Podcasts about The Roanoke Times

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Newspaper in Roanoke, Virginia

  • 37PODCASTS
  • 186EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Oct 8, 2021LATEST
The Roanoke Times

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about The Roanoke Times

Latest podcast episodes about The Roanoke Times

96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Leprechaun Lunch 10-8-21

96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


Sean and Jim talk all things Virginia Tech-Notre Dame ahead of this weekend's game. Sean talks to Mike Nyziolek from the Roanoke Times for the Hokie perspective.

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Sean Stires opens the show with Brian Kelly talking about Notre Dame’s offensive line and line coach Jeff Quinn, Mike Nyziolek of the Roanoke Times comes on next to talk Virginia Tech and Bobby Hensley joins the

96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Weekday Sportsbeat 10-5-21

96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Sean Stires opens the show with Brian Kelly talking about Notre Dame's offensive line and line coach Jeff Quinn, Mike Nyziolek of the Roanoke Times comes on next to talk Virginia Tech and Bobby Hensley joins the

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Mike Nyziolek Interview 10-5-21

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Mike Nyziolek of the Roanoke Times talks Virginia Tech football with Sean Stires on Budweiser’s Weekday Sportsbeat.

96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Mike Nyziolek Interview 10-5-21

96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Mike Nyziolek of the Roanoke Times talks Virginia Tech football with Sean Stires on Budweiser's Weekday Sportsbeat.

Transition Virginia
Dwayne Yancey: Innovating regional news in Southside and Southwest Virginia

Transition Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 45:11


The Transition Team discusses the recent contentious Gubernatorial debate and evaluates the policy differences between Terry McAuliffe and Glenn Youngkin. Then they check a voicemail about prison gerrymandering from Buckingham County Supervisor Thomas Miles. Miles wants to know why it's more fair for people in prison to be counted in their home localities than the localities in which they reside. Later Michael and Thomas interview Dwayne Yancey who will launch Cardinal News Sept. 27, a new online news service covering complex regional issues affecting Southwest and Southside Virginia. Cardinal News will launch as the first news organization west of I-81 with a bureau in Richmond Virginia. Yancey discusses his experience innovating local news during his long career with the Roanoke Times. What economic challenges does regional news face? Which issues will they cover that doesn't get covered today? All this and more on this episode of Transition Virginia. See more at www.CardinalNews.org.Transcript at www.transitionva.comPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/transitionvaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TransitionVA/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/transitionvapodcast/Twitter: twitter.com/transitionvaEmail: transitionvapodcast@gmail.com

Charlottesville Community Engagement
September 15, 2021: Smith pool to remain closed through late fall; input sought on natural hazard mitigation plan

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 15:24


In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out is for the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you! In today’s show: Several odds and ends from the Charlottesville Planning Commission meeting The Virginia Film Festival will return to movie screens in Charlottesville this OctoberYour input is requested on thoughts and concerns about future natural disastersWe begin today again with today’s COVID numbers. Today the Virginia Department of Health reports another 4,066 cases today. The number of COVID deaths since the beginning of the pandemic in Virginia is now at 12,170. Since September 1, there have been 309 reported, with 52 reported today. That does not mean all of those fatalities happened within a 24-hour period, as that number is tallied as death certificates are reported to the VDH. When natural disasters strike, governments across the region often cooperate with each other to lend a hand in the emergency response and recovery efforts. Before they strike, there is a federally-mandated document intended to provide direction on how to prepare to lessen their impacts.“The purpose of the Regional Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan is to prepare for natural disasters before they occur, thus reducing loss of life, property damage, and disruption of commerce,” reads the current plan, which was put together by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission.The last plan was adopted in 2018 and it is time to put together the next one as required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management. The TJPDC wants your input in the form of a survey which is now open. Participants are asked if they’ve ever experienced a natural disaster and if so, what the specific impact was. You’ll also be asked what hazards you are concerned about, ranging from dam failure to winter weather. (take the survey) The Virginia Film Festival will return to in-person events this October when the long-running series returns for action. Last year the event pivoted to drive-in and virtual screenings, but will return to the Violet Crown, the Culbreth Theatre, and the Paramount Theater. “The Festival will also continue its very popular Drive-In Movies series at the beautiful Morven Farm in Eastern Albemarle County.” said festival director Jody Kielbasa in a release. “As always, the Festival will work to create the safest environment possible for its audiences, requiring masks at all indoor venues.”The festival will run from October 27 to October 31, and the full program will be announced on September 28. Tickets will go on sale on September 30. A major highlight this year will be the screening of an episode of Dopesick, an upcoming series on Hulu about the nation’s opioid epidemic. The series is based on the work of former Roanoke Times journalist Beth Macy and the event at the Paramount will be presented in partnership with the Virginia Festival of the Book. For more information, visit virginiafilmfestival.org.Albemarle Supervisor Ann Mallek is one of 16 elected officials from around the United States to be appointed to an advisory panel of the Environmental Protection Agency. EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan made appointments to the Local Government Advisory Committee and its Small Community Advisory Subcommittee, and Mallek will serve on the latter. “From tackling climate change to advancing environmental justice, we need local partners at the table to address our most pressing environmental challenges,” Regan said in an August 25 press release. Kwasi Fraser, the Mayor of Purcellville in Loudoun County, is the only other Virginian appointed to either of the two groups. Speaking of appointments, last week Governor Ralph Northam appointed several Charlottesville residents to the Virginia Board of Workforce Development. They are:Rich Allevi, Vice President of Development, Sun Tribe SolarJohn Bahouth Jr., Executive Vice President, Apex Clean EnergyTierney T. Fairchild, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Resilience EducationAntonio Rice, President and Chief Executive Officer, Jobs for Virginia GraduatesThe Virginia Board of Workforce Development will meet next week for a special briefing. The board’s executive is Jane Dittmar, a former member of the Albemarle Board of Supervisors. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement. Time for two quick Patreon-shout-outs. One person wants you to know "We keep each other safe. Get vaccinated, wear a mask, wash your hands, and keep your distance."And in another one, one brand new Patreon supporter wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!For the rest of the show today, highlights from last night’s City Planning Commission meeting. I want to state up front that this newsletter does not feature the meeting’s main event, which was a public hearing for 240 Stribling in the Fry’s Spring neighborhood. That conversation that focused on a novel method of funding infrastructure improvements to support additional vehicular and human-powered traffic. I’m going to focus on that in an upcoming newsletter, but I want to get one concept on your mind. Let’s get some legal guidance from City Attorney Lisa Robertson about that mythical beast known as a “proffer.” For large developments that require a rezoning or a special use permit, you may also see the applicant offer cash or specific improvements as a required condition if their desired land use change is accepted. “Proffers are really to deal with impacts generated by the development itself and to provide cash for infrastructure that’s more directly sort of connected to or necessitated by the development,” Robertson said during the Commission’s pre-meeting. “In this situation as evidenced by the fact that the Stribling Avenue need for sidewalks has already been documented for a number of years in the city’s master plans and [Capital Improvement Program].”Southern Development is the applicant behind 240 Stribling had wanted to make its willingness to fund some of the infrastructure improvements in a proffer, but Robertson asked to pursue the matter in a different way because proffers are not two-way agreements. What happened with that? We’ll come back to that tomorrow. Highlights from the meetingAt the top of the actual meeting, the Commission elected Lyle Solla-Yates to serve as the body’s Chair. Solla-Yates was appointed to the seven-person body in March 2018 and succeeds Hosea Mitchell, who will remain on the commission. “Thank you very much Chair Mitchell for your two years of excellent service and for this honor and attempting to follow you,” Solla-Yates said. “Remarkable opportunity.”Next, Commissioners gave various reports on the various committees they are on. This is a good way to find out quickly a lot of things that are going on. Commissioner Mitchell said he and Commissioner Jody Lahendro with city Parks and Recreation officials reviewing a major problem in McIntire Park.“The drainage in McIntire Park is also creating a violation of the Department of Environmental Quality, their standards,” Mitchell said. “That is going to be a top priority and that’s going to be about $350,000 that we will be asking Council to approve but this is a must-do. We are in violation if we don’t fix that.” Mitchell said repairs to bring the outdoor Onesty Pool back next summer will cost about $400,000. There’s a lot of erosion and standing water at Oakwood Cemetery that will cost about $52,000.“And the last must-do thing is a comprehensive master plan,” Mitchell said. “We haven’t had anything like that in a number of years and our future is going to be relentless for Parks and Rec if we don’t do that and that’s going to be about $150,000.”Mitchell said the Smith Aquatic and Fitness Center is not expected to open now until late fall. Smith has been plagued with air quality problems since it opened in 2010. The facility shut down for several weeks in 2015 to install new exhaust pipes and has been closed since the spring of 2020 for at least $2.25 million in repairs. At least, that’s what Council approved as a capital improvement program budget line item in the Fiscal Year 2021 budget. In any case, Mitchell also announced that Todd Brown will be leaving his position as director of the city parks and recreation department to take a position in Fredericksburg. Bill Palmer, the University of Virginia’s liaison on the Charlottesville Planning Commission, reminded the Commission that UVA is working on an update of its Grounds Framework Plan. Palmer did not have much specific information but the closed-door Land Use and Environmental Planning Committee got a briefing at their meeting on July 23. “The Plan will be underway from Summer 2021 to Fall 2022 and includes a robust engagement process with the University and regional community,” reads a presentation made to LUEPC. The Grounds Framework Plan is intended to guide planning and development over the next 20 years with an emphasis on sustainability, resiliency, and equity. Some guidance in the presentation is to “capitalize on the potential of existing and new facilities” and “holistically consider Grounds as an integrated campus of mixed-use buildings and green spaces.”The firm Urban Strategies has been hired to conduct the work, which will build on smaller plans developed in the past several years ranging from the 2015 Brandon Avenue Master Plan to the 2019 Emmet Ivy Task Force report. UVa is also undertaking an affordable housing initiative to build up to 1,500 units on land that either UVA or its real estate foundation controls. The community also got a first look at Jim Freas, the new director of the City’s Department of Neighborhood Development Services. “Today is my second day so still finding my feet and learning my way around the building,” Freas said on Tuesday. Freas comes to the position from a similar one in Natick, Massachusetts. Natick consists of over 16 square miles in Middlesex County and has a population of 37,000 according to the U.S. Census. Thank you again for reading today. Want one of those shout-outs? Consider becoming a Patreon supporter. For $25 a month, you get four shout-outs spread across the various programs. That price will increase in the near future. Questions? Drop me a line! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

James Crepea Show
James Crepea Show 9/2/21: Big 12 eyeing 4 for expansion, Arizona reporter Michael Lev, Cal reporter Jim McGill, Va. Tech reporter Michael Niziolek, Fresno State coach Kalen DeBoer, USC reporter Antonio Morales

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 94:27


On Thursday's edition of The James Crepea Show on Fox Sports Eugene James discusses the Big 12 eyeing 4 for expansion, Arizona beat reporter Michael Lev of the Arizona Daily Star previews the season opener vs. BYU, Cal beat reporter Jim McGill of Bear Insider previews the season opener vs. Nevada, Virginia Tech beat reporter Michael Niziolek of the Roanoke Times discusses former Oregon QB Braxton Burmeister leading the Hokies vs. North Carolina, Fresno State coach Kalen DeBoer recaps the win over UConn and previews Saturday's game at Oregon and USC beat reporter Antonio Morales of The Athletic previews the season opener vs. San Jose State

James Crepea Show
9/2/21: Virginia Tech beat reporter Michael Niziolek

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 11:37


Virginia Tech beat reporter Michael Niziolek of the Roanoke Times returns to discuss former Oregon QB Braxton Burmeister leading the Hokies into the season opener vs. North Carolina

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 4, 2021: Greystar submits rezoning application for 525-unit Old Ivy residences; Charlottesville hires a planning director

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 16:47


In today’s Substack-fueled shout-out, Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit the Code for Charlottesville website to learn more, including details on projects that are underway.In this edition of the program:Charlottesville City Council discusses a rezoning in Belmont zoning, bringing up issues of affordability and ensuring safe connectivityCharlottesville hires a new planning director An international developer has submitted rezoning plans for 525 units on Old Ivy RoadThe summer surge in COVID-19 continues with another 1,717 cases reported this morning by the Virginia Department of Health. The percent positivity rate has increased to 6.5 percent. In the Blue Ridge Health District there are another 37 cases reported, and the percent positivity is at 4.2 percent.  The Central Shenandoah Health District reports 39 today, and Central Virginia Health District reports 34. There are some interesting geographic variances. The Alexandria district reports 19 while the Leonwisco district in far southwest Virginia reports 53 today and the neighboring Mount Rogers district reports 49.Six months ago today, the VDH reported 3,059 new cases. The agency will update a dashboard that breaks down cases by vaccination status on Friday.If you have questions about what’s happening, you’ll have the chance to ask health officials questions at a town hall that the Blue Ridge Health District will hold on Thursday, August 5, at 1 p.m. Panelists will include Dr. Denise Bonds of the health district and pediatricians Dr. Paige Perriello and Dr. Jeffrey Vergales.  Register on Zoom.On Tuesday, the Roanoke County School Board voted 3-2 to not require masks for kindergarten through 5th grade, according to the Roanoke Times. A look at cases in Virginia over the last 180 days. View the data yourself.Charlottesville has a new director of the department that oversees land use and zoning within the city. James Freas will be the next Director of Neighborhood Development Services, a position that’s been held by Alexander Ikefuna for the past six years. Freas is currently the director of Community and Economic Development in the town of Natick in Massachusetts, a position he has held since November 2019. Before that, he worked in land use positions in Newton, Massachusetts. He also served four years as a city planner in Hampton from 2005 to 2009. This will be a return to Charlottesville for Freas, who graduated from the University of Virginia with an undergraduate degree in psychology. He also earned a Master of Community Planning from the University of Rhode Island and a Master of Studies in Environmental Law from the Vermont Law School. "I am excited to be returning to Virginia and eager to get started with the City,” Freas said in a release. “There are a number of important conversations happening right now around development and zoning and I look forward to engaging with the community.”Freas will report to Deputy City Manager Sam Sanders and begins work on September 13. James Freas (Credit: City of Charlottesville)A developer that builds rental housing throughout the world has filed an application with Albemarle County to rezone 36 acres of undeveloped land on Old Ivy Road for 525 units. Greystar wants to build on property to the west of the University Village retirement community and Huntington Village. “The residences planned for the Property are proposed to be entirely for rent, at least initially, in response to a strong interest in rental properties in the area,” reads the narrative for the proposal. In all there are five properties involved in what’s being called Old Ivy Residences, all but two of which are zoned already at the R-15 zoning category required for density. One 5.52 acre property is zoned R-1. However, there is also an application to change the status of steep slopes on the property from preserved to managed. The lands are currently owned by the Filthy Beast LLC, Father Goose LLC, and the Beyer Family Investment Partnership. According to the narrative, there would be 77 single-family homes, 43 townhouses, 58 duplexes and 312 apartments. Again, all rental. “Market research demonstrates a demand for single- family residences for young families, young professionals, graduate students and retirees who desire more space but are not interested in, or able to purchase a home at this stage of their lives,” the narrative continues. An existing pond on the property would be retained and serve as open space and for stormwater management. Some of the land had been purchased by the Virginia Department of Transportation for the Western Bypass, a project that was canceled in 2014. The western edge of the property is the U.S. 250 bypass You’re listening to Charlottesville Community Engagement. In this subscriber supported public service announcement, over the course of the pandemic, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society has provided hours and hours of interviews, presentations, and discussions about interpretations and recollections of the past. All of this is available for you to watch, for free, on the Historical Society’s YouTube Channel. There’s even an appearance by me, talking about my work on this newsletter. Take a look! *There’s an age-old question in land use. Which comes first? The development, or the infrastructure? Should developments be limited in size if all of the pieces aren’t yet in place to support additional residents? The topic came up during Council’s consideration on August 2 on the rezoning of 1206 Carlton Avenue which will allow development of an eight-unit apartment complex on a currently empty lot in Belmont. The project also requires a special use permit. City planner Matt Alfele represented city staff. “The applicant is also requesting side setbacks be modified from 13 feet to 8 feet,” Alfele said. “The application materials indicate the height of the building would be approximately 40 feet but no greater than the R-3 allotted 45 feet.” Charles Neer of Chestnut Avenue appealed to Council to deny the rezoning, as a previous Council had done for that property in October 2018. “The petitioner has come back again asking to rezone the property, increasing the density from six to eight and not increasing the parking,” Neer said.The project is being developed by Management Services Inc., a firm represented by civil engineer Justin Shimp who we’ll hear from later.This rezoning comes at a time when there is heightened attention on the cost of housing. The Alfele said the Planning Commission had asked Shimp about how much it would cost to live in the apartments. The red star marks 1206 Carlton Avenue“The applicant stated it would be the $1,100 to $1,500 range for a mix of one and two bedroom units within the development,” Alfele said. “The Planning Commission also stated that this type of housing, missing middle, would support more housing opportunities in the neighborhood.”In his presentation, Shimp laid out the dimensions for the proposed building. “So the premise is here that we have a small building that is 26’ by 94’ so its essentially about the size of two single family houses stacked back to back, with a stairwell in the center, is the scale of the house, being about three stories,” Shimp said. Four of the units are one bedroom, and the other four are two bedroom units.    Shimp also said this proposal contains one more parking space than the one denied in 2019. “It is not intended to be luxury type of housing,” Shimp said. “The developer of this is not in that. They’re trying to build a simple structure with moderate price housing.”Shimp stated the rents would effectively be within the range of affordability for people and households making 80 percent of the area median income.  He said the property had been zoned R-3 until a city-wide rezoning in 2003. Charlottesville Mayor Nikuyah Walker had concerns there was not enough parking, and that the developer would not be required to add sidewalks elsewhere in the neighborhood as part of the development. She said the city should not have to be the sole party responsible for building infrastructure to support growth. “The developers are talking about feasibility and we never ask them questions about what that means in terms of profit for them and I know I’ve been told quite a few times that that’s apparently not our business,” Walker said. “How can they ask us for more but we think something that’s necessary for the neighborhood and especially for the new community members, that if we’re talking about walkability that we want them to walk somewhere and be safe. I just don’t understand how we think that that is not something that is acceptable to tie into a request when they are asking us to build more than they can build by-right.”Councilor Lloyd Snook  said if the city is going to intentionally increase density, there need to be plans for how the infrastructure will follow. “Whether the infrastructure is provided by the developer or whether it is provided by the city at our expense, and as I look at that area the first that concerns me is that the streets are all pretty narrow, the lots are pretty close together and that’s fine,” Snook said. “But if we’re going to have close together lots and an emphasis on walkability, then we also ought to be having an emphasis on sidewalks and sight lines on the roads that we’ve got. A lot of the roads not only are narrow but they twist and turn a little bit. I would like to think about whether there are things the city would recognize that there are things that we would like to go in that area.”There is no small area plan for Belmont. The 2007 Comprehensive Plan has an appendix that compile neighborhood input that had been collected by the defunct Charlottesville Community Design Center. There’s also the 2015 Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan as well as the also the 2016 Streets That Work plan, which is intended to make streets serve pedestrians and cyclists. Those are handy documents to have, but city engineer Jack Dawson said they are not always useful in cases like such as this. “There is sort of a missing link I would say very generally between developing a single property and looking at the overall multimodal network,” Dawson said. Neighborhood input in the 2007 Comprehensive Plan (page 302 of the PDF)But in the case of 1206 Carlton, Shimp pointed out that there is a sidewalk on one side of Carlton Avenue. He said the issue is a request to build a sidewalk on to Chestnut Street. “We have sidewalks on our side that will get you all the way into Belmont,” Shimp said. “It’s not an issue. There was a question of could we connect to across the street, and that road comes down at a pretty rough slope and I don’t think it’s possible to build a sidewalk without substantial work and probably right of way condemnation. Those are all outside the limits of this project.”Councilor Michael Payne has joined Council since the October 2019 vote. He said he supported the project as a good example of infill development that would provide workforce housing. “You know, I was just comparing it some recent apartments that have come on line,” Payne said. “These are half the rent of some of the new apartments that have come online.”Walker wanted to know what would prevent those units from increasing in rent anyway. Shimp said the design of the project would limit its worth on the open market.“The square footages are not substantial,” Shimp said. “It’s a smaller unit. There’s not swimming pools or other sort luxury amenities. It’s just designed as a workforce housing structure. That’s for the neighborhood that it is in.”Walker said that at one point, her house in Belmont was considered workforce housing with small homes on small lots. “Mill workers at the IX building and now you have houses that are selling for $300,000 and up,” Walker said. One home on Walker’s street that is blocks away sold in June for $452,500, or nearly 48 percent of the 2021 assessment. Shimp said a lack of non-luxury units in the community on the market helps contribute to the rising market price for housing. He again said this project would provide the “missing middle” prompting a question.“So when you are saying missing middle, what does that mean for you?” Walker asked.“That means something that is basically more than a duplex but less than a garden apartment building,” Shimp said. Shimp said that “missing middle” was about the structure, and not about the income of those in it. However, he also said he would be submitting a triplex to city officials and hoped the rent in those would be in the $800 range. Walker expressed concern the rents would not remain low without a guarantee. Shimp said he would like to see a city policy that would make it easier to build houses with rents at lower price points. That is not currently in place. Councilor Lloyd Snook said there was not much the city could do to put an affordability guarantee in place. “In a market economy, I don’t know how you guarantee that kind of thing more than a years down the road anyway,” Snook said. There was no official vote on the rezoning because a second reading is needed. A majority of Councilors did indicate support. It will come back up for approval at a future Council meeting. Before you go! To keep this program going, two things need to happen. I need to increase the number of people who sign up for this email. I also need more of you to sign up for paid subscription through Substack here. Ting Charlottesville will match your contribution as a sign of their support for local independent journalism. So, do consider signing up and drop me a line if you have questions. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 07-22-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 42:22


Hour 2… Rick, Neal and Dustin the Intern hear from Braxton Burmeister from the ACC Kickoff Media Day, his core of receivers returning to VT and a look ahead to 1st game. Later…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling; his thoughts on ACC Media Day, his picks for each division and is UNC really that good? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 07-19-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 39:37


Hour 3…In the power hour Rick and Neal give away a Papa Johns pizza for “Who hit most home runs after the all-star break”. Steroids in baseball and still…why is Pete Rose not in the hall of fame? In the bottom of the hour, Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Mike Niziolek as they discuss in-state recruiting, a 4-star OL coming to VT and the strength of the VT defense.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 07-15-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 43:00


Hour 2… Rick, Neal and Dustin the Intern talk about the Open Championship, how sports need feuds and the greatest golfers of all time. Later…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling; his thoughts on the failed “Texas pipeline” for VT football, early betting lines for college football and is UNC really that good? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 07-12-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 39:47


Hour 3…In the power hour Rick, Neal and Intern Dustin give away a Papa Johns pizza, town pronunciations and real country music. In the bottom of the hour, Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Mike Niziolek as they discuss in-state recruiting, a 4-star RB coming to VT and the NIL impact on the NCAA.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 07-08-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 41:09


Hour 2… Rick and Neal talk about Shohei Ohtani hitting his 32nd HR this season, the MLB homerun derby and the problems with the marketability of the MLB. Later…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling; his thoughts on UNC this season, MLB marketing, Appy League attendance problems and he'll be watching the Euro Final!!! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Aaron McFarling, Roanoke Times With Sports Betting Tips And Advice

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 13:21


Today on the Fast Lane pres. by Autos By Nelson: - Ed and Trey Lyle preview the #NBA Finals - Aaron McFarling Sports (Roanoke Times Sports) on his #EURO2020 hot streak and NIL - Poplar Grove Golf Club Dir. Of Instruction Dick Mast on his performance in the PGA Champions Tour

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 07-01-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 42:02


Hour 2… Rick and Neal talk more NIL, Tyrece Radford of VT entering the portal, the Longest Yard and Teen Wolf. Later…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling as they discuss how the NIL will affect college athletics, Tyrece leaving VT, NCST only has self to blame and the draws in Euro are good for him. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 06-24-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 40:28


Hour 3…In the power hour, Rick is joined by Roanoke Times sports columnist Aaron McFarling as they discuss getting to cover the Radford HS State Final match, the MLB sticky substance checks, Kyle Larson's run through NASCAR and a look ahead to his weekend. In the bottom of the hour, Rick welcomes in Dwight Vick, former All Conference Lineman for VT and creator of Vicktory Life (@vicktorylife), they talk about his former teammate Shane Beamer now a head coach and the Supreme Court decision on the NCAA. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 582 (6-21-21): Where Headwaters Flow, Rivers Begin

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:09). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-18-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 21, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2017 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 – instrumentalThat's part of “Highland,” by the group Wake Up Robin, with musicians from North Carolina, New York, California, and Washington State.  It opens an episode about waterways in the highest and most upstream part of watersheds, where water starts following a channel and flowing overland towards rivers.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to two Virginia examples, and see if you can guess the name for these upper watershed features.  And here's a hint: get this right and you'll stream to the head of water class.SOUND - ~ 11 sec If you guessed headwater streams, you're right!  Headwater streams are the first flowing waters in the upper part of a river's watershed.  These relatively small streams have a big range of functions, including as habitat for certain organisms or life stages, and as a source of water, materials, and organisms for downstream waters. Understanding the location and length of headwater streams in the Appalachian Mountains, particularly in response to storms, was the research goal of Carrie Jensen, a graduate student from 2014 to 2018 in Virginia Tech's Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.   In November 2017, Ms. Jensen described her research and its significance in just 90 seconds during the “Nutshell Games,” held by Virginia Tech's Center for Communicating Science.  Here's Ms. Jensen's presentation. GUEST VOICE - ~84 sec – “Hi, everyone.  My name is Carrie, and I study changes in stream length in Appalachian headwaters, which are the small streams where our rivers start on the landscape.  So I literally walk upstream with a GPS unit until I find where a stream begins in the mountains.  And these headwaters can expand and contract in length through time, getting longer when it's wet after it rains, and getting shorter during dry periods.  And I wanted to know if this expansion and contraction behavior is the same everywhere.  So I matched changes in stream length across the Appalachian Mountains and actually found some pretty big differences.  At some of my sites, stream length is really stable and hardly changes across a huge range of flows, but at other sites there's a lot of expansion and contraction: stream length varies from tens of feet to a couple of miles.  And this work is relevant for pretty much any application that requires knowing where streams are and when they have water.  So where to build stuff; how to build stuff; where you need riparian buffers of trees to protect water quality.  And normally we rely on maps for this information.  But the blue lines representing streams on maps don't tell us if the stream has water all the time, or 75 percent of the time, or maybe only once every couple of years.  So research describing and predicting these changes in stream length can help us better manage and protect our water resources.  Thank you.”As Ms. Jensen's work shows, there's much to know about headwaters, and such information can help us better understand quantity and quality patterns far downstream. Thanks to Carrie Jensen for permission to use the audio from her Nutshell Games talk.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstand for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Highland.”MUSIC - ~17 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 397, 12-4-17. The Nutshell Games are organized by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science to give graduate students a forum for describing their research in a short presentation designed for non-scientists.  More information about the Center for Communicating Science is available online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/.  Nutshell Games videos are available online at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC01cz4Mal3-AOZeODCauLHw.  Two news articles about the Nutshell Games are New center focuses on the art of communicating science effectively, Virginia Tech News, 2/28/17; and Understandable communication aim of first 'Nutshell Games', Roanoke Times, 3/3/17.“Highland,” from the 2018 album “Wake Up Robin,” on Great Bear Records, by the group of the same name, is used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about the album and band is available online at https://wakeuprobin.bandcamp.com.The sounds of headwater streams heard in this episode were recorded in Blacksburg, Va.'s Heritage Park on July 27, 2016, and in Blacksburg on Brush Mountain on January 31, 2010 (the latter stream is shown in the photos below). Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two views of a headwaters stream tributary to Toms Creek (New River basin) on Brush Mountain in Blacksburg, Va.: upper photo December 25, 2013; lower photo December 2, 2017. SOURCES Used for Audio Richard B. Alexander et al., “The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality,” Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 43, No. 1, February 2007, pages 41-59; available online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307624/(subscription may be required). Carrie Jensen, “Project Report, 2016 VWRRC Student Grant: Sensors reveal the timing and pattern of stream flow in headwaters after storms,” July 10, 2017, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg. Sacramento [Calif.] River Watershed Program, “Importance of the Headwaters,” by Todd Sloat, 9/21/14, online at https://sacriver.org/watershed-blog/importance-of-the-headwaters/. Craig Snyder, et al., “Significance of Headwater Streams and Perennial Springs in Ecological Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park,” 2013, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2013–1178; available online (as a PDF) at https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1178/pdf/ofr2013-1178.pdf. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Resources of the United States/Water Basics Glossary/Headwaters,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/water-basics_glossary.html#H. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Glossary/Headwater,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/dictionary.html#H. Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science, online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, “The Importance of Headwater Streams,” online at https://dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Pages/Headwaters.aspx. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/ U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml.  Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity.  Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia river basins.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021, so the episode number, date, and link may change. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge and three watersheds - Episode 209, 4-14-14. Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 334, 9-19-16. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – EP365 – 4/24/17. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16.Following are links to other episodes with information from presentations at the Nutshell Games, produced by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Sciences.Episode

new york bay university agency california music natural earth state audio college change sound accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical pond research ocean weather government education recreation conservation vol north carolina appalachian chesapeake snow gps environment wwe journal types organisms images ms va significance msonormal commonwealth stream highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide water resources biology rivers grade colorful forest resources washington state madison county signature bio continental scales blue ridge guest voice watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater ohio river environmental protection virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes communicating science blacksburg james river msohyperlink appalachian mountains smith river sections richard b life sciences stormwater headwaters headwater new river environmental conservation policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa heritage park new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap emerald ash borer sols understandable tennessee river tmdl geological survey shenandoah national park west virginia department biotic living systems roanoke times virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 06-21-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 41:25


Hour 3…In the power hour Rick continues his talk with Spencer Hodes (@PolyesterUnis) owner of Vintage Jerseys & Hats, of all things MLB uniforms. Which teams went down the wrong side with terrible uni's, how the uni's resonate with fans, why baseball over all other uniforms, best logos in the MLB and his massive hat and jersey collection! In the bottom of the hour, Rick welcomes in Mike Niziolek of the Roanoke Times. They discuss the slew of new VT recruits, the strong TE class, and a high ranked linebacker joins the class. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 06-17-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 41:58


Hour 2… Rick and Neal talk about the US Open, great 90's country bands, the NCAA coming down on Arizona State and the new NFL rules regarding vaccinations. Later…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling as they discuss his recent vacation and taking in the craps game at the local casino, high school sports being back with full crowds, and UVA baseball's run to the CWS. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 06-14-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 41:43


Hour 3…In the power hour Rick and Neal talk about Danish soccer player Christian Eriksen collapsing during his Euro match, Brett “the Hitman” Hart and the wonderful documentaries on professional wrestling.   In the bottom of the hour, Rick welcomes in Mike Niziolek of the Roanoke Times. They discuss the new VT recruits, where VT stands on the NIL debate, sports betting and his thoughts on the possibly change in the college football playoffs. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 06-07-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 40:18


Hour 3…In the power hour Rick and Neal give away a BDST Tee and talk the return of the USFL! In the bottom of the hour, Rick welcomes in Mike Niziolek of the Roanoke Times to discuss the overwhelming problems at VT with the impending charges. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 06-03-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 41:42


Hour 2… Rick and Neal give away a BDST Tee shirt for “Which four NFL teams have never been in a Super Bowl?” Later…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling as they talk about VT's football troubles, Coach K stepping down after this season and JMU continued run to the CWS. (Side Note: AMac has never seen Smokey and the Bandit…really?) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 05-31-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 43:11


Hour 3…In the power hour Rick and Neal the Love Boat, Andy Griffith Show, MASH and other great TV shows. In the bottom of the hour, Rick welcomes in Mike Niziolek of the Roanoke Times to discuss VT’s recent release of the schedule times, O-line commitments and the satellite camps. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Whad'ya Know Podcast
WYK Bus Tour: Roanoke VA 6 - 18 - 05

Whad'ya Know Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 117:59


From Roanoke VA with Ralph Berrier Jr of the Roanoke Times, Roddy Moore of the Ferrum College Blue Ridge Institute and the Dry Hill Draggers-- And, of course, Jim Packard, John Thulin, Jeff Hamann & The Funky Drummer, Clyde Stubblefield, Lyle Anderson, and me, I'm Michael Feldman--

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 579 (5-31-21): Water from Wells, Springs, and Cisterns Gets a Check-up through the Virginia Household Water Quality Program

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:56). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-28-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 31, 2021.  This revised episode from March 2017 is part of a series this year of groundwater-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec – running water faucet This week, we drop in on an event where people line up to talk and learn about their household water faucets.  Sound plumb unbelievable?  Well, just have a listen for about 50 seconds. VOICES - ~51 sec – Excerpts from March 20, 2017, recording at Virginia Tech. “You’ve already paid with a credit card for two samples?”“That’s exactly right, yep.” …“All the instructions are on there.  Have you participated before?”“No.”“Ok…so the sample instructions are in there…There’s a survey you’ll want to fill out, as well.  The big thing is -- one of the big things is -- to let the water sit in the pipes overnight, [from say] 10 o’clock…And then the first thing in the morning, [at] the tap you’re going to collect from, collect that bottle with the X first, and then you can collect the other bottles in whatever order you want to.  OK?” …“If we have questions, is there somewhere to send them to by chance?”“There’s a link on the Web site that’s in there….”“Ok.” …“Have you participated with us before?”“I have.  And if there’s basic instructions in there, I’m good to go with those.” …“And the drop-off’s Wednesday morning.”“Good deal.”“All right?”“Thank you.”“Thank you, and you all have a good one.”“Thank you.” You’ve been listening to citizen participants and Virginia Tech faculty at a Virginia Household Water Quality Program clinic kick-offin Montgomery County on March 20, 2017.  The program offers drinking-water clinics in which people who rely on private wells, springs, or cisterns can get their water tested inexpensively and receive a report interpreting the results.  Citizens pick up a sampling kit and instructions, collect water from a household faucet (or in some cases, directly from a spring or other water source), and return the samples two days later.  Tech laboratories analyze the samples for bacteria, lead, arsenic, nitrate, iron, sulfate, and several other constituents.  After about four weeks, program faculty hold a meeting to give participants their confidential results, offer interpretation of the analyses, and provide other information on managing water systems.  The clinics in 2021 began in February and run into late November, serving over 60 Virginia localities.  In operation since 1989, the program has covered the Commonwealth several times, with the results providing valuable information to specific homeowners and offering broader snapshots of groundwater conditions within localities. In a companion program—the Virginia Well Owner Network—trained Virginia Cooperative Extension agents assist Virginians with water-well questions and problems.  Both programs are administered by Virginia Tech’s Department of Biological Systems Engineering, through Cooperative Extension. For more information about these programs, search online for the Virginia Household Water Quality Program; phone (540) 231-9058; or contact your local Cooperative Extension office. We close with some music, named for the weather every well-owner—in fact, every water user—needs regularly.  Here’s about 25 seconds of “Driving Rain,” by the Nelson County, Va., band, Chamomile and Whiskey. MUSIC - ~24 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELLVirginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode updates and replaces Episode 361, 3-27-17. Thanks to Kelli Scott of Virginia Cooperative Extension, and to Brian Benham and Erin Ling of the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering, for their help with the 2017 version of this episode, and again to Erin Ling for her help with the 2021 update. “Driving Rain,” from the 2012 album “The Barn Sessions,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey and by County Wide Records, used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at http://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/, and information about Charlottesville-based County Wide records is available online at http://countywidemusic.worldsecuresystems.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 531, 6-29-20. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Kits containing sampling bottles and instructions await pickup by participants at the Virginia Household Water Quality Program kickoff for Montgomery County on March 20, 2017, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.Sample bottles and instruction sheets included in participant kits in the Virginia Household Water Quality Program, March 20, 2017. SOURCES Used for Audio Robby Korth, Virginia Tech researchers: Flint-like problems also present in Virginia wells, Roanoke Times, 4/10/16. Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering/Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Virginia Well Owner Network, “Clinic Description,” online at http://www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu; “Upcoming Events,” online at http://www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu/events.php.  For more information about these programs, contact Erin Ling, phone (540) 231-9058; e-mail: wellwater@vt.edu. Virginia Cooperative Extension, “Home Water Quality” publications page, online at http://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/tags.resource.html/pubs_ext_vt_edu:home-water-quality.  This site includes locality reports from the Household Water Quality Program, along with other information on managing household water systems. For More Information about Groundwater in Virginia or Elsewhere Charles W. Carlston, “Notes on the early history of water-well drilling in the United States,” Economic Geology (Vol. 38, pages 119-136, 1943); available online at https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/segweb/economicgeology/article/38/2/119/15747/Notes-on-the-early-history-of-water-well-drilling(subscription may be required for access). Marshall Fishwick, Springlore in Virginia, Bowling Green State University Popular Press, Bowling Green, Ky., 1978. Henrico County, Va., “Well Water FAQ” (undated), online at https://henrico.us/health/environmental-health/groundwater-and-wells/. Philip LaMoreaux and Judy Tanner, eds., Springs and Bottled Waters of the World:  Ancient History, Source, Occurrence, Quality, and Use, Springer-Verlag, Berlin and Heidelberg Germany, 2001; information available online at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321613235_Springs_and_Bottled_Waters_of_the_World_Ancient_History_Source_Occurence_Quality_and_Use(subscription may be required). National Ground Water Association, online at http://www.ngwa.org/Pages/default.aspx. National Speleological Society, online at http://www.caves.org/. “Pulse of the Planet” (Web site: http://www.pulseplanet.com/) segments with Virginia well-driller Eric Rorrer and with Erin Ling, the coordinator of the Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Virginia Well Owner Network.  The three segments are as follows:March 10, 2014: Water-Drilling;March 11, 2014: Water - Surface and Ground;March 12, 2014: Water-Well Maintenance. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. U.S. Geological Survey, “Groundwater Wells,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater-wells?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects.  U.S. Geological Survey, “Karst Topography - Teacher's Guide and Paper Model,” online at http://geomaps.wr.usgs.gov/parks/cave/karst.html. U.S. Geological Survey, “USGS Water Science School,” online at http://water.usgs.gov/edu/. George Veni et al., “Living with Karst,” American Geological Institute Environmental Awareness Series, 2001; available online at http://www.agiweb.org/environment/publications/karst.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Natural Heritage Karst Program,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/karsthome; see particularly “Introduction to Virginia’s Karst,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/document/introvakarst.pdf. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Groundwater Basics,” at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/GroundwaterProtectionSteeringCommittee/FrequentlyAskedQuestions.aspx. Virginia Legislative Information System, “Private Well Regulations,” Virginia Administrative Code, Sec. 12 VAC 5-630, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630/section30/.  “Design and Construction Criteria” are in Part III, starting at Section 12 VAC 5-630-350, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630/section350/. Virginia Places, “Caves and Springs in Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/cave/. Virginia Places, “Thermal Springs in Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/hotsprings.html; Virginia Water Resources Research Center groundwater-related publications from the 1980s to the 2000s are listed and linked online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23964/discover?rpp=10&etal=0&query=groundwater&group_by=none&page=3.  Here are some key publications:*Author unidentified, A Guide to Private Wells, 1995, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55265.*J.A. Poff, A Guide to Virginia’s Groundwater, 1997, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55247.*J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, 1999, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to other groundwater-related episodes.   Caves, caverns, and other karst features – Episode 527, 6-1-20.Eastern Virginia groundwater and the SWIFT project – Episode 534, 7-20-20.Groundwater introduction – Episode 575, 5-3-21.Information sources on Virginia’s water resources generally, including groundwater – Episode 546, 10-12-20.Springs – Episode 576, 5-10-21.Virginia’s Western Highlands and thermal springs – Episode 577. 5-17-21.Well construction – Episode 578, 5-24-21.Winter precipitation and water supplies, including the role of groundwater replenishment – Episode 567, 3-8-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. <

bay humans university design agency guide music berlin natural flint relationships earth state audio living college swift world sound accent pop dark tech water web index land rain united states pond research ocean ground government education public recreation conservation development vol checkup springs chesapeake snow caves environment types pulse images montgomery county va pages msonormal maintenance commonwealth stream ky normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices arial environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology whiskey civics grade kits ancient history colorful resource signature bio charlottesville sec karst excerpts govt watershed transcript earth sciences vac water quality household wg freshwater epa virginia tech bowling green ls atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table nelson county virginians heidelberg germany upcoming events poff ar sa homeowners blacksburg environmental protection agency chamomile cosgrove msohyperlink occurrence cooperative extension relyonvml sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext bmp acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols driving rain tmdl springer verlag cisterns geological survey countywide henrico county brian benham roanoke times virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 05-27-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 41:03


Hour 2…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling as they talk about bad fan behavior, their love of baseball at all levels, the fall of VT Baseball and his thoughts on Nascar. Later…Rick and Neal give away a BDST Tee shirt for “Which team ended Pete Rose’s hit streak at 44.” And we talk hot dogs with our listeners! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: 418 • 39 • 13.6; candidate questionnaires; and an official new City logo

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021


Good morning, RVA! It’s 68 °F, and today you can expect too-hot highs in the 90s for much of the day. Later this evening we could see some severe thunderstorms roll through, but it won’t do much to cool things off. Temperatures return to springlike this weekend, so, until then, accept the sweat and stay hydrated!Water coolerAs of this morning, the Virginia Department of Health reports the seven-day average of new COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths as: 418, 39, and 13.6, respectively. VDH reports a seven-day average of 44.6 new cases in and around Richmond (Richmond: 6.6; Henrico: 18.0, and Chesterfield: 20.0). Since this pandemic began, 1,322 people have died in the Richmond region. 42.5%, 52.9%, and 49.4% of the population in Richmond, Henrico, and Chesterfield have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. I rewrote the top of this email! What do you think? I may keep tweaking it over the next couple of weeks—thrilling stuff!Yesterday, Moderna announced that it plans to submit some new data to the FDA and will seek Emergency Use Authorization for its COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 12 through 17 in early June. The Washington Post has more details. This would be big news, even though we have loads of Pfizer laying around for this age group; the Pfizer vaccine is just so challenging to work with. Expanded authorization of Moderna would make things easier for folks on the ground who are still out there planning vaccination events and jabbing arms.I didn’t expect this! The Roanoke Times reports that “students, faculty and staff at Virginia’s community colleges will not be required to be vaccinated to be on campus this fall.” Hmmm, I wonder that that means.Whoa, Ali Rockett and Chris Suarez in the Richmond Times-Dispatch have an entire piece today, titled “Mayor Levar Stoney wrote an opinion piece for The New York Times reflecting on last summer. Here’s what he left out:,” point-by-pointing fives specifics the Mayor included in his recent column. I think I agree with most of these fives things and, if it had been me after this past summer in Richmond, I definitely would not have written a national opinion piece with the same tone. That said, it was just that: an opinion piece. The Mayor doesn’t have to mention his current tussles with the Civilian Review Board or the ongoing investigation about the cost of tearing down the monuments. He can tell his story how he wants, which most certainly casts himself as this summer’s hero. You can disagree with his telling of events, but I do think the NYT piece probably accomplished the Mayor’s political goals and raised his profile—especially among Virginians outside of Richmond. I do appreciate the local journalists who put this together to provide a more complete picture for readers of what happened a year ago.Richmond Together has put out a thoughtful candidate questionnaire for the Commonwealth’s Attorney race, and you can read the responses from incumbent Colette McEachin and challenger Tom Barbour. Have I ever read a candidate questionnaire for Commonwealth’s Attorney before? I’m not sure. If you haven’t either, take the opportunity to do so today—especially if you’re not even sure what the Commonwealth’s Attorney does. This questionnaire and the responses will give you a good idea for some of the roles and responsibilities one of these two candidates will have once elected.VPM’s Roberto Roldan reports on the Valentine Museum’s struggle to come to terms with the racist history of its namesake, sculptor Edward Valentine. I like local scholar Ana Edwards’s quote in this piece, "They all started off as institutions born into, if not the Confederacy per se, certainly the white supremacist South…That’s where they come from, that’s where their money comes from, that’s where their sensibility comes from.”Jonathan Spiers at Richmond BizSense reports on “the start of construction of a 36-home section at Armstrong Renaissance, the massive redevelopment of the 22-acre site along North 31st Street in Richmond’s East End.” Armstrong Renaissance is by far my favorite new development in the entire city—it’s beautiful, mixed-income, and has a lovely blend of density all set just a few feet from a decent bus line. I mean, check out these totals for the entire development: “130 income-based rental units, 90 apartments for seniors, and the 36 for-sale homes for both lower-income and market-rate buyers.” Sounds great, now do this everywhere.Today the City’s Governmental Operations committee will meet and take up a deeply nerdy ordinance that will officially change the logo of the City from the brassy skyline, James River, and bridge situation, to the more contemporary silhouette of the bateau boatman (ORD. 2021–128). This doesn’t really impact anything or any one, as the new logo is already in use, I just think it’s neat reading the in-ordinance text descriptions of the old and new logos.This morning’s longreadThe Dark Side of Congo’s Cobalt RushCobalt is in probably two or three things you’re touching right now or can see from where you’re sitting.The man stopped digging in his yard. Instead, he cut through the floor of his house, which he was renting, and dug to about thirty feet, carting out ore at night. Zanga Muteba, a baker who then lived in Kasulo, told me, “All of us, at that time, we knew nothing.” But one evening he and some neighbors heard telltale clanging noises coming from the man’s house. Rushing inside, they discovered that the man had carved out a series of underground galleries, following the vein of cobalt as it meandered under his neighbors’ houses. When the man’s landlord got wind of these modifications, they had an argument, and the man fled. “He had already made a lot of money,” Muteba told me. Judging from the amount of ore the man had dug out, he had probably made more than ten thousand dollars—in Congo, a small fortune. According to the World Bank, in 2018 three-quarters of the country’s population lived on less than two dollars a day.If you’d like your longread to show up here, go chip in a couple bucks on the ol’ Patreon.Picture of the DayAn adventure is afoot!

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Aaron McFarling, Roanoke Times ''Get Off My Lawn'' Segment

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 9:44


Ed and Trey discus the levels of player empowerment in college athletics. Roanoke Times Sports columnist Aaron McFarling Sports joins for get off my lawn chat Brad Daugherty talking about the Superstar Racing Experience

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 05-24-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 39:26


Hour 3…In the power hour Rick and Neal welcome in surprise guest Richie Davis and he brings Neal BACON and we talk golf. And we give away a BDST tee shirt. In the bottom of the hour, Rick welcomes in Mike Niziolek of the Roanoke Times to discuss VT football and 4 big questions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 05-20-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 39:09


Hour 2…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling as they talk about all the no hitters in the MLB, full capacity stadiums and the SEC bailout. Later…Rick and Neal give away a BDST Tee shirt and talk NFL See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 3 05-17-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 38:07


Hour 3…In the power hour, Rick is joined by former VCU standout and PGA’s Lanto Griffin as they discuss the past years accomplishments, playing during the pandemic vs having crowds, his golfing influences growing up and the upcoming PGA Championship. In the bottom of the hour, Rick welcomes in Mike Niziolek of the Roanoke Times to discuss VT football. A change in recruitment staff, team needs and the transfer portal. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
BDST Hour 2 05-13-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 39:22


Hour 2…Rick is joined by Roanoke Times writer Aaron McFarling as they talk about the return of sports, Aaron ranks the months, the possible fall of the NCAA, Radford High School’s new football Head coach and his wagering advice. Later…Rick and Neal give away a BDST Tee shirt and talk NFL Superbowl QBs. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Aaron McFarling, Roanoke.com Columnist On MiLB Return, Coaches Hassles

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 13:45


Ed and Trey Lyle discus the dominant win by MTJ Darlington Raceway Aaron McFarling Sports of The Roanoke Times joins to talk about Salem Red Sox Ed gives some more thoughts on Tim Tebow

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Fan Feedback On VT Hoops, Truex @$$ Whipping And Fast 5 At 5 - Ish

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 26:47


Ed and Trey Lyle discus the dominant win by MTJ Darlington Raceway Aaron McFarling Sports of The Roanoke Times joins to talk about Salem Red Sox Ed gives some more thoughts on Tim Tebow

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Fan Feedback On Tebow And What Urban Meyer Is Missing

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 8:07


Ed and Trey Lyle discus the dominant win by MTJ Darlington Raceway Aaron McFarling Sports of The Roanoke Times joins to talk about Salem Red Sox Ed gives some more thoughts on Tim Tebow

Locked On Raiders - Daily Podcast On The Oakland Raiders
Getting to Know Raiders 3rd Rd Picks Koonce and Deablo

Locked On Raiders - Daily Podcast On The Oakland Raiders

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 38:05


Your Boy Q gives you the News and Notes of the Day including a Veteran CB signing with the Silver N' Black and a Safety being released. Then the Getting to Know Series continues as Q takes a deep dive in to both 3rd round picks for the Raiders Malcolm Koonce and Divine Deablo. Rachel Lenzi (@rachelmlenzi on twitter) from the Buffalo News joins the show to talk Koonce and Michael Niziolek (@michaelniziolek on twitter ) from the Roanoke Times joins the show to talk all things Divine Deablo. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Big Dawg Sports Talk
Big Dawg Sports Talk Hour 3 05-03-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 40:39


Rick and Logan enjoy their final moments together on the show. Rick speaks to Mike Niziolek from The Roanoke Times about former Virginia Tech players in the NFL Draft. Logan closes out his time on the show. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: 1,015 • 61 • 14.3; more places to live in the Northside; and chestnut trees

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021


Good morning, RVA! It’s 66 °F, and rain is in our future. Today you can expect steadily—but slightly—increase temperatures, rain, and maybe even some thunderstorms. Keep an eye on the sky!Water coolerAs of this morning, the Virginia Department of Health reports 761 new positive cases of the coronavirus in the Commonwealth and 14 new deaths as a result of the virus. VDH reports 95 new cases in and around Richmond (Chesterfield: 42, Henrico: 34, and Richmond: 19). Since this pandemic began, 1,280 people have died in the Richmond region. The seven-day average of new reported cases across the state sits at 1,015. The Commonwealth’s cases keep dropping—although I do wonder if I need to start looking at that number regionally and dig into the difference between rural/urban/conservative/liberal parts of Virginia. Hospitalization rates have basically plateaued around 60ish per day, which matches the same numbers we saw back in November.Over in Virginia’s vaccine world, you can see the slowdown of new folks choosing to get vaccinated continues. We’ll see a bump on this graph once a vaccine gets approved for kids ages 12–15, but, other than that, I think this chart will slowly long-tail its way into the sunset over the next several months. Locally, though, we’re still vaccinating a ton of people each week, and we’re still making progress towards whatever it means to have 75% of our region vaccinated. However, that goal, according to this article in The New York Times, might not be realistic or achievable. Definitely a transitional time in vaccine world.The Richmond Times-Dispatch’s Sabrina Moreno has some follow-up reporting on the mass shooting that took place last week in The Belt Atlantic apartments, just across the street from George Wythe High School on the city’s Southside. Here’s a sobering quote: “In the past year, 40 RPS students have been shot.” There’s only but so much local government can do to directly address gun violence—the State and federal government, obviously, have much more authority to pass laws limiting the easy access to guns and their flow through our communities. Until those particular folks find the courage to take even the smallest step, we’ll need to keep investing locally in the people and programs that address the trauma caused by gun violence—Moreno mentions a few examples in her piece.I’ve now listened to all of Council’s budget amendment sessions to date, and last week was…a lot. As far as I can tell, Council has yet to make a ton of progress on anything other than 1) discussions on the double-bonus police and fire raises, which they decided not to do, and 2) discussions on how they hadn’t made a ton of progress on anything other than the double-bonus police and fire raises. Today on their calendar, they have a special meeting, the Organizational Development committee meeting, and the fourth budget amendment work session—and they could have budget discussion at all of these meetings! It’s a lot to get your hands around as a citizen (or, I imagine, even as a councilmember). Stay tuned to see if they make more progress this week. P.S. Honestly, they kind of have no choice: The state-mandated deadlines for passing at least portions of the budget quickly approach. For example, Council must pass the RPS budget by May 15th.Unrelated to the budget, but closely related to my heart, the City’s Planning Commission will hear a presentation on the Greater Scott’s Addition Rezoning. No slides up on the website yet, but you can listen live today at 1:30 PM.Jonathan Spiers at Richmond BizSense has the details on 52 new apartments proposed for a site just off Chamberlayne near the Tabol brewery. There’s a ton of new residential construction in this part of the city, and I think we’re starting see some connections building to the different pieces of the neighborhood. I know we’re all distracted by the casino and possible replacement for the Diamond, but I’d love to see some intentional focus brought to getting more pieces of the VUU / Chamberlayne Neighborhood Plan implemented.The RTD reposted this fascinating story from the Roanoke Times about bringing back chestnut trees. I had no idea we lost chestnut trees to a horrible blight 150 years ago. Now I must find and read a book on the subject!This morning’s longreadNASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter to Begin New Demonstration PhaseOK, maybe this mission briefing for Ingenuity is a little boring, but we put a drone on mars! And are flying it around up there! So cool.The operations demonstration will begin in about two weeks with the helicopter’s sixth flight. Until then, Ingenuity will be in a transitional phase that includes its fourth and fifth forays into Mars’ crimson skies. Flight four will send the rotorcraft about 436 feet (133 meters) south to collect aerial imagery of a potential new landing zone before returning to land at Wright Brothers Field, the name for the Martian airfield on which Ingenuity’s first flight took place. This 873-foot (266-meter) roundtrip effort would surpass the range, speed, and duration marks achieved on the third flight. Ingenuity was programmed to execute a fourth flight Friday, with a takeoff to take place at 10:46 a.m. EDT (7:46 a.m. PDT, 12:30 p.m. local Mars time) and first data to be returned at 1:39 p.m. EDT (10:39 a.m. PDT). The fifth flight would send Ingenuity on a one-way mission, landing at the new site. If Ingenuity remains healthy after those flights, the next phase can begin.If you’d like your longread to show up here, go chip in a couple bucks on the ol’ Patreon.Picture of the Day

Big Dawg Sports Talk
Big Dawg Sports Talk Hour 2 04-29-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 40:13


Rick speaks to Sports Columnist for The Roanoke Times, Aaron McFarling, about the NFL Draft. Later on, Rick speaks to Pooch to get his Top 15 for the NFL Draft. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
Big Dawg Sports Talk Hour 3 04-26-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 40:27


Rick speaks to WDBJ7 Sports Director, Travis Wells, about Radford University’s new Head Basketball Coach. Later on, Rick speaks to Mike Niziolek from The Roanoke Times about the latest from Virginia Tech. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
Big Dawg Sports Talk Hour 2 04-22-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 40:48


Rick speaks to Sports Columnist for The Roanoke Times, Aaron McFarling, about the new Radford University Head Basketball Coach. Later on, Rick speaks to Rick Cormany about his time coaching Darris Nichols. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
Big Dawg Sports Talk Hour 2 04-15-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 41:21


  Rick talks about professional wrestling back in the day. Later on, Rick speaks to Sports Columnist for The Roanoke Times, Aaron McFarling. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Dawg Sports Talk
Big Dawg Sports Talk Hour 3 04-12-21

Big Dawg Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 39:15


Rick speaks to Mike Niziolek from The Roanoke Times to get his take on the Hokies’ scrimmage. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Aaron McFarling, Roanoke Times On Transfers And NASCAR At Bristol

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 10:52


Ed reacts to the latest UVA transfer Aaron McFarling (Roanoke Times Sports) gives his thoughts on the latest transfer news for the Hokies and Hoos NASCAR Cup driver and 2020 Rookie of the Year Cole Custer on what it was like in the Bristol Motor Speedway Dirt Race

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Aaron McFarling, Roanoke Times On What Ifs For UVA And VT Hoops

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 14:36


Ed talks about his appreciation for the #NCAA having a tournament despite the PR mistakes Aaron McFarling of Roanoke Times recapping the Hokies and Hoos hoops season Demetri Ravanos (BarrettSportsMedia.com) talking the unique Jim Nantz fascination

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
NCAA Tournament Gaffes Overshadow Holding Event And Fast 5 At 5 - Ish

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 22:35


Ed talks about his appreciation for the #NCAA having a tournament despite the PR mistakes Aaron McFarling of Roanoke Times recapping the Hokies and Hoos hoops season Demetri Ravanos (BarrettSportsMedia.com) talking the unique Jim Nantz fascination

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane
Demetri Ravanos, BarrettSportsMedia.com On Jim Nantz Season

The Fast Lane with Ed Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 12:06


Ed talks about his appreciation for the #NCAA having a tournament despite the PR mistakes Aaron McFarling of Roanoke Times recapping the Hokies and Hoos hoops season Demetri Ravanos (BarrettSportsMedia.com) talking the unique Jim Nantz fascination

Transition Virginia
What happened in Virginia's 2021 General Assembly Session?

Transition Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 48:35


Journalists Jeff Schapiro of the Richmond Times-Dispatch and Amy Friedenberger of the Roanoke Times join the Transition Team to evaluate the major legislation in the 2021 General Assembly session. They break down what passed, what didn't pass, and what else is there to look forward to in 2021.