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Best podcasts about virginia museum

Latest podcast episodes about virginia museum

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 138 Part 1: How Metalsmith Magazine Is Highlights New Voices in Jewelry with Editor, Adriane Dalton

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:10


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Metalsmith magazine, and why it maintains its name even as its scope has expanded beyond metals How SNAG has made efforts to diversify the voices in Metalsmith and open the organization to new members What type of content Adriane looks for as an editor, and how you can pitch ideas to her What changes need to be made in the jewelry industry to make it more equitable Why being a curator and being an editor aren't so different About Adriane Dalton Adriane Dalton is an artist, writer, and educator based in Philadelphia, PA. She is the editor of Metalsmith, the magazine published by the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG). She was formerly the Assistant Curator and Exhibitions Manager at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art (NEHMA) in Logan, Utah, where she co-curated “ARTsySTEM: The Changing Climate of the Arts and Sciences” and taught History of American Studio Craft, among many other curatorial and educational projects.  She holds an MA in the history of decorative arts and design from Parsons The New School for Design (2014), and a BFA in craft and material studies from the University of the Arts (2004). Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at Contemporary Craft (Pittsburgh, PA), The Wayne Art Center (Wayne, PA), Snyderman-Works Gallery (Philadelphia, PA), A CASA Museu de Object Brasileiro (Sao Paulo, Brazil), the Metal Museum (Memphis, TN), and Space 1026 (Philadelphia, PA). Additional Resources: SNAG Website Adriane's Instagram Photos: Recent Metal Smith Covers Transcript: Adriane Dalton took a meandering path to become editor of Metalsmith, the Society of North American Goldsmith's (SNAG) quarterly magazine, but her background as a maker, her work as a curator, and her education in the history of craft has only helped her hone her editorial skills. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the overlaps between making, curating and editing; what she looks for when selecting work for the magazine; and why it's important we not just talk about objects and the people who make them, but the conditions in which people make them. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Adriane Dalton, editor of Metalsmith Magazine published by SNAG, the Society of North American Goldsmiths. The publication is designed to keep makers, jewelers and other artists in the field informed about important issues and people in their creative field. Adriane, welcome to the program. Adriane: Hi, it's wonderful to be here. Sharon: So glad to have you. I'm really looking forward to hearing all about this. I've been reading the magazine for so long. Tell us about your own jewelry journey. Were you a maker? How did you get into this? Did you come to it through journalism or the arts? Adriane: I came to it through the arts. I do not have a journalism background. I actually have a BFA in craft and material studies from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, which is where I now live again after being in a lot of other places over the years. That craft and material studies program was my first introduction to jewelry making and to the contemporary jewelry field as we know it and as represented by SNAG and Metalsmith. Prior to that, I think my conception of jewelry was limited to the standard things you would see in the mall. That program was my gateway to the field. Sharon: Is that what you wanted to do when you came to study crafts and material arts? Did you think you'd be doing jewelry? Were you going to do fine art? Adriane: When I started undergrad, I had intended to be a photography major or potentially a glassblower. You have this first, foundational year of art school where you get to try different things out, and then you have to decide what your major is. I decided that in order to try to blow glass and work with my hands, I would need to be in the glass department. You couldn't major in glass at the time, so you had to pick a different focus area and then you could take classes in the glass department. So, I became a jewelry major sort of incidentally. I've always enjoyed working with my hands and making physical objects, so it ended up being a good fit for me. While I was there, I studied with Sharon Church, Rod McCormick and Lola Brooks, who were all teaching in the program at the time. That was my introduction to jewelry as an art form, not just as a piece of adornment. Sharon: So, you weren't third grade thinking, “I want to make jewelry.” Adriane: No. Sharon: When you graduated, were you making? How did it come about that you're now editing a publication? Adriane: It's been a meandering path, honestly. I graduated with my BFA with a focus in jewelry and metals. I was interested in enameling, and I did a lot of enamel work. When I finished undergrad, I had a studio and I worked on some small production lines. I worked on one-of-a-kind work, but I also needed to have a job to support myself beyond that, and I found out very quickly that I didn't like making production work. It wasn't what I wanted to do to support myself or express myself creatively. For about eight years, I worked in an office job and had a studio space. I was involved in some community arts organizations here in Philadelphia and maintained my own creative practice during that time.  It was almost 10 years after I had graduated from undergrad that I decided to go to grad school. I was interested in studying the field of craft more broadly, not just jewelry itself, so I enrolled in the joint program between Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York and Parsons. At the time, it was called History of Decorative Arts and Design. I believe the program is now History of Design and Curatorial Studies. I went into the program hoping to have a more formalized and research-based approach to thinking about craft. Sharon: Wow! That must have been exciting to be in New York and studying at such premier schools. Were you going to do research? Did you want to go into museums? What did you think you might want to do? Adriane: I was 30 at the time when I started grad school, and I had enough time after undergrad to figure out some of the things I didn't want to do. I considered going and receiving an MFA. I toyed with that idea a bit, and I decided I wanted to try to have a career that would allow me to use my creative mind in the work, but that would hopefully feed into my creative practice in some way while also supporting me. I had a curatorial focus when I was in grad school, and I had some fellowships in the Cooper Hewitt Product Design and Decorative Arts Department under Sarah Coffin when she was still curator there; I think she's since retired. I also was the jewelry intern under Alice Newman at the Museum of Arts and Design while I was in grad school. Those two experiences opened up possibilities for me to engage with the field in a way I hadn't prior to grad school. Sharon: Wow! Some really important people that were mentors or teachers. How did it come about that you're now at Metalsmith Magazine? Adriane: After grad school, I actually moved to Utah from New York, to a small town in northern Utah where I was the assistant curator of an art museum there, the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, which at the time had some exhibitions that were craft-centric. I came on to help with some of that. They have a fantastic ceramics collection. Ceramics is not my focus area, but having a broad generalization in craft, I can sort of move between materials. So, I was in Utah for a few years working as a curator. Then I moved back to the East Coast, to Richmond. I was working at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in their education department doing programming.  The way I came to be the editor of Metalsmith was a fluke in a lot of ways. I had applied for a different position at SNAG at the time that was educationally focused. I had a couple of interviews, got along really well with the executive director at the time, Gwynne Rukenbrod Smith. A few months later, she reached out to me and said, “Hey, our editor, Emily Zilber, is leaving, and I need someone to come in on an interim basis and keep things going until we figure out what we are going to do with the position and the magazine. Is this something you'd be interested in and capable of?” I said, “Yes, sure.” I came on thinking it would be potentially a six-month arrangement and then I would go on doing museum education, which is what I was doing. It ended up working out and I was invited to stay on, and so here I am. Sharon: Wow! Tell us about Metalsmith and what you want to do with it, what its purpose is, that sort of thing. Adriane: Sure. Metalsmith is one program area of SNAG. For folks who are listening who may not be familiar with SNAG, SNAG is the Society of North American Goldsmiths. It's a 50-year-old—well, I think it's 51 years old now—organization that's an international member-based organization. We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Our member base is predominantly a variety of metalsmiths, jewelers, other folks who maybe don't consider themselves jewelers but use the body as a flight for expression, production studio jewelry artists, teachers, historians, curators, collectors, gallerists and writers. Our member focus is North America, but we do have members and subscribers all over the world. Metalsmith fits into SNAG in the sense that as a program area, it helps SNAG fulfill part of its mission statement, which is to advance the field of jewelry and metalsmithing and to inspire creativity, encourage education and foster community. Before it was Metalsmith, SNAG had three other publications. It started as a newsletter in the early days, and then it became Gold Dust. Then it was, I think, Goldsmith's Journal. Metalsmith was established in 1980. So, we are now in our 41st year of publication. Sharon: Did it become Metalsmith because—I'm a member of SNAG and I really like it, but I've only met maybe one goldsmith. Is that what happened there, going from Gold Dust to Metalsmith? Adriane: I think so. I'm not privy to all the early decisions of how the magazine was established and run, but I think choosing Metalsmith was to be more inclusive of the field at that time. Now, of course, one of the critiques I hear sometimes from members and other folks in the field is that Metalsmith doesn't always have that much metal in it. Sharon: That's true, yes. Adriane: That is true. That is, I think, indicative of the shifts in interdisciplinarity and shifts in thinking about materials that are appropriate for these forms that have happened over the past 20 or 30 years in the field. There have been times when people have said, “Well, they should change the name to something else,” but it still fits in a lot of ways. The word “smith” in and of itself points to the action that is involved. For me and how I think about the magazine and the work that's in the magazine, it doesn't necessarily matter what the material is; it's more about the approach and the context in which the maker is putting it out into the world. Sharon: How are you choosing the subjects? There are so many different areas now. I think of plastics; I think of wood; I think about all different kinds of crafts and jewelry. How do you choose the issues and writers you put in the publication? Adriane: I take pictures and proposals. Anyone listening to this podcast, anyone out there can send me an email or get in touch with me to propose any idea they have for an article or an artist they want to cover, things like that. It's a combination of taking proposals from people who reach out to me and me seeking people out who I'm interested in their work or interested in their writing, or me finding someone who I think would be good to write about a particular artist's work. It depends, and it's a mishmash of those things. A misconception I try to dispel any chance I get, and will do so now, is that I have a glut of proposals coming in. Really, a lot of the time I don't, particularly in the past 18 months. During the pandemic, people's focus has been in other directions, as it should be, but it's hard to keep things going if I have to do all the outreach and it's not going in both directions like it should. Sharon: I'm surprised; with everybody at home during lockdown, it seems like it would have been the perfect time for people to be writing or pitching or proposing or thinking about it at least. Adriane: Yeah, it is a combination of things. I do have people who reach out to me who I may or may not be familiar with. I'm really interested in having voices in the magazine that are new to the field or are in the process of establishing themselves as a thinker in the field. One of the ways we have done that in the past two years was through a writing competition that we hosted during our 40th volume, which was the previous volume to the one that's being published now. That was proposed to me by an artist and author, Lauren Eckert, who approached me at SNAG's conference in Chicago, the last in-person conference we held. She said, “What do you think about having a writing contest to get new voices into the magazine?” and I said, “Oh, I think that that's a great idea. Would you want to help me get that together?” She volunteered, and I invited Lauren to join the publication's advisory committee, which is a sounding board and feedback board for the magazine.  We ran the competition and had two awardees, and we published their writing in this most recent volume. In issue 41, we had Jessica Todd's article “Restrung: Contemporary North American Beadsmiths.” In issue 42, we had “Difficult Adornments: Recontextualizing Creative Adornment Through Display” which was by Rebecca Schena. Jessica was the New Voices award winner and Rebecca was the runner up, but we couldn't narrow it down to just one because there were so many great submissions. It was very hard to pick them.  Sharon: In terms of issues, what issues are really close to you, important to you? What issues do you see in the field? It's a few months old now, but I was looking at one of the publications about Black jewelers and inequality in the field, and I thought, “Well, that's not a namby-pamby issue; it's right out there and you're not afraid to discuss those kinds of things.” Adriane: Yeah, something that is important to me and has become extremely necessary as the world has shifted so much in the past 18 months is to not just create content in a vacuum, but to have the work and the voices in the magazine truly be representative of what is going on in the field. Some of that includes acknowledging ways the field of jewelry and metalsmithing replicates other systemic racist structures that exist in American society. To speak to the bigger picture for how I think about the content of the magazine—and this also predates the pandemic, but the pandemic has made me more firm in this—is that it's important to not just talk about objects and the people who make them, but to talk about the conditions in which people make them. That is especially relevant now that the world has been the way it has been for the past 18 months and we are all more acutely aware of a lot of things than perhaps previously. Sharon: That's a good point, in terms of picking up a publication or going online and saying, “What are the pretty pictures?” or “What are the creative objects?” You also mentioned in one of your notes from the editor—it must be a challenge to come with that every month, in terms of pithy subjects—you wrote that for some, the process of growth is discomfort. How does that manifest itself? Do you see it manifesting in SNAG's members, for example? Adriane: I don't know if I can speak to how it manifests for our members. I will say SNAG has a diverse membership. When I'm making the magazine, I'm making it not only for SNAG's membership, but we also have some people who subscribe but aren't SNAG members, and the magazine is on newsstands. So, I'm trying to think broadly whenever possible. As far as that particular letter from the editor, some of the content in that issue—which includes that essay by Rebecca Schena that I mentioned before—but it also includes the piece you alluded to, which is by Valena Robinson Grass, “Moving Beyond Acknowledgment: Systemic Barriers for Black American Metalsmiths.” There's another article in there by Leslie Boyd about how white educators can be more attentive to the ways their students are showing up in the structure of academia. As I'm talking, I'm getting further and further away from answering your question, but— Sharon: No, I don't get that impression. Adriane: I think that, much like a lot of other things that have happened in the past 18 months, there needs to be some amount of reflection and reckoning in parts of the jewelry field that have been predominantly white spaces and reflecting upon why that is, and thinking about how you can claim to value diversity and inclusivity and equity. You can say those things and you can mean them, but unless you're willing to do the reflection and make some changes, then it's meaningless; it's empty. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Odili Donald Odita, David Hartt

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 78:46


Episode No. 524 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Odili Donald Odita and David Hartt. Odili Donald Odita is featured in "Point of Departure: Abstraction 1958-Present" at the Sheldon Museum of Art at the University of Nebraska. The exhibition is drawn from the Sheldon's excellent collection of two-dimensional abstraction and reveals how artists have used abstraction to advance ideas and ideologies from outside art's own history. Odita's abstract paintings marry color and composition to history, sociopolitical investigation and ideology. He has fulfilled major mural commissions for museums such as the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. Recent exhibitions of his work have included the Laumeier and Jeske Sculpture Parks in Saint Louis and Ferguson, Missouri, the ICA Miami, the Sarasota Museum of Art, the Front International triennial in Cleveland, the Newark Museum of Art, and more. David Hartt is the subject of a Hammer Projects exhibition on view at the Hammer Museum through January 2, 2022. The show features Hartt's 2020 The Histories (Old Black Joe), two jacquard-woven tapestries and a quadraphonic soundtrack arranged by musician Van Dyke Parks. Hartt's work joins and interrogates three nineteenth-century figures : American painter Robert S. Duncanson, Trinidadian painter Michel-Jean Cazabon, and composer Stephen Foster, whose song “Old Black Joe” has endured as a dying slave's lament even though of Foster mostly wrote for blackface minstrel shows. The Hammer presentation was curated by Aram Moshayedi with Nicholas Barlow. Other Hartt museum projects have included "David Hartt: A Colored Garden," which just closed at The Glass House in New Canaan, Conn., and exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago, The Graham Foundation in Chicago, LAXArt in Los Angeles, the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Arts Conversations
Interview with Truly Matthews of Virginia MOCA

Arts Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 3:50


As the arts remerge in person this fall, the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art in Virginia Beach offers a chance to peek inside the minds of talented young women through an exhibition called “Emergence,” running through November 28. Rebecca Weinstein spoke with Virginia MOCA's Curator of Education, Truly Matthews, about the project.

Artelligence Podcast
Exploring the Dirty South with VMFA's Valerie Cassel Oliver

Artelligence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 41:23


Valerie Cassel Oliver discusses her latest trailblazing exhibition at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, “The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse.” Illustrating, through the frame of Southern hip-hop, how early 20th-century Black visual and sound aesthetics helped shape contemporary Southern art, music, and a material culture of customized cars and personal adornment, Cassel Oliver's show is an exemplary expression of her curatorial vision. Cassel Oliver is the Sydney and Francis Lewis Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Prior to this position, she spent sixteen years at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, Texas, where she was senior curator.

Artemis Speaks
Jeffrey W. Allison, Educator and Director, Exhibitions at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Artemis Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 29:51


Jeffrey W. Allison is the Paul Mellon Collection Educator and Director, Statewide Programs and Exhibitions at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and played an instrumental role in designing and implementing VMFA on the Road: which was launched in 2018 and has since traveled all over the state bringing art to over 160,000 visitors.  Jeffrey was a consultant on the Discovery Channel series Ancient Origins of Native Americans and the New York Times Magazine article, Horace Bristol and the Grapes of Wrath. Awards include the 2010 John Kent Shumate Advocate of the Year. He was also a Richmond Times-Dispatch Person of the Year honoree in 2019. Jeffrey's own photographic works are in numerous collections.  Jeffrey has acted as a technical consultant for numerous museums, art centers, and festivals, including The Chrysler Museum, Hollins University, and William King Museum of Art. Most recently, Jeffrey curated the exhibition, How Far Can Creativity Take You: VMFA Fellowship Artists.  He has worked at VMFA for more than 20 years, growing the VMFA statewide partner program from 32 to more than 1,200 partners.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Allison Janae Hamilton, Hannah Wilke

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 76:18


Episode No. 509 features artist Allison Janae Hamilton and curator Tamara Schenkenberg. Allison Janae Hamilton is included in "Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse," which is at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond through September 6. The exhibition, which was curated by Valerie Cassel Oliver, examines the aesthetics of early 20th-century Black culture across the South. It details how sonic and visual parallels in Southern Black culture have informed and shaped broader contemporary American culture. She's also included in "Enunciated Life" at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles, which considers Black spirituality. It was curated by Taylor Renee Aldridge and runs through August 15. Hamilton's work investigates and reveals the South's history and landscape and their influence on the American story across photographs, sculpture, video and installation. She has had solo exhibitions at Recess in New York, the Atlanta Contemporary and at MASS MoCA, and New York's Times Square Arts and Creative Time have presented her work. Clips from several of the Hamilton video installations discussed on this program are available on Hamilton's Vimeo page, including: Wacissa (2019); Waters of a Lower Register (2020); and A Pale Horse (2021); On the second segment, Schenkenberg discusses her exhibition "Hannah Wilke: Art for Life's Sake," which is at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in Saint Louis through January 16, 2022. The career-spanning exhibition features 120 works that reveal how Wilke considered the vulnerability of the human body as essential to experiencing life and connection. The museum's exhibition guide is available as a free download.

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: Quick updates, a road diet, and pinball wizards

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021


Good morning, RVA! It's 69 °F, and today looks hot and humid with sticky highs in the 90s. Hold on tight, though, because (slightly) cooler weather shows up tomorrow.Water coolerA quick update on two papers floating around during yesterday's Land Use, Housing and Transportation committee meeting! First, the Richmond 300 amendments resolution (RES. 2021-R026) which I say bad things about was recommended for continuance, and, second, Councilmember Jones's resolution to ask the CAO for a report on how to evenly distribute affordable housing across council districts (RES. 2021-R043) was recommended for approval. Stoked on the latter, and wondering if the former is in the process of death by a thousand continuations. Introduced back in April, RES. 2021-R026 is now one of the older items on Council's agenda. Shoutout to current Methuselatic Ordinance titleholder, ORD. 2019–275, which was introduced way back in October…of 2019!There's not a ton of new information in this article by VPM's Alan Rodriguez about the School Board's decision to issue their own RFP for a George Wythe replacement. However, I do think it's worth reading to squeeze out a little more of the situation's flavor. With School Board now having drawn a end-of-August line in the sand for issuing an RFP, how do we react when the RPS administration fails to meet that possibly (probably?) unrealistic deadline? Or what do we do if the administration somehow crushes it out of the park and pulls off getting an RFP out the door in the next 41 days—while also reopening in-person school for the first time in over 400 days?Look at this great news: Jessica Nocera in the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that Henrico County will give Church Road, way out by Short Pump and 295, a road diet! Not only will the County reduce the number of lanes, thereby slowing traffic, but they'll use the newly created extra space to install bike lanes. Check out these incredible results from their public engagement process: “71% of respondents overwhelmingly favored the final option.”Rich Griset in Style Weekly has an update on all of the the updates going on at a lot of the city's museums. The VMFA, Virginia Museum of History & Culture, Science Museum of Virginia, and the Valentine are all in the midst of expansions, renovations, and reorganizations. I'm glad these museums survived the last year and are even in a place to expand.I've spent the last 18 months aging in place and have lost track of the number of new arcades/barcades in Scott's Addition. So it is new news to me that DawnStar Video Games and Arcade will open not one but two mini pinball rooms. One, the Starcade will feature “brighter, more nostalgic machines” while the other, the Mooncade, will host “darker, horror themed machines.” Honestly, I love everything about this article by Noah Daboul in Richmond BizSense, especially the header image.This morning's longreadThe new real estate normalThis is what a housing crisis looks like!They'd seen more than 50 houses in the past three months, and the only thing that had changed about their housing search in Boise was that the prices continued to rise. They'd gone from looking at homes listed for a maximum of $400,000, to stretching their budget up to $450,000, to now considering spending $500,000 or more. “It's on the far, far end of our range,” Craig said. “We'd be looking at five times our old house payment.” “We need somewhere to live,” Heidi said. “If we keep going like this for another few months, we might be looking at the same places for $600,000. What choice do we have?”If you'd like your longread to show up here, go chip in a couple bucks on the ol' Patreon.Picture of the Day

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 586 (7-19-21): A Virginia Rivers and Watersheds Quiz Game

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:41). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-16-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of July 19, 2021.  This revised episode from September 2016 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. SOUND – ~ 7 sec This week, that sound of the Roanoke River, recorded along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Roanoke, Va., sets the stage for a Virginia rivers quiz game to highlight some key facts about the Commonwealth major rivers and their watersheds. I'll ask you six questions about Virginia's rivers.  Then I'll give you the answer after a few seconds of some appropriate music: “Exploring the Rivers,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va. Let the game begin!Question 1: What river that is very much associated with Virginia's past and present is not actually IN Virginia.MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumentalThat's the Potomac River, whose main stem along Virginia's northern border is owned by the State of Maryland.Question 2: Of the James, Rappahannock, and York rivers, which two have their entire watersheds in Virginia? MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumental The answer is the Rappahannock and the York.  A small part of the headwaters of the James is in West Virginia.Question 3: What is the largest river watershed in Virginia?MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumental This time the answer IS the James River, whose watershed covers over 10,000 square miles in Virginia.Question 5: What's the longest river in Virginia, counting only each river's main stem, not all of the tributaries? MUSIC - ~ 4 sec – instrumental Once again, it's the James, whose main stem travels about 340 miles. Question 5: What two large Virginia rivers flow generally north? MUSIC - ~ 6 sec – instrumental Virginia's major northerly-flowing rivers are the New and the Shenandoah. And last, question 6: What major river flows southwesterly into Tennessee? MUSIC - ~ 6 sec – instrumental That's the Clinch River, one of several rivers in southwestern Virginia flowing toward the Volunteer State in the Tennessee River watershed, which in turn is part of the watersheds of the Ohio River, Mississippi River, and Gulf of Mexico. If you're thinking that this game left out some major Virginia rivers and river basins, you're right!  Other main rivers in the Commonwealth include the Dan, Holston, Powell, and Roanoke.  And other major watersheds with areas in Virginia include those of the Big Sandy River, which forms the border between Kentucky and West Virginia; the Chowan and Yadkin rivers, whose main stems are in North Carolina; Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay coastal rivers; and Albemarle Sound on North Carolina's coast. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close about 25 more seconds of “Exploring the Rivers.” MUSIC – ~ 27 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 344, 9-19-16. The sounds of the Roanoke River were recorded by Virginia Water Radio from the Blue Ridge Parkway near Roanoke, Va., on June 15, 2017. “Exploring the Rivers,” on the 2006 album “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Records, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  This music used previously Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 475, 6-3-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Roanoke River as seen from the Blue Ridge Parkway near the City of Roanoke, Va., June 15, 2017 (the is the location of the recording heard at the beginning of this episode).James River at Robius boat landing in Chesterfield County, Va., June 21, 2007.New River near Eggleston, Va. (Giles County), August 13, 2016.White's Ferry on the Potomac River, viewed from Loudoun County, Va., March 23, 2008.Rappahannock River near Remington, Va., (Fauquier County), December 27, 2009.North Fork Shenandoah River at U.S. Highway 55 on the county line between Shenandoah and Warren counties, Va., October 13, 2012.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT MAJOR VIRGINIA WATERSHEDS The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml.  This information was also included in the Show Notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 581, 6-14-21, an introduction to watersheds. WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River Roanoke 6,274 Roanoke River, Dan River, Banister River, Kerr Reservoir Yadkin 118 Ararat River York 2,669 York River, Pamunkey River, Mattaponi River Holston 1,322 N. Fork Holston River, Middle Fork Holston River, S. Fork Holston River Clinch - Powell 1,811 Clinch River, Powell River, Guest River Big Sandy 999 Levisa Fork, Russel Fork, Tug Fork SOURCES Used for Audio Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers,” online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. Frits van der Leeden:The Environmental Almanac of Virginia, Tennyson Press, Lexington, Va., 1998;Virginia Water Atlas, Tennyson Press, Lexington, Va., 1993. Kathryn P. Sevebeck, Jacob H. Kahn, and Nancy L. Chapman, Virginia's Waters, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, Va., 1986 (out of print).Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Final 2020 305(b)/303(d) Water Quality Assessment Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report.  Chapter 2, “State Background Information,” states that Virginia has an estimated 100,923 miles of rivers and streams. Virginia Museum of Natural History, “Virginia's Water Resources,” special issue of Virginia Explorer, Winter 2000, Martinsville, Va. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, “West Virginia Watersheds,” online at http://www.dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Pages/Watersheds.aspx. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places:“Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html;“Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, pages 8-11, available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21 Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Water cycle introduction – Episode 191, 12-9-13; and water cycle diagrams reconsidered – Episode 480, 7-8-19. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 585, 7-12-21. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth Resources4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth ScienceES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms.2.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents.3.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents. Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.2 – Physical geography and native peoples of Virginia past and present.VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history. World Geography CourseWG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

bay university agency mexico music exploring natural state audio game college north america sound map impact accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical pond research ocean tennessee government education gulf recreation conservation north carolina west virginia maryland chesapeake bay mississippi river chapman chesapeake snow environment wwe images va quiz msonormal commonwealth stream kentucky normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence williamsburg arial environmental highways times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide waters shenandoah water resources natural history lexington powell rivers grade kahn ferry colorful madison county signature geology continental scales blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river environmental protection virginia tech back bay atlantic ocean natural resources volunteer state grades k roanoke environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table rappahannock in virginia ar sa blacksburg virginia museum james river msohyperlink fauquier county loudoun county relyonvml smith river usi blue ridge parkway sections potomac river eggleston stormwater nancy l headwater radford university new river martinsville policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa powell river new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap sols tennessee river giles county big sandy tmdl geological survey frits little river united states history yadkin jacob h west virginia department chesterfield county dan river virginia standards water center holston rappahannock river audio notes dismal swamp
Squabbling Squibs
Ep. 27 Black Widow... Spiders!

Squabbling Squibs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 27:13


Are you as excited as we are for the upcoming Black Widow movie? We thought we'd take a fun tangent from that and talk about the inspiration for the character's name: the Black Widow Spider. We decided to bring in our friend Liberty Hightower from the Virginia Museum of Natural History to talk about these fascinating arachnids. We cover everything from their over-hyped venomous bite to why they have that bright red marking. Enjoy! Plus our round of Nerd News: Alex (new Guardians of the Galaxy game): https://guardiansofthegalaxy.square-enix-games.com/en-us/ Katie (Jurassic World: Dominion preview in IMAX): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXLmZmmnHFw Liberty (new study shows how glasswing butterflies achieve transparency): https://www.sciencenews.org/article/new-images-how-glasswing-butterflies-wings-transparent As always, like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/squabblingsquibs And follow us on Twitter: @squibsquabbles This podcast is hosted by ZenCast.fm

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 578 (5-24-21): Water Well Construction is an Ancient and Modern Human Practice

