Podcasts about series b

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Latest podcast episodes about series b

Not Boring
Not Boring Founders: Peter Johnston, Polywork

Not Boring

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 73:40


Peter Johnston is the founder of Polywork. Polywork is a place to discover opportunities to collaborate with other professionals. Existing networks like LinkedIn focus on connecting us to 9-5 opportunities — but where do you go to find opportunities to speak on podcasts? Or discover partners for your side project? Check out who at Google or Netflix is open to angel investing or starting a company? If LinkedIn is built for the 9-5 generation, Polywork is built for the collaboration generation. It's been in private beta for just over a year, but this week it publicly launched for everyone, was #1 on Product Hunt, and announced its Series B funding. So what's its magic? Polywork understands that as professionals, our list of job titles don't do a good job of telling our full stories. Furthermore, it's purpose built for professionals who want to connect with one another beyond their 9-5. There's a growing network of amazing professionals from places like Figma, Snapchat, and Github all sharing what they want to do — making it incredibly easy to collaborate with anyone, on anything. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/notboring/message

The aSaaSins Podcast
Money Morning Quarterback: (Warning, HOT episode) Pano AI's $20M Series A to help fire professionals fight wildfires

The aSaaSins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 13:29


On the aSaaSins 'Money Morning Quarterback' segment, our host Justin Vandehey breaks down the companies that raised their Seed, Series A, or Series B round of funding the prior week.This week, Justin plays 'Money Morning Quarterback' with Pano AI, a hardware and software platform that helps fire professionals detect threats and respond to fire emergencies faster.   He unpacks their $20M Series A and the opportunity that Pano has to help fight wildfires.

The StartUp to ScaleUp Game Plan
Blockchain: game-changing technology or marketing hype?

The StartUp to ScaleUp Game Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 33:53


Ambre Soubiran is the CEO at Kaiko – a cryptocurrency market data provider who in June ‘22 raised a $55m Series B led by Eight Roads. Kaiko aims to become the Bloomberg of the blockchain & cryptocurrency worlds! We explored: Why Ambre gave up a successful banking career to build a blockchain startup How blockchain data services will empower decision-makers across many industries Why being too early can become a competitive advantage in a data-centric market Why successful entrepreneurs should obsess less about fundraising- it's not how about raising money, it's how you spend it! How to ensure a diverse international culture from Day 1 How Ambre handled closing a Series B & giving birth to her baby on the same evening! For more insights into Kaiko head over to https://www.kaiko.com/ & for advice on hiring leaders for B2B SaaS scale-up heads over to https://alpinasearch.com/

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life
Edtech SaaS Breaks $4m, Looking at $10m Series B Next

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 18:54


Student platform that improves conversations.

RecTech: the Recruiting Technology Podcast
Several New HR Tech Funding Announcements

RecTech: the Recruiting Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 5:40


The Muse, a values-based job search and career development platform used by 75 million people annually, is proud to announce $8 million in new investment led by MBM Capital, founded and run by managing partners Lauren Bonner and Arun Mittal. The investment is a result of The Muse's progressive vision to bring together key players in the future-of-work arena. https://hrtechfeed.com/the-muse-gets-more-funding/  Knoetic, the #1 Chief People Officer (CPO) platform and “single source of truth” for people analytics, today announced its $36M Series B. https://hrtechfeed.com/knoetic-raises-36m-series-b-empowering-chief-people-officers-to-make-better-data-driven-decisions/ SilkRoad Technology, the world-class talent acquisition leader, announced today the addition of person-to-person texting and SMS notifications in its RedCarpet Onboarding solution and On-demand Talent Campaigns (OTC) at its annual user conference, Connections. These powerful capabilities will enable organizations to source, attract, convert, engage and retain talent amidst the most dynamic talent economy in recent memory. https://hrtechfeed.com/silkroad-technology-announces-texting-features-for-onboarding/ Polywork, the professional network, just announced $28 million in Series B funding. The round was co-led by Nat Friedman (former GitHub CEO) and Caffeinated Capital with participation from existing and new investors including Andreessen Horowitz, Baron Davis, Bungalow Capital, Daniel Gross, Elad Gil, Fidji Simo, Maverick Carter and the founders of Stripe, Lyft, Clubhouse, Instacart, Lattice, Minted, and Divvy Homes. https://hrtechfeed.com/professional-network-platform-gets-28m-in-funding/ Sourcing platform Findem has raised $30 million in Series B financing. This round brings their total funding to $37.3 million. Four Rivers and Quarry Ventures led the round, with participation from our existing investor Wing Venture Capital. https://hrtechfeed.com/findem-lands-30m-investment/

Fintech Business Podcast
Interview: Neal Desai of Kafene

Fintech Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 43:47


Welcome back to Fintech Business Podcast. In this episode, I talk to Neal Desai, co-founder and CEO of lease-to-own startup Kafene — which just announced it has raised an $18 million Series B. Congrats to Neal and the entire Kafene team!We had a chance to talk about:How lease-to-own works & how it's different than BNPLWhat's “fintech” about Kafene vs. legacy players like Aaron's and Rent-a-CenterHow Kafene's lease-to-own can actually be cheaper than credit cardsHow Kafene underwrites risk and handles customers who can't payand more!If you're interested in sponsoring an episode or appearing as a guest, drop us a line.Existing subscriber? Please consider supporting this newsletter by upgrading to a paid subscription. New here? Subscribe to get Fintech Business Weekly each Sunday: Get full access to Fintech Business Weekly at fintechbusinessweekly.substack.com/subscribe

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
664. News: Fintechs fight for your online checkout

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 57:55


Our expert hosts, Kate Moody and Benjamin Ensor, are joined by some great guests to talk about the most notable fintech, financial services and banking news from the past week. This week's guests include: Eric Johansson, Fintech Editor, Verdict Adam Bialy, Founder & CEO, Fiat Republic We cover the following stories from the fintech and financial services space: JPMorgan Chase acquires payments fintech Renovite to battle Stripe and Block - 5:08 Revolut wants to compete with PayPal and Apple at online checkouts 14:25 Bolt's $1.5bn deal to buy Wyre dies 27:45 Minority neobank Majority secures $37.5m in Series B raise 38:28 Greenwashing is a systemic problem at UK banks 47:58 Flurry of new rules leave Turkish banks struggling to lend 49:47 Kim Kardashian launches private equity firm 51:45 This episode is sponsored by Tink As the leading open banking platform, Tink enables the largest banks, lenders and payments providers to offer exceptional user experiences. Tink offers the best way to connect to banks across Europe, to build seamless services that can reach more than 250 million consumers. And they're already doing this for the likes of American Express, PayPal and Revolut. To get started with data-driven solutions for customer onboarding, making better risk decisions, or for instant bank payments with the highest conversion rate in the industry - visit tink.com This episode is sponsored by LinkedIn As you gear up for Autumn, you need the right people on your team to help your small business fire on all cylinders. LinkedIn Jobs is here to make it easier. Tap into the world's largest professional network with over 30 million people in the UK. Create a job post in minutes, and spread the word so your network can help you find the right people to hire. Just add the purple #Hiring frame to your LinkedIn profile. Simple tools, like screening questions, make it easy to find candidates with just the right skills and experience. It's why small businesses rate LinkedIn Jobs #1 in delivering quality hires vs leading competitors. LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. And, you can post a job for free. Just visit Linkedin.com/FINTECH (https://business.linkedin.com/talent-solutions/cx/21/01/jobs-single-cta-11-podcast-uk?src=re-pod&trk=fintech&veh=fintech&mcid=6963291076820369422). Terms and conditions apply. Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. It's hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David M. Brear, Ross Gallagher, Benjamin Ensor, and Kate Moody - as well as a range of brilliant guests. We cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: @fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, or email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Adam Bialy and Eric Johansson.

Modern Startup Marketing
112 - Can Marketers Fall In Love With Outbound? (Pete Lorenco, VP of Marketing at Alyce)

Modern Startup Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 55:37


*listeners: please fill out this short 3-min. survey to help me level up the show: https://forms.gle/iporNXSgtfuoHSPJA Guys, you're gonna love this episode. I finally got to bring on Pete Lorenco (VP of Marketing at Alyce) to join me on the show. I'm a big fan and you'll soon be too. Prior to Alyce, Pete was VP of Marketing at Avid Technology (a public company) and several other enterprise companies including Iron Mountain and EMC (prior to their acquisition by Dell). Alyce was founded in 2015, has 174 people and is based out of Boston, MA. They've raised Series B funding ($46M total). Alyce provides a better way to do outbound B2B marketing by transforming from transactional touch-points to delivering personal experiences using gifting, swag, and direct mail. Here's what we hit on: I had Dan Frohnen (former CMO at Sendoso) on the show, Episode 16, and we talked about gifting. There are other players in the space, how do you compete; How does gifting work effectively within the buyer journey; Some people will not agree with our POV and why that's a good thing; How is outbound broken today, and what should we do about it; Why certain goals matter in order to create an experience people will love, and what those goals should be; At Alyce you're sourcing 70% of total new logo pipeline & revenue from inbound marketing - what's your 2022 marketing plan; What channels are you leaning into; How're you setting up effective ABM at Alyce, from your target list of accounts to winning deals; What are your top marketing challenges; What are the last 1-2 really good, creative marketing ideas you/your team has come up with. You can reach Pete on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/peter-lorenco Find out more about Alyce: www.alyce.com For more content, subscribe to Modern Startup Marketing on Apple or Spotify or wherever you like to listen, and don't forget to leave a review! People call me (Anna) the Marie Kondo of startup marketing because I help VC backed early stage startups clean up their marketing mess to uncover more joy (and revenue). For those startups that have already built their marketing foundation and have been testing different marketing plays but just aren't satisfied with the traction they're seeing, I created the Marketing Audit + Roadmap offering. At the end of your audit, you'll get a custom Roadmap with improvement opportunities for the next 3-6 months. So that you can finally put the missing pieces in place to start seeing more traction and stop spending time and money on the wrong things. You can learn more about it by visiting my website: www.furmanovmarketing.com/pricing You can find me on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/annafurmanov --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/anna-furmanov/message

The aSaaSins Podcast
Money Morning Quarterback: Chris Yeh and Justin break down Verkada's $205M and Tract's $7M rounds

The aSaaSins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 26:33


On the aSaaSins 'Money Morning Quarterback' segment, our hosts Justin Vandehey and Chris Yeh break down the companies that raised their Seed, Series A, or Series B round of funding the prior week.This week, Justin and Chris play 'Money Morning Quarterback' with Verkada, an enterprise building security company, and Tract, a community and content marketplace for student-directed learning. They unpack Verkada's $205M round and Tract's $7M round. 

The Startup Junkies Podcast
313: Changing the Success Rate of Entrepreneurs with Greg Shepard

The Startup Junkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 52:42


Summary: Welcome to another great episode of Startup Junkies! On this episode, hosts Caleb Talley, Jeff Amerine, and Davis McEntire sit down with Greg Shepard, founder and CEO of BOSS Capital Partners, a boutique investment firm focused on Series Seed through Series B technology businesses. Greg also founded BOSS Startup Science, a school for entrepreneurs. Greg is a twenty-year startup veteran and serial entrepreneur, a Forbes author, a TEDX speaker, and the host of Meet The BOSS Forbes Radio show. Throughout the episode, Caleb, Jeff, Davis, and Greg discuss the curriculum of BOSS Startup Science and the methodology behind startup accelerators.   Show Notes: (1:06) Introduction to Greg (1:45) Greg's Background in the Venture Capital Arena (3:39) About BOSS Capital Partners (8:32) Insights from Greg's Five-Year Study (17:28) Thoughts on Raising Money vs. Selling a Product or Service (20:55) Success of the BOSS Startup Science Methodology (24:52) Concept Centric vs. Entrepreneur Centric (34:42) Curriculum of BOSS Startup Science (44:04) Advice To Younger Self (50:32) Closing Thoughts   Links: Caleb Talley Jeff Amerine Davis McEntire Greg Shepard BOSS Capital Partners   Quotes: “I did this study and was trying to figure out why they were failing, but what I really needed to learn was when they were failing because the why was coordinated with the when. They always collided at the same time.” - Greg Shepard, (4:55) “I thought that the first thing I should focus on was helping them not fail, but the first thing I needed to focus on was helping them get into an accelerator in the first place.” - Greg Shepard, (6:18) “It enables the people that are running the venture studio to put together funds and start making money on the loads. I don't feel that is helping the entrepreneur. I think a lot of these things developed are helping the middle man but not really helping the entrepreneurs.” - Greg Shepard, (25:40)

The VentureFizz Podcast
Episode 271: Vishal Sunak - CEO & Founder, LinkSquares

The VentureFizz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 52:03


Most companies in the tech industry that scale aggressively and create a category leading company usually raise a significant amount of venture capital funding. In the case of LinkSquares, the company has raised over $161M in funding which includes a $100M Series C round of funding that was announced in April. The funding has come along at a very steady clip with its Series B round in 2021 and Series A round in 2020. Needless to say LinkSquares is in hypergrowth mode and this capital is helping the company take advantage of its product market fit, but Vishal and I start off the conversation with a deep dive into how he's been able to raise capital each year while balancing his responsibilities as a CEO with hundreds of other taks that need to be tackled. LinkSquares is the company behind the AI-powered contract management platform for legal teams aiming to move their business forward faster. In this episode of our podcast, we cover: * Vishal's background growing up, including the start of his professional career and how the Startup Institute helped pave his way into the world of startups. * His experience at Backupify and various roles that he played at the company. * The full story of LinkSquares and how they identified this opportunity to disrupt an industry and take on incumbants. * All the details on the LinkSquares platform and how they are leveraging AI, plus the company's growth plans ahead. * His biggest lessons learned as a CEO of a hypergrowth company. * And so much more. If you like the show, please remember to subscribe and review us on iTunes, Soundcloud, Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Play.

Paul's Security Weekly TV
Funding Rounds Rebound, Bitwarden Password Management, Cymulate, & Ethereum's Merge - ESW #288

Paul's Security Weekly TV

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 49:59


In the Enterprise Security News for this week: Funding rounds are back!, Bitwarden rasies $100M for password management Cymulate raises $70M, and a ton more Series A, Series B, and Seed announcements from vendors just coming out of stealth, Ethereum's merge completes and moves to proof of stake, Some updates on the Twitterpocalypse, The latest in annoying buzzword innovation, and some Cyber Insurance trends that I promise are interesting!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw288

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast

This week, we're joined aboard a Soviet submarine by Mark McManus, Jack Shanahan and a low-effort lizard alien, who proceeds to run around the boat in the nude murdering members of the crew. But we're all too interested in Jenna Coleman, David Warner, some guys from Game of Thrones and a discarded fibreglass suit of armour to notice. Notes and links The tale of Steven Berkoff's wilful destruction of the climactic scenes of The Power of Three is told in its entirety in Episode 234: Stop Watching a Kids' Show. Those of you lucky enough not to remember 1983 might need to be told about The Hunt for Red October (1990), a film set on board a Russian submarine captained by a typically Scottish-sounding Sean Connery. Mark Gatiss is definitely looking over his shoulder at that film while he's writing this episode. Nathan refers to the most recent episode of Bondfinger, where we comment on am episode of The Saint which contains scenes of French people speaking to one another in English with a French accent. (Which is just the sort of thing they probably do all the time just to prank us.) Here's El Sandifer's brutal assessment of the Ice Warriors: “…if we're being honest, the fact that they are literally green reptile monsters from Mars has to mark the point where the show has simply given up on monsters and concluded that the audience will accept anything.” Spencer Wilding played Skaldak in this story and was the Wooden King in The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe and the Minotaur in The God Complex. He also played Darth Vader in Rogue One. Fans of hefty lads will enjoy his Instagram. I certainly did. Follow us Nathan is on Twitter as @nathanbottomley, Brendan is @brandybongos, Jack is @shackjanahan, and Mark is @QuarkMcMalus The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. You can hear more of Jack, in conversation with our friend Joe Ford, on The Nimon Be Praised podcast, which is on Twitter as @NimonPodcast. Mark can be found on the Trap One podcast, and he also appears regularly on the Maximum Power podcast. We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on Apple Podcasts, or in our next episode we'll spoil the surprising and extremely upsetting ending to The Song of the Red Snow. And more You can find Jodie into Terror, our flashcast on the Whittaker Era of Doctor Who, at jodieintoterror.com, at @JodieIntoTerror on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and wherever podcasts can be found. We'll be releasing our final episode on The Power of the Doctor some time in October, we expect. Our James Bond commentary podcast is called Bondfinger, and you can find that at bondfinger.com, at @bondfingercast on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and everywhere else as well. We can also be heard on the Blakes 7 podcast Maximum Power, whose coverage of Series B will be starting soon. And finally, there's our Star Trek commentary podcast, Untitled Star Trek Project, featuring Nathan and friend-of-the-podcast Joe Ford. This week, we released an epic two-hour episode on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine's two-part Season 7 opener Image in the Sand and Shadows and Symbols.

Enterprise Security Weekly (Audio)
ESW #288 - Paddy Harrington, Sean Metcalf

Enterprise Security Weekly (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 128:51


Enterprise browsers are a new addition into the endpoint security market. Combining enhanced features not in the existing browsers, with centralized reporting and controls, they're promising to bring a better experience to the users and a more secure delivery of applications to the companies who use them. What's real, what's "vision", and what makes them different than all the other solutions that promise to "secure the browsing experience".   In the Enterprise Security News for this week: Funding rounds are back!, Bitwarden rasies $100M for password management Cymulate raises $70M, and a ton more Series A, Series B, and Seed announcements from vendors just coming out of stealth, Ethereum's merge completes and moves to proof of stake, Some updates on the Twitterpocalypse, The latest in annoying buzzword innovation, and some Cyber Insurance trends that I promise are interesting!   Attackers have been targeting Active Directory for years and more recently set their sights on Azure AD & Microsoft Office 365. There are ways to tighten up these platforms beyond the default configuration and greatly improve the security posture. Segment Resources: Trimarc Webcast on how to quickly level up Active Directory security: https://www.hub.trimarcsecurity.com/post/webcast-top-10-ways-to-improve-active-directory-security-quickly Performing your own Active Directory Security Review - article and PowerShell tool: https://www.hub.trimarcsecurity.com/post/securing-active-directory-performing-an-active-directory-security-review Trimarc Content Hub: https://hub.trimarcsecurity.com   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw288

Paul's Security Weekly
ESW #288 - Paddy Harrington, Sean Metcalf

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 128:51


Enterprise browsers are a new addition into the endpoint security market. Combining enhanced features not in the existing browsers, with centralized reporting and controls, they're promising to bring a better experience to the users and a more secure delivery of applications to the companies who use them. What's real, what's "vision", and what makes them different than all the other solutions that promise to "secure the browsing experience".   In the Enterprise Security News for this week: Funding rounds are back!, Bitwarden rasies $100M for password management Cymulate raises $70M, and a ton more Series A, Series B, and Seed announcements from vendors just coming out of stealth, Ethereum's merge completes and moves to proof of stake, Some updates on the Twitterpocalypse, The latest in annoying buzzword innovation, and some Cyber Insurance trends that I promise are interesting!   Attackers have been targeting Active Directory for years and more recently set their sights on Azure AD & Microsoft Office 365. There are ways to tighten up these platforms beyond the default configuration and greatly improve the security posture. Segment Resources: Trimarc Webcast on how to quickly level up Active Directory security: https://www.hub.trimarcsecurity.com/post/webcast-top-10-ways-to-improve-active-directory-security-quickly Performing your own Active Directory Security Review - article and PowerShell tool: https://www.hub.trimarcsecurity.com/post/securing-active-directory-performing-an-active-directory-security-review Trimarc Content Hub: https://hub.trimarcsecurity.com   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw288

RecTech: the Recruiting Technology Podcast
Indeed Flex, Joonko and PI Funding

RecTech: the Recruiting Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 5:37


Joonko, the only automated sourcing platform focused solely on underrepresented candidates, today announced $25M in Series B funding led by global software investor Insight Partners, with participation from Target Global and existing investors Kapor Capital and Vertex Ventures Israel. https://hrtechfeed.com/diversity-recruiting-platform-raises-25-million/ The Predictive Index (PI) announced today a $30 million minority investment from JM Family Enterprises, Inc. (JMFE) to accelerate its mission of Better work, better world through product enhancements to the world's only global talent optimization platform. https://hrtechfeed.com/assessment-platform-predictive-index-lands-new-funding/  Ashby, the all-in-one recruiting platform for high-growth startups and enterprise companies launches publicly today with over 500 paying customers and $21.5 million in Series B funding. The round was led by F-Prime Capital with participation from Elad Gil, Lachy Groom, Semper Virens, Base Case Capital, Gaingels, as well as over a 100 customers, partners, and operators. The new injection of capital will be used to scale operations, engineering, and go-to-market teams. https://hrtechfeed.com/a-new-ats-enters-the-fray/ Indeed Flex, the online marketplace for flexible and temporary workers is expanding into California.   The tech-first staffing platform, which was acquired by Indeed in 2019, is now available to job seekers and employers in Los Angeles County, Orange County, and San Bernardino County, with further expansion across the state planned in the coming months.

Enterprise Security Weekly (Video)
Funding Rounds Rebound, Bitwarden Password Management, Cymulate, & Ethereum's Merge - ESW #288

Enterprise Security Weekly (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 49:59


In the Enterprise Security News for this week: Funding rounds are back!, Bitwarden rasies $100M for password management Cymulate raises $70M, and a ton more Series A, Series B, and Seed announcements from vendors just coming out of stealth, Ethereum's merge completes and moves to proof of stake, Some updates on the Twitterpocalypse, The latest in annoying buzzword innovation, and some Cyber Insurance trends that I promise are interesting!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw288

The aSaaSins Podcast
Beyond the Series A and the future of executive coaching with Christine Tao, CEO and Cofounder of SoundingBoard

The aSaaSins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 20:58


Christine Tao, CEO and Cofounder of SoundingBoard joins the aSaaSins Podcast to discuss:- The future of executive coaching and disrupting a category that has traditionally been limited to the highest earners in society.- The challenges she faced when raising her seed round and additional challenges that female founders face when raising venture capital.- The differences between raising SoundingBoard's Series B vs. their Seed and Series A. - How Christine built SoundingBoard's initial network of leadership coaches, and importance of experience quality when building out the hard side of their network.

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition
Denim, a fintech platform for freight brokers, raises $126M in equity and debt

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 4:05


Denim, the fintech platform for freight and logistics formerly known as Axle Payments, today announced that it raised $126 million in a Series B funding round led by Pelion Venture Partners.

Short Term Rentalz
STRz Podcast 39: Nils Mattisson, Minut

Short Term Rentalz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 20:59


For episode 39 of the ShortTermRentalz podcast, we catch up with Nils Mattisson, co-founder and CEO of property monitoring company Minut, about how the company is using its Series B funding to protect guest privacy, how Minut is supporting sustainable travel, and his thoughts on what the future holds in monitoring and regulating noise in short-term rentals. This episode is kindly sponsored by Minut, the co-host that cares for your home, guests and community. The Minut sensor monitors noise, occupancy, motion and temperature in rental properties, helping hosts prevent parties, enhance guest experience and protect their homes, while respecting guest privacy.

Forbes India Daily Tech Brief Podcast
Apple iPhones: 12 percent could be made in India by FY26 – report; Byju's losses skyrocket

Forbes India Daily Tech Brief Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 5:31


By fiscal year 2026, at least 12 percent of the free-on-board value of Apple's global iPhone shipments could be made in India, Inc42 reports, citing a report by Business Standard that is behind a paywall. Byju's, India's most-valued startup, yesterday, reported losses of Rs. 4,589 crore for the fiscal year that ended March 31, 2021, which is close to a 20-fold increase over the Rs. 231.69 crore adjusted loss for the previous fiscal year, Moneycontrol reports. And SoftBank Group could be planning another Vision Fund, Wall Street Journal reports. Notes: Byju's, India's most-valued startup, yesterday, reported losses of Rs. 4,589 crore for the fiscal year that ended March 31, 2021, which is close to a 20-fold increase over the Rs. 231.69 crore losses for the previous fiscal year, Moneycontrol reports. The company's revenue for FY21 fell 3 percent year on year to Rs. 2,428 crore on a consolidated basis, down from Rs. 2,511 crore the previous year, according to Moneycontrol. By the fiscal year 2026, at least 12 percent of the free-on-board value of Apple's global iPhone shipments could be made in India, Inc42 reports, citing a report by Business Standard on Sep. 12 that is behind a paywall. Apple has been stepping up efforts to boost production in India to reduce its dependence on China, where currently almost all its iPhones are made. According to numbers submitted to the government by Foxconn, Wistron and Pegatron, India might account for at least 12 percent of the free-on-board value of Apple iPhones manufactured by its vendors worldwide. Free-on-board value typically refers to the cost of the goods being shipped including transportation to specific destinations, insurance, loading and unloading and so on. The total value of iPhones sold worldwide could reach $250 billion in FY26 and the total free-on-board of iPhones made in India would be around 12 percent of that, according to the Business Standard repot, as cited by Inc42. SoftBank Group, one of the world's biggest investors in tech startups, is considering the launch of a new giant fund even though its first and second Vision Funds have been hit with big losses owing to the global tech route, Wall Street Journal reports. The Tokyo-based tech conglomerate, by far the world's largest startup investor in recent years, would likely use its own cash for what would be the third SoftBank Vision Fund if it moves ahead with the plan, according to the Journal. Sigmoid, a data engineering, analytics and AI solutions company in Silicon Valley, has closed $12 million in Series B funding, in a mix of primary and secondary investments from Sequoia Capital India. Founded in 2013 by IIT alumni Lokesh Anand, Mayur Rustagi and Rahul Kumar Singh, Sigmoid has a team of about 500 data professionals, who offer deep expertise in data engineering, cloud data modernization, artificial intelligence, and DataOps, according to the release. Theme music courtesy Free Music & Sounds: https://soundcloud.com/freemusicandsounds

Medsider Radio: Learn from Medical Device and Medtech Thought Leaders
How to Find Product-Market Fit by Going Deep Versus Wide: Interview with New View Surgical CEO Bryce Klontz

Medsider Radio: Learn from Medical Device and Medtech Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 63:43


In this episode of Medsider Radio, we sat down with Bryce Klontz, President and CEO of New View Surgical.With over 20 years of experience working in the surgical device space from Canada to Singapore, Bryce brings a tactical advantage to his role as the CEO of New View Surgical. Under his leadership, New View Surgical has closed a successful Series B with a cumulative total of $14.5 million in investments and secured 510(k) clearance along the way. He previously worked as the VP of Commercial Strategy for Emerging Markets at Covidien in addition to leadership roles at several other startups.In this discussion, Bryce shares insights from his decades of experience in the surgical devices space, from building relationships of trust with regulators and investors to working closely with practitioners to perfect product-market fit. Before we jump into the conversation, I wanted to mention a few things:If you're into learning from proven medtech and healthtech leaders, and want to know when new content and interviews go live, head over to Medsider.com and sign up for our free newsletter. You'll get access to gated articles, and lots of other interesting healthcare content.Second, if you want even more inside info from proven experts, think about a Medsider premium membership. We talk to experienced healthcare leaders about the nuts and bolts of running a business and bringing products to market.This is your place for valuable knowledge on specific topics like seed funding, prototyping, insurance reimbursement, and positioning a medtech startup for an exit.In addition to the entire back catalog of Medsider interviews over the past decade, premium members get a copy of every volume of Medsider Mentors sent to their door at no additional cost. If you're interested, go to medsider.com/subscribe to learn more.Lastly, here's the link to the full interview with Bryce if you'd rather read it instead.

LA Venture
Mike Fernandez -- B Capital

LA Venture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 28:57


Why is a Series B pitch so much different than pitching a Series A company?  How do growth stage investors think about multiples today?   Mike Fernandez talks about what he is seeing in growth rounds today and the sort of support that is needed for later stage companies.

The aSaaSins Podcast
Money Morning Quarterback: Muck Rack's MASSIVE $180M Growth Round to build the system of record for Public Relations

The aSaaSins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 12:45


On the aSaaSins 'Money Morning Quarterback' segment, our host Justin Vandehey breaks down the companies that raised their Seed, Series A, or Series B round of funding the prior week.This week, Justin plays 'Money Morning Quarterback' with Muck Rack, a Public Relations Management platform.   He unpacks their $180M growth equity round and analyzes the opportunity in the media intelligence and PR space. 

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast

The Doctor has a very limited first date repetoire: watching the destruction of Earth with weird aliens, visiting a far-future traffic jam full of weird aliens, seeing an entire marketing department being slaughtered by weird aliens, and stopping a gentle space whale from being endlessly tortured by English people. And his first date with Clara is no exception: hiring a space moped from a weird alien called Dor'een and visiting The Rings of Akhaten. Notes and links It's in her essay on The Bells of Saint John that El Sandifer says that the second part of Series 7 “is an extended exercise in not fucking up too badly that is, in everyone's eyes, undermined by fucking up at least once, though opinions differ on precisely where.” The Rings of Akhaten came ninth last in Doctor Who Magazine's First Fifty Years poll in 2014. (Yes, that's number 233, as Peter happened to remember with perfect accuracy.) You can find the rest of the results here. Time and the Rani came third last, so, you know. Emilia Jones, who played Merry in this episode, is 20 years old now, of course. In 2021, she starred in a film called CODA, in which she played Marlee Matlin's daughter. It won the Academy Award for Best Picture in 2022. Yes, a before-they-were-famous Rock “the Dwayne” Johnson did feature in an episode of Star Trek: Voyager called Tsunkatse, in which he is beaten up by Jeri Ryan's Seven of Nine. Here is Johnson admitting to this on Twitter (complete with video evidence), and here is Jeri Ryan's reply. Here's Big Finish announcing the casting of Lauren Cornelius as Dodo Chaplet in the First Doctor Adventures. The press release is curiously reticent about what accent Lauren is intending to use. Follow us Nathan is on Twitter as @nathanbottomley, Brendan is @brandybongos and Todd is @ToddBeilby The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on Apple Podcasts, or we'll use your wedding album to buy gin and cigarettes. And more You can find Jodie into Terror, our flashcast on the Whittaker Era of Doctor Who, at jodieintoterror.com, at @JodieIntoTerror on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and wherever podcasts can be found. We'll be recording our final episode in just a few weeks from now. Our James Bond commentary podcast is called Bondfinger, and you can find that at bondfinger.com, at @bondfingercast on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and everywhere else as well. We can also be heard on the Blakes 7 podcast Maximum Power, whose coverage of Series B will be starting soon. And finally, there's our Star Trek commentary podcast, Untitled Star Trek Project, featuring Nathan and friend-of-the-podcast Joe Ford. This week, we found ourselves enjoying an episode of Star Trek: Voyager called State of Flux.

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Plug-and-play AI for your own projects

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 27:35


AssemblyAI is an AI-as-a-service provider focused on speech-to-text and text analysis. Their mission is to make it easy for developers and product teams to incorporate state-of-the-art AI technology into the solutions they're building. Their customers include Spotify, the Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. Need AI to run semantic analysis on your forum comments or automatically produce summaries of blog post submissions? Rent an ML model on-demand from the cloud instead of building a solution from scratch.Just three months after its $28M Series A, AssemblyAI raised another $30M in a Series B round led by Insight Partners, Y Combinator, and Accel. In this economy?When it comes to new and cutting-edge AI developments, what's Dylan excited about right now? This open-source implementation of AlphaFold from GitHub user lucidrains.Connect with Dylan on LinkedIn.Today we're shouting out the winner of an Inquisitive Badge: User Edson Horacio Junior asked a well-received question on 30 separate days and maintained a positive question record.

Startup Insider
Investments & Exits - mit Jenny Dreier von EQT Ventures

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 23:55


In der Rubrik “Investments & Exits” begrüßen wir heute Jenny Dreier, Investment Manager bei EQT Ventures. Jenny hat die Runde von Varjo, Localyze und Tozero kommentiert: Das Software-Startup Localyze hat gestern bekanntgegeben, dass es in einer Series B unter der Führung von General Catalyst 35 Millionen US-Dollar eingesammelt hat. Zudem beteiligten sich u.a. auch der Visionaries Club, der Web Summit Fund, Frontline Ventures sowie Business Angel und CEO von Remote namens Job van der Voort an der Series B. Das Global #Mobility Unternehmen möchte bis Ende des Jahres in die USA und Kanada expandieren und im Jahr 2023 die ersten Länder in Asien erschließen. Localyze hat eine Softwarelösung entwickelt, die alle Aspekte der Mobilität von Mitarbeitenden vereinfachen soll. Ihr wollt mehr über die frische Runde erfahren? Gestern war Hanna Marie Asmussen, CEO und Co-Founder von Localyze, bei uns zu Gast und hat über die Finanzierungs gesprochen: lnk.to/localyze Varjo hat außerdem eine 40 Millionen US-Dollar Investition für High-End-VR und Cloud-Streaming erhalten. Für den finnischen Hersteller ist es die vierte große Finanzierungsrunde. Laut Crunchbase hat Varjo bisher rund 162 Millionen US-Dollar erhalten. Zu den Geldgebern gehören EQT Ventures, Atomico, Volvo Car Tech Fund, Lifeline Ventures und neue strategische Investoren wie die Schweizer Privatbank Mirabaud und der Elektronikhersteller Foxconn. Tozero, ein neues Startup aus Deutschland, das nach eigenen Angaben ein neuartiges Verfahren zur Rückgewinnung wichtiger Materialien wie Lithium, Nickel und Kobalt aus Lithium-Ionen-Batterien anbietet, konnte 3,5 Millionen Euro einsammeln. Die Pre-Seed-Finanzierungsrunde wurde unter der Leitung von Atlantic Labs aus Berlin geführt. Verve Ventures, Possible Ventures, Angels und andere Gründer haben sich an der Runde beteiligt, darunter das ehemalige VW-Vorstandsmitglied Jochem Heizmann sowie die Mitbegründer von Personio und FINN.

The {Closed} Session
Early Stage Customers

The {Closed} Session

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 52:15


super{set} is in the business of solving real-world problems, meaning disentangling actual customer problems - not building a product in a vacuum because it looked cool to us. You can't wait for every feature of your product to be built before you start having conversations - and testing the market-message fit. As your product launches, early customers are less about maximizing revenue streams (mistakes will be made along the way: customers will fire you) and more about earning valuable product feedback before the scale stage for your company. Metrics like ACV and ARR don't matter in the earliest stages. What matters is losing the fear of failure to rally the entire company - not just a sales team in a corner - to land those customers and learn from them.Tom and Vivek chat about how founders must experience the thrill of being in the sales arena, even if they aren't from a sales background, and how entrepreneurs must show up to those early conversations with high conviction, even if the product isn't there. They then discuss the staging and sequencing for building out the anthropological customer profile, ensuring a feedback loop to product, and evolving from founder-led sales to standing up a proper BDR function. Finally, special guest Matt Kilmartin, CEO of Habu, joins to give his perspective on operating as a former Chief Revenue Officer and his current role as a founder and CEO scaling a Series B cloud data technology company.Learn more about how we at super{set} found and fund data-driven companies at superset.com.

Can I get that software in blue?
Episode 18 | Gaurav Gupta, GP Lightspeed Venture Partners | Former VP Product @ Elastic and Splunk

Can I get that software in blue?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 67:41


Episode #18 of "Can I get that software in blue?", a podcast by and for people engaged in technology sales. If you are in the technology presales, solution architecture, sales, support or professional services career paths then this show is for you! Your hosts Steve Mayzak and Chad Tindel are joined by Gaurav Gupta, General Partner at Lightspeed Venture Partners where's led investments into notable tech companies such as Grafana Labs, Clickhouse, Hasura and others. Before joining Lightspeed, Gaurav was VP of Product at Elastic and Splunk. Gaurav goes pretty deep into what it's like to move into the Venture Capital space, and his process for how he decides to invest in a founder/company and how that varies at the different company stages (Seed, Series A, Series B). Also he gives us some real talk on the current state of the VC world during the current pull back. Contact us on Twitter or LinkedIn to suggest companies or tech news articles worthy of the podcast! Our website: https://softwareinblue.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/softwareinblue LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/softwareinblue Make sure to subscribe or follow us to get notified about our upcoming episodes: Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8qfPUKO_rPmtvuB4nV87rg Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/can-i-get-that-software-in-blue/id1561899125 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/25r9ckggqIv6rGU8ca0WP2 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/can-i-get-that-software-in-blue Links mentioned in the episode: Facebook slashes eng hiring plans by 30%: https://ground.news/article/meta-slashes-hiring-plans-girds-for-fierce-headwinds_02b3f1

How to be a CEO
Zapp and the instant grocery boom

How to be a CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 23:32


Steve O'Hear is Strategy VP at Zapp, one of the earliest quick commerce companies that bring snacks and groceries to your door.In this episode we talk about: The complex supply chain that powers instant grocery services Opportunities for disabled people in the post-pandemic remote work environment The “make the moment or save the moment” problem solving of philosophy of Zapp Why they're expanding from crisps and ice cream to luxury brands and electronicsWhy they limited discounts when rivals were “throwing money” at customers How quick commerce developed before the pandemic made it so popular The $200m Series B funding round that attracted Lewis Hamilton's attention What's inside the giant warehouse that keeps all Zapp's stock Find us on Twitter at #HowToBeACEOFor more business interviews, news, analysis and commentary go to standard.co.uk/business or pick up the Evening Standard newspaper. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The aSaaSins Podcast
Money Morning Quarterback: (TIMBER!!) Yesler's $5M Round for it's Lumber and building materials marketplace

The aSaaSins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 16:34


On the aSaaSins 'Money Morning Quarterback' segment, our host Justin Vandehey breaks down the companies that raised their Seed, Series A, or Series B round of funding the prior week.This week, Justin plays 'Money Morning Quarterback' with Yesler, a lumber and building materials marketplace.   He unpacks their $5M round and analyzes the opportunity in the lumber management space.

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast
A Proud Bear Holding a Bag of Chips Getting to Be Celia Imrie

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 47:52


It's 2013 and Doctor Who is back for its anniversary season — with a new companion, a new outfit for the Doctor, and a lethal and potentially world-ending new threat from the Internet, more than a decade before the invention of Web3. Keep a close eye on your apes, everyone: it's The Bells of Saint John. Notes and links Celia Imrie is known and loved by all of us here at FTE from her role in Absolutely Fabulous as Jennifer Saunders's rival in PR, Claudia Bing from Bing, Bing, Bing & Bing. Here's an in-depth interview with her, about her career both as an actress and a writer, which published in The Scotsman in 2016. Danny Hargreaves was Doctor Who's extremely photogenic special effects supervisor, who was always a very welcome addition to any episode of Doctor Who Confidential. And, finally, it's time that we sat down and had a serious, proper talk about Doctor Who production codes. From the very beginning of the show in 1963, every story was referred to internally by its production code, which was initially a single capital letter from A to Z, then a double letter (AA to ZZ), then a triple letter (AAA to ZZZ) and then finally an initial number followed by a letter (4A to 4Z and so on). And so An Unearthly Child was A and Ghost Light was 7Q. Back in the day, certain of us knew the production codes for every story — sadly, in these hectic modern times, we have better things to do. You can find out all about the ins and outs of production codes here. Follow us Nathan is on Twitter as @nathanbottomley, Brendan is @brandybongos and James is @ohjamessellwood The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on Apple Podcasts, or we'll move in next door to you and give our wifi network an obscene and insulting SSID. And more You can find Jodie into Terror, our flashcast on the Whittaker Era of Doctor Who, at jodieintoterror.com, at @JodieIntoTerror on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and wherever podcasts can be found. We'll be recording our final episode some time in October. Our James Bond commentary podcast is called Bondfinger, and you can find that at bondfinger.com, at @bondfingercast on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and everywhere else as well. We can also be heard on the Blakes 7 podcast Maximum Power, whose coverage of Series B will be starting any second now. And finally, there's our Star Trek commentary podcast, Untitled Star Trek Project, featuring Nathan and friend-of-the-podcast Joe Ford. In the most recent episode, they are surprised to find themselves fighting to the death over a beautiful woman, in Amok Time.

Our Epic Ocean
Justin Kolbeck - Co-Founder and CEO Wildtype. | E35

Our Epic Ocean

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 71:17


Justin Kolbeck is co-founder and CEO of cultivated salmon producer Wildtype with longtime friend Aryé Elfenbein, currently on a mission to create the cleanest, most sustainable seafood on the planet. Inspired by breakthroughs in stem cell research, and witnessing firsthand the impact of global food insecurity in places such as Pakistan and Afghanistan, these old friends brought their experiences together to reimagine the future of seafood starting with creating sushi grade salmon from Coho Salmon cells.  Wildtype has recently raised over $100 million in Series B funding to make its product ubiquitous, from top restaurants to grocery stores.  Prior to Wildtype, Justin spent nearly five years as a consultant at Strategy& helping companies develop and launch products, grow into new markets, and operate efficiently. He started his career as a Foreign Service Officer, serving in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Australia, and Washington DC.  He is a graduate of the Yale School of Management, L'Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris, and UC Berkeley.     LEARN MORE ABOUT JUSTIN KOLBECK and WILDTYPE FOODS here:    Wildtype Website: https://www.wildtypefoods.com/ Wildtype on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/wildtype-foods/ Wildtype on Twitter: https://twitter.com/wildtypefoods Wildtype on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bluefrontiercampaign/ Wildtype Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildtype_Foods Wildtype on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wildtypefoods/ TechCrunch: https://techcrunch.com/2022/02/22/can-100-million-get-wildtypes-cell-grown-salmon-into-the-wild/ Forbes: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffkart/2021/06/17/wildtype-says-its-sustainable-cell-cultivated-salmon-can-ease-stress-on-our-oceans/?sh=3a0c42d46629 Arye' Elfenbein LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elfenbein216/ Justin Kolbeck LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/justin-kolbeck/ BBC News: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-51657573 New Republic Lab to Table: https://newrepublic.com/article/163554/lab-meat-save-planet NY Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/10/business/fake-fish-impossible-foods.html Future of Seafood: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBY96h7mcko Science Insider: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWRwrQI3XOY Bloomberg QuickTake: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDTQTdPwBsQ Time Lab Grown Meat could Feed the Planet : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FIk8ruwG4s Forbes: Cell Cultured Seafood: https://www.forbes.com/sites/briankateman/2022/06/06/cell-cultured-seafood-isnt-just-an-idea-its-a-reality/?sh=3118d9d4146d Insider: https://www.businessinsider.com/wildtype-cultivated-cell-grown-salmon-looks-feels-tastes-real-2021-10     “Maybe it seems strange that all the meat that we'll consume (in the future) won't require slaughtering animals. But strange things happen all the time.” -Josh Tetrick, cofounder and CEO of Eat Just, Inc. and Good Meat.    TO SUGGEST A GUEST YOU CAN REACH US here: guest@ourepicocean.com or email the Executive Producer here: steve@project-o.org

Screaming in the Cloud
Third Wave Security with Alex Marshall of Twingate

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 31:46


About AlexAlex is the Chief Product Officer of Twingate, which he cofounded in 2019. Alex has held a range of product leadership roles in the enterprise software market over the last 16 years, including at Dropbox, where he was the first enterprise hire in the company's transformation from consumer to enterprise business. A focus of his product career has been using the power of design thinking to make technically complex products intuitive and easy to use. Alex graduated from Stanford University with a degree in Electrical Engineering.Links Referenced:twingate.com: https://twingate.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is brought to us by our friends at Twingate, and in addition to bringing you this episode, they also brought me a guest. Alex Marshall is the Chief Product Officer at Twingate. Alex, thank you for joining me, and what is a Twingate?Alex: Yeah, well, thanks. Well, it's great to be here. What is Twingate? Well, the way to think about Twingate is we're really a network overlay layer. And so, the experience you have when you're running Twingate as a user is that network resources or network destinations that wouldn't otherwise be accessible to you or magically accessible to you and you're properly authenticated and authorized to access them.Corey: When you say it's a network overlay, what I tend to hear and the context I usually see that in, in the real world is, “Well, we're running some things in AWS and some things in Google Cloud, and I don't know because of a sudden sharp blow to the head, maybe Azure as well, and how do you get all of the various security network models of security groups on one side to talk to their equivalent on the other side?” And the correct answer is generally that you don't and you use something else that more or less makes the rest of that irrelevant. Is that the direction you're coming at this from, or do you view it differently?Alex: Yeah, so I think the way that we view this in terms of, like, why we decide to build a product in the first place is that if you look at, sort of like, the internet in 2022, like, there's one thing that's missing from the network routing table, which is authentication and authorization on each row [laugh]. And so, the way that we designed the product is we said, “Okay, we're not going to worry about everything, basically, above the network layer and we're going to focus on making sure that what we're controlling with the client is looking at outbound network connections and making sure that when someone accesses something and only when they access it, that we check to make sure that they're allowed access.” We're basically holding those network connections until someone's proven that they're allowed to access to, then we let it go. And so, from the standpoint of, like, figuring out, like, security groups and all that kind of stuff, we're basically saying, like, “Yeah, if you're allowed to access the database in AWS, or your home assistant on your home network, fine, we'll let you do that, but we'll only let you go there once you've proven you're allowed to. And then once you're there, then you know, we'll let you figure out how you want to authenticate into the destination system.” So, our view is, like, let's start at the network layer, and then that solves a lot of problems.Corey: When I call this a VPN, I know a couple of things are going to be true. One, you're almost certainly going to correct me on that because this is all about Zero Trust. This is the Year of our Lord 2022, after all. But also what I round to what basically becomes a VPN to my mind, there are usually two implementations or implementation patterns that I think about. One of them is the idea of client access, where I have a laptop; I'm in a Starbucks; I want to connect to a thing. And the other has historically been considered, site to site, or I have a data center that I want to have constantly connected to my cloud environment. Which side of that mental model do you tend to fall in? Or is that the wrong way to frame it?Alex: Mm-hm. The way we look at it and sort of the vision that we have for what the product should be, the problem that we should be solving for customers is what we want to solve for customers is that Twingate is a product that lets you be certain that your employees can work securely from anywhere. And so, you need a little bit of a different model to do that. And the two examples you gave are actually both entirely valid, especially given the fact that people just work from everywhere now. Like, resources everywhere, they use a lot of different devices, people work from lots of different networks, and so it's a really hard problem to solve.And so, the way that we look at it is that you really want to be running something or have a system in place that's always taking into account the context that user is in. So, in your example of someone's at a Starbucks, you know, in the public WiFi, last time I checked, Starbucks WiFi was unencrypted, so it's pretty bad for security. So, what we should do is you should take that context into account and then make sure that all that traffic is encrypted. But at the same time, like, you might be in the corporate office, network is perfectly safe, but you still want to make sure that you're authorizing people at the point in time they try to access something to make sure that they actually are entitled to access that database in the AWS network. And so, we're trying to get people away from thinking about this, like, point-to-point connection with a VPN, where you know, the usual experience we've all had as employees is, “Great. Now, I need to fire up the VPN. My internet traffic is going to be horrible. My battery's probably going to die. My—”Corey: Pull out the manual token that rotates with an RSA—Alex: Exactly.Corey: —token that spits out a different digital code every 30 seconds if the battery hasn't died or they haven't gotten their seeds leaked again, and then log in and the rest; in some horrible implementations type that code after your password for some Godforsaken reason. Yeah, we've all been down that path and it's like, “Yeah, just sign into the corporate VPN.” It's like, “Did you just tell me to go screw myself because that's what I heard.”Alex: [laugh]. Exactly. And that is exactly the situation that we're in. And the fact is, like, VPNs were invented a long time ago and they were designed to connect to networks, right? They were designed to connect a branch office to a corporate office, and they're just to join all the devices on the network.So, we're really, like—everybody has had this experience of VPN is suffering from the fact that it's the wrong tool for the job. Going back to, sort of like, this idea of, like, us being the network overlay, we don't want to touch any traffic that isn't intended to go to something that the company or the organization or the team wants to protect. And so, we're only going to gate traffic that goes to those network destinations that you actually want to protect. And we're going to make sure that when that happens, it's painless. So, for example, like, you know, I don't know, again, like, use your example again; you've been at Starbucks, you've been working your email, you don't really need to access anything that's private, and all of a sudden, like, you need to as part of your work that you're doing on the Starbucks WiFi is access something that's in AWS.Well, then the moment you do that, then maybe you're actually fine to access it because you've been authenticated, you know, and you're within the window, it's just going to work, right, so you don't have to go through this painful process of firing up the VPN like you're just talking about.Corey: There are a number of companies out there that, first, self-described as being, “Oh, we do Zero Trust.” And when I hear that, what I immediately hear in my own mind is, “I have something to sell you,” which, fair enough, we live in an industry. We're trying to have a society here. I get it. The next part that I wind up getting confused by then is, it seems like one of those deeply overloaded terms that exists to, more or less—in some cases to be very direct—well, we've been selling this thing for 15 years and that's the buzzword, so now we're going to describe it as the thing we do with a fresh coat of paint on it.Other times it seems to be something radically different. And, on some level, I feel like I could wind up building an entire security suite out of nothing other than things self-billing themselves as Zero Trust. What is it that makes Twingate different compared to a wide variety of other offerings, ranging from Seam to whatever the hell an XDR might be to, apparently according to RSA, a breakfast cereal?Alex: So, you're right. Like, Zero Trust is completely, like, overused word. And so, what's different about Twingate is that really, I think goes back to, like, why we started the company in the first place, which is that we started looking at the remote workspace. And this is, of course, before the pandemic, before everybody was actually working remotely and it became a really urgent problem.Corey: During the pandemic, of course, a lot of the traditional VPN companies are, “Huh. Why is the VPN concentrator glowing white in the rack and melting? And it sounds like screaming. What's going on?” Yeah, it turns out capacity provisioning and bottlenecking of an entire company tends to be a thing at scale.Alex: And so, you're right, like, that is exactly the conversation. We've had a bunch of customers over the last couple years, it's like their VPN gateway is, like, blowing up because it used to be that 10% of the workforce used it on average, and all of a sudden everybody had to use it. What's different about our approach in terms of what we observed when we started the company, is that what we noticed is that this term Zero Trust is kind of floating out there, but the only company that actually implemented Zero Trust was Google. So, if you think about the situations that you look at, Zero Trust is like, obvious. It's like, it's what you would want to do if you redesigned the internet, which is you'd want to say every network connection has to be authorized every single time it's made.But the internet isn't actually designed that way. It's designed default open instead of default closed. And so, we looked at the industry are, like, “Great. Like, Google's done it. Google has, like, tons and tons of resources. Why hasn't anyone else done it?”And the example that I like to talk about when we talk about inception of the business is we went to some products that are out there that were implementing the right technological approach, and one of these products is still in use today, believe it or not, but I went to the documentation page, and I hit print, and it was almost 50 pages of documentation to implement it. And so, when you look at that, you're, like, okay, like, maybe there's a usability problem here [laugh]. And so, what we really, really focus on is, how do we make this product as easy as possible to deploy? And that gets into, like, this area of change management. And so, if you're in IT or DevOps or engineering or security and you're listening to this, I'm sure you've been through this process where it's taken months to deploy something because it was just really technically difficult and because you had to change user behavior. So, the thing that we focus on is making sure that you didn't have to change user behavior.Corey: Every time you expect people to start doing things completely differently, congratulations, you've already lost before you've started.Alex: Yes, exactly. And so, the difference with our product is that you can switch off the VPN one day, have people install a Twingate client, and then tomorrow, they still access things with exactly the same addresses they used before. And this seems like such a minor point, but the fact that I don't have to rewrite scripts, I don't have to change my SSH proxy configuration, I don't have to do anything, all of those private DNS addresses or those private IP address, they'll still work because of the way that our client works on the device.Corey: So, what you're saying is fundamental; you could even do a slow rollout. It doesn't need to be a knife-switch cutover at two in the morning where you're scrambling around and, “Oh, my God, we forgot the entire accounting department.”Alex: Yep, that's exactly right. And that is, like, an attraction of deploying this is that you can actually deploy it department by department and not have to change all your infrastructure at the same time. So again, it's like pretty fundamental point here. It's like, if you're going to get adoption technology, it's not just about how cool the technology is under the hood and how advanced it is; it's actually thinking about from a customer and a business standpoint, like, how much is actually going to cost time-wise and effort-wise to move over to the new solution. So, we've really, really focused on that.Corey: Yeah. That is generally one of those things, that seems to be the hardest approach. I mean, let's back up a little bit here because I will challenge—likely—something that you said a few minutes ago, which is Google was the first and only company for a little while doing Zero Trust. Back in 2012, it turned out that we weren't calling it that then, but that is fundamentally what I built out of the ten-person startup that I was at, where I was the first ops hire, which generally comes in right around Series B when developers realize, okay, we can no longer lie to ourselves that we know what we're doing on an ops side. Everything's on fire and no one can sleep through the night. Help, help, help. Which is fine.I've never had tolerance or patience for ops people who insult people in those situations. It's, “Well, they got far enough along to hire you, didn't they? So, maybe show some respect.” But one of the things that I did was, being on the corporate network got you access to the printer in the corner and that was it. There was no special treatment of that network.And I didn't think much of it at the time, but I got some very strange looks and had some—uh, will call it interesting a decade later; most of the pain has faded—discussions with our auditor when we were going through some PCI work, and they showed up and said, “Great. Okay, where are the credentials for your directory?” And my response was, “Our what now?” And that's when I realized there's a certain point of scale. Back when I started as an independent consultant, everything I did for single-sign-on, for example, was my 1Password vault. Easy enough.Now, that we've scaled up beyond that, I'm starting to see the value of things like single-sign-on in a way that I never did before, and in hindsight, I'd like to go back and do things very differently as a result. Scale matters. What is the point of scale that you find is your sweet spot? Is it one person trying to connect to a whole bunch of nonsense? Is it small to midsize companies—and we should probably bound that because to me, a big company is still one that has 200 people there?Alex: To your original interesting point, which is that yeah, kudos to you for, like, implementing that, like, back then because we've had probably—Corey: I was just being lazy and it was what was there. It's like, “Why do I want to maintain a server in the closet? Honestly, I'm not sure that the office is that secure. And all it's going to do—what I'm I going to put on that? A SharePoint server? Please. We're using Macs.”Alex: Yeah, exactly. Yeah. So it's, we've had, like, I don't know at this point, thousands of customer conversations. The number of people have actually gone down that route implementing things themselves as a very small number. And I think that just shows how hard it is. So again, like, kudos.And I think the scale point is, I think, really critical. So, I think it's changed over time, but actually, the point at which a customer gets to a scale where I think a solution has, like, leveraged high value is when you get to maybe only 50, 75 people, which is a pretty small business. And the reason is that that's the point at which a bunch of tools start getting implemented a company, right? When you're five people, you're not going to install, like, an MDM or something on people's devices, right? When you get to 50, 75, 100, you start hiring your first IT team members. That's the point where them being able to, like, centralize management of things at the company becomes really critical.And so, one of the other aspects that makes this a little bit different terms of approach is that what we see is that there's a huge number of tools that have to be managed, and they have different configuration settings. You can't even get consistency on MDM is across different platforms, necessarily, right? Like, Linux, Windows, and Mac are all going to have slight differences, and so what we've been working with the platform towards is actually being the centralization point where we integrate with these different systems and then pull together, like, a consistent way to create those authentication authorization policies I was talking about before. And the last thing on SSO, just to sort of reiterate that, I think that you're talking about you're seeing the value of that, the other thing that we've, like, made a deliberate decision on is that we're not going to try to, like, re-solve, like, a bunch of these problems. Like, some of the things that we do on the user authentication point is that we rely on there being an SSO, like, user directory, that handles authentication, that handles, like, creating user groups. And we want to reuse that when people are using Twingate to control access to network destinations.So, for us, like, it's actually, you know, that point of scale comes fairly early. It only gets harder from there, and it's especially when that IT team is, like, a relatively small number of people compared to number of employees where it becomes really critical to be able to leverage all the technology they have to deploy.Corey: I guess this might be one of those areas where I'm not deep enough in your space to really see it the same way that you do, which is the whole reason I have people like you on the show: so I can ask these questions directly. What is the painful position that I find myself in that I should say, “Ah, I should bring Twingate in to solve this obnoxious, painful problem so I never have to think about it again.” What is it that you solve?Alex: Yeah, I mean, I think for what our customers tell us, it's providing a, like, consistent way to get access into, like, a wide variety of internal resources, and generally in multi-cloud environments. That's where it gets, like, really tricky. And the consistency is, like, really important because you're trying to provide access to your team—often like it's DevOps teams, but all kinds of people can access these things—trying to write access is a multiple different environments, again, there's a consistency problem where there are multiple different ways to provide that, and there isn't a single place to manage all that. And so, it gets really challenging to understand who has access to what, makes sure that credentials expire when they're supposed to expire, make sure that all the routing inside those remote destinations is set up correctly. And it just becomes, like, a real hassle to manage those things.So, that's the big one. And usually where people are coming from is that they've been using VPN to do that because they didn't know anything better exists, or they haven't found anything that's easy enough to deploy, right? So, that's really the problem that they're running into.Corey: There's also a lot of tribal knowledge that gets passed down. The oral tradition of, “I have this problem. What should I do? I know, I will consult the wise old sage.” “Well, where can you find the wise old sage?” “Under the rack of servers, swearing at them.” “Great, cool. Well, use a VPN. That's what we've used since time immemorial.” And then the sins are visited onto yet another generation.There's a sense that I have that companies that are started now are going to have a radically different security posture and a different way of thinking about these things than the quote-unquote, “Legacy companies.”—legacy, of course, being that condescending engineering term for ‘it makes money—who are migrating their way into a brave new world because they had the temerity to found themselves as companies before 2012.Alex: Absolutely. When we're working with customers, there is a sort of a sweet spot, both in terms of, like, the size and role that we were talking about before, but also just in terms of, like, where they are, in, sort of like, the sort of lifecycle of their company. And I think one of the most exciting things for us is that we get to work with companies that are kind of figuring this stuff out for the first time and they're taking a fresh look at, like, what the capabilities are out there in the landscape. And that's, I think, what makes this whole space, like, super, super interesting.There's some really, really fantastic things you can do. Just give you an example, again, that I think might resonate with your audience quite a bit is this whole topic of automation, right? Your time at the tribal knowledge of, like, “Oh, of course. You know, we set up a VPN and so on.” One of the things that I don't think is necessarily obvious in this space is that for the teams that—at companies that are deploying, configuring, managing internal network infrastructure, is that in the past, you've had to make compromises on infrastructure in order to accommodate access, right?Because it's kind of a pain to deploy a bunch of, like, VPN gateways, mostly for the end-user because they got to, like, choose which one they're connecting to. You potentially had to open up traffic routes to accommodate a VPN gateway that you wouldn't otherwise want to open up. And so, one of the things that's, like, really sort of fascinating about, like, a new way of looking at things is that what we allow with Twingate—and part of this is because we've really made sure that the product is, like, API-first in the very beginning, which allows us to very easily integrate in with things, like, Terraform and Pulumi for deployment automation, is that now you have a new way of looking at things, which is that you can build a network infrastructure that you want with the data flow rules that you want, and very easily provide access into, like, points of that infrastructure, whether that's an entire subnet or just a single host somewhere. I think these are the ways, like, the capabilities have been realized are possible until they, sort of like, understand some of these new technologies.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: This feels like one of those technologies where the place that a customer starts from and where they wind up going are very far apart. Because I can see the metaphorical camel's nose under the tent flap being, “Ah, this is a VPN except it doesn't suck. Great.” But once you wind up with effectively an overlay network connecting all the things that you care about within an organization, it feels like that unlocks a whole universe of possibility.Alex: Mm-hm. Yeah, definitely. I mean, I think you hit the nail on the head there. Like, a lot of people approach us because they're having a lot of pain with VPN and all the operational difficulties they were talking about earlier, but I think what sort of starts to open up is there's some, sort of like, not obvious things that happen. And one of them is that all of a sudden, when you can limit access at a network connection level, you start to think about, like, credentials and access management a little differently, right?So, one of the problems that well-known is people set a bastion host. And they set bastion host so that there's, like, a limited way into the network and all the, you know, keys are stored in that bastion host and so on. So, you basically have a system where fine, we had bastion host set up because, A, we want limited ingress, and B, we want to make sure that we know exactly who has access to our internal resources. You could do away with that and with a simple, like, configuration change, you can basically say, “Even if this employee for whatever reason, we've forgotten to remove—revoke their SSH keys, even if they still have those keys, they can't access the destination because we're blocking network access at their actual device,” then you have a very different way to restrict access. So, it's still important to manage credentials, but you now have a way to actually block things out at a network level. And I think it's like when people start to realize that these capabilities are possible that they definitely start thinking about things a little bit differently. VPNs just don't allow this, like, level of granularity.Corey: I am a firm believer in the idea that any product with any kind of longevity gets an awful lot of its use case and product-market fit not from the people building it, but from the things that those folks learn from their customers. What did you learn from customers rolling out Twingate that reshaped how you thought about the space, or surprised you as far as use cases go?Alex: Yeah, so I think it's a really interesting question because one of the benefits of having a small business and being early on is that you have very close relationships with all your customers and they're really passionate about your product. And what that leads to is just a lot of, sort of like, knowledge sharing around, like, how they're using your product, which then helps inform the types of things that we build. So, one of the things that we've done internally to help us learn, but then also help us respond more quickly to customers, is we have this group called Twingate Labs. And it's really just a group of folks that are outside the engineering org that are just allowed to build whatever they want to try to prove out, like, interesting concepts. And a lot of those—I say a lot; honestly, probably all of those concepts have come from our customers, and so we've been able to, like, push the boundaries on that.And so, it just gave you an example, I mean, AWS can be sometimes a challenging product to manage and interact with, and so that team has, for example, built capabilities, again, using that just the regular Twingate API to show that it's possible to automatically configure resources in AWS based on tags. Now, that's not something that's in our product, but it's us showing our customers that, you know, we can respond quickly to them and then they actually, like, try to accommodate some, like, these special use cases they have. And if that works out, then great, we'll pull it into the product, right? So, I think that's, like, the nice thing about serving a smaller businesses is that you get a lot of that back and forth to your customers and they help us generate ideas, too.Corey: One thing that stands out to me from the testimonials from customers you have on your website has been a recurring theme that crops up that speaks to I guess, once I spend more than ten seconds thinking about it, one of the most obvious reasons that I would say, “Oh, Twingate? That sounds great for somebody else. We're never rolling it out here.” And that is the ease of adoption into environments that are not greenfield because I don't believe that something like this product will ever get deployed to something greenfield because this is exactly the kind of problem that you don't realize exists and don't have to solve for until it's too late because you already have that painful problem. It's an early optimization until suddenly, it's something you should have done six months ago. What is the rolling it out process for a company that presumably already is built out, has hired a bunch of people, and they already have something that, quote-unquote, “Works,” for granting access to things?Alex: Mm-hm. Yeah, so the beauty is that you can really deploy this side-by-side with an existing solution, so—whatever it happens to be; I mean, whether it's a VPN or something else—is you can put the side-by-side and the deployment process, just to talk a little bit about the architecture; we've talked a lot about this client that runs on the user's device, but on the remote network side, just to be really clear on this, there's a component called a connector that gets deployed inside the remote network, and it does not have to be installed on every single destination host. You're sort of thinking about it, sort of like this routing point inside that network, and that connector controls what traffic is allowed to go to internal locations based on the rules. So, from a deployment standpoint, it's really just put a connector in place and put it in place in whatever subnet you want to provide access to.And so you're—unlikely, but if your entire company has one subnet, great. You're done with one connector. But it does mean you can sort of gradually roll it out as it goes. And the connector can be deployed in a bunch of different environments, so we're just talking with AWS. Maybe it's inside a VPC, but we have a lot of people that actually just want to control access to specific services inside a Kubernetes cluster, and so you can deploy it as a container, right inside Kubernetes. And so, you can be, like, really specific about how you do that and then gradually roll it out to teams as they need it and without having to necessarily on that day actually shut off the old solution.So, just to your comment, by the way, on the greenfield versus, sort of like, brownfield, I think the greenfield story, I think, is changing a little bit, I think, especially to your comment earlier around younger companies. I think younger companies are realizing that this type of capability is an option and that they want to get in earlier. But the reality is that, you know, 98% of people are really in the established network situation, and so that's where that rollout process is really important.Corey: As you take a look throughout what you're seeing customers doing, what you see the industry doing as a result of that—because customers are, in fact, the industry, let's be clear here—what do you think is, I guess, the next wave of security offerings? I guess what I'm trying to do here is read the tea leaves and predict what the buzzwords will be all over the place that next RSA. But on a slightly more serious note, what do you see this is building towards? What are the trends that you're identifying in the space?Alex: There's a couple of things that we see. So one, sort of, way to look at this is that we're sort of in this, like, Third Wave. And I think these things change more slowly than—with all due respect to marketers—than marketers would [laugh] have you believe. And so, thinking about where we are, there's, like, Wave One is, like, good old happy days, we're all in the office, like, your computer can't move, like, all the data is in the office, like, everything is in one place, right?Corey: What if someone steals your desktop? Well, they're probably going to give themselves a hernia because that thing's heavy. Yeah.Alex: Exactly. And is it really worth stealing, right? But the Wave One was really, like, network security was actually just physical security, to that point; that's all it was, just, like, physically secure the premises.Wave Two—and arguably you could say we're kind of still in this—is actually the transition to cloud. So, let's convert all CapEx to OpEx, but that also introduces a different problem, which is that everything is off-network. So, you have to, like, figure out, you know, what you do about that.But Wave Three is really I think—and again, just to be clear, I think Wave Two, there are, like, multi-decade things that happen—and I'd say we're in the middle of, like, Wave Three. And I think that everyone is still, like, gradually adapting to this, which is what we describe it as sort of people everywhere, applications are everywhere, people are using a whole bunch of different devices, right? There is no such thing as BYOD in the early-2000s, late-90s, and people are accessing things from all kinds of different networks. And this presents a really, really challenging problem. So, I would argue, to your question, I think we're still in the middle of that Wave Three and it's going to take a long time to see that play through the industry. Just, things change slowly. That tribal knowledge takes time to change.The other thing that I think we very strongly believe in is that—and again, this is, sort of like, coming from our customers, too—is that people basically with security industry have had a tough time trying things out and adopting them because a lot of vendors have put a lot of blockers in place of doing that. There's no public documentation; you can't just go use the product. You got to talk to a salesperson who then filters you through—Corey: We have our fifth call with the sales team. We're hoping this is the one where they'll tell us how much it costs.Alex: Exactly. Or like, you know, now you get to the sales engineer, so you gradually adopt this knowledge. But ultimately, people just want to try the darn thing [laugh], right? So, I think we're big believers that I think hopefully, what we'll see in the security industry is that—we're trying to set an example here—is really that there's an old way of doing things, but a new way of doing things is make the product available for people to use, document the heck out of it, explain all the different use cases that exist for how to be successful your product, and then have these users actually then reach out to you when they want to have more in-depth conversation about things. So, those are the two big things, I'd say. I don't know if those are translated buzzwords at RSA, but those are two big trends we see.Corey: I look forward to having you back in a year or two and seeing how close we get to the reality. “Well, I guess we didn't see that acronym coming, but don't worry. They've been doing it for the last 15 years under different names, so it works out.” I really want to thank you for being as generous with your time as you have been. If people want to learn more, where should they go?Alex: Well, as we're just talking about, you try the product at twingate.com. So, that should be your first stop.Corey: And we will of course put links to that in the show notes. Thank you so much for being as forthcoming as you have been about all this stuff. I really appreciate your time.Alex: Yeah, thank you, Corey. I really appreciate it. Thanks.Corey: Alex Marshall, Chief Product Officer at Twingate. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a long angry ranty comment about what you hated about the episode, which will inevitably get lost when it fails to submit because your crappy VPN concentrator just dropped it on the floor.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Five & Thrive
September 1st's Weekly Rundown

Five & Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 5:02


Introduction: Welcome to Five & Thrive: a weekly podcast highlighting the Southeast's most interesting news, entrepreneurs, and information of the week, all under 5 minutes.  My name is Jon Birdsong and I'm with Atlanta Ventures. Y'all we did shorten the intro as time is just too precious.  Product of the Week: There are two products of the week worth highlighting. First is a company call Nauvus which is one simple platform to book load, manage expenses and get paid when it comes to freight and trucking. Still early, but the grand vision is to be a universal freight network & payment solution for trucking companies and the independent dispatchers that support them all in an effort to maximize revenue and reduce cost. Check out Nauvus and if you're into logistics and payments.  The second product of the week is called Givsly. This company has created software that makes it really simple to infuse social good into your marketing. Let's say Arby's wants to promote a new sandwich and wants to put a social good twist on the campaign. Enter Givsly that provides the tools, services, and reporting capabilities companies can connect with causes and produces seamless campaigns to increase revenue and giving. Check out Givsly if you want to add a charitable spin to your go to market efforts. Quiet Giant: This week's QuietGiant raised a growth equity round in June and the company is called Inductive Health. According to LinkedIn there are approximately 60 employees and Inductive Health brings disruptive technologies to the public health informatics arena to lower the costs of integration and large-scale analysis of health data – probably a pretty timely tool over the last two and half years. From the looks of it, they have been bootstrapped and the PE firm that infused growth capital is called Diversis and they are out of Los Angeles. Another fantastic example of a Quiet Giant, right off Clairmont road, that is nearly another 10 year over night success story. All you folks out there building Quiet Giants, keep at it!  Question of the Week: Can billion dollar businesses be built on nice to have products? This is the question that was posed last week in a conversation with an entrepreneur we talked to in Miami. The call that was supposed to last 30 minutes and wove towards an hour as we shared our thoughts on the differences between nice to have products versus need to have products — which is such a fascinating discussion. The short answer is: at some point the product must become a need to have in the person or company's business, if not significant churn will result and it will not become an extraordinarily valuable business. I'll never forget the moment years ago, when I was speaking to a CEO who had about 30 sales reps at the time, share how Salesloft had transformed his sales team and that it was a must have for them to operate. Yet, for the 18 months beforehand, they piece-mealed the workflow on spreadsheets and free email accounts. So I asked: “when did you finally realize Salesloft was a must have for your business?” Two things had occurred in the business: one the pain point of having so many sales reps on his team that the manual process was costing the business too much not to have it. 2) It took a sales rep to uncover that realization and educate the company that there is a better way. Fortunately, Salesloft is tied directly to ROI which makes the case that much more compelling. There is a continuum of nice to have vs. need to have products but at some point in the customer's life span, the product must turn into a need to have.       Raise a Glass: Nashville based SoundStripe just raised their Series B led by TopMark Partners out of Tampa and includes existing investors most notably David Sacks of Craft Ventures. SoundStripe “keeps creators creating” with a plethora of royalty-free music, videos, and sound effects. Now, creators to corporations can pay a simple subscription fee and not have to worry about licensing rights, copyright infringements, and more. To date, the startup has issued more than 10 million licenses for tens of thousands of customers in more than 140 countries – cha ching! Started in 2016, SoundStripe out of Nashville, fills the seemingly ideal narrative for fast growing software company out Music City.  Annnnd, that's 5 minutes. Thank you for listening to Five and Thrive. We provide 5 minutes of quality information, so you can thrive in the upcoming week. Please subscribe to the show and spread the good word!  Resources discussed in this episode: Product of the Week: Nauvus and Givsly Quiet Giant:  Inductive Health Raises Money from Diversis Raise a Glass:  SoundStripe

The J Curve
Parker Treacy / Cobli on key learnings from bootstrapping First Help Financial, building an efficient sales organization and why the pace of learning is founder's competitive advantage

The J Curve

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 30:29


August 31: For this episode of the JCurve I am thrilled to bring you my conversation with Parker Treacy, founder and CEO at Cobli, Brazilian telematics and fleet management platform that has recently raised $35M Series B from the likes of Softbank, Fifth Wall, Qualcomm Ventures and Valor Capital. Prior to that, Parker founded First Help Financial now one of the largest independent auto finance companies in the United States.In today's episode we will learn: 1. What are Parker's key learnings of starting First Help Financial fresh out of college?2. How to build a high performing sales organization for SaaS companies?3. Why founders' competitive advantage is their pace of learning?4. What would be Parker's approach towards fundraising and running operations if he were to raise Series B during recession?5. What are the next billion dollar company building opportunities nobody's pursuing yet? 

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition
Data analytics startup StarTree secures cash to expand its Apache Pinot–powered platform

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 5:08


StarTree, a company building what it describes as an “analytics-as-a-service” platform, today announced that it raised $47 million in a Series B round led by GGV Capital with participation from Sapphire Ventures, Bain Capital Ventures, and CRV.

The aSaaSins Podcast
Money Morning Quarterback: CurbWaste's $6M Seed Round

The aSaaSins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 15:36


On the aSaaSins 'Money Morning Quarterback' segment, our host Justin Vandehey breaks down the companies that raised their Seed, Series A, or Series B round of funding the prior week.This week, Justin plays 'Money Morning Quarterback' with CurbWaste, a waste management and business operations platform for physical waste haulers.   He unpacks their $6M seed round and analyzes the opportunity in the waste management space.

Founders Unfiltered
Ep61: Democratizing Global Hiring ft. Multiplier

Founders Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 40:40


Founders Unfiltered Ep-61: Brought to you by the Founders Unfiltered podcast by A Junior VC - Unscripted conversations with Indian founders about their story and the process of building a company. Hosted by Aviral and Mazin. Join us as we talk to Sagar Khatri, the Co-Founder and CEO of Multiplier Technologies about their story. Sagar Khatri is the Co-Founder and CEO of Multiplier. He is an Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay graduate. Later, he worked as an investment banker for Nomura and served as Hmlet's VP of Growth and Expansion. He oversaw the 40 million dollar Series B funding, expansion into Australia and Japan, and a joint venture with MEC in Japan. About Multiplier Technologies: Multiplier, a top global hiring platform, is simple for businesses to hire teams abroad. It enables businesses to handle employee benefits, tax payments, and employment contracts and comply with these requirements. It generates revenue through subscription-based business models. In March 2022, the company raised $60M in Series B fundraising. For more details- https://ajuniorvc.com/podcast/

NerdFT Radio
Episode #76 Ready Player Me x A16z

NerdFT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 36:03


Ready Player Me has announced that it has raised $56 million in a Series B funding round led by Andreessen Horowitz's A16z. We dive into what that could mean for the NFT space and touch on some backlash from the non-NFT community. Meta has officially rolled out what it's calling Meta accounts and Meta Horizon Profiles. Plus, Sandbox Alpha Season 3 is Live; time for some streaming. Let us know what you think. Questions? Comments? https://twitter.com/NerdFTRadio Follow us on Twitter! https://twitter.com/Crypto_Crier https://twitter.com/RedsoxguyEth Follow us on Instagram @NerdFT_Radio! DISCLAIMER: All of the information discussed in our podcast is for entertainment purposes only. As with any financial endeavor, do your own research. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nerdftradio/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nerdftradio/support

The aSaaSins Podcast
Money Morning Quarterback: Incredible Health's $80M Series B

The aSaaSins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 15:16


On the aSaaSins 'Money Morning Quarterback' segment, our host Justin Vandehey breaks down the companies that raised their Seed, Series A, or Series B round of funding the prior week.This week, Justin plays 'Money Morning Quarterback' with Incredible Health, a medical and health platform that connects health systems with nurses.   He unpacks their $80M Series B round and analyzes the healthcare technology industry's first health talent unicorn.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner
Replay: #41 Joe Percoco of Titan: My Favorite Books, Tools, Habits, and More | 20 Minute Playbook

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 25:10


In Episode #41, we deconstruct Joe Percoco's peak performance playbook—from his favorite book to the tiny habit that's had the biggest impact on his life. Joe is the Co-CEO and Co-Founder of Titan. We cover Y intercept vs. slope in hiring, calendar auditing, and T-shirt ROI assessments. “I think failure is definitely glorified to a degree. The goal is that you don't just fail consistently; eventually, you provide successful impact to others. But to the degree you're able to royally fail, and then royally succeed, that's way better than just royally succeeding. It's like a great underdog story in a way.” – Joe Percoco EPISODE GUIDE (LINKS, QUOTES, NOTES, AND BOOKS MENTIONED) https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/joe-percoco2-outlier-academy-show-notes  FULL TEXT TRANSCRIPT https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/joe-percoco-outlier-academy-transcript  CHAPTERS In this episode, we deconstruct Joe Percoco's peak performance playbook—from his favorite book to the tiny habit that's had the biggest impact on his life. In it we cover: 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:00:48 – The importance of working on your relationship with yourself 00:03:59 – Y intercept vs. slope in hiring 00:07:37 – Green/yellow/red light calendar auditing 00:09:58 – T-shirt ROI assessments 00:10:53 – Learning from the best coaches 00:14:32 – Training to win and to lose 00:17:10 – Royally failing to royally succeeding ABOUT JOE PERCOCO Joe Percoco is Co-CEO and Co-Founder of Titan, an investment firm focused on leveling the playing field across the wealth spectrum. Titan has recently been valued at $450 million at the close of their Series B round. Before launching Titan, Joe Percoco managed investments at Goldman Sachs and McKinsey & Company.

The Stack
Scaling Up Your Stack with Horacio Zambrano, CMO at Secret Double Octopus

The Stack

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 39:37


Secret Double Octopus was founded in 2015. The company jumped onto the growing demand for enterprise-level passwordless authentication. In 2020 they raised $15 million in the Series B funding round, and by 2021, they were named best in class for their category by the AITE Group. Their growth has been fast, so in 2021 they also brought on Horacio Zambrano as CMO to help scale the business accordingly. Horacio has launched multiple cybersecurity start-ups and has led marketing teams up to Series C. One of Horacio's big strategies is to collect and utilize intent data. His team then ties that data into a coordinated outreach strategy from SDRs and nurtures those leads for the long game. He tells us all about the stack he's built to collect and use that data, and he also shares the different strategies he uses to keep a functional stack in times of growth.Join us every week as we journey to the bleeding edge of the modern tech stack. You'll hear from real experts on how to nail your strategy, build a revenue machine and take your sales to the next level.

Live Love Thrive with Catherine Gray
Ep. 300 Raising millions - Series B with Sounding Board Founder, Christine Tao

Live Love Thrive with Catherine Gray

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 25:11


Invest In Her host Catherine Gray talks with Christine Tao, Co-founder and CEO of Sounding Board, the first Leader Development Platform designed to bridge the leadership gap. Christine has also enjoyed several roles in Silicon Valley at Google and Youtube, but her inspiration to launch Sounding Board began while she worked at TapJoy, a leading, venture-backed mobile advertising and publishing network. Sounding Board is backed by leading investors Canaan, Jazz Ventures, Bloomberg Beta, and Precursor, and is one of less than three percent of female-founded companies to raise venture capital.    www.sheangelinvestors.com  https://www.soundingboardinc.com/   Follow Us On Social Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | LinkedIn

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast
Customer Data Management Explained With Soumyadeb Mitra - CEO and Founder of Rudderstack

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 54:47


Soumyadeb is the founder and CEO of RudderStack. He started RudderStack in 2019 and recently raised a $56 million Series B round led by Insight Partners, with support from previous investors Kleiner Perkins and S28 Capital.RudderStack is Soumyadeb's 3rd startup. He sold his previous startup, a B2B ad-tech platform called MarianaIQ, to 8×8 where he then spent a year building customer data pipelines.While at 8×8, Soumyadeb's challenges collecting and processing customer data at enterprise scale inspired him to start RudderStack. He's now building RudderStack to address the pain points he became intimately familiar with at 8×8.Michael and Soumyadeb have a great conversation about the importance of focusing your data efforts on customer data. Soumyadeb explains his efforts with some of the largest names in retail and other industries and how Rudderstack helps them be successful.#MDM #CDM #data

Tech for Non-Techies
112. The three stages of start-up teams

Tech for Non-Techies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 14:16


A tech start-up begins its life with a tiny team. The founders are either technical or tech savvy, but as the company scales its team has to change.  Learn about the three stages of start-up team growth here. Learning notes from this episode: At stage 1, the start-up is focussed on building its first product and getting the first customers. The team is usually tiny, and each team member is either building the technology themselves or is very closely involved in the process. Everyone learns from each other on the job. At stage 2, the start-up has raised Series A or Series B and is focussed on scaling. This is when specialists in non-technical fields start getting hired: HR experts, sales people etc. The gap between the techies and the non-techies widens, and this is where opportunities get lost. At stage 3, the start-up is a late stage venture and is either preparing for a merger or an IPO. At this point, the original founder is very unlikely to be the CEO. According to analysis by Harvard Business School professor Noam Wasserman: “by the time the ventures were three years old, 50% of founders were no longer the CEO; in year four, only 40% were still in the corner office; and fewer than 25% led their companies' initial public offerings.”  Resources mentioned in this episode: Harvard Business Review: The Founders' Dilemma by Noam Wasserman Join the The Non-Technical Founders Introduction to Tech workshop You will learn: The framework for how to go from idea to live product Product management fundamentals How to work with developers effectively How and when to hire a product team   Listen here on Apple Podcasts Listen here on Spotify ----- If you like learning about how tech products and profits get made, you'll like our newsletter. It's funny too. Sign up here. ----- There are 2 ways to apply this work to your goals: For individuals, APPLY FOR A CONSULTATION CALL for Tech For Non-Techies membership. For companies: If you want to increase productivity, innovation and diversity, then your non-technical teams need to learn how to collaborate with the techies.  BOOK A CALL to discuss bespoke training & consulting. We love hearing from our readers and listeners. So if you have questions about the content or working with us, just get in touch on info@techfornontechies.co   Say hi to Sophia on Twitter and follow her on LinkedIn. Following us on Facebook, Instagram and TikTok will make you smarter.  (Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash)

Acquisition Talk
SBIR mills, dual-use tech, and the case for reform with Ben Van Roo

Acquisition Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 56:28


I was pleased to have Ben Van Roo on the Acquisition Talk podcast to discuss data on the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and potential reforms. The SBIR program was created in 1982 and is currently funded with 3.2 percent of extramural R&D performed by larger agencies. Coming from a founder and VC perspective, the question Ben asked was whether an emerging tech company should be going after SBIR money. While it is sometimes call "America's Seed Fund," Ben found that some companies will each receive tens of millions in SBIR awards year after year. These firms, sometimes called "SBIR mills," have by-and-large failed to receive significant DoD follow on contracts, indicating a failure to commercialize. The top 25 firms won $1.5 billion in SBIR awards over a six year period, or more than 20 percent of the SBIR total. Overall, Ben finds that perhaps 50-60 percent of all SBIR funding will go to incumbent firms that have sophisticated proposal writing functions. Another 20 to 30 percent of SBIR funding goes towards firms that use third-party consultants to write their proposals. These consulting firms often employ former procurement officials who can help navigate difficult parts like large, open-ended cost volumes. This is where you'll hear "pay to play" in the SBIR world. Ben's rough estimates for these services are $3,000 to $6,000 per month, and there may be different fee structures where the consultants can receive some equity in the company or a fraction of the award if successful. That means between 10 and 30 percent of SBIR funding is up for grabs to emerging tech companies, meaning that their likelihood to win is relatively low. While SBIR may be one of the most accessible programs to get into the defense industry, it is not one designed to transition dual-use tech firms into fielded capabilities. Ben notes that comparatively few firms that received DIU or In-Q-Tel funding also won SBIR awards, perhaps because they were more focused on growth opportunities of companies that are already commercializing (Series B or Series C). This podcast was produced by Eric Lofgren. You can follow me on Twitter @AcqTalk and find more information at https://AcquisitionTalk.com

Office Hours with Spencer Rascoff
Syndio CEO Maria Colacurcio On How Persistence Pays Off When Pitching, and Why Pay Equity Is Valuable to Businesses

Office Hours with Spencer Rascoff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 38:11


Spencer speaks with Maria Colacurcio, the CEO of Syndio Solutions on this episode of Office Hours. Syndio is a software startup helping companies around the world create an equitable workplace for all employees, regardless of gender, race or ethnicity. Syndio's workplace equity platform helps companies close pay and opportunity gaps, mitigate legal risk and turn diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) goals into tangible results. Prior to joining Syndio, Colacurcio co-founded Smartsheet.com, which went public in 2018, and spent three years at Starbucks, one of the first Fortune 50 companies to make their pay equity results public. Colacurcio serves on the board of the nonprofit Fair Pay Workplace and has been named one of the 100 most intriguing entrepreneurs by Goldman Sachs' Builders and Innovators Summit. As a CEO and a mom of seven, Colacurcio is walking the walk on eradicating workplace inequities; she was able to raise a $17.1 million Series B investment in January 2021 while eight months pregnant.

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Raising $60M and Not Touching a Dollar of It; The 3 Decisions That Led to a Cash-Flow Positive Business, Why Not Being Able To Fundraise in the Early Days Can Help Build Your Business & What are the First Things To Break in Scaling Orgs with Sam

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch