming 2022 Monterey Car Week, a Texan selling off his collection, how fast an MGB can really go, and then take a dive into the history of the Aston Martin DB4, DB4 GT and DB4 GT Zagato, the basis for Aston Martin's recent continuation vehicles.    Links to items from this episode: Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion Top 20 lots at Monterey Car Week 2022 Monterey Car Week 2022 Insights Collection of rare and unique MGs to go up for auction this September  and here An MGB built by Snake River Classics hits 162 mph at Sun Valley Tour de Force Bentley Speed Six Continuation Series announced DB4 GT Factory Lightweights Prices for recent DB4 salesOther links to the Aston Martin DB4 https://www.astonmartin.com/en/models/past-models/db4gt-db4gt-zagato https://www.evo.co.uk/aston-martin/db4

The School of Higher Consciousness
21. Human Design Manifesting Generator. Learn all about the MG type with Sarah Alnoon!

The School of Higher Consciousness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 68:48


Find your Human Design Type HERE! Are you a Human Design Manifesting Generator? Or do you know one and want to understand them better? This episode is absolutely for YOU! Manifesting Generators aka. MGs or Mani-Gens are creative, talented, capable, multi-passionate beings. Join me in episode 21 as I share some reflections and traits of these energizer bunnies, and listen as I dive into a rich and insightful interview with an incredible Mani-Gen Sarah Alnoon. Sarah shares her personal insights and experience living as Human Design MG in a very relatable manner. Sarah runs a successful online coaching program for women leaders and offers Human Design cosmic blueprints for those interested in learning more about their Human Design. Learn more about her "Sacred Leader" program HERE. If you enjoy this episode, please share the episode with a friend or leave a positive review (5 STARS) for the podcast! You can find me on Instagram @higher_consciousness_school or my website. Subscribe to the podcast to get notified for future episodes. I appreciate all of your support on this creative journey. Links: Find your Human Design Type HERE! Sarah Alnoon Instagram (@sarahalnoon) The School of Higher Consciousness Website The School of Higher Consciousness Instagram Email Gina: gina@theschoolofhigherconsciousness.com Episode Time-Stamps: Manifesting Generator Traits (3:53) Meet Sarah Alnoon (12:06) Difference between Manifesting Generator, Generator, & Manifestor (17:09) Sarah's experience of being an MG with an emotional authority (27:17) Common thread of MGs when they feel stuck (38:02) Common thread of MGs when they are in flow (42:06) Befriending the Not-self theme of frustration (50:15) Parent / Reflector child relationship (49:42) MGs play by their own rules! (56:09) Manifesting Generator Billboard message (1:04)

Drunken Lullabies: Drunk At The Movies
Mash-Up Monday 8/15/22

Drunken Lullabies: Drunk At The Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 32:09


MottyMix - Respect (Otis Redding v Aretha Franklin) Phat Tony - Hold On, I'm Coming Ghetto Funk Remix (Sam & Dave) I'll Take Your Shine (Staple Singers v Newsboys) Ghostbuster's Finger (The Bar-Kays v Ray Parker Jr) Hit the Wood (Eddie Floyd v People Under the Stairs) Try a Little Tenderness Dead Men Rockin Mix (Otis Redding v Notorious B.I.G.) DoM - Intergalactic Soul (The Bar-Kays v Beastie Boys) Divide & Kreate - Santatage (Otis Redding v Beastie Boys) Disco Tech - Can I Live (Isaac Hayes v Jay-Z) This Is What Shaft Came For (Isaac Hayes v Rihanna) The Perfect Onion (Booker T & the MGs v Nine Inch Nails) The Horse Passenger (Booker T & The MGs v Iggy Pop)