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:51). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-21-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 24, 2021.  This revised episode from June 2014 is part of a series this year of groundwater-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That rattling and humming sound opens an episode on an ancient human practice related to groundwater.  Have a listen for about 10 more seconds, and see if you can guess what’s making the sound.  And here’s a hint: think deep into human civilization, and you’ll guess well enough. SOUND  - ~9 sec If you guessed, drilling a water well, you’re right!  That was the sound of a well-drilling rig in June 2014, working through 100 to 200 feet of limestone bedrock to reach groundwater for a residence in Montgomery County, Virginia.  For thousands of years, humans have been developing ways to dig below the earth’s surface to reach groundwater aquifers.  Digging with hands and tools was the first method, of course.  Today dug wells, as well as bored or driven wells, remain in use in areas of the United States and in other parts of the world. But drillingallows deeper and narrower wells.  In the United States, water-well drilling dates back to the early 1800s.  Since then, many different drilling methods and machines have been developed to adapt to the various geological conditions drillers encounter and to make drilling more efficient.  Modern well drillers also must follow regulations intended to prevent groundwater pollution that could threaten public health or the environment.  In Virginia, thattradition dates back at least to 1610, when the Colony of Virginia’s first sanitation law required that, quote, “no man or woman...make cleane, any kettle, pot, or pan, or such like vessell within twenty foote of the olde well.” Thanks to Blacksburg well-driller Wayne Fenton for permission to record this week’s sounds. We close with some music from the era of that 1610 well-protection law in the Virginia colony.  Here’s about 20 seconds of “Sir John Smith His Almayne,” composed by John Dowland, a popular English musician during the early 1600s, and performed here by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va. MUSIC - ~24 sec – instrumentalSHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 219, 6-23-14.The sounds in this episode were recorded on June 20, 2014, at a residential well-drilling site in Montgomery County, Va.  Thanks to Wayne Fenton, owner at that time of Fenton Well Drilling and Pump Service in Blacksburg, Va., for permission to record his work that day and for providing information in for this original (2014) version of this episode.  More information about Fenton Well Drilling and Pump Service is available online at https://fentonwellandpumpservice.com/. “Sir John Smith, His Almayne,” from the 2006 album “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.   According to Timothy Dickey (“John Dowland—Sir John Smith, his Almain, for Lute, P47,” AllMusic Web site, online at http://www.allmusic.com/composition/sir-john-smith-his-almain-for-lute-p-47-mc0002373007), an almayne, or almain, is a dance typically considered to be of German origin, or a tune for such a dance; and John Dowland (ca. 1563-1626), composed this piece for some Englishman with that fairly common name (but not, evidently, for the Captain John Smith of Jamestown Colony fame).  More information from Timothy Dickey on John Dowland is available online at https://www.allmusic.com/artist/john-dowland-mn0000770105/biography.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 350, 1-9-17. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Top: Well-drilling rig.  Bottom: Rotary drilling and the mixture of soil, rock, and water being brought to the surface.  Both photos taken at a Montgomery County, Va., residential well-drilling project by Fenton Well Drilling and Pump Service of Blacksburg, Va., June 20, 2014. SOURCES Used for Audio Charles W. Carlston, “Notes on the early history of water-well drilling in the United States,” Economic Geology (Vol. 38, pages 119-136, 1943); available online at https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/segweb/economicgeology/article/38/2/119/15747/Notes-on-the-early-history-of-water-well-drilling(subscription may be required for access). Thomas V. Cech, Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy, Third Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, N.J., 2010, pages 1-4.Fletcher G. Driscoll, Groundwater and Wells, Second Edition, Johnson Screen, St. Paul, Minn., 1986. Henrico County, Va., “Well Water FAQ” (undated), online at https://henrico.us/health/environmental-health/groundwater-and-wells/. as of 5/21/21. Bruce Misstear et al., Water Wells and Boreholes, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, England, 2006, pages 1-6. U.S. Geological Survey, “Groundwater Wells,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater-wells?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects.U.S. Peace Corps, “Wells Construction: Hand Dug and Hand Drilled (M0009),” April 13, 2017, online at https://pclive.peacecorps.gov/pclive/index.php/environment/item/1198-wells-construction-hand-dug-and-hand-drilled-m0009. Virginia Department of Health, “About Us (Old)” online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/drinking-water/about-us/ (information on Virginia’s 1610 sanitation law). Virginia Humanities, Encyclopedia Virginia, “Lawes Divine, Morall and Martiall,” online at https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/lawes-divine-morall-and-martiall/ (information on Virginia’s 1610 sanitation law). Virginia Legislative Information System, “Private Well Regulations,” Virginia Administrative Code, Sec. 12 VAC 5-630, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630/section30/.  “Design and Construction Criteria” are in Part III, starting at Section 12 VAC 5-630-350, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630/section350/. Virginia Places, “Waste Management,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/waste/ (information on Virginia’s 1610 sanitation law). WaterAid, “Technology Resources,” online at https://washmatters.wateraid.org/publications/technology-resources. For More Information about Groundwater in Virginia or Elsewhere Stan Cohen, The Homestead and Warm Springs Valley, Virginia: A Pictorial Heritage, Pictorial Histories Publishing Company, Charleston, W. Va., 1984. Marshall Fishwick, Springlore in Virginia, Bowling Green State University Popular Press, Bowling Green, Ky., 1978. Philip LaMoreaux and Judy Tanner, eds., Springs and Bottled Waters of the World:  Ancient History, Source, Occurrence, Quality, and Use, Springer-Verlag, Berlin and Heidelberg Germany, 2001; information available online at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321613235_Springs_and_Bottled_Waters_of_the_World_Ancient_History_Source_Occurence_Quality_and_Use(subscription may be required). National Speleological Society, online at http://www.caves.org/. “Pulse of the Planet” (Web site: http://www.pulseplanet.com/) segments with Virginia well-driller Eric Rorrer and with Erin Ling, the coordinator of the Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Virginia Well-owner Network (in the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering).  The three segments are as follows:March 10, 2014: Water-Drilling;March 11, 2014: Water - Surface and Ground;March 12, 2014: Water-Well Maintenance. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. George Veni et al., “Living with Karst,” American Geological Institute Environmental Awareness Series, 2001; available online at http://www.agiweb.org/environment/publications/karst.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Natural Heritage Karst Program,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/karsthome; see particularly “Introduction to Virginia’s Karst,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/document/introvakarst.pdf. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan. Virginia Museum of History and Culture, “The Regions of Virginia,” online at https://virginiahistory.org/learn/regions-virginia. Virginia Places, “Caves and Springs in Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/cave/. Virginia Places, “Thermal Springs in Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/hotsprings.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center groundwater-related publications from the 1980s to the 2000s are listed and linked online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23964/discover?rpp=10&etal=0&query=groundwater&group_by=none&page=3.  Here are some key publications:*Author unidentified, A Guide to Private Wells, 1995, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55265.*J.A. Poff, A Guide to Virginia’s Groundwater, 1997, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55247. *J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, 1999, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268 RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to other groundwater-related episodes.  Note that some of these episodes are being re-done in May-June 2021, following posting of this episode.  If that has occurred at the time you are viewing this post, the links below will redirect you to the updated episodes. Caves, caverns, and other karst features – Episode 527, 6-1-20.Eastern Virginia groundwater and the SWIFT project – Episode 534, 7-20-20.Groundwater introduction – Episode 575, 5-3-21.Information sources on Virginia’s water resources generally, including groundwater) – Episode 546, 10-12-20.Springs – Episode 576, 5-10-21.Testing water from wells and other household water sources – Episode 361, 3-27-17.Virginia’s Western Highlands and thermal springs – Episode 577. 5-17-21.Winter precipitation and water supplies, including the role of groundwater replenishment – Episode 567, 3-8-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. G

health culture bay humans management university design agency german guide music berlin principles natural earth state audio living college english swift history world sound modern england accent pop dark network testing tech water web index land rain united states pond digging research ocean ground government education construction recreation conservation development vol charleston springs chesapeake snow caves environment pulse images policy montgomery county va englishman msonormal maintenance commonwealth hoboken stream ky normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens practice sons williamsburg arial environmental dynamic ancient times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology civics grade peace corps ancient history colorful resource chichester signature bio sec colony karst scales govt watershed transcript earth sciences vac waste management homestead wg freshwater epa virginia tech bowling green atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources john dowland wateraid grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table virginia humanities in virginia heidelberg germany poff driscoll homeowners blacksburg minn virginia museum regions environmental protection agency lute msohyperlink occurrence sections john wiley second edition stormwater policymakers msobodytext thomas v bmp third edition new standard acknowledgment virginia department cech cripple creek cumberland gap sols tmdl springer verlag geological survey jamestown colony captain john smith henrico county virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 577 (5-17-21): Water's at the Heart of Virginia's Western Highlands

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021


 CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-14-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO

western merriam webster culture bay humans university agency america guide music highlands berlin natural relationships earth state audio living college swift history north america world abraham lincoln sound accent dark testing tech water web index land rain pond research tourism ocean government education recreation conservation development maine west virginia route charleston hot springs springs falls chesapeake snow caves environment images richmond va bath yarmouth msonormal maintenance commonwealth figures stream ky highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental spine times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading morton shenandoah commerce grade ancient history colorful signature nonesuch resort karst watershed transcript earth sciences see what i have done homestead wg freshwater epa virginia tech bowling green ls atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table harrisonburg heidelberg germany poff ar sa homeowners blacksburg virginia museum warm springs james river regions environmental protection agency cosgrove msohyperlink occurrence usi sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater annals policymakers bmp acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap michael martz sols tmdl springer verlag united states history biotic alleghany county virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 576 (5-10-21): An Introduction to Springs

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021


Click to listen to episode (3:56)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-7-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO  From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 10, 2021.  This revised episode from August 2011 is part of a series this year of groundwater-relatedepisodes. MUSIC – ~ 12 sec – instrumental This week, that music opens an episode about a natural resource marking water’s transition from underground to the land’s surface.  We start with a series of guest voices and mystery names.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds, and see if you can guess what kind of water resource connects this series of names and, by the way, is in the title of this week’s opening music.  And here’s a hint: settlements around the world have SPRUNG up around this resource. FLOWING WATER SOUND and VOICES - ~25 sec – “Yellow Sulphur, Laurel, Augusta, Iron Hill, Lacy, Willow, Highland, Glade, Virginia Mineral, Barren, Warm, Bloomer.”If you guessed springs, you’re right!  The opening music is titled “John Ashe’s Spring,” by the western Virginia-based band New Standard, referring to a spring in Ivy, Virginia.  The guest voices called out some of the many Virginia places named for nearby springs.  Some places, such as Yellow Sulphur Springs in Montgomery County, developed as recreational or health-promoting attractions for bathers and spa-goers.  But many towns and other settlements grew up near springs because the springs provided access to convenient, reliable drinking water; in fact, many Virginia public water systems still use springs as a water source.But what, exactly, is a spring?  Simply put, it’s a place where groundwater becomes surface water.  Springs appear where groundwater moves from underground storage areas to the land surface, particularly in low-lying areas and along hillsides or slopes.  Springs are found throughout Virginia, but most commonly in the western part of the Commonwealth among the Ridge and Valley region’s karst landscapes, which are also noted for caves, caverns, sinkholes, and sinking creeks.Thanks to Quinn Hull for creating this episode and to citizens in downtown Blacksburg for lending their voices.  Thanks also to New Standard for permission to use this week’s music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “John Ashe’s Spring.” MUSIC – ~ 23 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 75, 8-15-11.  The original episode was created by Quinn Hull, who recorded the guest voices in Blacksburg, Va., in August 2011. “John Ashe’s Spring,” from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” is copyright by New Standard, used with permission.  The title refers to a spring near Ivy, Virginia (Albemarle County).  More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Big Spring north of Leesburg, Va. (Loudoun County), December 10, 2006.Piped spring along the Appalachian Trail in Washington County, Va., December 14, 2008.Spring locations in a Virginia Department of Environmental Quality database, as of 2016.  Map accessed at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/GroundwaterCharacterization/SpringDatabase.aspx, on July 28, 2017; the map was no longer available at that URL as of May 11, 2021. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT SPRINGS IN VIRGINIA The following information was taken from J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, 1999, available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268. (from pages 11-12): “In 1928, a team of geologists…explored Virginia’s fields and forest in search of springs.  They located over 500 springs in the Valley and Ridge Province.  Most of the springs were concentrated in the Shenandoah Valley and the counties of August, Rockbridge, Rockingham, Shenandoah, Bath, and Highland.  This is an area of karst topography, where water-soluble limestone is perforated by channels, caves, sinkholes, and underground caverns, and has an abundance of springs.  Researchers from the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences at Virginia Tech continued this survey some 50 years later.  The research team located more than 1,600 additional springs.  Most of the springs were on private lands west of the Blue Ridge.” (from pages 15-16): “Both cold-water and thermal (warm or hot water) springs are found in Virginia.  The Virginia Tech researchers located more than 1500 cold-water springs and 100 thermal springs.  The water temperature of cold-water springs averages between 52 and 58 degrees Fahrenheit (F), about the same as the mean air temperature.  Thermal springs with waters heated deep within the earth flow at temperatures of 100 to 600 F year-round. Warm springs have a mean water temperature greater than average air temperature but less than 98 F; hot springs have mean water temperatures above 98 F.”   SOURCES Used for Audio Cultural Landscape Foundation, “Yellow Sulphur Springs (Christiansburg, Virginia),” online at https://tclf.org/landscapes/yellow-sulphur-springs. DeLorme Company of Yarmouth, Maine, Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer, 2000. Philip LaMoreaux and Judy Tanner, eds., Springs and Bottled Waters of the World:  Ancient History, Source, Occurrence, Quality, and Use, Springer-Verlag, Berlin and Heidelberg Germany, 2001; information available online at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321613235_Springs_and_Bottled_Waters_of_the_World_Ancient_History_Source_Occurence_Quality_and_Use(subscription may be required). J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source (Blacksburg: Virginia Water Resources Research Center, 1999), available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Natural Heritage Karst Program,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/karsthome; see particularly “Introduction to Virginia’s Karst,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/document/introvakarst.pdf. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan. Virginia Museum of History and Culture, “The Regions of Virginia,” online at https://virginiahistory.org/learn/regions-virginia. For More Information about Groundwater Charles W. Carlston, “Notes on the early history of water-well drilling in the United States,” Economic Geology (Vol. 38, pages 119-136, 1943); available online at https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/segweb/economicgeology/article/38/2/119/15747/Notes-on-the-early-history-of-water-well-drilling(subscription may be required for access). Bruce Misstear et al., Water Wells and Boreholes, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, England, 2006. National Speleological Society, online at http://www.caves.org/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. George Veni et al., “Living with Karst,” American Geological Institute Environmental Awareness Series, 2001; available online at http://www.agiweb.org/environment/publications/karst.pdf. Virginia Administrative Code, “Private Well Regulations,” Section 12 VAC 5-630, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630, [“Design and Construction Criteria” are in Part III, starting at Section 12 VAC 5-630-350.] Virginia Water Resources Research Center groundwater-related publications from the 1980s to the 2000s are listed and linked online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23964/discover?rpp=10&etal=0&query=groundwater&group_by=none&page=3.  Here are two key publications:*Author unidentified, A Guide to Private Wells, 1995, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55265.*J.A. Poff, A Guide to Virginia’s Groundwater, 1997, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55247. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to other groundwater-related episodes.  Note that some of these episodes are being re-done in May-June 2021, following posting of this episode.  If that has occurred at the time you are viewing this post, the links below will redirect you to the updated episodes.Caves, caverns, and other karst features – Episode 527, 6-1-20 (featuring Luray Caverns’ Great Stalacpipe Organ).Eastern Virginia groundwater and the SWIFT project – Episode 534, 7-20-20.Groundwater introduction – Episode 575, 5-3-21 (re-do of EP306 – 3/7/16).Information sources on Virginia’s water resources generally, including groundwater) – Episode 546, 10-12-20.Testing water from wells and other household sources – Episode 361, 3-27-17.Virginia’s Western Highlands and thermal springs – Episode 379, 7-31-17.Well construction – Episode 219, 6-23-14.Winter precipitation and water supplies, including the role of groundwater replenishment – Episode 567, 3-8-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia. Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms. Grades K-3 Economics Theme

culture bay humans university design agency america guide music berlin natural earth state audio living college swift history valley world map england accent dark testing tech water web index land rain united states pond research ocean government education recreation conservation development vol maine spring springs chesapeake snow caves environment images montgomery county va bath yarmouth msonormal maintenance commonwealth stream highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices sons arial environmental times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah shenandoah valley bluegrass grade ancient history colorful resource chichester signature piped warm iron hill karst scales blue ridge washington county appalachian trail watershed transcript earth sciences vac researchers wg freshwater epa virginia tech sprung atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources thermal grades k glade drinking water fisheries environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table heidelberg germany poff homeowners blacksburg virginia museum regions environmental protection agency barren msohyperlink occurrence loudoun county usi sections john wiley stormwater policymakers bmp rockingham new standard acknowledgment bloomer virginia department leesburg cripple creek big spring cumberland gap sols tmdl springer verlag united states history virginia standards water center usic space systems audio notes
The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Natural Bridge, Americans in Spain

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 63:22


Episode No. 495 features curators Chris Oliver and Corey Piper. Oliver is the curator of "Virginia Arcadia: The Natural Bridge in American Art" at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. The exhibition, which is on view through August 1, examines how artists portrayed the Natural Bridge, the famed landscape feature in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Despite being in the South, a region rarely visited by artists who tended to focus their work on the northeast, the Natural Bridge attracted artists such as Frederic Church and David Johnson who were interested in its geology, its association with Thomas Jefferson (who owned the land that contains the Natural Bridge), how it could be used to address American republicanism and Union, and more. The exhibition is accompanied by a small catalogue published by VMFA, which offers it for $20. Along with Brandon Ruud, Corey Piper is the co-curator of "Americans in Spain: Painting and Travel, 1820-1920" at the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginia. It looks at a period when both American artists and Europeans rushed into Spain to chronicle its scenic landscapes and cities and to learn from painters such as Velasquez, and considers how Spain and Spanish art informed America's art. The exhibition is at the Chrysler through May 16; it will travel to the Milwaukee Art Museum. The fine exhibition catalogue is available from Indiebound and Amazon for about $60.

Cerebral Women Art Talks Podcast

Episode 60 features Candida Alvarez. She is the 2021 recipient of the FCA Helen Frankenthaler award for painting and visual arts. Her works include drawings, paintings, prints, and collages that are created with materials as diverse as acrylic paint, colored pencils, enamel, and embroidery thread on cloth, on various supports ranging from canvas to PVC, cotton napkins to vellum. Alvarez’s solo exhibitions include Mambomountain, Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago, IL (2012); Candida Alvarez: Here, Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, IL (2017); DeColores, GAVLAK, Palm Beach, FL (2019); and Estoy Bien, Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago, IL (2020). Her many group exhibitions include Brooklyn Museum, NY; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX; DePaul Art Museum, Chicago; El Museo del Barrio, New York ; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA; Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, MO; Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico, San Juan; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; Queens Museum, NY; and Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, VA, among others. Her work is in the collections of El Museo del Barrio, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Addison Gallery of American Art, the DePaul Art Museum, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Prior to her FCA award, Candida received a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant (2019), a Regional Fellowship from the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (1988), New York State Council on the Arts/New York Foundation for the Arts Artist Fellowship (1986), and a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant (1994). In 1980, she participated in the International Studio and Workspace Program at MoMA PS1, and in 1985, she was an Artist-in-Residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (1981) and was a resident artist at MacDowell (1986). Alvarez received her B.F.A. from Fordham University and her M.F.A. from Yale School of Art. She is the F.H. Sellers Professor in Painting at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Candida Alvarez is represented by Monique Meloche, Chicago and GAVLAK Palm Beach/Los Angeles. Artist website https://www.candidaalvarez.com https://www.candidaalvarez.com/news Monique Meloche Gallery https://www.moniquemeloche.com/artists/33-candida-alvarez/works/ Foundation for Contemporary Arts https://www.foundationforcontemporaryarts.org/recipients/candida-alvarez WSJ https://www.wsj.com/articles/el-museo-del-barrio-hosts-first-triennial-exhibition-11615325292 Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candida_Alvarez El Museo del Barrio https://www.elmuseo.org/la-trienal/ Art News `https://www.artnews.com/art-news/news/breaking-art-industry-news-january-2021-week-4-1234582112/ Hyde Park Art Center https://www.hydeparkart.org/exhibition-archive/candida-alvarez-mambomountain/

Sound & Vision
Ryan McGinness

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 78:48


Ryan McGinness is an American artist, living and working in New York, New York. He grew up in the surf and skate culture of Virginia Beach, Virginia, and then studied at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as an Andrew Carnegie Scholar. During college, he interned at the Andy Warhol Museum as a curatorial assistant. Known for his extensive vocabulary of original graphic drawings that use the visual language of public signage, corporate logos, and contemporary symbology, Ryan is credited with elevating the status of the icon to fine art through the creation of his paintings, sculptures, installations, and books. Concerned with the perceived value of forms, he assumes the power of this visual language in order to share personal expressions. The New York Times noted, “In the past decade, Ryan has become an art star, thanks to his Warholian mix of pop iconography and silk-screening.” Vogue declared, “Ryan McGinness is a leading pioneer of the new semiotics.” His work is in the permanent public collections of the Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Cincinnati Art Museum, MUSAC in Spain, and the Taguchi Art Collection in Japan. ryanmcginness.com Instagram: @McGinnessWorks Sound & Vision is sponsored by Golden Paint and The NYSS. Sound and Vision is supported by the New York Studio School, where drawing, painting and sculpture are studied in depth, debated energetically, and created with passion. The School’s full-time programs: a two-year MFA and a three-year Certificate prioritize experimental learning and perception. Beginning in Fall 2021, the Studio School welcomes artists from around the world to join its inaugural Virtual Certificate Program. Combining the studio-centric emphasis of the School’s teaching methods with an individual, real-time approach to online learning, this full-time program is designed for serious artists, and dedicated aspiring artists, who seek to cultivate the studio skills and methods that will prepare them for a lifetime of art-making. The priority application deadline is April 30th, 2021 - apply online today at nyss.org

Windowsill Chats
Permission to not be perfect. Sarah Hand talks play and color, working with our hands, and the tangible pursuit of happiness. And a new book!

Windowsill Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 37:48


This week Margo is joined by artist, illustrator, and teacher, Sarah Hand. Sarah teaches at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Visual Arts Center of Richmond, art retreats, and online. Her work has been featured in Somerset Studio magazine, and she has had many solo exhibits of her art. She is the author and illustrator of the book, Art Makers - Papier Mache: A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating More Than a Dozen Adorable Projects!, from Quarto Creates.   Margo and Sarah discuss: How Sarah got into papier mache Why she finds paper mache to be a soothing art & craft The difference between the children and adults she teaches paper mache to Letting go of perfectionism Things that have kept her going throughout the pandemic Not being afraid to take time off or away And much more!   When she's not elbows deep in paste and paper, you can find Sarah painting, drawing, and dreaming up stories and images for picture books. Sarah lives and creates in Richmond, Virginia with her husband and their three-legged cat, Roger.   Connect with Sarah:  http://www.sarah-hand.com/ https://www.instagram.com/sarah.hand_art.and.wonder/

Meet Me At Mill Mountain: The Podcast
"Designing" A Career with Jimmy Ray Ward

Meet Me At Mill Mountain: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 64:15


Our nineteenth official episode of Meet Me At Mill Mountain: The Podcast features Scenic Designer Jimmy Ray Ward. Host Ginger Poole, the Producing Artistic Director of Mill Mountain Theatre, talks to Jimmy about his rich career at Mill Mountain Theatre and beyond. With an MFA in Design from UNC-Greensboro and a BS in Theatre from Radford University, Jimmy Ward has been designing scenery, lighting, and costumes professionally for over 20 years. His design and production credits include work at numerous theatre companies along the East coast including Spoleto Festival USA, Williamstown Theatre Festival, Seaside Music Theatre, Flatrock Playhouse, and the Gainesville Theatre Alliance. Within Southwest Virginia, Jimmy frequently designs for Opera Roanoke, Virginia Children's Theatre, and Mill Mountain Theatre, where he worked as Resident Designer for nine seasons. Jimmy's work has also been featured in installation projects for the Taubman Museum of Art, Virginia Museum of Transportation, the History Museum of Western Virginia, and most recently in Virginia Tech's Newman Library where the "Performing History: Women and the Vote" exhibit, co-produced by faculty from Radford and Virginia Tech, can be viewed. Mill Mountain Theatre strives to inspire, entertain, enrich, educate, and challenge audiences of Southwest Virginia through high-quality, professional theatrical productions and experiences. Meet Me At Mill Mountain: The Podcast explores all of the buzz words in Mill Mountain Theatre’s mission statement.

The Great Women Artists
Howardena Pindell

The Great Women Artists

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 46:43


In episode 54 of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the LEGENDARY artist Howardena Pindell !!!! [This episode is brought to you by Alighieri jewellery: www.alighieri.co.uk | use the code TGWA at checkout for 10% off!] Working across a variety of mediums, from painting to film, and who has employed a range of unconventional materials, such as glitter to talcum powder; since the late 1960s, Howardena Pindell has examined a wide range of subject matter, from the personal, historical, political and social for her highly important and activistic like work that deals with racism, feminism, violence and exploitation. Born in 1943 in Philadelphia, Pindell first studied painting at Boston University and later Yale University, and upon graduating, accepted a job in the Department of Prints and Illustrated Books at the Museum of Modern Art, where she remained for 12 years, from 1967 to 1979. A co-founder of the pioneering feminist A.I.R Gallery, Pindell is also a professor at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, where she has been since 1979.  Renowned early works include her mesmeric and labour intensive, pointillist paintings of the 1970s, created by spraying paint through a template, and Free, White and 21, a video made in 1980 in which the artist plays herself and, wearing a mask, a white woman, whose conversation relays Pindell’s own experiences of racism, which was first shown at artist Ana Mendieta’s curated exhibition at AIR in 1980.  Currently the subject of a major exhibition right now at New York’s The Shed, a show examining the violent, historical trauma of racism in America and the therapeutic power of artistic creation, other recent museum solo exhibitions have included at the MCA Chicago, Rose Museum, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, as well as an upcoming exhibition at Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge.  Pindell has also featured in recent landmark group exhibitions such as the touring Soul of a Nation: Art in the age of Black Power, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–1985 at the Brooklyn Museum, and WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, at LACMA. Among many many others.  Addressing important subjects that continue to educate people around the world, when asked about her viewers Howardena recently said in an interview, “I want them to look at the hidden history instead of the history we were taught”. And that is why we are so lucky to have her work out on the world stage, and I couldn't be more delighted to be speaking with her today. ENJOY!!! FURTHER LINKS! https://www.howardenapindell.org/https://theshed.org/program/143-howardena-pindell-rope-fire-water https://mcachicago.org/Exhibitions/2018/Howardena-Pindell https://www.garthgreenan.com/artists/howardena-pindell https://www.victoria-miro.com/artists/216-howardena-pindell/ Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Sound editing by Laura Hendry  Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/

Mental Note: Journeys of Health and Recovery
39 - Black Mental Health, Part 1

Mental Note: Journeys of Health and Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2021 27:13


How does the history of race impact your mental health? To get a better idea, we’re spending the next two episodes with Dr. Mazella Fuller and Dr. Charlynn Small - two leading thinkers on Black mental health. Today’s show is all about the history and definitions of Black mental health. Part 2 will focus on how to make change happen - whether you’re part of the Black community or not. It will feature practical tools to evolve the mental health community by making it more equitable and inclusive. Sources: mentalnotepodcast.com Dr. Mazella Fuller Bio Dr. Charlynn Small Bio Treating Black Women With Eating Disorders: A Clinician’s Guide Historical Sources “Historical Attitudes on Black Mental Health” Virtual Presentation for Virginia’s Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Services (DBHDS) Karen Sherry, Ph.D. Curator of Museum Collections, Virginia Museum of History & Culture (VMHC) ksherry@virginiahistory.org

Killing It Softly
S2 Episode 2: "Hey Doc, Something's Wrong"

Killing It Softly

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2021 61:09


In this episode of the show, I speak with my former co-worker Wesley and Dr. Karen Sherry. Wesley is currently working as a registered oncology nurse in Northern Virginia. Dr. Karen is an art historian and a curator of museum collections at the Virginia Museum of History and Culture.  Our discussion focuses on historical facts presented by Karen on aspects of systemic racism in the medical field, and how those issues are still negatively impacting Americans of Color today. We also spend time brainstorming different action steps we can take to create more equity in the medical field. 

Artisans & Trade
18. Into The Painterly Night :: Stephen Fox

Artisans & Trade

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2021 76:55


Stephen Fox is a photorealistic painter whose work renders nighttime scenes with a quality of mystery and fantastical nature. His work typically involves explorations of recurring elements and scenes such as glowing phone booths, illuminated billboards, interstate highways, and after-hours parks and playgrounds. He is a three-time recipient of the Virginia Museum Professional Artist's Fellowship among other awards, and his work has been exhibited at various galleries across the world including Posco Gallery in Seoul, South Korea, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond Virginia.Fox is currently a professor at the School of Visual Arts where he teaches freshmen students on the "Principles of Visual Language". He currently works and resides in Brooklyn, New York City. In this episode, we talk about an artist's purpose, finding one's visual language, and prioritizing investing in one's self.::::If you're getting value from these conversations, please share an episode with someone you think would benefit from it. Learn something new? Share your thoughts with us in our review and rating section here. (Your review helps creatives like you find us.)Help us cover the costs of producing resourceful content for you. Support the podcast with a donation at artisansandtrade.com/donate.Follow: @artisansandtrade::::Discover Stephen Fox: Website: www.stephenfoxart.comInstagram: @stephenfoxart

New York Said
Exploring the Mindscapes of Ryan McGinness

New York Said

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2020 43:11


Ryan McGinness talks showing your work, exploiting the analog glitches, pure geometry and the burden of communication. https://www.newyorksaid.com/ Notes from the Conversation Prolific | Approaching Fifty | Creating an Immersive Environment | Miles McEnery Gallery | Make a Statement | One Grand Singular Statement | Street Signs | One Grand Painting | The Black Holes | Narrative Elements | A System Started to Emerge | Systematic Approach to the Work | Why 72? | Site Specific |Easily Reconfigured to Any Other Space | Many Details to Discern | Macro and Micro Compositions | Taking in the Work | No Overarching Narrative | No Linear Way to Read the Work | Discreet Units of Meaning | No Stories | Interpreting | The Burden of Communication | Art that Invites You | Pure Geometry | Finding Truth in Geometry | Real World vs Simulation | Brush Work | Even Crosshatching | Communication Through Art | Art vs Graphic Design | Took the Pursuit of Art Very Seriously | Stickers and Zines | Silk Screening |  That Takashi Murakami Interview | Beauty as a Trojan Horse | Universal Icon Aesthetic | Original Drawings | Hobo Signs | Henry Dreyfuss | Who is Bozo Texino | Fight for your Time | The Studio of the Mind that you Can’t Escape | Isotopes | Marcel Duchamp | Most of our Offenses are Language Based | Exploiting the Analog Glitches | The Process Informs the Finished Painting | The Cologne Progressives | Jori Finkel | Simulation of Mindscapes Book | No Fear of Sharing | Show Your Work | Driven by Logic More on Ryan Ryan McGinness lives and works in New York, NY. His work is included in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY; Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, CA and Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, OH, among others. Official Website | Instagram ~~~ Share This Conversation with a Friend

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Amy Cutler, Degree Zero

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2020 66:17


Episode No. 475 features artist Amy Cutler and curator Samantha Friedman. Cutler is included in "Telling Stories: Resilience and Struggle in Contemporary Narrative Drawing" at the Toledo Museum of Art. The exhibition, which also features Robyn O'Neil and Annie Pootoogook examines how the three artists have used contemporary drawing to build and explore narrative. Curated by Robin Reisenfeld, "Telling Stories" will be on view through February 14, 2021. Cutler's paintings join feminism-informed suggested or hinted-at narratives to traditions that include miniature painting, textile design, nature and landscape, and more. Her work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art in Virginia Beach, at SITE Santa Fe, the Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, and more. In February 2021 the Madison (Wisc.) Museum of Contemporary Art will present a survey of Cutler's work. On the second segment, Museum of Modern Art, New York curator Samantha Friedman discusses "Degree Zero: Drawing at Midcentury." On view through February 6, 2021, the exhibition examines how artists on five continents used drawing to create new visual languages in the years after World War II.

