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Accolade given by the Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists

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Best podcasts about sag awards

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Latest podcast episodes about sag awards

Seize the Yay
Bobby Holland Hanton // From stunt double (to Thor!!) and sportsman to starting something new...

Seize the Yay

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 62:54


I doubt there are many of you listening who haven't drooled once or twice over Chris Hemsworth's body before... I mean, you're only human right? WELL, you may NOT have realised you were actually drooling over our GUEST for this week – yep, I'm thrilled to have Chris' legendary body double and professional stuntman Bobby Holland Hanton on the show this week.Bobby has worked on many major Hollywood blockbuster films including Thor, The Avengers, Batman, Captain America, Wonder Woman, Mission Impossible, Star Wars, as well as hit TV show, Game of Thrones earning him a host of awards including 8 SAG AWARDS and 2 EMMYS. You know I love having all sorts of pathways on the show and we all see stunt doubles ALL the time but I've never really thought about how you actually become one, so this one was a BLAST!It kind of makes sense that Bobby's beginnings were in gymnastics starting as young as four building up to becoming a Gold Medalist for Great Britain and competing all around the world – a career interesting and multi-faceted in itself that you'll hear about. PLUS Bobby isn't just a pretty face slash body, he's also just THIS WEEK releasing his first children's picture book - The Adventures of Eddie and Flip Boy. He'll tell you more about it himself, so introducing…. Bobby Holland Hanton!GET THE ADVENTURES OF EDDIE AND FLIP BOY HERE+ Announcements on Insta at @spoonful_of_sarah+ Join our Facebook community here+ Subscribe to not miss out on the next instalment of YAY!

Geektown Radio - TV News, Interviews & UK TV Air Dates
Geektown Behind The Scenes Podcast 61: Stunt Coordinator Matt LeFevour - 'Shining Girls', 'The Batman', & Doubling Chris Hemsworth!

Geektown Radio - TV News, Interviews & UK TV Air Dates

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 21:18


I know many of you might be expecting a normal Geektown Radio episode this week, but unfortunately, we had to skip it due to timing issues. We usually record on Mondays, and I was in London interviewing the cast of Halo (watch out for that interview coming soon!)However, to tide you over until next week, we have an interview with Stunt Coordinator Matt LeFevour, who has worked on a huge array of tv shows and movies, both performing and coordinating stunt work. He was stunt coordinator on the Apple TV+ series 'Shining Girls', Showtime series 'The Chi', along with working on Chicago Fire, Med and PD. On the film side, Matt stunt coordinated Aaron Sorkin's six-time Oscar-nominated feature 'The Trial of the Chicago 7' which earned him a SAG Award nomination for Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble. He has also worked on various comic book projects including almost all of the Batman films from 'Batman Begins' through to 'The Batman', where he served as assistant stunt coordinator. In addition to all that, he is Chris Hemsworth's stunt double for many of his movies, including the 'Thor' films and other appearances in the MCU. He is currently working on 'Power Book IV: Force', and was stunt coordinator on 'Mike', the upcoming Hulu drama based on the life of heavyweight champion Mike Tyson.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/geektown. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

AwardsWatch Oscar and Emmy Podcasts
The AwardsWatch Podcast #139: Recent movies like 'Lightyear,' 'Cha Cha Real Smooth' and 'Elvis' plus our Top 5 Pixar films ranked

AwardsWatch Oscar and Emmy Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 128:51


On episode 139 of The AwardsWatch Podcast, AwardsWatch Executive Editor Ryan McQuade is joined by Editor in Chief Erik Anderson, TV Editor Tyler Doster, and AwardsWatch contributors Sophia Ciminello to discuss what they have been recently watching their Top 5 Pixar Movies, as well as some listener questions and a brand new game. First up is an update within the 2022 AwardsWatch Summer Movie Draft. While it is early in the game, Ryan's team has a wide margin ahead of Erik's team, who still have plenty of time to catch up. Winner of this competition will be announced at the end of August. Since it has been a couple of episodes since everyone talked about movies, Ryan, Erik, Tyler and Sophia each give out some thoughts on some recent releases, including Jurassic World Dominion, Cha Cha Real Smooth, Lightyear, and so much more. Speaking of Lightyear, it was a good transition for everyone to talk about their Top 5 Pixar Movies. Pixar is a staple not just within the world of animation but for each of our hosts, thus as they talk about their favorite films from the studio, they not only talk about their moments of joy in seeing these films, but they also talk about the moments that moved them to their core. It is a beautiful conversation you aren't going to want to miss. For this week's listener questions, the crew talked about the Oscar chances for Dakota Johnson and her latest film, Cha Cha Real Smooth, as well as the Oscar prospects for international smash hit, RRR. They also answer a question about what films, actors, or directors that they think of when they think of each other. This lead to some pretty interesting choices for each host. Finally, the gang play a brand new game called Part of the Ensemble. The game goes as so; Ryan reads a list of actor's names from nominated casts for Best Ensemble in a Film at the SAG Awards. He starts with someone lesser known in the cast, one at a time, till one of the other hosts buzzes in with their guess. It is a lot of fun and something they plan on doing again, next time on the television side. You can listen to The AwardsWatch Podcast wherever you stream podcasts, from iTunes, Soundcloud, Stitcher, Spotify and more. This podcast runs 2h09m. This is a little bit on the long side but we are really proud of this one. Without further ado, let's get into it.

SAG-AFTRA Foundation Conversations
Conversations with Ray Liotta (2017)

SAG-AFTRA Foundation Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 64:00


Career Q&A with Ray Liotta. Moderated by Stacey Wilson Hunt, New York Magazine. Ray Liotta currently stars on the NBC drama “Shades of Blue” as Lt. Matt Wozniak. Liotta started his career with a Golden Globe-nominated performance in Jonathan Demme's “Something Wild” and followed that by co-starring opposite Tom Hulce in “Dominic and Eugene.” He's also well-known for the iconic role of Shoeless Joe Jackson in the Oscar-nominated film “Field of Dreams.” But perhaps the film that brought Liotta his most widespread acclaim was his portrayal of real-life mobster Henry Hill in Martin Scorsese's epic movie “Goodfellas” starring opposite Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci. His performance helped the film earn a Best Picture nomination and solidified Liotta's status with critics and the public alike. Liotta continued to create notable performances in films such as “Copland,” opposite Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel for director James Mangold; “Hannibal,” opposite Anthony Hopkins for director Ridley Scott; “Heartbreakers,” co-starring Sigourney Weaver; and “Blow,” opposite Johnny Depp. Liotta then produced and starred in the intense cop drama “Narc” for director Joe Carnahan. The film received critical acclaim and earned Liotta an Independent Spirit Award nomination. Additional film credits include “Place Beyond the Pines,” starring opposite Ryan Gosling; “The Iceman,” opposite Michael Shannon and Winona Ryder; “Killing Them Softly,” for director Andrew Dominik with Brad Pitt; “The Details,” opposite Tobey Maguire; and “Wanderlust, directed by Judd Apatow. Liotta won an Emmy as Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama in 2005 for a memorable appearance on “ER.” He also earned a SAG Award nomination for Male Actor in a TV Movie or Miniseries for the 1998 HBO telepic “The Rat Pack” playing Frank Sinatra. In 2015 Liotta co-starred on the A&E miniseries “Texas Rising,” co-starring Brendan Fraser and Bill Paxton, and directed by Roland Joffe. Liotta was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries. For his 2004 Broadway debut opposite Frank Langella in Stephen Belber's “Match,” Liotta received a Distinguished Performance honor at the Drama League Awards. A New Jersey native, Liotta began acting while a student at the University of Miami.

AwardsWatch Oscar and Emmy Podcasts
The AwardsWatch Podcast #135: Cannes Film Festival awards, reviewing 'Top Gun: Maverick' and a Tom Cruise filmography face-off

AwardsWatch Oscar and Emmy Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 87:18


On episode 135 of The AwardsWatch Podcast, Executive Editor Ryan McQuade is joined by Editor-In-Chief Erik Anderson, as well as AwardsWatch contributor Dan Bayer, as they review Top Gun Maverick, and talk about the prize winners for the 2022 Cannes Film Festival. As discussed on the last couple of episodes, the Cannes Film Festival is going on, and as of this past week, it wrapped up with the jury prize winners announced, with NEON landing their third straight Palme d'Or winner with Ruben Östlund's Triangle of Sadness. Ryan, Erik, and Dan break down the full list of winners, as well as if they think any of these wins will translate over into an Oscar campaign for the respective films or performances that won. Transitioning over to listener questions, the guys talk about their favorite moments they have experienced at a film festival, and what they watch to decompress after a rough last couple of weeks. They also choose who which musician they would like to see making the jump to the big screen. Diving into some more Oscar related questions, they breakdown some of their favorite VFX Oscar winners of all time, which network they thing the SAG Awards will end up on, and how they would fix the Best International Feature Film category qualifications. Lastly, they look at this year's Best Animated Feature category and examine why there is so much genre bias within the Academy. After that, Ryan and Dan review Top Gun: Maverick, which landed in theaters this past weekend. They talk about the film's spectacle, smocking hot cast, and how it is exceeding all expectations, with both of them clearing expressing that it is better than the original in almost every way. They also give some thoughts on the first trailer for Mission: Impossible – Dead Reckoning Part One, which premiered online this past week. Basically, we live in Tom Cruises world right now, and they are okay with it as he seems to be the only one making these types of practical big-budget films that dare to go above and beyond with each outing. And in the final segment of the show, the gang play the beloved AwardsWatch or Not Game, this time breaking down the filmography of Tom Cruise and pitting his films up against each other. They also give out recommendations for which shows or movies you should be watching right now. You can listen to The AwardsWatch Podcast wherever you stream podcasts, from iTunes, Soundcloud, Stitcher, Spotify and more. This podcast runs 1h27m. Let's get into it.

Little Gold Men
And the First Breakout Hit of Cannes Is.... Top Gun: Maverick

Little Gold Men

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:56


A look ahead at Cannes and the splashy Tom Cruise sequel that will open it, discussion of the Tony Award nominations and the SAG Awards leaving TBS and TNT, and a return discussion of HBO's The Staircase, which has only gotten more interesting as it goes on. Sign up to receive texts from us at Subtext. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Oscar-nominated and multiple Emmy winner Alfre Woodard, star of new series The Porter on BET plus

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 7:45


ABOUT ALFRE WOODARD AND THE PORTERBET+ has a new series on its way called The Porter and it's a civil rights drama that'll keep you coming back for more.The weekly series is set to premiere on May 5th and has an ensemble cast including Alfre Woodard, who also serves as an executive producer for the series.Woodard plays Fay, a woman who runs the local brothel in St. Antoine who is sexy, direct, and takes great pride in living life on her own terms.Set in the early 1920s and inspired by real events, the drama follows two train porters and their friends and families as a tragedy on the job sets them on starkly different paths to better lives - and on a direct collision course with each other.Other cast members include Aml Ameen, Ronnie Rowe Jr., Mouna Traoré, Loren Lott, Olunike Adeliyi, Luke Bilyk, Sabryn, Paul Essiembre, Arnold Pinnock, Bruce Ramsay, and Luc Roderique.The show will premiere on BET+ on Thursday, May 5th with all episodes readily available for streaming. Here's the trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjgaLE16BOoAlfre Woodard's work as an actor has earned her an Oscar nomination, four Emmy Awards and seventeen Emmy nominations, three SAG Awards and a Golden Globe. The versatile Boston University School of Fine Arts graduate has portrayed doctors, judges, mothers high and low, queens, freedom fighters, suburban neighbors, POTUS and a comic book supervillain.Woodard's illustrious body of work includes an Oscar nominated performance in Martin Ritt's Cross Creek; HBO's Mandela, for which she earned an ACE award for her portrayal of Winnie Mandela; Lawrence Kasdan's Grand Canyon; John Sayles' Passion Fish; Joseph Sargent's Miss Evers' Boys, for which she won an Emmy, SAG and Golden Globe Awards; Spike Lee's Crooklyn; Gina Prince-Bythewood's Love and Basketball; Tyler Perry's The Family That Preys; Maya Angelou's Down in The Delta, and, most importantly, her intergalactic turn with Captain Picard in Star Trek: First Contact.We've enjoyed Alfre's astonishing range on screen over four decades, about which she advises "Google me!"She played Betty Applewhite on the ABC drama Desperate Housewives and Ruby Jean Reynolds, mother to Lafayette Reynolds, on HBO's True Blood. Woodard co-starred in Lifetime's hit remake of Steel Magnolias, for which she was nominated for Screen Actors Guild and Emmy Awards, and won a NAACP Image Award for her performance as Ouiser.Most recently, she appeared in the acclaimed drama 12 Years A Slave, directed by Steve McQueen, and Marvel's Captain America: Civil War, plus New Line's Annabelle, and the Netflix Original feature Juanita, as the title character. Somehow she also found time to star in Marvel'S Luke Cage as the diabolical Mariah Dillard, and she also appeared in the Apple series SEE, opposite Jason Momoa. Woodard also gave voice to Sarabi in Jon Favreau's Live Action The Lion King. Recently, her riveting portrayal of a death row prison warden in Chinonye Chukwu's Clemency, was awarded the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.Whilst building this illustrious career, Alfre co-founded Artists for a New South Africa, a nonprofit working to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS and further the cause of democracy and human rights in South Africa and the U.S. For this and her anti apartheid activism she was honored with the Order of Companions of Oliver Tambo, that country's highest civilian medal. Alfre directed and produced, Nelson Mandela's Favorite African Folktales, which won the 2010 Audiobook of the Year, and garnered a 2010 Grammy Award nomination for "Best Children's Spoken Word Album." The audiobook hosts a collaboration of talent both broad and diverse, featuring: Matt Damon, Don Cheadle, Helen Mirren, Alan Rickman, and Samuel L. Jackson.In 2009, President Barack Obama appointed her to his President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities. As part of her work on the Committee, Woodard adopted several high poverty and under-performing public schools around the country.She is an active advocate for the arts in education, largely through her work on the Committee's "Turnaround Arts" initiative, which was launched in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Education and the White House Domestic Policy Council to narrow the achievement gap and increase student engagement through the arts. Now based in the Kennedy Center, Turnaround Arts is spurring the creativity, expanding the scholarship, nurturing the citizenship, and introducing possibility in the lives of 50,000 kids, while turning around 80 formerly 'at risk' schools nationwide.She says acting is her profession, but feels everyone's real job "is to learn how to love each other - in our households, in our communities," she has said. "We do that by working for justice."Woodard is unfazed by the glitz of celebrity, but is grateful for its opportunity to "get her to the mic".  She remains fueled by the values she learned growing up in Tulsa.In November 2014, she was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, and took the opportunity to credit her parents in her acceptance remarks. Her parents, always mindful of the hardship of others, "planted the seed of humanity" in her as a child. "They allowed me artistic as well as personal freedom. They didn't say 'go out and conquer' or 'go out and accumulate,' they just said 'Go. Do it. Be it. Be yourself. Fill yourself all the way up, Alfre, and never, ever forget your neighbor.'" 

Next Best Picture Podcast
Episode 293 - The SAG Awards Need A New Home & The "Don't Worry Darling" Trailer

Next Best Picture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 93:12


For Episode 293, I'm joined by Amy Smith, Josh Parham, Nadia Dalimonte & Tom O'Brien. Today, we're talking about where the SAG Awards will be broadcast since it announced it would not air on TNT/TBS this year due to the Warner Bros. Discovery merger. We also give our thoughts on the trailer for "Don't Worry Darling," go over the polls, discuss other film news, answer your fan-submitted questions, and more! We want to wish all of the moms out there a Happy Mother's Day! We love and appreciate each and every single one of you! Please take a listen down below or subscribe to us on your favorite podcast app. Thank you as always for your continued support, and enjoy the show! Check out more on NextBestPicture.com Please subscribe on... SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/nextbestpicturepodcast iTunes Podcasts - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/negs-best-film-podcast/id1087678387?mt=2 Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/7IMIzpYehTqeUa1d9EC4jT And be sure to help support us on Patreon for as little as $1 a month at https://www.patreon.com/NextBestPicture

Down to Birth
#159 | Yvonne Strahovski's Birth Story: The Most Important Lesson in Childbirth

Down to Birth

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 68:29


Yvonne Strahovski is the Emmy-nominated, SAG Award-nominated and Golden-Globe-nominated actress whose voice you may recognize as the stoic Serena Joy Waterford from The Handmaid's Tale. She is the mother of a toddler and newborn, with starkly different birth stories to share. During Yvonne's first pregnancy, she felt an intuitive pull toward birthing at home, but suppressed her inner voice in favor of the rational, which warned Yvonne that she lived too far from the hospital in the event of a possible transfer.  Choosing not to explore it further, Yvonne had her first baby in the hospital. Despite having an obstetrician she deeply trusted, she felt her birthing body start to shut down as soon as she arrived to the unfamiliar setting and found herself surrounded by numerous "strangers" - e.g. hospital staff. Yvonne began her second pregnancy sensing some PTSD from her first birth, and this time allowed her inner voice to grow louder. Yvonne shares her story of consuming  a series of inspiring home-birth stories on Down to Birth Show and other platforms, until finally she said, "If all these women can do it, why can't I?" Yvonne's second son was born at home in December 2021, with her husband, midwives and doula present, along with some of her closest friends and even her obstetrician, who served as a back-up attendant. Yvonne shares how her fear was never completely eradicated before going into her second labor, and said her supportive team and HypnoBirthing - which she had once assumed was best-suited for those with an inclination toward yoga and meditation - were what kept her erring on the side of grounded and calm through pregnancy and birth rather than fearful.Yvonne commented on the irony of playing Serena Waterford in the world of Gilead during these formative years as a new mother, and is certain she'll have more to say when she can speak freely after the next season drops. Even though Yvonne is typically very private, she felt compelled to join us as a way to pay forward an inspiring story that might reach those with their own inner voices about pursuing home birth. * * * * * * * * * *Connect with us on Instagram @DownToBirthShow. To submit a question for one of our monthly Q&A episodes, visit the Down To Birth website. Connect with us at:Instagram: @downtobirthshow on InstagramEmail: Contact@DownToBirthShow.comCynthia is an expert in the HypnoBirthing method. Her classes are live, interactive and online, and they're offered six times per year. You can reach her by emailing Cynthia@HypnoBirthingCT.com or by visiting HypnoBirthingCT.com or texting 203-952-7299.Trisha is an IBCLC and supports breastfeeding mothers in private online sessions. Email her at Trisha.Ludwig@gmail.com or text 734-649-6294 for more info.We serve women and couples coast to coast.We are so grateful for your reviews and shares - thank you all for your support! Please remember we don't provide medical advice, and to speak with your licensed medical provider related to all your healthcare matters. Thanks for joining us, and see you next week!This show is sponsored by:Silverette USADYPERNOM MaternitySerenity KidsWildbird.coBeautiful Births and BeyondPostpartum SootheSupport the show

SAG-AFTRA Foundation Conversations
Conversations with Jeff Daniels (2016)

SAG-AFTRA Foundation Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 80:11


Career Conversations with Jeff Daniels. Moderated by BroadwayWorld.com's Richard Ridge of "Backstage with Richard Ridge!" Actor, musician, and playwright Jeff Daniels is known for his roles in such films as Terms of Endearment, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Arachnophobia, Dumb & Dumber, The Hours, The Squid and the Whale, and Good Night and Good Luck, as well as his Emmy Award-winning performance on HBO's The Newsroom. Daniels can currently be seen on his return to Broadway in 2016's Blackbird, alongside Michelle Williams. His most recent projects include part 1 of The Divergent Series: Allegiant, alongside Shailene Woodley and Theo James, 20th Century-Fox's The Martian, directed by Ridley Scott, and Universal's Steve Jobs, directed by Danny Boyle. Daniels has received many prestigious nominations over the course of his long career, including four Golden Globes, four SAG Awards, and two Emmys. Alongside screen work, Daniels has many stage credits to his name and is the founder of The Purple Rose Theater Company in Chelsea, Michigan. On Broadway, he has appeared in Yasmina Reza's God of Carnage for which his performance earned a 2009 Tony Award nomination for Best Actor, A. R. Gurney's The Golden Age, Lanford Wilson's Redwood Curtain, and Wilson's Fifth of July. He has appeared off Broadway in productions of Wilson's Lemon Sky and Bradley Rand Smith's adaptation of Johnny Got His Gun. Daniels is also a musician and songwriter, and has recorded six full length albums.

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Stephen Root - Hour 3 (4-20-2022)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 49:58


Rich reacts to Deebo Samuel asking the 49ers for a trade and weighs in on which NFL teams might be most interested in acquiring the disgruntled Niners WR, and reacts to Browns Head Coach Kevin Stefanski's latest comments on Baker Mayfield.   Actor Stephen Root joins Rich in-studio to preview the new season of HBO's ‘Barry,' plays a round of ‘Celebrity True or False' where he reveals he still has that famous red stapler from ‘Office Space,' why he was edited out of Arnold Schwarzenegger's ‘Kindergarten Cop,' says if actor Rip Torn or some of the extras on ‘Dodgeball: a True Underdog Story' were tougher, reveals how Andy Dick got the cast of ‘NewsRadio' banned from the SAG Awards and more. Rich reacts to Deebo Samuel liking a tweet from a Cowboys fan who photoshopped the WR in a Dallas uniform saying Big D would be the LAST place the Niners would trade him. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WHAT'S UP, BRO
WuBro 352 - Ish and Our Top 8

WHAT'S UP, BRO

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 85:17


This week Ish from PLMTY is back joining Nery and Mike as they talk about new Miami area code, top 8, the SAG Awards and more.  Also have a great "Am I The A-Hole" (AITA) scenario. Make sure to "like" and "follow" our Facebook, YouTube and Twitch pages to watch the (video) show LIVE when we record next. Also, we Have MERCH MERCH MERCH available at this link: GEEKMORE MERCH Or you can search "GeekBro" on Amazon or go to TeePublic.com The podcast now has DONATE button and an AMAZON banner that you can click on to support the show.          Want MORE WuBro? Join our NEW Patreon page. Patreon.com/WuBroPod or Click HERE! WuBro is on INSTAGRAM! The podcast now has DONATE button and an AMAZON banner that you can click on to support the show. CLICK HERE

Unleash Your Inner Creative with Lauren LoGrasso
From Walking Dogs to Vogue's Best Dressed At The SAG Awards- Let's Talk Making It w/ Michelle Meredith

Unleash Your Inner Creative with Lauren LoGrasso

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 65:15


On The Guest: Michelle Meredith is an actress most known for her recurring co-star role on the Apple TV+ series, The Morning Show. She's also appeared on shows such as I'm Dying Up Here and Black-ish. From this conversation you'll learn: Giving credit to yourself where credit is due The importance of having creative outlets outside of your career The skill of receiving compliments Accepting what AND how the universe gives you what you want How to navigate giving and receiving help from others Surprising types of codependency Tips for new actors The role of guilt and luck in success How to appreciate the rate at which your career takes off How to be an “early-investor” in your friends' dreams The importance of building a community of support Behind the scenes for an actor on set How to find the joy in smaller parts Tools for dealing with creative disappointment Simple ways to get out of a mental spiral The importance of being open and vulnerable about mental health And so much more! Follow the show @unleashyourinnercreative Follow me @LaurenLoGrasso --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/unleashyourinnercreative/message

We're Watching What?!
We're Interviewing Who?! - Everything Everywhere All at Once with Michelle Yeoh, Ke Huy Quan and Stephanie Hsu

We're Watching What?!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 14:06


Welcome Michelle Yeoh, Ke Huy Quan, and Stephanie Hsu to discuss Everything Everywhere All at Once, emotionally challenging scenes, expectations growing up, and AAPI representation on film. More about Everything Everywhere All at Once Directed by Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert, collectively known as Daniels, the film is a hilarious and big-hearted sci-fi action adventure about an exhausted Chinese American woman (Michelle Yeoh) who can't seem to finish her taxes. Starring: Michelle Yeoh, Ke Huy Quan, Stephanie Hsu, James Hong, Jenny Slate, Harry Shum Jr, and Jamie Lee Curtis. More about Michelle Yeoh Michelle Yeoh is recognized as one of the greatest and the most successful actresses from the East. Michelle can recently be seen as 'Emperor Philippa Georgiou' in CBS's Star Trek: Discovery, in Destin Daniel Cretton's Shang-Chi for Marvel and in Navot Papushado's action-thriller Gunpowder Milkshake. The former Bond girl is best known for her roles in John M. Chu's romantic comedy, Crazy Rich Asians, Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon 1 & 2, Rob Marshall's Memoirs of a Geisha, Roger Spottiswoode's Tomorrow Never Dies and Danny Boyle's Sunshine. Other notable performances include starring in Luc Besson's critically acclaimed biographical lm The Lady and voicing a role in the Dreamworks animated hit, Kung Fu Panda 2. More about Ke Huy Quan Born in Saigon to Chinese immigrants, Ke is the seventh of nine children. He has starred in classics like Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and The Goonies. He has worked as an action choreographer. Ke's love for acting did not wane; however, jobs for Asian Actors in Hollywood remained few and far between. This all changed in 2018 when Crazy Rich Asians, featuring an all-Asian cast took the box of ce by storm, opening new doors for Asian actors. Ke, recognizing Hollywood's acknowledgement of the importance of Asian representation took this as his cue to return to his roots. He decided to step back in front of the camera for Everything Everywhere All at Once. More about Stephanie Hsu Stephanie recently wrapped on season four of Amazon's hit show, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” as Mei, the provocative love-interest to Joel Maisel. The cast won a SAG Award in 2020 for best ensemble in a comedy series. Her past television and lm credits include a recurring role on “The Path,” “Awkwa na is Nora from Queens,” “Femme,” “Set It Up,” “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” and “Girl Code." Everything Everywhere All at Once comes out wide April 8, 2022 Find us at www.werewatchingwhat.com THEDHK can be found at instagram.com/thedhk , twitter.com/thedhk, and facebook.com/thedhkmovies

1A
Best Of: Actors Marlee Matlin And Troy Kotsur Make Movie History In 'CODA'

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 31:46


This year, CODA won three Oscars, including the Academy Award for Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay. "CODA" takes us into the world of the close-knit Rossi family. Jackie and Frank are happily married with one adult son and a daughter about to graduate high school. But money is tight where they live, a fishing town on Massachusetts' coast. Finding a way to make ends meet is even harder as a deaf family.So they rely on the only hearing person in their family, their daughter Ruby, to help them for practically everything. Marlee Matlin stars as Jackie Rossi. She received an Academy Award for her role in "Children of a Lesser God" in 1987 and is the only deaf actor to have won an Oscar. Troy Kotsur stars as Frank Rossi. He recently became the first male deaf actor to be nominated for a SAG Award. We revisit our conversation with Marlee Matlin and Troy Kotsur about authentic representation of deaf culture in Hollywood and why this film breaks barriers. Their interpreters were Jack Jason and Justin Maurer. A transcript is available here. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Trap Bootcamp Podcast
Ep. 19: The Secrets to Living a Life of No Regrets | Guest: Miss Conversation Piece | TBC Podcast

Trap Bootcamp Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 15:14


Are you a Girl on the Grind? V. Brown, affectionately known as Miss Conversation Piece , is the guest on this weeks episode. She is here to share her secrets to living life of no regrets. Join our hosts as they "engage that core" in the Elevate and Dominate segment and show off all the good in a New reel on out WTF segment. This months theme is " Living a Life of No Regrets" and we have a new Candle this month to celebrate that life, available on our Etsy and Trapbootcamp.com. Segments on this Episode Hot Flashes WTF Herb of the Week Elevate & Dominate Miss Conversation Piece is a journalist, brand ambassador, and actress. Her published work has collectively gotten over 5 million views between her various media placements. She has freelanced for outlets such as- EUR Web, Vlad TV, Hip Hop Weekly, Baller Alert, The Shade Room, WorldStar Hip Hop, After buzz TV, Black Hollywood Live, Focus TV Network, The Jasmine Brand and has interviewed A-list talent. Her journey in media began after independently publishing Conversation Piece Magazine in her hometown of Memphis, TN. After three years, she decided to take her work to a visual platform and is now located in Los Angeles, CA where she is destined to be the next big thing online and on your TV screens. Miss Conversation Piece began building the brand Conversation Piece in 2007 and has since been featured as an actress on MTV, ABC, TV One, CW Network, & national commercials for Budweiser, Def Jam, and Cheetos. In addition, V Brown is a motivational speaker, coordinates events, and is a tastemaker for various brands. Miss Conversation Piece has a background in marketing stemming from her education at her alma mater Dillard University in New Orleans, LA and her work experience at Sony Music Entertainment. She is also on the SAG Awards nominee committee. Miss Conversation Piece is now developing a new movement and brand, “Girls on the Grind” as she continues her journey on the road to success. She knew that her GRIND- hosting, acting, & producing, could inspire women and girls while giving them a platform by recognizing the accomplishments of women in various industries. The purpose of Girls on the Grind is to motivate young girls and women looking to make transitions in life. Miss Conversation Piece says that “Even though it can be difficult, a ‘Girl on the Grind' never takes no for an answer, and never lets roadblocks deter her from her goals. The mission is to spark hope & inspiration to other girls on their grind.” https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMG5w22POeew4fO6dO7j8IvRP0JSxMTJv https://youtu.be/MDt_9CGfoEk Say hi on social: https://www.instagram.com/trapbootcampSnapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/oraclejdTwitter: https://twitter.com/TrapBootcamp/ Trapbootcamp/ https://www.pinterest.com/bootcamp1365/_created/ https://www.trapbootcamp.com/YouTube Video URL: *Affiliate Disclaimer: Note this description contains affiliate links that allow you to find the items mentioned in this video and support the channel at no cost to you. While this channel may earn minimal sums when the viewer uses the links, the viewer is in no way obligated to use these links. Thank you for your support! #howtolivewithoutregrets #missconversationpiece #vbrown #podcast #garyvee #overcome #motivationalspeaker --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/trapbootcamppodcast/message

What's Up with Wendy
Lauren Lapkus, Actress & Comedian

What's Up with Wendy

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 22:54


Lauren Lapkus is a SAG Award-winning and Emmy-nominated actress and comedian best known for her role as corrections officer Susan Fischer in Orange is the New Black. She has appeared in films including Jurassic World, The Wrong Missy, in which she starred as the title character opposite David Spade, and Between Two Ferns: The Movie opposite Zach Galifianakis. Lauren's television credits include The Big Bang Theory, Bob's Burgers, Good Girls, Crashing, Lucifer, and the upcoming animated series Bad Crimes.

JAF Project Podcast
Counterparts - Dee Dee Pfeiffer - March 29th 2022

JAF Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 59:42


DEEDEE PFEIFFER!! After a 10-year absence from Hollywood, Dedee Pfeiffer is back starring on the new David E. Kelley helmed drama, BIG SKY. The series is set in rural Montana where private detectives search for two sisters who have been kidnapped by a truck driver on a remote highway. After a successful first season, ABC has picked it up for season 2! During her recent time away from Hollywood, Pfeiffer has been hard at work earning a Bachelors Degree in Psychology at Pierce College, Valley College and California State University Northridge. It was at UCLA where she earned a Masters of Social Work. Her area of concentration includes mental illness, substance use and homelessness. Television fans will know this talented actress from her series regular roles on FOR YOUR LOVE with Holly Robinson Peete, Tamala Jones and James Lesure and from the award-winning comedy series CYBILL opposite Cybill Shepherd and Christine Baranski. This series won a SAG Award for Outstanding Ensemble Series. Other notable small-screen guest roles include but are not limited to ELLEN, SEINFELD, CSI, CSI:NEW YORK, WANTED, FRIENDS and ER. No stranger to the big screen, Pfeiffer also had impressive roles in the films RED SURF opposite George Clooney, FALLING DOWN with Michael Douglas, TUNE IN TOMORROW with Keanu Reeves and INTO THE NIGHT with Jeff Goldblum. Early in her career, she starred in the indie cult film VAMP with the legendary music icon, Grace Jones. In addition, she has dozens of other studio and independent films to her credits including producing the indie award-winning film LOREDO. The short film, THE TUB in which she starred and produced won multiple awards including a festival Best Actress Award. Dedee Pfeiffer, the single mother of two bright and talented young men is happy to be back working at her creative craft. She is eager to return to the living rooms of television fans everywhere with the highly anticipated fall premiere of BIG SKY. @dedeepfeifferofficial- Instagram About Counterparts: Join us for conversations about film, music, health, and life. Two cousins from the Bronx are bringing you entertainment through great conversations. Nothing complicated. Just good talk and some funny commentary. It's LIVE so bring your questions and commentary too! Join us LIVE every Tuesday at 8 pm EST 7PM Central https://lnkd.in/eRbxWUB Thank you for watching and supporting our channel! To further support and become part of our Counterparts Crew, Please visit our merch store! https://lnkd.in/egMwAmT You may also email us at counterpartspodcast@gmail.com. We love to hear from our viewers!

Shock Your Potential
Not a Hair Out of Place - Gregg Giannillo

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 6:38


Are you looking for tips on how to get your hair camera-ready? Gregg Giannillo is an expert at making his clients look effortlessly polished, both on and off camera.   With almost 20 years of experience in the beauty industry, Gregg Giannillo is undoubtedly one of the most influential magnates in the beauty business today. He has coiffed the manes of countless celebrities – Venessa Williams, Lara Spencer, Raquel Zimmerman, Beyoncé, Kathie Lee Gifford and Olivia Palermo, just to name a few. He's been a staple on every major red carpet – The Oscars, Grammy's, CFDA Fashion Awards, Emmy's, People's Choice, Golden Globes and SAG Awards – plus blockbuster movie premieres, press Junkets and more. The incomparable precision of Gregg Giannillo's haircuts have attained a “cult-like” following. Recognized as a true expert in his field, Giannillo has served as beauty expert on the nationally syndicated television show, Better, for over 5 years,  and has lent his expertise to ABC's Good Morning America, AlloyTV, OKTV, and BeautyBoss in numerous make-over and ‘how -to' segments In this snippet from the full-length interview, Giannillo talks about the ups and downs of supporting his clients on live TV, as well as how to fix a quick look that is presentable. Listen in! Social Media Handles https://www.linkedin.com/in/gregg-giannillo-b6b669b/ https://web.facebook.com/giannillo?_rdc=1&_rdr https://twitter.com/giannillo ………………………………………………… Do you want to be a go to expert that news reporters, anchors and media producers turn to? Are you a media professional looking for credible, reliable and timely guests? Shock Your Media Potential is here for you. Shock Your Media Potential is a one of a kind platform that connects vetted experts with news professionals around the globe. As part of the launch of the platform, CEO Michael Sherlock, along with co-host Eddie Luisi, stage manager for Good Morning America, have interviewed 25 media personalities and professionals to ask them the questions you need to know the answers to in order to become more newsworthy, pitch your story better, and get invited back again and again, and much more. Some of their guests are household names, with exceptional on-camera careers. Others are award-winning directors, producers, camera operators, audio engineers, celebrity hair and makeup professionals, and so much more. As a part of our launch celebration, you can participate for free in our Shock Your Media Potential virtual conference, running March 28th through April 1st. To learn more about our platform and our conference today, go to https://www.shockyourmediapotential.com.

VO BOSS Podcast
Voice and AI: PANA

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 35:39


There is nothing more human than storytelling. In this bonus Voice & Ai episode, Anne is joined by award-winning voice actor Emily Lawrence, Co-Founder of The Professional Audiobook Narrators' Association. They discuss the financial vs. social implications of Ai voices, creating a community for audiobook narrators, and why human-ness is an essential part of storytelling… Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast for another episode of the AI and voice series. I'm your host, Anne Ganguzza, and today I'm excited to bring special guest Emily Lawrence to the show. Emily is an award-winning actor and writer that's narrated more than 425 audiobooks for publishers such as McMillan, Harper Collins, Penguin, Random House, Simon and Schuster, and many more. She's incredibly proud to be the co-founder and chair of the newly formed Professional Audiobook Narrators Association, or PANA, as everybody has come to know it. Her greatest loves are storytelling and reading of course. So narrating audiobooks is a dream come true for her. And her other passions include traveling, LARPing, aerial surf, fostering kittens, and chocolate. So I have a lot to talk to you about because I love cats. We know that. I have three of them. And so I just love the fact that you foster kittens. Emily: I do. Anne: And thank you so much for joining me today. It's a pleasure to have you here. Emily: Well, thank you for having me. Anne: Yes. Emily: Happy to be here. Anne: So in addition to the kitties, um, I need to ask you for a more complete description. I have never heard of this, but that might not be a surprise. LARPing. Emily: A-ha. Anne: For those BOSSes in the audience that may not be familiar with that, what is that? Emily: Uh, so LARPing stands for live action role play, and it's the nerdiest thing you've never heard of. Anne: I kinda love that. Emily: Um, so basically it's like -- people tend to be more familiar with Dungeons and Dragons, so it's basically like that, which is a kind of like you're role-playing out a video game kind of, only in Dungeons and Dragons, you sit around a table, and you talk about everything you're doing and you like roll dice to simulate fighting and whatever. And in LARPing, you actually role-play everything. So it's like a bunch of nerds in a park with like foam weapons. Anne: I love it. Emily: Fighting each other. Anne: I love it. That's great. Well, look, hey, the nerdier, the better as far as I'm concerned. Emily: Yeah, no, I love it. Anne: That's fantastic. So again, it's great to get to know the you behind the association that has been newly formed. How old is PANA now? Emily: Uh, well we opened to members, I think it was October 21st or -- Anne: Wow. Emily: -- thereabouts. Anne: Fantastic. So tell me, you know, I'm very excited to hear about this because I think it's probably about time, right, in the audiobook world, that there is an association that is vested in the interests of the community. Talk to me about that. Emily: Yeah. Well, I mean, there have been other organizations such as the Audio Publishers Association, which really represents publishers. Anne: Right. Emily: But narrators and other people in the industry can be members. And then obviously there's SAG-AFTRA which represents narrators as a labor union, but SAG-AFTRA also represents everybody else. Anne: Sure. Emily: So there was no organization that really was dedicated to narrators specifically. And I think you're right. It was about time and long overdue. Anne: So, I know that there's a lot involved in creating an organization. Tell me a little bit about that story and how did that begin? I mean, what was -- were there issues that were coming up in the audiobook world that you were saying, you know what, we need an organization to really take care of our community? Emily: Yeah. There have been talks for many years of -- among narrators of feeling unrepresented in various places and in various ways. And then obviously with the rising danger, I guess, or whatever of AI, I certainly felt like, okay, somebody has to do something. And so earlier this year, there were a lot of conversations in Narrator, Facebook, and other groups just kind of like that made me feel like, okay, we need to organize. We need to come together. And so I did that. Anne: And have a voice. I love that. Well, hey, it's one thing to talk, right, to sit around in groups and talk. I have so much respect for the fact that you pulled something together. I mean, there's a lot of work involved in that. Emily: Yeah. It was definitely a lot of work. I am very grateful to have my co-founder Emily Ellet with me through the whole process. And so we kind of started talking like about what this would be and how the community needs it. And then we just kind of did it. Anne: Well, I -- Emily: Here we are. Anne: You know, I love it. I was looking at your website, which for those BOSSes out there that want to check them out, it is pronarrators.org. I love your statement on who we are. I just think that your mission statement is providing opportunities for raising awareness of the narrator within public consciousness. And you have so many wonderful things that represent that this organization is going to be doing for narrators. Tell me a little bit about the initiatives for those things. Emily: Sure. Well, we're certainly very ambitious. We have a lot of really big plans, mostly around three things really. One is education, education both of narrators in order to raise narration standards throughout the industry, but also education of the public, and education in the industry about narrator needs and the fact that we exist because -- Anne: Sure. Emily: -- a lot of people listen to audiobooks and don't give a second thought to the performer who's bringing that story to life for them. And that's obviously important to us that, especially when you're talking about having humans versus robot narrators, you know, for people to recognize that we're human to begin with is probably really important there. So education in general is a big focus for us. Uh, we also have a focus on advocacy, which is kind of our umbrella term for all of the things that we want to do to help our industry thrive with human narrators as part of the mix, and the changes that we would like to see in order to help make that happen. And then the last one would be just community, fostering a community. As I kind of pointed out before, there was no organization that really represented narrators specifically, and only -- and we have a really wonderful, giving community. I mean, honestly, the narrator community is some of the most wonderful, friendly, open, supportive people I've ever met. You know, for a bunch of people who are essentially competitors, we're all so supportive of each other. We all help each other out all the time. And it felt like it would be really wonderful to have an organization that sort of formally recognizes, celebrates, expands, and strengthens that. Anne: So what sort of -- do you have events planned for things that you've -- meetings coming up, events, community outreach, what sorts of things do you have planned for the future? Emily: So we've got lots of plans. Um, everything's just in the beginning stages. We're a member-driven organization. So we operate entirely on volunteer labor. And so our committees have only just started. I mean, they all had their first meeting last month. And so everything is in its infancy. We're just getting started, but we've got big plans for example, community events to get together both in person and online and sort of, you know, build friendships, but also network and things like that. We have plans for an award ceremony that is going to be community-driven and peer-reviewed. So kind of like the Audies, which is our current Oscars essentially meets like the SAG Award. So it will be like a peer-reviewed award show, but that has different sort of categories than typical award shows that really focus in on celebrating our community in a different way, which I think I'm really excited about. Anne: Plans on collaborating or is it a possibility to do any type of collaborative work with the union? Emily: Oh, absolutely. Yeah. We've reached out to both the APA and SAG-AFTRA announcing our existence -- Anne: Right. Emily: -- and saying that we would really like to work with them to further our mutual goals, and both of them have responded very positively -- Anne: Excellent. Emily: -- and very supportive. And so we really do look forward to working with existing organizations to move everyone forward. Anne: So in terms of membership, so if I wanted to be a member, are there requirements, are there -- do you vet your members? What's involved if I wanted to become a member? Emily: Sure. Anne: Because I personally don't do audiobooks and don't hold that against me. I -- just not in my genre, but I know so many people that are just so passionate about the craft of audiobooks and narrating. So if I wanted to be a member, could I, or what is the process? Emily: So members are -- you're eligible for membership if you have recorded at least one audiobook -- Anne: Okay. Emily: -- that is available on some sort of commercial platform. Anne: Okay. Emily: So it's a very low, you know, if you've narrated one book, you can join. There's dues that have to pay, but then you're a voting member. Anne: Okay, great. Emily: If you do not qualify for a membership, we also are creating sponsorship tiers. So we'll have sponsorship tiers -- Anne: Okay. Emily: -- for -- Anne: Nice. Emily: -- other people in the industry like directors, proofers, editors, et cetera. And those are not ready yet, but once they are, there'll be sort of different ways to support the industry and get benefits and like access to events and things like that for doing stuff. Anne: Got it. Are you an official nonprofit organization? Emily: Okay. So we are operating as a nonprofit. We cannot apply for our nonprofit status until we file our first tax return. Anne: Got it. Emily: So -- Anne: Got -- well, I know that it's an involved thing, which is one of the reasons why -- I've, I've served on the boards of many nonprofits. So I know how involved it can be, which is again, why I have a lot of respect for you taking the initiative to put this together for the community. There's so much work involved in nonprofit, and I know how important volunteers and volunteer efforts go. It's so hard when everybody is busy to take the time and be able to help out in an organization like this. And I really look forward to the success of PANA because I know a lot of organizations that start off with the best of hopes. And then it turns into something where it is an awful lot of work and maybe more work than people anticipate. And so I know how it can be hard to progress. Emily: Well, it's definitely more work than I anticipated. Anne: Yup. Emily: I'm committed. So I'm there. And I know my co-founder Emily Ellet is also very committed, and we have a wonderful board. We've put together a board of some of the most respected -- Anne: Oh yes. Emily: -- people in our industry, and they are all very committed also. Everyone has expressed a sort of surprised at how much work it really is. Anne: Right, yeah. Emily: But, um, you know, everybody has affirmed to me multiple times, as recently as yesterday, that like, you know, we're in this and we're going to make this work. Anne: Well, I think having a voice for the audiobook industry is so important, especially with things that develop within our own industry. I mean, not just in audiobooks, but in the voiceover industry as a whole, we are facing changes, and I've known this because I've done my AI and voice series for at least 30 episodes now. So there are things that are, you know, impending and coming into this industry that we as professionals need to understand, and I don't know, evolve or work with or not, or form an educated strategy in order to co-exist, let's say, with them. So I will talk about the AI elephant in the room, which is AI. And what are your thoughts? I know that it's, it's scary for a lot of us that this technology is coming. And so what is your position on behalf of PANA in regards to let's say the evolution of AI and AI narrators? Emily: Well, we are a pro-narrator organization, pro-human narrator. Anne: Sure. Emily: And so we are dedicated to supporting human narrators however we can. We have a lot of ideas about how to address this, but I think the board has expressed our first priority to be education, because I think that a lot of narrators don't really understand all of the possible risks right now. I think it's wonderful that you're doing this, you know, you're, series to educate people. Um, but I think that we have a task ahead of us just to make sure that people fully understand -- Anne: yeah. Emily: -- what everything is. Like -- Anne: Sure. Emily: -- for example, a lot of people don't understand the difference between creating an artificial voice, like a clone of someone, and machine learning, which I don't know if you've covered in your series, but that's a really big thing that people need to be aware of. Anne: Yeah. Emily: So we have a lot of ideas about how to address that first and foremost, but also I think, you know, a lot of people -- just today I was seeing on Facebook, people posting like, oh, I listened to this, and it's actually not that terrible and blah, blah, blah. And so I think that it's important that we stay ahead of the game. You know, we can't let the robots catch up to us. We have to stay better. But also I think that, I mean, for me personally, this is not like PANA's official position or anything, but me personally, I think that a lot of the conversation is revolving around like dollars and cents. You know, publishers and whoever are going to do what makes the most economic sense to them. And if it's cheaper, consumers will follow suit. And there's just, it's kind of all about money and jobs and the things that general AI conversations are about. Anne: Yeah. Emily: But I think that with our field, it's not only about our jobs, it's also about the art of storytelling. Anne: Sure. Emily: Something that -- Anne: Agreed. Emily: -- I mean verbal storytelling is as old as language. It's like, we've been doing it as humans for forever. And that's, I mean, to me, that's what's at stake here. Like, yes, I would like to have a job. I would like to be able to do what I love to do for the rest of my life. But I'm equally as worried about, you know, the power of literature and stories and what it means to have, you know, just from like a moral, ethical standpoint to have robots sharing the human experience that they literally can't understand because they're an algorithm. And so I think that that is something that needs to be more part of the conversation for everyone, because what we do is an art. Anne: Sure, absolutely. Emily: And even if a robot is possible, it can never actually express anything human. And I think that that's important to me. Anne: Right. I agree with you. And I think that the consuming public has a lot to say, obviously, right? We are a market-driven kind of industry. What the consumer wants, right, or is it marketable to consumers or is it not? I mean, do consumers want to be able to listen to an audiobook and have a human? Like, is it meaningful to have a human or maybe for certain types of audiobooks, does it matter if it's a human or not? There's so many questions about that. Is there any type of book that you feel might be okay with something that's not human? Emily: Um, no, personally I don't because -- Anne: Well, and that makes complete sense. Emily: I mean, sure. I mean, obviously I have a certain point of view, but I think, you know, a lot of people are saying, oh, well, it's more suited for non-fiction. I think that that's kind of insulting, like -- Anne: Yeah, yeah. Emily: -- yes non-fiction does not involve character voices and things like that. Anne: Right. Emily: So from that perspective, it's easier for a robot to do, but I don't know, I've narrated nonfiction too. It's every bit as human. I think that authors would generally be insulted to hear that like, nonfiction is less human than fiction. I mean, I think it's all part of the human experience. Anne: Sure. Emily: It's all part of something that human beings have spent hours or months or years putting together. And they deserve a human voice to express that. Anne: Well, and you're talking to, you know, my specialty corporate narration and e-learning, so I understand that completely. I mean, to me, I mean, I want there to be a human teacher behind the mic. Emily: Sure. Anne: I want there to be, you know, I'm a company, I want there to be a human that's expressing my mission statement or my objective. And again, it comes to people responding and saying, well, you know, it's what the market wants. Or I guess for me, if I'm just one little person, me, I'm not going to necessarily stop the progression of technology. And so in terms of how I need to, I guess, evolve or work with technology that's, that may be encroaching on, let's say genres that I, you know, specialize in, I have to try to think of it in terms of, okay. So are there certain types that might be okay? A lot of times, you know, it's like, why do consumers go to outlets like the -- Fiverr, right, to get their voiceover? Because they don't have a value necessarily, or they don't -- Emily: Sure. Anne: -- or they have a certain value associated with that job. So could this not be the future lower end of -- Emily: Yeah. Lower budget production -- Anne: -- consumer -- yeah, lower budget. Emily: I mean, look, there are already people who are driven by money, you know -- Anne: Yup, yup. Emily: -- want the cheapest product, and they're hiring brand new narrators on indie platforms -- Anne: Yup. Emily: -- for like a quarter of the standard rate -- Anne: Right. Emily: -- or less, you know? Like those people already exist. Will those people start doing robots instead? Anne: Yeah. Emily: Maybe. Anne: Yeah. Emily: You know, who can stop that? Anne: Yeah, exactly. Emily: But I think yes, that is a concern because the more artificially narrated audiobooks that are put in the market, the more consumers get used to it, the harder it is -- Anne: Yeah. Emily: -- to argue our position. Anne: Exactly. Yeah. Emily: It's all concerning. I do agree that there's a certain element that I don't know how much control we have, but I also think that there will always be an element of high budget productions -- Anne: Yes. Emily: -- that will always have a human narrator. Anne: Oh, I completely agree with you. I mean, I don't think that there's ever going to be -- and I'm a tech girl. I worked in technology for 20 years. I do believe that there's always, there's always going to be a place for the human still in voiceover. And I think that narrators that have been for years, you know, telling stories and audiobooks, I mean, that is a level of acting that cannot be reached right now by any type of AI voice. Emily: Oh no. Anne: And I don't know that the public wants -- Emily: No. Anne: -- to be, necessarily feel like they've been duped either. Emily: Sure. Anne: So if they're listening to an audiobook, and they think it might be a human, so I think it's all speculation right now trying to figure out how -- like how long will it take? How far will it go and how human will it sound? And I guess my argument has always been well, humans are developing it. So I think you will always have those people that want to take it to the point where, oh my gosh, is this a deepfake? They'll always try to get there. But I like to think that technology is good inherently, and that because humans are developing technology, it will develop to a point that will help humans and not necessarily take them down or, you know, erase an industry. So I do believe that there will always be a space for a human actor in voiceover. I just don't know how far the AI will go in five to ten years, let's say,. Emily: Sure. But I will say that -- okay. So the way that these algorithms work, right, is that they find the middle ground, right? So they'll always be passible. They'll never be award worthy. Right? They're never going to take acting risks. They're never going to be able to, I mean, unless they have an engineer sit there and like tweak them for every moment, at which case, like just have a voice actor do it. Anne: Well, yeah. Sometimes there is a lot of tweaking involved, that's for sure. Emily: Yeah. So it's like, they'll just, they'll never be able to cry. You know, they'll never really be able to make a listener cry or feel that connected because they're not connected. You know, they're an algorithm. So they'll make the baseline choice, the easy, safe choice, because that's, you know, when you're talking about machine learning or it's studying thousands and thousands and thousands of performances, no two narrators are the same. We wouldn't make the same choices on the same book. So they're going to pick the baseline, which I think means that it will never be as good, no matter what, inherently it'll never be as good as the best narrators. So that's why we need to make all narrators, or at least narrators who want to make a living doing this, the best that they can be, because I don't think machines can ever really, truly catch up with anything that is off the cusp and beautiful and you know, like human, and they'll never be that. Anne: What if -- now here's my what if, because I do know of technology called speech-to speech where it can mimic. So what about an actor who, you know, has great acting skills, and they can act a baseline model, right? And then other voices can be applied on top of that. I mean, it's scary. I've heard it. Emily: Basically have a human narrate the book, but then put someone else's voice on their performance? Anne: Yeah, that is a mimic. So that would make it sound pretty much human, but with somebody else's voice or maybe with a different language. Emily: Well, I mean, if you're doing that, at least that actor is getting paid to do it -- Anne: Right. Emily: -- because they'd have to custom record that book. Anne: Exactly. Emily: Um, so that's, uh, a less scary proposition to me. Anne: Yeah, yeah. Emily: But um, yeah, I mean, I guess that's a possibility. I think the -- what we're more concerned about or most concerned about anyway, is machine learning, which will completely replace humans entirely. So like right now, most of the AI voices are licensed, where it's basically like they have somebody sit in a studio for a few days, and then from there they extrapolate whatever texts they want to be able to put on that person's habits. But machine learning would be like, they can listen to the thousand most popular in audiobooks and narrators of all time and sort of create an algorithm based out of that. Anne: Yes. Emily: And they'll never have to license. They'll never have to pay a single human for that. I think that's the biggest fear is completely taking us out of the equation. I think when it comes to licensing your voice or what you just mentioned, where it's like you record the book and then they put some celebrity's voice on it or something, I mean, personally, I am against those things. But I can see why some people might feel like there's more wiggle room in those. Again, that is not my personal opinion. I want to stop all of this, nip this on the bud. But if we're at a point where it's like, that's all that's left to us, at least there are still humans involved. Anne: Yeah. Well, and I think, again, if we're thinking about how we can evolve with it, if, if that becomes part of it, and I do know that that technology exists. I don't know at this point -- you've got people, you've got other companies that are not voiceover that are creating this technology. So how can we work with those companies or do we choose not to work with those companies right, in order to -- Emily: Sure. Anne: -- stay ahead, right? Is that a possibility? Emily: Um, okay. My personal feeling is I don't support anyone doing that because, and I have more to say, but like, because I feel like that's just kind of giving in. It's, you know, you get a sum of money, which is enough for a few years, and you're basically giving up your whole career in trade, and the careers of all of your colleagues, because how many of those, how many people's voices are they really going to need to license? So ultimately, and I understand that everyone's situation is different and, you know, I shouldn't judge, but ultimately it's a very self-serving decision to do that. And so I personally, and this is my personal opinion, don't feel like I can support those things. However, if someone's going to do it, I think there's a lot of important ways to protect yourself and to protect others in the industry. So I know that our union is working on licensing agreements that would be union. As far as I know, every one of these that I've heard of or seen advertisements for or whatever is non-union. And there's a reason for that. It's because they're taking advantage of people who are vulnerable. Anne: Sure. Emily: And they're taking advantage of people who need the money and who think, oh my gosh, a year's salary for a few days in the booth? Of course, I'm going to do that. Not realizing or not thinking through the consequences. You know, there's a reason that they don't want these contracts to be union because the union would want to, for example, limit how many times that person's voice can be used. Can they make a hundred audiobooks from that person's voice versus a thousand or a million from the same person's voice? You know, they're going to try to put limits on it to make it more equitable and spread it out. And these companies don't want to do that. There was no advantage to them for doing that. And then there's other things like, well, I've talked a bunch about machine learning, which if people don't know, I really highly recommend looking into it. But if you license your voice, and there's no provision in your contract which says that they can't use that for machine learning, they can take that voice and not only use it for clone or whatever, but they can use it to create a totally synthetic voice that they'll never have to pay anyone a dime for. You know, there's a lot of risks, and that's part of why we want to do an educational series is if you're going to do this, which I personally strongly recommend and hope that you won't, but if you will, please at least be smart about it. You know, there are companies involved like, you know, Google and whatever that have really deep pockets, and they can offer the kind of money that a lot of people would have a really hard time turning down. But you also have to remember that there's a lot more at stake here than your wallet or even your career. Um, so we just, if you're going to do it, you have to be smart about it and you have to read those contracts with a fine tooth comb. Anne: So I totally, totally understand all of that. Absolutely. What about the possibility of, as an organization, having a voice and going to these companies and saying -- I want to say it's like in the video gaming industry, when musicians would create music for video games, fighting for their creative licensing rights. What about that sort of thing? Like, and I understand, I mean, Google and you know that a lot of the big companies have a lot of voices already, not even voice actors, right? Just voices -- Emily: Right, yeah. Anne: -- that they're using to learn, right. They're using to put into machine learning and learn and test and create other voices. If as an organization, you could be a strong voice in saying, hey, you know what, anybody's voice that's used really you should be asking permission. There should be compensation. There should be -- Emily: Right. Anne: -- you know -- Emily: We should be getting royalties. Anne: Right, exactly. Emily: You know, like with any contract, you should have a limited period of time -- Anne: Exactly. Emily: -- where you can -- Anne: Exactly. Emily: You can't license in perpetuity, you should get six months or whatever, you know, like, I totally agree. That's part of why, if these contracts are going to happen, they should be union. Anne: Yeah. Emily: And that's why they don't -- they don't want to give us that, they don't. Um, they just want to give us a sum of money that is like an absolute fraction of what we would deserve for doing that kind of work. Anne: I have spoken with some companies who say that they are not those companies. You know, they say that they are for -- Emily: Well, of course they say -- Anne: Well, okay. But that's the thing though, is that, do you assume that all companies are not ethical? You know what I mean, in this game? Emily: I think honestly, I think any company doing this nonunion and not offering the protections and the compensation that any actor doing this deserves it, I don't think that's ethical. This is my personal opinion. I'm not speaking for PANA. Anne: Oh, no, no. Emily: I don't think it's ethical to offer a desperate actor a year salary and have their voice in perpetuity to use -- Anne: I agree. Emily: -- for whatever you want. You know? Anne: I agree with that. And I totally agree with that. And I think that that is absolutely where voice actors need to, you know, they need to be aware of these things that, you know, these companies that are for TTS. For me, that's a big red flag. And if you have a contract or you have a company that wants to pay you for, you know, 3000 lines of whatever, I absolutely believe that you should have a lawyer on that. Um, I say I would not take the job. However, if you go to these AI companies, I'm going to say independently and, you know, and try to work with them, or if there's an organization that can be on a board -- there is an organization right now that is working towards policies and legal contracts that will be in protection of the voice acting community. So I feel like there could be power in that as well. Emily: Sure. Anne: And especially from the audiobook narrators industry as well, because you guys are a -- you're a large community, and you have strong voices, and you work closely with the union. And I think that that is a wonderful thing. And I think that if you can get in on the ground floor of those usage policies, which everybody should have, right? And then, you know, ultimately, you know, fight the good fight hopefully so that the companies now understand, because I think in my research, I'm just going to say, there's a lot of AI companies out there that don't understand the voice acting industry. They don't understand like I actually had to say, no, there's usage. There's -- Emily: Right. Anne: -- you know, there's usage here for how long. And we have contracts that, you know, we can't use our voice for this company, because we're already committed to this company. Emily: Sure. Anne: And there's a lot of education, not just for us, but -- Emily: But for them. Anne: -- on their side as well. And I think that if you have a strong community of voices, that might be something to consider. Like you said, education, maybe education for AI companies as well. Emily: Sure. I -- Anne: Yeah. Emily: -- I would certainly be open to that. Anne: Yeah. Emily: And another one that we haven't mentioned, but that is definitely a concern, at least for me, would be having some sort of limitations on the content that they -- Anne: Yes, absolutely. Emily: -- could use voices for. Anne: Yup, yup. Emily: Like for example, you know, I'm, I'm Jewish. Anne: Yup. Emily: I would be horrified if my voice was used to narrate Nazi propaganda. Anne: Yup. Emily: You know, like that's just -- so I think any, any contract that is like in perpetuity with no limitations is unethical to me -- Anne: Yup. Emily: -- because that's just not how it should work. Anne: Oh yeah. Emily: Am I -- Anne: I agree. Emily: Am I open to working with AI companies to create a more equitable compensation system? Personally I think that that's SAG-AFTRA's job. If I ever hear of an AI company actually having union agreements with SAG-AFTRA, I would feel more kindly towards that AI company. I have yet to hear of that. I would potentially be open to that kind of effort, but honestly, I feel like that's putting the cart before the horse. I don't think we should give up the fight yet. I think we have enough good arguments and resources on our side to not necessarily have to get to that point yet. Anne: Okay. Well, I think that you've definitely got some strong arguments there, and I, I have also been in the forums and I hear what people say, and I understand. I myself have done so much research, probably a little bit more with the companies maybe than others, which is the only reason I bring up the point that there are companies who say that they are ethical and say that they will, you know, your license or your voice belongs to you. It's licensed to you. We will not use it in our machine learning, right? Only with your permission and only if you are compensated fairly, so. Emily: I mean, that's good. Good on those companies. Anne: Yeah. Well, I'm hoping that more companies will, with things, you know, with the unfortunate, but actually now fortunate episode that happened to -- maybe not fortunate. I don't know if I would call it that, but that happened with Bev Standing, right, with her suit against TikTok and the fact that it got settled, it does set a precedent. And so it's unfortunate sometimes that bad things have to happen in order for, right, resulting policies and standards and laws to come into play. You know, the whole thing with the Anthony Bourdain movie, right? Why resurrecting a voice without the permission? I think that there are bad things that happen. However, good things can come out of it afterwards in order to build laws. And I think that that's kind of where we might be in this crazy world of AI. And it seems like AI has just sprung up in the last couple of years like crazy. Emily: Sure. Anne: So I do believe after my research, for me, I think it comes to educating the companies, the AI companies about us and about what we need and about what our rights should be as actors. And I, I'm hoping that my involvement in this podcast is going to also have a voice that can help affect that. And so that they will see that we do need to license our voice. We do need to be fairly compensated. And, you know, I can only hope that my little part in it has something to do with maybe getting things the way that would be fair and equitable to us. Emily: Sure. I mean, I hope that, I hope that your efforts are successful. I do think that, I would like to think that these companies are just unaware or something. Anne: Yeah, yeah. Emily: And I'm sure some of them are, but I also think that some of them are very clever. Anne: Yeah, of course. Emily: And I know there are, for example, I can think of certain companies in the audiobook world who say, well, we won't -- they are clever in the way that they deceive people. You know, they'll say, well, we're not using our data to clone your voice, but they won't say that they're not using the data for machine learning or other things, you know? Like, and I think that, because I think that if we could get companies to do union contracts, that would certainly order it, you know, equivalent. That would certainly be a step forward. But I also think that educating voice actors to understand all of this stuff -- because it is complicated -- Anne: Sure. Emily: - and it's not necessarily natural to a lot of people. I think that's important too, because like right now there are companies where we're -- actors and publishers are literally giving data to and not really recognizing how it could be used. Anne: Agreed, agreed. Emily: And so that's a problem. Anne: I think we always have though, you know what I mean? I'm going to say long before this AI craziness, I think also, you know, there have been devices that have been listening to us and capturing our voices for a long time now. Emily: Sure. Anne: And so it's, I think it's good that we all are educated on it. And I just wanna give a shout-out to the organization, which I'm a part of, and anybody, if you're interested in joining them, it's called the Open Voice Network, which is based on creating standards for anything voice. And there are some companies who create AI voices that are in this organization, but it's all for the good of the voiceover world as well, to make sure that we are fairly compensated and hopefully, you know, we have a set of standards that can work for everyone. So that's openvoicenetwork.org. Maybe that's something that, you know, uh, BOSSes out there, you want to take a look at. I love, love, love what you're doing with PANA. I mean, thank you really. It's, I know how hard it is to bring an organization up and get these things going and moving and being productive. So congratulations to you guys. I think it's an amazing thing you're doing for the audiobook community, and I think it's wonderful what you're doing. Emily: Thank you. Anne: Yeah, yeah. Emily: Appreciate that. Anne: So tell us how people can find out more about your organization and you? Emily: Sure. Uh, pronarrators.org is our website. We are @pronarrators on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, and I'm Emily Lawrence. And you can find me at emilylawrence.com. Anne: Fantastic. Thank you so much, Emily, for spending time with us today. BOSSes, go check out pronarrators.org. Thanks again so much for joining us. I'm going to give a great big shout-out to our sponsor ipDTL. You too can connect and network like a BOSS. Find out more ipdtl.com, and we'll see you guys next week. Thanks so much. Bye! Emily: Bye. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Get Rich Nick
SAG Awards with the B.O. Boys

Get Rich Nick

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 63:17


We got the B.O. Boys Back in the studio. This was actually recorded last week so the timeline of events we discuss reflects that. The SAG Awards provides a LOT OF INSIGHT into the Academy race and we break down what it all means.  Bet on the Oscars! Use our code for Bovada or MyBookie Find all of our Sponsor Discounts @ GetRichNick.com/Sponsors JOIN THE PATREON!  $5 gets you a bonus show every week and $10 gets you ad-free early episodes Follow @getrichnickpodcast on Instagram @getrichnickpod on Twitter BUY OUR SONG ON ITUNES Get Rich Nick Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/GetRichNick See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Some Like It Scott
Ep. 182 - The Batman (feat. Jay Habib)

Some Like It Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 111:25


Hello and welcome to a brand new episode of Some Like It Scott! On this week's episode, the Bat is back, and the two Scotts are joined by countdown series co-host and comic book movie repeat guest, Jay Habib, for a fulsome discussion of the brand new Matt Reeves-directed Batman movie from D.C., aptly named, THE BATMAN. After discussing whether the fresh, noir take on the character works, which in the cast of characters worked more than others, and whether the action and story were worthy of a near-3hr runtime, the two Scotts save some time at the end to discuss the latest in awards season, specifically the results of the SAG Awards. See time codes below:   7:51 - The Batman 1:30:02 - Awards update   Next time: Turning Red (Disney+)   Patreon: www.patreon.com/MediaPlugPods