Hechos Ecuador
CPCCS informa sobre procesos de designación de autoridades

Hechos Ecuador

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 3:22


El Pleno del Consejo de Participación Ciudadana y Control Social (CPCCS), conoció los avances en los procesos de designación de autoridades que se encuentran en marcha. Adicionalmente resolvió sobre información relevante para las siguientes fases de los concursos públicos. Renovación Parcial del Consejo Nacional Electoral. - La secretaria del Equipo Técnico dio a conocer que en este proceso, el CPCCS seleccionó, a través de sorteo público, a los 10 postulantes ciudadanos a la Comisión Ciudadana que se encargará de llevar a cabo el concurso para la renovación parcial del Consejo Nacional Electoral. Adicionalmente, indicó que el CPCCS se encuentra a la espera de los nuevos delegados de la Función de Transparencia y Control Social (FTCS), para conformar esta Comisión Ciudadana, quienes deberán pasar por la fase de revisión de requisitos. El Pleno resolvió que el funcionario Michel Lenoy Briones Montesdeoca será parte del Equipo Técnico de apoyo en este proceso. Contraloría General del Estado. - En este proceso, el CPCCS seleccionó, a través de sorteo público, a los 10 representantes de la ciudadanía a la Comisión Ciudadana que se encargará de llevar a cabo el concurso para designación de la primera autoridad de la Contraloría General del Estado. El Pleno aprobó que la Abg. María Gabriela Dávila Arteaga se incorpore a la Comisión Técnica que apoya este proceso de designación. Defensoría Pública: La representante del Equipo Técnico indicó que la conformación de la Comisión Ciudadana de Selección se encuentra en la etapa de impugnación. Una vez realizadas las audiencias públicas, el Pleno del CPCCS conocerá el informe de la Coordinación Jurídica sobre este proceso. Adicionalmente, el Equipo Técnico se encuentra preparando el informe de verificación de requisitos e inhabilidades de la delegada de la Función Electoral a la Comisión Ciudadana, Mgs. Jessica Rojas Vallejo, quien también se someterá a la fase de escrutinio público. El Pleno aprobó que la Abg. María Gabriela Dávila Arteaga integre la Comisión Técnica que apoya este proceso de designación. Superintendencia de Bancos. - En cumplimiento de la sentencia 9333-2022-00895 emitida por autoridad competente, el presidente del CPCCS, Abg. Hernán Ulloa Ordóñez, solicitó al Ejecutivo el envío inmediato de una nueva terna para la designación del titular de la Superintendencia de Bancos. La sentencia judicial anula la designación realizada por el Consejo el 20 de julio, por lo que la nueva terna se someterá al procedimiento contemplado en el Reglamento que incluye la fase de admisión, impugnación ciudadana y presentación del Plan de Trabajo. Procuraduría General de Estado. - El Pleno aprobó la conformación de la Comisión Técnica que dará soporte al proceso de selección de la primera autoridad de la Procuraduría General del Estado. Esta Comisión está integrada por: Nelson Silva, Marcia Samaniego, Fernanda Pozo, y Cynthia Condoy. Abg. Hernán Ulloa Ordóñez Presidente del CPCCS --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hechosecuador/message

Hechos Ecuador
CPCCS solicitará ternas para la designación de los titulares de la Procuraduría y la Superintendencia de Protección de Datos

Hechos Ecuador

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 2:26


El Pleno del Consejo de Participación Ciudadana y Control Social (CPCCS) resolvió, este 28 de julio, solicitar al Presidente de la República que remita las ternas para la designación de la primera autoridad de la Procuraduría General del Estado y de la autoridad de la Superintendencia de Protección de Datos. El pedido se realiza una vez que se cuenta con la normativa y están conformadas las Veedurías Ciudadanas que vigilarán la transparencia de cada uno de los procesos de designación, para lo cual tendrán acceso al desarrollo de todas las fases, desde la recepción de las ternas hasta la designación de las autoridades. En cuanto el Ejecutivo remita las ternas con sus candidatos, se verificará que cumplan con los requisitos y no incurran en inhabilidades para el cargo, posteriormente se convocará a la ciudadanía a impugnar las candidaturas que considere que no cumplen con el perfil requerido; los candidatos que superen estas etapas presentarán ante el Pleno del CPCCS sus planes de trabajo, para que los consejeros resuelvan sobre los ganadores de los procesos. Además, el Pleno del CPCCS conoció el oficio de la Función Electoral, mediante el cual se nombra a la Mgs. Jessica Rojas Vallejo como su delegada en la Comisión Ciudadana de Selección para la designación de la primera autoridad de la Defensoría Pública. El expediente se remitirá al equipo técnico de apoyo, para que realice el proceso de verificación de requisitos e inhabilidades de la delegada, quien también se someterá a la fase de escrutinio público. En otro punto del orden del día, el Pleno resolvió convocar a la ciudadanía para que, de forma individual o colectiva, se inscriba en la siguiente Veeduría Ciudadana: Veeduría para el análisis al proceso de contratación y ejecución del dragado emergente de la Dársena del Puerto Comercial de Esmeraldas, ejecutado en los meses de febrero, marzo y abril de 2022, con la finalidad de transparentar lo actuado en el contrato Nro. APE-2022-004, de conformidad con el oficio número APE-APE-2022-0282-GG, del 13 de julio, enviado por el gerente general de la Autoridad Portuaria de Esmeraldas. Hernán Ulloa Ordóñez Presidente del CPCCS --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hechosecuador/message