Conversations at the Washington Library
185. Seeking a City of Refuge in the Great Dismal Swamp with Marcus P. Nevius

Conversations at the Washington Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2020 52:49


The Great Dismal Swamp is a remarkable feature of the southern coastal plain. Spanning from Norfolk, Virginia to Elizabeth City, North Carolina, the Swamp is now a National Wildlife Refuge home to Bald cypress, black bears, otters, and over 200 species of birds, among many other critters. But in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it was the home to the ambitions of planters and businessmen who sought to transform the swamp into a plantation enterprise of rice, timber, and other commodities. It was also home to the enslaved individuals who labored to make those dreams a reality. Yet the natural landscape, combined with the circumstances of the white-owned companies who controlled the Swamp, created opportunities for the enslaved to resist their bondage, and even self-emancipate into the Swamp’s rugged interior. And like the Jamaican Maroons who sought security in the island’s central mountains, some enslaved Virginians found a city of refugee in the Great Dismal Swamp. These acts of resistance were, as today’s guest explains, a form of petit marronage in a region that experienced more continently than change from the colonial era to the eve of the American Civil War. On today’s show, Dr. Marcus P. Nevius joins Jim Ambuske to discuss his new book, City of Refuge: Slavery and Petit Marronage in the Great Dismal Swamp, 1765-1856, published by the University of George Press in 2020. Nevius is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Rhode Island and a 2020 Washington Library Research Fellow. Ambuske caught up with him over Zoom as he was completing some research on the Great Dismal Swamp in the revolutionary era. About Our Guest: Marcus P. Nevius is an assistant professor of history at the University of Rhode Island. His scholarship has received the support of a Mellon Fellowship from the Virginia Museum of History and Culture and the support of a research fellowship awarded by the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. He has also published several book reviews in the Journal of African American History. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske, Ph.D. leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. A historian of the American Revolution, Scotland, and the British Atlantic World, Ambuske graduated from the University of Virginia in 2016. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA Law, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project. He is currently at work on a book about emigration from Scotland in the era of the American Revolution as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/support

Boldly Becoming You Podcast
Episode 50 Follow Your Curiosity

Boldly Becoming You Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2020 43:14


Jowarnise is a visual artist and designer who explores the human condition with themes involving race, social class, and culture through her naturalistic portraits of women in eloquent poses. She often focuses on the female African American experience. Her work has been exhibited at the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia, the Meredith Gallery at Virginia State University, the medical campus of Virginia Commonwealth University, and the Virginia Museum of History and Culture. She was awarded in 2012 by the National Arts Program and in 2019 by the Visual Arts Center of Richmond. She is based in Richmond, VA.   In this episode Jowarnise and I sit down and talk about her journey from following the path that she was “supposed” to take to following the path that she was truly meant to be on - living her passion and following her curiosity. She’s charming, inspiring, and wonderfully honest and I know you will thoroughly enjoy listening to her talk about how she gave herself permission to boldly become the person she is meant to be. Check out her website and follow her on Facebook and Instagram! In this episode we discussed: Listening to your inner voice Being open and trusting the journey Finding the courage to say “Yes” If this episode lights you up in some way or inspires you to question something, I’d LOVE to hear about it! Take a screenshot of your listening on your device, post in to your stories on FB or IG and tag Boldly Becoming You @boldlybecomingyou or @TashaSkillin. Snag the 11 Questions to gain massive clarity in your vision for Boldly Becoming You. Are you part of our community yet? Come check out the conversations about purpose, impact and self discovery in the Boldly Becoming You village online.  Download the free Boldly Becoming You Jumpstart Checklist to fast track your journey to your truest self.  

Long may she reign
Pocahontas (Matoaka)

Long may she reign

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2020 54:03


Pocahontas is one of the most famous Native American women in history, she's used in history books as the definition of a “civilized savage” but this is complete whitewashing, she was just a little girl who was stolen from her people. Join me Julia and Lindsey in discussing her life. Support this podcast: https://t.co/rHVVdHBtuf Works Cited “Chief Powhatan.” Historic Jamestowne, historicjamestowne.org/history/chief-powhatan/. “Food and Languages.” Powhatan, nativeamericans33.weebly.com/food-and-languages.html. From Issue: Spring 2014 Vol. 15 No. 1, et al. “Pocahontas' First Marriage: The Powhatan Side of the Story.” NMAI Magazine, www.americanindianmagazine.org/story/pocahontas-first-marriage-powhatan-side-story. History.com Editors. “Pocahontas.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 29 Oct. 2009, www.history.com/topics/native-american-history/pocahontas. “Jamestown, Virginia.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 9 Sept. 2020, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamestown,_Virginia. Kupperman, Karen Ordahl. “The Real Story of Pocahontas: Her Life, Death and Meaning.” Time, Time, 12 Mar. 2019, time.com/5548379/pocahontas-real-meaning/. “Life Portrait of Pocahontas.” Virginia Museum of History & Culture, 21 Sept. 2020, www.virginiahistory.org/collections-and-resources/virginia-history-explorer/life-portrait-pocahontas. Mansky, Jackie. “The True Story of Pocahontas.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 23 Mar. 2017, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/true-story-pocahontas-180962649/. Michals, Edited by Debra. “Pocahontas.” National Women's History Museum, www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/pocahontas. “Pocahontas.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 24 Sept. 2020, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocahontas. https://www.historyisfun.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Young-Pocahontas-bio-11-07.pdf Hashtag histories episode on the true story of pocahontas.

LookSEE
Working Together: Louis Draper and the Kamoinge Workshop

LookSEE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2020 27:02


In February of this year, a show, long in the making, of the work of a collective of black photographers in 1960s New York City called the Komoinge Workshop, had just opened with a joyful celebration at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. And then the world changed. We are living with a pandemic. Our city was a center of racial justice protests that roiled our country in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and many others. And now we are on the brink of a national election that will speak to how we see ourselves as a nation. AND YET . . . Kehinde Wiley’s statue, Rumors of War, stands on Arthur Ashe Boulevard. Commonwealth, an exhibition examining these very questions of who we are, how we define we the people, and how we can reimagine wealth and come together for the common good opened a few weeks ago at the ICA at VCU. Galleries around town are showing work that speaks to this moment, asks the hard questions, and holds up the mirror, as artists do. And at the VMFA, visitors can see the work of those 1960s black photographers, now through the lens of the events of the past six months. Dr. Sarah Eckhardt, curator of the exhibition, joined me via Zoom to talk about the show.

Cerebral Women Art Talks Podcast

Episode Thirty-Three features Derrick Adams. He was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1970. He received his MFA from Columbia University and BFA from Pratt Institute. Adams has been the subject of numerous solo shows, including exhibitions at the Museum of Arts and Design, NY, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, the California African American Museum, LA, and the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Adams’ work has been presented in public exhibitions, including Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth. (2019) by the Smithsonian Institution; PERFORMA (2015, 2013, 2005); The Shadows Took Shape (2014) and Radical Presence (2013–14) at The Studio Museum in Harlem. His work resides in the permanent collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. www.derrickadams.com https://madmuseum.org/exhibition/derrick-adams-sanctuary https://studiomuseum.org/press-release/derrick-adams-patrick-kelly-journey https://www.hrm.org/exhibitions/derrick-adams/

Research at the National Archives and Beyond!
Finding Female Ancestors When Few Clues Exist with Viola Baskerville

Research at the National Archives and Beyond!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2020 43:00


 Telling Her Story: Finding Female Ancestors When Few Clues Exist” Viola Osborne Baskerville is a Richmond native who has been tracing several lines of her own family history for over thirty years.  Brief sketches  about three family matriarchs led her on a hunt to find out more about  them. Ms. Baskerville is a member of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society (AAHGS), Greater Richmond VA Chapter as well as a member of ASALH, Richmond Chapter.  She received her B.A. from the College of William and Mary and her Juris Doctorate from the University of Iowa, College of Law.  As a public servant, she advocated for the preservation of Virginia’s African American history through placing statues and historical markers, most notably a monument to Arthur Ashe in Richmond and a plaque naming and honoring Virginia’s Black Reconstruction Era state lawmakers at the Capitol.  In addition, Ms. Baskerville secured state funded scholarships for former students locked out of Virginia’s schools when the state closed public schools rather than integrate them.  Currently, she serves as a Virginia Outdoors Foundation trustee. The foundation is focused on creating equity and justice in selecting its land use preservation projects.  One project the Foundation has supported is the restoration of  Evergreen Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, a historic African American Cemetery.  Ms. Baskerville is currently featured as one of the contemporary Agents of Change, in the Virginia Museum of History and Culture’s exhibition, Agents of Change: Female Activism in Virginia from Women’s Suffrage to Today on exhibit through November 1.  

Stitch Please
Art and Fashion Design: Sahara Clemons

Stitch Please

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2020 49:47


Support the Stitch Please podcast and Black Women StitchBuy these amazing STITCH PLEASE pattern weights Made by Bianca Springer of Thanks I Made Them! 20% of September purchases will be donated to us! $15 to the Paypal account for a Black Women Stitch lapel pin! DM or email your mailing to address for free USA shipping. You can also use  Cash App  Sustained financial support also appreciated here:For as little as $2 a month, your Patreon support means a lot: Join  here PatreonFREE SUPPORT Is also appreciated. Please rate, review, subscribe to the podcast. Tell a friend to do the same! Learn more about Sahara Clemons!Sahara Clemons is a multimedia artist, designer and activist born in Washington, D.C., and based in Charlottesville, Virginia. Playing with both the traditional and unconventional, Clemons creates paintings on wood and fabric, wearable art and fashion design. Her work confronts interpersonal and intersectional concepts and provides commentary on the historic, political and social trauma of people of color and its effect on shaping identity. Her work has been shown at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Second Street Gallery, The Bridge Progressive Arts Institute and McGuffey Art Center. Clemons is a YoungArts alumni and is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Rhode Island School of Design.  From  Cville Tomorrow. More information on Sahara:Follow her on InstagramHer TedX Talk Art as ConversationOn the installation of her 2020 mural. Art Against the ClockThe Fall 2018 SOUP.  Sahara won.  About her McGuffey Art Studio Residency Other mentions: The Nap Ministry  is a vital project. Check it out. 

Teaching Artist Podcast
#24: Blade Wynne: Teaching As Improv

Teaching Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2020 61:30


Blade shared how he teaches with a focus on process over product and bringing his ways of looking and making into his classrooms. He shifted from teaching at the university level through a summer career shift program and just dove into teaching at the elementary level, primarily 2nd grade, this year. What a wild first year! Blade is constantly inspired by the work his early elementary students create and talks about the inventiveness of this age level. He also shares some of his favorite lessons so far and how teaching is akin to improv in some ways. Blade Wynne was born in 1980, in Providence, Rhode Island. He received his BFA in Painting from Pratt Institute in 2002 and his MFA in Painting from Rhode Island School of Design in 2008. His work has recently been exhibited at Shockoe Artspace of Richmond, and The Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art. His work has appeared in publications such as “Journal of the Print World" and "New American Paintings." He is a recipient of the VMFA Visual Arts Fellowship, (Professional Award) as well as the Virginia Commission for the Arts Fellowship in Painting. As an educator he taught 2D design, Painting, and Drawing for several years in the Foundation Art Department at Virginia Commonwealth University and The Governor’s School for the Arts in Norfolk, Virginia. He is currently entering his second year of teaching elementary art in the public school system of Chesapeake, Virginia. I love how Blade has adjusted his own art practice to fit into his life as a busy first year teacher and parent of 3 young kids. He’s growing trees in pots as an art form, as objects to draw or paint from, as sculpture, as a practice that feeds creativity. I can’t help but relate his plants to his students. He spoke about how he gives a little water and helps shape the plants and the plants continue to grow for years. It makes him think about longevity and a brighter future. Children bring me to those hopeful thoughts. Blog post with images and links @bladewynne on Instagram . . . https://befunbekind.com/listing/teach-the-art-of-printmaking-to-anyone/ https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/together-while-apart/ https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/opportunities/ . . . Follow: @teachingartistpodcast @pottsart Support this podcast. Subscribe, leave a review, or see more ways to support here. We also offer opportunities for artists! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/teachingartistpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teachingartistpodcast/support

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 26, 2020: RWSA to keep Buck Mountain land; cheaper water supply expansion in Greene?

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2020 8:55


Today’s shout-out is for the Parent-Teacher Organizations of the Charlottesville City Schools, and their request for donations to the jointly organized Reopening Fund: Ready to Teach, Ready to Learn. Visit their website for more information and to make a contribution. *The Virginia Department of Health is reporting another 823 cases of COVID-19 today, and another 21 deaths. The seven day average for positive tests remains at 6.4 percent for the third straight day. In the Thomas Jefferson Health District, there are 15 new cases and another death for a total of 47. The newly deceased is from Albemarle. The seven day average for positive tests in the Thomas Jefferson Health District remains at 5.5 percent for the second day in a row. That’s down from 6.4 percent a week ago. *The Greene County Board of Supervisors got a small update last night on the future of planning for a new reservoir to expand its urban water supply plan. In July, the Rapidan Service Authority voted to stop accepting facility fees from each bill to pay for the project. Bill Martin is chair of the Greene Board of Supervisors and a member of the RSA Board of Directors. He had invited RSA’s executive director to attend the meeting, but that invitation was declined for now. “It’s clear that there is a dispute between Greene County and RSA and I thought it would have been a good opportunity for RSA general management to speak to all of us and citizens in particular,” Martin said, adding that RSA’s director of projects had a conflict.Martin did brief his colleagues on the August 20 meeting of the RSA board at which RSA officials stated they could expand the water capacity by new technology at the existing water treatment plant that takes from the Rapidan River. At $10 million, that would be a cheaper alternative than the new reservoir. Read Terry Beigie’s coverage in the Greene County Record for the full story. *Two natural events prompted the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority (RWSA) to implement emergency action plans earlier this month. Executive Director Bill Mawyer said heavy rains on August 6 caused concern.“There was more than three inches of rain coming across the Sugar Hollow reservoir dam,” Mawyer said. “All worked out fine but that’s an example of how we manage the reservoirs particularly during storms.”An earthquake in Sparta, North Carolina with a magnitude of 5.1 forced RWSA safety engineers to have to inspect all of the dams to make sure they suffered no damage. One of those inspectors is Jennifer Whittaker, the RWSA’s chief engineer. She briefed the Board of Directors on several projects designed to increase drinking water capacity in Crozet, one of Albemarle’s designated growth areas. The COVID-19 pandemic has increased consumption but that is within acceptable range. “What we’re seeing right now is that our peak day number is staying fairly high, particularly associated with warm weather,” Whittaker said. “Because Crozet is 80 percent residential we believe we are seeing an impact from people working from home perhaps more historically than they have.”One of the planned pieces of infrastructure is a new pump station at Beaver Creek Reservoir. While this new facility would be on county property, an easement across private land is required for an underground pipeline. “They understand for the most part what we’re trying to do,” Mawyer said. “We understand that they might not be so happy that we may need an easement across their property and we’re looking at all the alternatives.” The RWSA also reviewed a study on what to do with land purchased in the 1980’s for a dam that was never built due to environmental concerns. The RWSA owns 1,314 acres of land in northwest Albemarle and some landowners want to buy back their property. Scenarios envisioned in the plan include selling all or portions of the property, retaining the property, or a mixture of the two. The RWSA Board adopted a resolution to develop a comprehensive property management plan for the agency to retain the property. They will also seek to manage the property in a way to offset the RWSA’s carbon footprint.*Albemarle's historic preservation committee voted Monday to recommend a historical marker be created to commemorate the role the Union Run Baptist Church in Keswick played in local history. The exact text remains to be written. Union Run is a Black church founded in 1865 by newly freed people after Emancipation and the Civil War. An acre of land was given for the church by Thomas Jefferson's grandson, who had owned many of the parishioners. Pastor Robert Hughes oversaw the congregation for thirty years. There is a deadline of October 1, 2020 to get information to the Virginia Department of Historic Resources. The Historic Preservation Committee wants to install several markers to commemorate Black history in Albemarle, as well the role women have played throughout time. They will be seeking input from the community.  (Union Run Baptist Church website)*A Charlottesville artist is among 40 recipients of a $5,000 grant from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the Northam administration. The Virginia Artist Relief Fellowship Program will distribute $200,000 to visual artists of all kinds. The selections were made from more than 350 applications and the funding comes from the museum’s existing endowment. The person selected from Charlottesville asked not to be named. (release)*In meetings today, the Leadership Charlottesville Alumni Association will hold another “Courageous Conversation” at 2 p.m. This time around a series of panelists will discuss the challenges facing public schools who will open virtually to begin the academic year.Guests include parent and architect Shawn Mulligan, Juandiego Wade of the Charlottesville City School board member; and LaTishia Wilson, the Principal of Stony Point Elementary School. The Charlottesville Tree Commission meets at 5 p.m. One of the items is a presentation from member Paul Josey about the roles the commission and city government can take to improve city canopy, including the site review process. Josey has expressed concern about the decreasing amount of tree canopy coverage in the city and increasing canopy inequality present in the city. (register)  (agenda)One clarification today. In yesterday’s newsletter, I reported on housing vouchers being granted by the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. The 49 vouchers on the street and the 20 additional ones planned are supplemental vouchers added in recent years in excess of the 350 or so already in use. Thanks to those who pointed this out and I am glad to further clarify. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Mending Walls
Spirit of Sankofa

Mending Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2020 30:19


The Sankofa bird, a symbol used by the Akan people of Ghana, expresses the importance of looking to the lessons of the past to create a positive future. Host Hamilton Glass chats with Artists Ian C. Hess and Jowarnise about the many symbolic meanings in their mural painted inside the Virginia Museum of History and Culture.-Who is Marcus David Peters?http://richmondfreepress.com/news/2020/jul/23/city-prosecutor-review-marcus-david-peters-case/https://heavy.com/news/2018/05/marcus-david-peters/_The public art created for Mending Walls addresses where we are now in society to inspire conversation about how we can move forward with empathy through understanding and collaboration. Join the conversation! Virtual community gatherings, hosted in partnership with the Drums No Guns Foundation and the Community Foundation for a Greater Richmond, have been scheduled. Register NOW!--More information on the project and artists:Mending Walls RVA Mural ProjectHamilton GlassIan C. Hess & Endeavor StudiosJowarniseInstagram:@mendingwallsrva@endeavor.rva@jowarnise@19red.fuelProduction:19RED @ FuelIn Your Ear Studios

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Holiday clips: Beuford Smith, Hedda Sterne

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2020 61:07


Episode No. 452 is a holiday clips episode featuring artist Beuford Smith and art historian Shaina Larrivee. Smith is featured in two exhibitions that are on view at recently re-opened American art museums: "Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power" at the MFA Houston, and "Working Together: Louis Draper and the Kamoinge Workshop" at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Hedda Sterne Foundation director Shaina Larrivee discusses “Hedda Sterne: Imagination & Machine” at the Des Moines Art Center.

Sound & Vision
Enrico Riley

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2020 94:51


Enrico Riley is an artist and the George Frederick Jewett Professor of Studio Art at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. He currently lives in Norwich, VT. Enrico received a BA in Visual Studies from Dartmouth College and an MFA in painting from Yale University School of Art. He is the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, a Rome Prize in Visual Arts, an American Academy of Arts and Letters Purchase Prize in painting and a Jacobus Family Fellowship through Dartmouth College. He has exhibited work both nationally and internationally. Selected exhibitions include: Jenkins Johnson Projects, Brooklyn, NY, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR, The American Academy in Rome, Rome, Italy, The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, VA. The Columbus Museum, Columbus, Georgia, The Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, Texas, The American Academy of Arts and Letters in New York City, Hood Museum of Art, Hanover, NH, The Museum for the National Center of Afro-American Arts in Roxbury, MA, Accademia di Belle Arti di Roma, Rome, Italy, Rhode Island School of Design Ehp, Rome, Italy, Teckningsmuseet, Laholm, Sweden, Giampietro Gallery, New Haven, CT, SACI School of Art Florence, Italy, Pageant Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, Hampshire College, Amherst, MA, Lori Bookstein Fine Art in New York City, The Painting Center in New York City, SACI School of Art Florence, Italy, His work had been reviewed in Art New England, The New Criterion, The Hudson Review and the New York Times.

Good Morning, RVA!
Good morning, RVA: 1,284 • 12; protests across the region, and a rad cemetery map

Good Morning, RVA!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2020


Good morning, RVA! It’s 58 °F, and yesterday’s beautiful weather continues today. Expect highs in the mid 80s and lots of sunshine. Looking at the extended forecast, we might have a pretty nice week ahead of us.Water coolerAs of this morning, the Virginia Department of Health reports 1,284 new positive cases of the coronavirus in the Commonwealthand 12 new deaths as a result of the virus. VDH reports 126 new cases in and around Richmond (Chesterfield: 34, Henrico: 63, and Richmond: 29). Since this pandemic began, 197 people have died in the Richmond region.More than a week after they began, protests for police and social justice reform continue throughout the region. Saturday night, protestors pulled down the Williams Wickham Statue in Monroe Park. Wickham served in the Confederate Army, and I’m sure there are at least a few things named after him scattered throughout the City that might could use some renaming. Speaking of, folks—including the Jefferson Davis Neighborhood Civic Association—have asked 8th District Councilmember Reva Trammell to submit the ordinance required to rename the City’s portion of Jefferson Davis Highway. No word on the Councilmember’s response. On Sunday, Henrico Supervisor Tyrone Nelson posted a few pics from a huge protest in the Countyand promises to go into detail about potential policy changes today. Also in Henrico, a Hanover County man, using his vehicle as a weapon, drove his truck into a group of people protesting. He got arrested and charged with assault and battery. The man he hit with his car is OK, but his cargo bike was damaged. Justin Mattingly and Sean Gorman at the Richmond Times-Dispatch have details and photographs from the “Mindfulness March for Kids”which took place in the City’s East End also on Sunday. With multiple thousand-person marches happening across the region on multiple days, I’d say folks' energy is still high and the desire for meaningful change pretty intense.The Mayor and Chief of Police should take note of that previous paragraph when reading through this piece in the Virginia Mercury by Ned Oliver. Oliver tried, and mostly failed, to get some more details on what will happen to the police officers who gassed peaceful protestors at the Robert E. Lee monument last weekend. RPD was unwilling to provide the following information: Who ordered the gassing and why, what policies govern the department’s use of chemical irritants, how many officers have been disciplined in connection with the incident, what disciplinary action was taken against them, what was the finding that resulted in that action, and whether any disciplinary actions have been taken following other incidents. First, we should just take away all of RPD’s chemical irritants, then they wouldn’t have to go through all of the work of providing the policies governing their use. Second, the vibe of the RPD spokesperson is not great. This isn’t a sentence I want to read this week: “I don’t think the chief plans to revisit this anytime soon…He has apologized repeatedly.” Part of an apology involves a commitment to right the wrong that necessitated the apology in the first place. The Chief should be “revisiting” this continually and using last weekend and the ongoing protests as a lens to reevaluate his entire department. We’re a week out from the RPD’s decision to gas peaceful protestors and escalate the situation unnecessarily. What’s changed since then?The Cheats Movement has some really excellent photos from the last week or so by Lydia Armstrong. One thing I want to point out: Notice how her photos of the monuments resist centering the statuary. So much of the video and photography I see of of the newly added context to these monuments still focuses on the bronze statues of racist men and their horses.City Council will hold their regularly scheduled meeting today, at 6:00 PM. You can find the agenda here (PDF) and, if you’re interested, tune in to the audio here. The citizen comment period has five out of eight folks signed up to speak about the “resolution regarding monument removal.” That resolution is not yet on the agenda, so the unrelated citizen’s comment period is the only opportunity for folks to publicly get in front of Council and speak about taking down (or, I suppose, leaving up) Confederate monuments. I’m not going to make any assumptions about which side of the issue these folks are on based on their names, but, I will guess that you can expect more folks speaking out—one either side—as we get closer to Council actually voting to get rid of our monuments to White supremacy. RES. 2020-R034, which would have surplussed a bunch of Downtown properties, making them available for private redevelopment, will be amended and considered. I’m not sure how the resolution will be amended, so stay tuned. Of note at their 3:00 PM informal meeting, Council will hear a presentation on the new City website (PDF), and, big news, the URL will change from richmondgov.com to rva.gov! I am and have been irrationally annoyed that the City’s official website is a weird .com while Henrico and Chesterfield both have clean .gov domains. Also, and who knows what the reality will be once implemented, but the presentation claims that the new website will allow “individual departments to edit and manage their own web pages—without submitting a change request to DIT and involving additional parties.” Emphasis theirs! I’m hoping that the new platform will give regular folks (well, regularish) access to better and more current public information. No word on a launch date in the aforelinked PDF, you’ll have to tune in to the informal meeting, I guess!This is pretty neat, Colleen Curran at the RTD says the Virginia Museum of History & Culture will try to acquire part of the Pulse bus burned and destroyed during the first night of protests. Historians are so awesome, and I love that they’re actively trying to find the artifacts that will tell the current moment’s story many, many years from now.Check out this extremely rad map of the graves in the East End Cemetery. For the longest time East End Cemetery, a historic Black cemetery, sat with large parts unmaintained and overgrown. That’s changed over the last couple of years as the Friends of East End, in their words, have restored “Richmond’s historic East End cemetery one plot at a time.” It’s really impressive what the folks involved have done with a lot of their own hard work, a commitment to data collection, and support from some of our region’s institutions and leaders.This morning’s longreadThirty-six Thousand Feet Under the SeaThis piece from The New Yorker has nothing to do has nothing to with current events—just a rich guy trying to build a submarine to go to the deepest point in every ocean for no particular reason. Actually, I dunno, maybe this does tangentially relate to this moment in time.Past twenty-seven thousand feet, the pilot had gone beyond the theoretical limit for any kind of fish. (Their cells collapse at greater depths.) After thirty-five thousand feet, he began releasing a series of weights, to slow his descent. Nearly seven miles of water was pressing on the titanium sphere. If there were any imperfections, it could instantly implode. The submarine touched the silty bottom, and the pilot, a fifty-three-year-old Texan named Victor Vescovo, became the first living creature with blood and bones to reach the deepest point in the Tonga Trench. He was piloting the only submersible that can bring a human to that depth: his own.If you’d like your longread to show up here, go chip in a couple bucks on the ol’ Patreon.

Breaking Distance
"On Race, Art and Everything in Between" - Featuring Miguel Carter-Fisher

Breaking Distance

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2020 61:33


It's been such an emotional and confusing time for our communities and Beauty for Freedom wanted to address the police brutality and widespread systemic racism representing historical and current sources of trauma in communities of color.We decided to go back to our communities of artists and thought leaders and have started a special #BreakingDistance Podcast series discussing Race Relations, political activism and the role of the arts and communication in healing; the first episode features Miguel Carter-Fisher,  Professor at Virginia State University and Artist (Narrative Painter). This is our response to our current civil rights crisis, the collective trauma caused by inequality and violence, and processing our emotions throughout.    Evolution is the ongoing process of change.If we want to consciously and intentionally changeour social systems, we need to talk together about it.The more inclusive, wise and productive ourconversations are, the more powerful and positivethe changes will be. - The Role of Conversation in Evolution (The Co-Intelligence Institute)        More About MiguelMiguel Carter-Fisher is currently based in his hometown, Richmond, Virginia. His interest in the arts began as a child and was nurtured by his father, the late painter Bill Fisher. At 18 he moved to Connecticut, where he studied both painting and philosophy at the University of Hartford. After graduating, Miguel moved to Brooklyn to attend the New York Academy of Art. There he studied traditional drawing, painting, and composition techniques. After graduate school, he worked at Soho Art Materials, where he educated artists, collectors, and galleries on diverse methods and materials of painting. Since returning to Richmond in 2014, Miguel has taught at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Milk River Arts, Bon Air Juvenile Corrections Center through Art 180, and Virginia Commonwealth University. He is currently an assistant professor and studio arts coordinator at Virginia State University. Miguel’s work has been exhibited at various galleries in New York, Virginia, DC, Massachusetts, Washington, and abroad.  Please support Miguel's work at https://www.miguelcf.com/   Miguel Carter-Fisher Solo ShowEric Schindler Gallery, Richmond, VASometime in October or November depending on the development of the coronavirus.  https://www.ericschindlergallery.com/     Socials --- Instagram --- https://www.instagram.com/miguelCFstudio/Facebook --- https://www.facebook.com/miguel.carterfisher      ResourcesRegister to Vote Onlinehttps://www.usa.gov/register-to-vote    Defunding the Police. What Does this Mean? Fast Company Articlehttps://www.fastcompany.com/90511824/is-it-time-to-defund-the-police    Track Progress of LegislationFEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL LEGISLATION ADDRESSING POLICE VIOLENCEhttps://www.joincampaignzero.org/#visionhttps://8cantwait.org/     Center for Policing Equity—The Science of Justice: Race, Justice, and Police Use of Forcehttps://policingequity.org/what-we-do/research/the-science-of-justice-race-arrests-and-police-use-of-force     This detailed report delves into police administrative data to show disparities in the use of force. You can watch the director of the Center, Phillip Atiba Goff, deliver a TED talk on fighting racism and improving policing here. https://www.ted.com/talks/dr_phillip_atiba_goff_how_we_can_make_racism_a_solvable_problem_and_improve_policing    NAACP Campaign to End Racial Profilinghttps://www.naacp.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/RP-One-Pager-7-2-12-Draft.pdf    NAACP Racial Profiling Curriculum GuideCategorized By Topichttps://www.naacp.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Racial-Profiling-Curriculum-Guide-TOPIC.pdf    The recommended reforms in this report, which are intended to create accountability and build better relationships between law enforcement and communities of color, stem from President Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing. You can read the Task Force’s 2015 report https://cops.usdoj.gov/pdf/taskforce/taskforce_finalreport.pdfhttps://policingequity.org/what-we-do/research/the-science-of-justice-race-arrests-and-police-use-of-force   Color of Change—Sign a Petition to End Violent Policing Against Black Peoplehttps://act.colorofchange.org/signup/state-emergency-black-people-are-dying       LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR ANTI-TRAFFICKING ORGANIZATION BEAUTY FOR FREEDOM AT:    https://beautyforfreedom.org/       BEAUTY FOR FREEDOM MISSION STATEMENT      Art Therapy. Education. Empowerment. This is how we help survivors of human trafficking. We support recovery through creativity and skills training. We nurture our youth by removing potential stigmas surrounding self-expression, legitimizing their ideas, hopes, and dreams. In light of the COVID-19 global pandemic, we realize it’s our time to step up. Using the platform we’ve built to usher in change in the lives of people across the globe, we hope to help the world heal in this time of crisis. Here’s to paying it forward. 

I Just Called To Tell You A Joke

In this episode I call my Aunt, Cindy, and I tell her a joke. I don't see my Aunt Cindy very often, she lives in the US and I'm in Australia, but I never feel so welcome as when I visit her. She's an excellent cook, a wonderful grandmother, and a really incredible artist. She also volunteers as a tour guide at the Virginia Museum of Fine Art, near where she lives. If you're ever in town make sure you ask for her: https://www.vmfa.museum/ Come and talk to me on twitter - @josie_is Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/ijustcalledtotellyouajoke. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Voice Lessons Podcast
A Lesson on Using Your Voice with Bellen Woodard

Voice Lessons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2020 14:44


Eight-year-old Bellen Woodard is the only African-American girl in her third-grade class in a Virginia school. After a moment coloring made her feel unimportant, she had an idea to change the conversation by giving the “skin-color” crayon a new meaning. This idea has evolved into a movement and business called “More than Peach” that is giving people across the country a way to talk about identity, race, and inclusion and inspiring girls, and women, to use their voice for change. TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE: What adults get wrong about little girls. What happened in Bellen’s classroom and how she changed an uncomfortable conversation? What is the “More than Peach” project? Why Bellen isn’t afraid to speak up. What are Bellen’s Palette Packets? How Bellen has helped 2000 classrooms with her multi-cultural kits. What it means for Bellen to be inducted into the Virginia Museum of History & Culture. Bellen’s advice from her mom. How Bellen dealt with a first grader teasing her about her hair. What makes an idea shift and turn into a movement? How girls can lead at any age #LESSONUP: (3:04) Every time we would color in school, they always ask for the skin color crayon and we all just knew that, oh the skin color crayon is crayon language for the peach crayon, not really thinking about what we were doing. (4:00) And then when I told my mom about this, she said: “how about you give them the brown crayon next time?” And I said, “I don't want to do that. Instead, I want to ask what color they want as it could be a number of any colors.” And that's what I did. And then everyone started actually telling me, “I want the peach crayon or I want the brown crayon.” (5:14) I want kids to feel like they can be kids and not feel excluded and have the best options. And how I'm doing that is I have my pallet packets, which include multicultural items and my very own, “More than Peach” crayons coming in June. I actually deliver them to schools and now I'm donating to senior centers because they can't see their families due to COVID-19, because they're more at risk. Everyone should be able to color. (5:30) My big goal is to get this not just around the country but maybe even around the world so people can know that they have their own skin color and it's okay if the peach one or brown one doesn't actually match you and if it doesn't, you can actually say something. (7:02) We went into the Virginia Museum of History & Culture Museum and they decided to put one of my palette packets on display and a More than Peach tee shirt to be at the museum forever and ever. And that's really good because when I'm older, maybe people can start doing their own More than Peach project, making sure other people know that there's a skin color for everyone. (8:58) I need younger kids to stop asking for the skin color crayon, always assuming to get the peach crayon and actually telling them I want this... I actually want the peach crayon. (10:34) Be you. You are brilliant, be brilliant. And just know that if you want something to change, you should be the change and don't just hold it in for a long time. If it really bothers you, then make sure you say something because people may not think it's weird. They may actually think about it and say, you're right. I could imagine having the same hardship. (13:19) Maybe God made my hair crazy because I'm also all over the place, my hair is also all over the place. And how many of you will actually have matching personalities with their hair?

Monument Lab
Word Sound Power: A Self Determined Lexicon for Commemorative Justice with Historical Strategist Free Egunfemi Bangura

Monument Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2020 69:05


In Richmond, Virginia, you encounter monuments, old and new – on Monument Avenue one-hundred-year-old Confederate generals stand alongside, since 1996, a statue honoring African American Tennis icon Arthur Ashe. Nearby, Kehinde Wiley’s new statue, Rumours of War, sits outside the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, a new permanent sculpture moved there following its premiere in New York’s Times Square last year. But the makeup of Monument Avenue may soon change. Just in the last few days, and after years of activism and organizing across the state, Governor Ralph Northam signed a Confederate Monuments Bill. Starting in summer 2020, local municipalities in Virginia can remove, relocate or contextualize monuments as they see fit.Last year, in anticipation of the shifts at the state level, Richmond’s Mayor Levar Stoney convened a History and Culture Commission. Its chair, Free Egunfemi Bangura, our guest today, is a tactical urbanist who founded Untold RVA. She pursues ways to memorialize beyond bronze and marble. Bangura illuminates the connections between language and power.“I promised myself I would always become a historian. And so I just feel like that was the earliest part of when I saw that history was going to be controlled by the dominant narrative, and that the dominant narrative was going to do nothing to try to make sure that people had a balanced understanding of their own history, and that you weren't going to learn anything about Richmond or the struggles of Richmond,” says Bangura.This episode, we speak to Bangura about her work in “Commemorative Justice,” a term she coined. She also breaks down her projects that have left an imprint on Richmond, and how traveling outside of the country has shifted her thinking on her homegrown projects.Bangura is a Soros Justice Fellow, a bureau chief at the United States Department of Arts and Culture, and 2019 Monument Lab Fellow. We collaborate together, including on an upcoming project called Shaping the Past, a partnership with the Goethe Institute and German Federal Agency for Civic Education.

What's On: The Cuberis Podcast
Episode 12: Alison Byrne and Brad Tuggle from Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art

What's On: The Cuberis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2020 25:07


If you're listening to this in April 2020, which is when I'm recording this, I don't need to tell you how much has changed in the world since the last time I did an episode of What's On. If you happen to be listening in the distant future and don't remember what I'm talking about, we are in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, and museums are temporarily closed to the public. Physically, at least. As days of sheltering in place turned into weeks, and now over a month, museum members, families, and just people in general have been hungry for the sort of cultural and educational sustenance that only a museum can provide. And some museums are using digital tools to rise to the occasion. A couple of weeks ago I was looking through the excellent thread of posts using the #MuseumFromHome hashtag, and I spotted a tweet from Virginia MOCA announcing the launch of a new site: Virtual VA MOCA. When I clicked through, I landed on a pretty robust site, with virtual galleries of current exhibitions, educational resources and videos made from home, and interviews with artists, who are exhibiting from home. All of this was built out on a free Google site, and it felt totally made for this exact moment. Because it was. I started this podcast two years ago to showcase the great work museums are doing with online content, in the hopes of inspiring other museum professionals who are struggling with content strategies. And now, more than ever, that's my goal. So I spoke with Brad Tuggle, Virginia MOCA's Director Of Audience Development, and Alison Byrne, Director of Exhibitions and Education, to ask them to share a little inspiration in this strange and challenging time.

Breaking Distance
Breaking Distance by Beauty for Freedom - Episode 1_Part 2

Breaking Distance

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2020 24:31


Thursday, April 2nd Featured panelists include:Rebekah A. Frimpong, MPH, President of CR8:BLK, Doctoral Candidate DrPHJacqueline Douge, MD, MPH, FAAPSarpoma Sefa-Boakye, M.D.Gilbert Frank Daniels (Artist - Photojournalist)Raj Shah (Artist - Design/Marketing)Joseph Otsiman (Artist - Actor)Lisa Russell, MPH, World Health Organization COVID-19 Arts Curator (Artist - Filmmaker)Miguel Carter-Fisher (Educator, Visual Artist)Rebekah A. Frimpong, MPH, President of CR8:BLK, Doctoral Candidate DrPHRebekah A. Frimpong, MPH is a dedicated mother, and a Ghanaian-American award winning filmmaker, scholar, researcher, creative strategist, and published author/writer. Rebekah spends her spare time as a mentor to youth and as a community activist fighting for women's rights and global health issues. Rebekah grew up with a great appreciation for the arts thanks to the exposure her mother provided her at an early age. In her youth, she studied tap dance, ballet, and was a saxophonist in jazz orchestra for seven years. It was this exposure to the arts and her experimentation with painting, crafts, and poetry that led to her developing a passion for the arts and serving the arts community. Rebekah currently works in emergency response helping people recover after disasters and continues creating art working as an independent documentary filmmaker.Jacqueline Douge, MD, MPH, FAAPDr. Douge is the Medical Director for the Bureau of Health Services in Howard County Health Department. She is a pediatrician with a public health background and degrees from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health and Rutgers University. She is also the host of What is Black? Podcast. Sarpoma Sefa-Boakye, M.D.Board Certified Family Medicine Physician, Public Speaker and Global Health ExpertSarpoma Sefa-Boakye, M.D., is a Cuba trained USA, Board Certified Family Medicine Physician and Global Health Medical Expert. Voted Top Doctor San Diego in 2017, and well known for her International work which has been featured on the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) World News, National Public Radio (NPR) All Things Considered and most notably for receiving honorable mention by former Secretary of the United States Colin Powell to complete her Doctoral Medical training in Cuba.As an undergraduate at the University of California at Los Angeles (U.C.L.A) Dr.Sarpoma majored in International Development Studies with a sub specialization in Public Health of Sub Saharan Africa and Latin America. She later successfully attained her Medical Degree in Spanish on full academic scholarship at the Latin American School of Medicine in Havana ,Cuba where she also trained with the National Afro-Cuban Dance Company. Prior to Medical School Dr. Sarpoma also studied one year at the University of Ghana at Legon where she completed field work research on the Safe Motherhood initiative in the maternity centers of Accra Ghana, her country of origin. Shortly after completing her Medical training Dr.Sarpoma became the first International Medical Director of the Birthing Project USA, an organization aimed at increasing Maternal and Infant survival rates in woman globally. She advocates for donations of medical supplies globally and sparked a very successful safe birth kit distribution campaign which resulted in securing medical birthing supplies for more than 10k women in such countries as Ghana, Nigeria, Uganda, Malawi, Honduras and India. She is a true innovator in her field and has lead many medical missions in West Africa primarily in Ghana, providing medical supplies and Safe Birth Kits to families in need. She is also an Independent Medical Examiner offering insight and medical expertise to Veterans. She is currently practicing medicine in San Diego, California where she lives with her family.Gilbert Frank Daniels Ugandan based photojournalist Daniels, known as Bwette, is a former breakdancer turned activist. Bwette develops and executes projects that include hip-hop diplomacy using the art of movement as a tool for youth empowerment and working to use his photography to tell the stories of young African visionaries. Raj ShahRaj is a Senior Visual Designer and Professional Photographer at Condé Nast in NYC and has been an Ambassador for Beauty for Freedom since 2015. He believes deeply that creative expression can provide infinite paths to empowerment. He is committed to using the power of storytelling to move hearts and minds into action.Joseph OtsimanGhanaian actor, producer and radio presenter/DJ, Otsiman is noted for his role as Pastor John Moses in The Cursed Ones and Kojo Bonsu in The Burial of Kojo. Otsiman attended the National Institute of Information Technology (NIIT). He is an AMA Awards nominee for the role he played in his first feature film The Cursed Ones in 2015. He is the Co-Founder of Greenyard Entertainment; a production house that is currently involved in short films and web series.Lisa Russell, MPH, WHO COVID-19 Arts Curator at World Health OrganizationLisa Russell, MPH is an Emmy-winning filmmaker with a Masters in Public Health who has been producing films and creative campaigns and curating artistic performances for UN/NGO agencies for the past 10+ years. An avid proponent of narrative justice and responsible storytelling, Lisa has been a featured speaker and workshop facilitator at some of the leading global health gatherings including TEDxJNJ (Johnson & Johnson), Switchpoint, Envision, Unite for Sight, and others. Lisa is also the CEO/Founder of StoryShifter, a new entertainment portal where tech and culture meet for the social good. Residing in Brooklyn, NY, Lisa is also a teaching artist for young artists in NYC.Miguel Carter-FisherMiguel Carter-Fisher is currently based in his hometown, Richmond, Virginia. His interest in the arts began as a child and was nurtured by his father, the late painter Bill Fisher. At 18 he moved to Connecticut, where he studied both painting and philosophy at the University of Hartford. After graduating, Miguel moved to Brooklyn to attend the New York Academy of Art. There he studied traditional drawing, painting, and composition techniques. After graduate school, he worked at Soho Art Materials, where he educated artists, collectors, and galleries on diverse methods and materials of painting. Since returning to Richmond in 2014, Miguel has taught at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Milk River Arts, Bon Air Juvenile Corrections Center through Art 180, and Virginia Commonwealth University. He is currently an assistant professor and studio arts coordinator at Virginia State University. Miguel’s work has been exhibited at various galleries in New York, Virginia, DC, Massachusetts, Washington, and abroad.

Breaking Distance
Breaking Distance by Beauty for Freedom - Episode 1_Part1

Breaking Distance

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2020 28:29


Thursday, April 2nd Featured panelists include:Rebekah A. Frimpong, MPH, President of CR8:BLK, Doctoral Candidate DrPHJacqueline Douge, MD, MPH, FAAPSarpoma Sefa-Boakye, M.D.Gilbert Frank Daniels (Artist - Photojournalist)Raj Shah (Artist - Design/Marketing)Joseph Otsiman (Artist - Actor)Lisa Russell, MPH, World Health Organization COVID-19 Arts Curator (Artist - Filmmaker)Miguel Carter-Fisher (Educator, Visual Artist)Rebekah A. Frimpong, MPH, President of CR8:BLK, Doctoral Candidate DrPHRebekah A. Frimpong, MPH is a dedicated mother, and a Ghanaian-American award winning filmmaker, scholar, researcher, creative strategist, and published author/writer. Rebekah spends her spare time as a mentor to youth and as a community activist fighting for women's rights and global health issues. Rebekah grew up with a great appreciation for the arts thanks to the exposure her mother provided her at an early age. In her youth, she studied tap dance, ballet, and was a saxophonist in jazz orchestra for seven years. It was this exposure to the arts and her experimentation with painting, crafts, and poetry that led to her developing a passion for the arts and serving the arts community. Rebekah currently works in emergency response helping people recover after disasters and continues creating art working as an independent documentary filmmaker.Jacqueline Douge, MD, MPH, FAAPDr. Douge is the Medical Director for the Bureau of Health Services in Howard County Health Department. She is a pediatrician with a public health background and degrees from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health and Rutgers University. She is also the host of What is Black? Podcast. Sarpoma Sefa-Boakye, M.D.Board Certified Family Medicine Physician, Public Speaker and Global Health ExpertSarpoma Sefa-Boakye, M.D., is a Cuba trained USA, Board Certified Family Medicine Physician and Global Health Medical Expert. Voted Top Doctor San Diego in 2017, and well known for her International work which has been featured on the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) World News, National Public Radio (NPR) All Things Considered and most notably for receiving honorable mention by former Secretary of the United States Colin Powell to complete her Doctoral Medical training in Cuba.As an undergraduate at the University of California at Los Angeles (U.C.L.A) Dr.Sarpoma majored in International Development Studies with a sub specialization in Public Health of Sub Saharan Africa and Latin America. She later successfully attained her Medical Degree in Spanish on full academic scholarship at the Latin American School of Medicine in Havana ,Cuba where she also trained with the National Afro-Cuban Dance Company. Prior to Medical School Dr. Sarpoma also studied one year at the University of Ghana at Legon where she completed field work research on the Safe Motherhood initiative in the maternity centers of Accra Ghana, her country of origin. Shortly after completing her Medical training Dr.Sarpoma became the first International Medical Director of the Birthing Project USA, an organization aimed at increasing Maternal and Infant survival rates in woman globally. She advocates for donations of medical supplies globally and sparked a very successful safe birth kit distribution campaign which resulted in securing medical birthing supplies for more than 10k women in such countries as Ghana, Nigeria, Uganda, Malawi, Honduras and India. She is a true innovator in her field and has lead many medical missions in West Africa primarily in Ghana, providing medical supplies and Safe Birth Kits to families in need. She is also an Independent Medical Examiner offering insight and medical expertise to Veterans. She is currently practicing medicine in San Diego, California where she lives with her family.Gilbert Frank Daniels Ugandan based photojournalist Daniels, known as Bwette, is a former breakdancer turned activist. Bwette develops and executes projects that include hip-hop diplomacy using the art of movement as a tool for youth empowerment and working to use his photography to tell the stories of young African visionaries. Raj ShahRaj is a Senior Visual Designer and Professional Photographer at Condé Nast in NYC and has been an Ambassador for Beauty for Freedom since 2015. He believes deeply that creative expression can provide infinite paths to empowerment. He is committed to using the power of storytelling to move hearts and minds into action.Joseph OtsimanGhanaian actor, producer and radio presenter/DJ, Otsiman is noted for his role as Pastor John Moses in The Cursed Ones and Kojo Bonsu in The Burial of Kojo. Otsiman attended the National Institute of Information Technology (NIIT). He is an AMA Awards nominee for the role he played in his first feature film The Cursed Ones in 2015. He is the Co-Founder of Greenyard Entertainment; a production house that is currently involved in short films and web series.Lisa Russell, MPH, WHO COVID-19 Arts Curator at World Health OrganizationLisa Russell, MPH is an Emmy-winning filmmaker with a Masters in Public Health who has been producing films and creative campaigns and curating artistic performances for UN/NGO agencies for the past 10+ years. An avid proponent of narrative justice and responsible storytelling, Lisa has been a featured speaker and workshop facilitator at some of the leading global health gatherings including TEDxJNJ (Johnson & Johnson), Switchpoint, Envision, Unite for Sight, and others. Lisa is also the CEO/Founder of StoryShifter, a new entertainment portal where tech and culture meet for the social good. Residing in Brooklyn, NY, Lisa is also a teaching artist for young artists in NYC.Miguel Carter-FisherMiguel Carter-Fisher is currently based in his hometown, Richmond, Virginia. His interest in the arts began as a child and was nurtured by his father, the late painter Bill Fisher. At 18 he moved to Connecticut, where he studied both painting and philosophy at the University of Hartford. After graduating, Miguel moved to Brooklyn to attend the New York Academy of Art. There he studied traditional drawing, painting, and composition techniques. After graduate school, he worked at Soho Art Materials, where he educated artists, collectors, and galleries on diverse methods and materials of painting. Since returning to Richmond in 2014, Miguel has taught at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Milk River Arts, Bon Air Juvenile Corrections Center through Art 180, and Virginia Commonwealth University. He is currently an assistant professor and studio arts coordinator at Virginia State University. Miguel’s work has been exhibited at various galleries in New York, Virginia, DC, Massachusetts, Washington, and abroad.

Lo-Fi Podcast
Episode 13: Agnes Grochulska (Poland-United States) - "Line & Color"

Lo-Fi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2020 69:41


In this episode, I talk with Richmond, Virginia based painter Agnes Grochulska. We discuss her relocation from Poland-where she was born-to the United States, taking a long hiatus from art-making to raise a family, the life of Alice Neel and being a female artist and much more. From her website: Agnes Grochulska is a contemporary realist painter working mainly in oils. She also enjoys creating drawings in graphite and charcoal. Agnes studied design at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Poland. She currently resides in Richmond, Virginia, and her art can be viewed at the local Eric Schindler Gallery. Since becoming a full -time artist in 2016 her work has been shown among others, at galleries in New York City, Denver, Miami, local galleries in Virginia and abroad. A solo exhibition of her work took place at Eric Schindler Gallery in Richmond, Virginia, May 2019. Recent exhibitions include NOMAD St. Moritz, Switzerland with John Wolf, and “New Waves 2020” at the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art curated by Susan Thompson, an Associate Curator at the Guggenheim Museum. Agnes’ work has won several awards and has been published in the Artist’s Magazine, Drawing Magazine, Artists on Art Magazine, and others. Her drawings and paintings have been shown and privately collected throughout the US and Europe, most notably the Del Cerro Family Collection and the DaLuz Collection. New work can be also found at her regularly updated website, Instagram, and Facebook accounts. Agnes is interested in a broad spectrum of themes and subjects in her art. She is drawn to the human subject with all the emotion, meaning, and importance that only the human form can carry. Another idea she likes to explore is the landscape around her, trying to capture the essence of the place. Her upcoming exhibitions: * NOMAD St.Moritz curated by John Wolf, Switzerland, February 2020 * New Waves 2020, Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, March 20 - August 16, 2020 Website Instagram Eric Schindler Gallery Find us on all your favorite platforms including: Apple Spotify YouTube Facebook IG: @lofipod

Lineage Podcast
Derrick Adams

Lineage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2020 70:12


Derrick Adams is a Baltimore-born, Brooklyn, New York-based artist whose critically admired work spans painting, collage, sculpture, performance, video, and sound installations.  Adams received his MFA from Columbia University and BFA from Pratt Institute. He is an alumnus of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation’s Studio Program.  His work resides in the permanent collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and the Birmingham Museum of Art.

Real Photo Show with Michael Chovan-Dalton
Paolo Morales | Blind Leading the Blind - Ep.110

Real Photo Show with Michael Chovan-Dalton

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 29, 2020 60:49


"When I would come up from Virginia I would go there and I would take pictures and I would be like, okay if I take a picture then he'll live until next time." Paolo Morales and I met to record at SVA during his short break from teaching at Hollins University in Roanoke Virginia. We talk about what it has been like for a New York City kid to relocate to Virginia to keep working and talk about his most recently exhibited work, The Blind Leading the Blind and Memphis Tulips, which deal with dislocation, isolation, and gentrification. We also discuss Paolo's take on his identity as an Asian American and a photographer as revealed through his work. Paolo Morales is a photographer who was born and raised in New York City and currently lives in Virginia. Exhibitions include Hamiltonian Gallery, The George Washington University, New York Asian Film Festival, Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, and Capital One Bank Headquarters, among others. Residencies include Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, Blue Mountain Center, and Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. He received an MFA in photography from Rhode Island School of Design and is Visiting Assistant Professor of Art at Hollins University. https://www.paolomorales.com/ https://www.instagram.com/paolojmorales/ This episode sponsored by the School of Visual Arts MFA Photography, Video, & Related Media - Charles Traub, Chair. http://www.mfaphoto.sva.edu/ Visit realphotoshow.com @realphotoshow on Twitter/IG/FB

Perceived Value
Grad School Was My Version Of YOLO: Adriane Dalton

Perceived Value

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2019 80:07


Adriane Dalton is an artist, writer, and educator based in Richmond, Virginia. She is the Editor of Metalsmith and Metalsmith Tech magazines, and the annual Jewelry and Metals Survey (JaMS) published by the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG). She received her MA in History of Decorative Arts and Design (now the History of Design and Curatorial Studies) from Parsons The New School for Design in partnership with the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, and her BFA in Craft & Material Studies from The University of the Arts in Philadelphia.She was formerly the Assistant Curator and Exhibitions Manager at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art (NEHMA) in Logan, Utah where she co-curated ARTsySTEM: The Changing Climate of the Arts and Sciences and taught History of American Studio Craft, among many other curatorial and educational projects. She is a past contributor to Art Jewelry Forum and the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Object of the Day blog.Over the past fifteen years, her studio practice has evolved from traditional metalsmithing and enameling techniques to incorporate alternative and recycled materials. Lately, she is using disused and discarded materials to engage with intersections of labor, class, gender, and consumption. She brings her appreciation for creative reuse into her role as lead instructor for Teen Stylin’—a twelve-week wearable arts program at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. She also teaches recycled materials jewelry and enameling at the Visual Arts Center of Richmond, and is a past Program Leader at ART 180, a non-profit providing art-related programming for young people in Richmond.APPLY TO THE NEW VOICES WRITING CONTESTIn celebration of its 40th year of publication, Metalsmith magazine invites new and aspiring writers to submit proposals to the New Voices Writing Contest. Do you have a research topic that feels congruent with the varieties of content featured in Metalsmith? Are you interested in broadening the discourse within the fields of jewelry, metalworking, adornment, design, and craft? Do you have a fresh perspective, unique voice, or a radical idea? We want to hear about it!New Voices: https://www.snagmetalsmith.org/metalsmith-magazine/new-voices-writing-contest/Application: https://www.snagmetalsmith.org/metalsmith-magazine/new-voices-writing-contest/

Virginia Historical Society Podcasts
Is Cancer Still the Emperor? How Innovative Research and Treatments Offer Hope for a Cure

Virginia Historical Society Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2019 79:47


In 2009, physician, researcher, and science writer, Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, published his Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer. In it, he describes the story of cancer as a human story marked by ingenuity, resilience, and perseverance, but also hubris, paternalism, and misperception. On November 13, 2019, a panel of physicians and researchers from the VCU Massey Cancer Center discussed the impact of Mukherjee’s book and the groundbreaking advances in cancer research, treatment, and prevention that has emerged during the past decade. A reception will follow the lecture. INTRODUCTORY REMARKS: Ross Mackenzie — Retired Syndicated Columnist and Editor of the Editorial Pages of The Richmond News Leader and the Richmond Times-Dispatch MODERATOR: Peter F. Buckley, M.D. — Dean, VCU School of Medicine PANEL: Walter Lawrence, M.D. — Founding Director, VCU Massey Cancer Center Steven Grant, M.D. — Shirley Carter and Sture Gordon Olsson Chair in Cancer Research; Professor and Eminent Scholar, Internal Medicine, School of Medicine; Associate Director for Translational Research, VCU Massey Cancer Center; Program Co-Leader, Developmental Therapeutics John M McCarty, M.D. — Professor of Medicine, G. Watson James Endowed Professor of Hematology; Interim Chief, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology; Medical Director, Cellular Immunotherapies and Transplant Program; Medical Director, Cellular Therapeutics Laboratory; VCU Massey Cancer Center This was the third program in our Health in History Series, a partnership between the MCV Foundation and the Virginia Museum of History & Culture and sponsored by the Virginia Sargeant Reynolds Foundation.

Museum Confidential
Edward Hopper Was Here

Museum Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2019 28:01


The name "Edward Hopper" is synonymous with loneliness. Hotels and motels play a central role in Hopper’s art. "Edward Hopper and The American Hotel" recently opened at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. It is the first in-depth look at this side of Hopper’s work and features a recreated room based on Hopper’s “Western Motel.” The space serves as a fully functional hotel room. Every night sold out before opening day. On this episode we chat with the show’s curator, Dr. Leo Mazow.

Perceived Value
Teach Me Always: Susie Ganch of Radical Jewelry Makeover

Perceived Value

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2019 88:53


Susie Ganch is an artist and educator living in Richmond, VA where she is Interim Chair for the Department of Craft/Material Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. She received her MFA from University of Wisconsin-Madison. Part of her practice is Directing Radical Jewelry Makeover, an international jewelry mining and recycling project that continues to travel across the country and abroad. Recent solo exhibitions: How Soon is Now?, MS State University, TIED, an ArtForum Critics’ pick, Visual Arts Center, Richmond, VA, Land and Sea, Sienna Patti Contemporary, Lenox, MA. Her work has been included nationally and internationally in museum exhibitions including: Smithsonian National Museum for Women in the Arts, MFA Boston, the Design Museum, London, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia, Ueno Royal Museum, Tokyo, Japan, Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan, WI, Milwaukee Art Museum. Public collections: LACMA, CA, Asheville Art Museum, NC, MFA Boston, Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA, Metal Museum, Memphis, TN, Quirk Hotel, Richmond, VA. Grants include: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Fellowship, Peter S. Reed Foundation Grant, Theresa Pollack Fine Art Award, a VA Commission for the Arts Grant, and multiple VCU Faculty Research Grants. She is represented by Sienna Patti Contemporary Gallery.You can find out more: www.susieganch.com and www.radicaljewelrymakeover.org.