New Paradigm Human
BONUS: Sourcing Happiness and Satisfaction from Within

New Paradigm Human

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 9:09


I have an excerpt to share with you from my new exclusive podcast from the Sacral Being Toolkit! In this one, we're talking about why it's important for Generators and MGs to look within for happiness. If you'd like to hear the rest of the episode, check out the Sacral Being Toolkit: https://puregenerators.mykajabi.com/sacral-being-toolkitSupport the show

Not Your Average GOAT
6. Chelsea Gilchrist: From Finding My Own Voice—to Becoming a Voice for the Voiceless

Not Your Average GOAT

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 80:21


Gaining confidence and finding her own voice is something Chelsea Gilchrist, MGS struggled with for awhile, but once she conquered it, she not only had the courage to speak up for herself, she also became the loud vocals for many older adults who had become voiceless themselves. In this conversation, we talk about what it was like for 14-year-old Chelsea trying to cope with her grandmother's dementia; some of the regrets she still has today about not fully understanding the disease back then; and many myths and misconceptions that exist about dementia as well as Alzheimer's today. We also dive into her extraordinary career in the gerontology/aging space. We explore her work in social isolation and falls prevention; touch upon several issues plaguing the aging community today (e.g., poorly managed long-term care facilities, a lack of resources for younger caregivers and the unfortunate reality of many older adults getting separated from their beloved pets despite myriad data illustrating their immense value); and the incredible contributions Chelsea's made as the volunteer President of the junior board of the D.C. area chapter of the Alzheimer's Association. Then, we zoom in closely on some of the ironic ageism Chelsea herself has had to face while working in an industry “dedicated” to fighting ageism, and discuss what it means to be a true leader—especially as it relates to women. Resources Older Adult Companionship Human Animal Bond Research Institute (HABRI) Pet Peace of Mind Mars Petcare Generations United The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation The Eisner Foundation Alzheimer's and Caregiving Eldercare Locator Alzheimer's Association If you would like to learn how to get involved with the D.C. area chapter of the Alzheimer's Association, or send Chelsea a question on anything aging related, you can find her on LinkedIn. Disclaimer: Not Your Average GOAT is produced and edited by Teisha Gillespie with music by Anton Vlasov and Serge Quadrado. All content is copyrighted and should not be reproduced, recreated or reused without explicit permission. Please visit NotYourAverageGOAT.org/Contact for questions.

The Retro Blast Podcast (Retro Gaming Podcast)
Episode 24: Metal Gear Solid

The Retro Blast Podcast (Retro Gaming Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 99:07


Metal Gear Solid wasn't the first game in Hideo Kojima's popular Metal Gear series, but it was arguably the most important. Join us under our cardboard box as we infiltrate Shadow Moses and find out just why this game matters so much. Special Guest: Donnie G Retro from Gamers Week Podcast  Follow our Linktree if you'd like to be a part of our growing retro gaming community on Twitter, Instagram, or Discord! https://linktr.ee/RetroBlastPodcast

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice,