Podcasts about Plaid

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Best podcasts about Plaid

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Latest podcast episodes about Plaid

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Plaid and Column Co-Founder, William Hockey on Why the Brands that Win in Fintech Will Not Be Financial Services Brands, What US Banking Can Learn from China & Why Companies Can Be Built Slower than People Think?

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 50:28


Will Hockey is the Co-Founder and Co-CEO @ Column, the only nationally chartered bank built to enable developers and builders to create new financial products. Before co-founding Column, Will was the Co-Founder, President, and CTO @ Plaid, a world-leading data network and payments platform. In 2020, Visa attempted to acquire Plaid for $5.3BN, however, this was blocked due to regulatory issues and the company went on to raise at a reported $13.4BN valuation just 9 months later. Additionally, Will is on the board of Scale.ai. In Today's Episode with Will Hockey We Discuss: 1.) The Founding of $13.4BN Plaid: How did Will make his way into the world of startups and come to found Plaid with Zach? If we are all a function of our histories, what is Will running from? What is he running toward? What does Will know now that he wishes he had known when he started Plaid? 2.) Will Hockey: The Makings of a Decacorn Founder: What does the term "high performance" mean to Will? How has this changed over time? Having had such a successful time building Plaid to $13.4BN, how does Will assess his own relationship to risk and his relationship to money? How does Will approach his own personal portfolio planning? Equity, debt, real-estate? How does Will optimize his own personal wealth? Column is his second time founding a company, what did Will decide to take from Plaid that worked well? What did he decide he would not do having seen it work badly at Plaid? 3.) The Building of Truly Great Teams: Why does Will believe that companies can be built so much slower than people think? How does Will determine the decisions that have to be made fast vs those with time? How does Will ensure the same size of urgency and speed within his team without this time or funding pressure? What have been Will's single biggest lessons when it comes to people acquisition and retention? 4.) Fintech: The Next 10 Years: How will the next 10 years look different from the last in fintech? What changes will be better? What will be worse? What is Will worried about? What is he excited about? What does Will mean when he says, "the US financial system can function like a protocol"? What does Will believe are some of the core myths of the US financial system? Why does Will believe the current financial system can and will fix a lot of what crypto is trying to solve? What barriers will prevent this from happening? Items Mentioned in Today's Episode: Will's Favourite Book: The World for Sale: Money, Power and the Traders Who Barter the Earth's Resources, Merchants of Grain: The Power and Profits of the Five Giant Companies at the Center of the World's Food Supply

Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast
Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast, Episode 271: Folds and Rhizomes

Spartacus Roosevelt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022


"To Live and Drive in L.A." by Drugdealer from Hiding in Plain Sight; "Striped Pants" by Flaccid Mojo from their self titled album; "Hare" by Wand from Spiders in the Rain; "Son of Troutdale" by Lowbelly from Night Town; "Nightcrawler" by Plaid featuring Mason Bee from Feorm Falorx; "Trocadero" by The Soft Pink Truth from Is It Going to Get Any Deeper Than This?; "Downriver" by Skyminds from Terra Preta; "I Been Gone" by Moon Duo from Live at Levitation; "This Continuous Spectrum" by Jessica Moss from Galaxy Heart; "The Dreamer" by Anja Lauvdal from From A Story Now Lost; "One Thousand" by Marco Zenker from Channel Balance; "Condescend" by Low from Songs for a Dead Pilot. Courtesy of Kranky; "Space Labyrinth or Eclipse on Friday" by Acid Mothers Temple and The Melting Paraiso U.F.O. from Dark Side of the Black Moon: What Planet Are We On?

Purple Haze Radio
Business of Cannabis with David Skuy & Sharoz Makarechi - Plaid America - Doug Cortina, Nor-Cal Cannabis Company

Purple Haze Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 56:49


Business of Cannabis with David Skuy & Sharoz Makarechi - Plaid America - Doug Cortina, Nor-Cal Cannabis Company

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 654: Big Archeology

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 215:26


How was your Thanksgiving. The story about Michael J. Fox drinking cobra blood that only Woody Harrelson could tell. What do Bigfoot believers have in common? World Cup. Rob reviews Andor season 1. Oatly Emotional Support Hotline. Fotie's new skincare book. Plaid. 50 Cent is suing over claims that he had penis enlargement surgery. Ancient […]

With Jason Barnard...
SPARK Your Marketing with Conversion Content (Carly J. Cais and Jason Barnard)

With Jason Barnard...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 29:53


Carly J. Cais talks with Jason Barnard about spark your marketing with conversion content. Carly J. Cais started in marketing before she even knew it was marketing: she created websites for businesses in 2001 (her first website was a My Little Pony flipping shop ). She later started a niche blog and grew it over 12 years to a monthly readership of more than 120,000, partnering with ad networks and brands like L'OREAL, Martha Stewart Crafts and PLAID. She initially worked in B2C marketing, then moved into B2B in 2014, landing in the SaaS space shortly thereafter. After working with a number of early-stage startups, she found a knack for growing SaaS organizations through a combination of marketing, operations and Sales enablement, helping companies grow their pipeline, expand their customer base and lay the groundwork for scaling. She co-founded a consulting firm in mid-2021 and launched her own business as RevvSpark in early 2022. RevvSpark provides conversion content to marketing and sales teams of B2B SaaS companies with a focus on content marketing, demand gen and sales enablement. If it's visual and needs to persuade and convert, RevvSpark delivers it. Sales and marketing alignment is critical for any business. Creating common goals, strategies and communication between each team to also deliver consistent messaging and content that guides customers along their Buyer's Journey, regardless of what stage they are at. In this wonderful episode, the lovely Carly J. Cais shares brilliant nuggets about how to create high-converting content using her SPARK principle, Strategy, Planning, Assessment, Roles and Responsibilities, and Kick Start. She also goes into detail about the three stages of the buyer journey, the Awareness Stage, the Conversion Stage, and the Decision Stage, and what content best fits each stage: Top of Funnel Content, Middle of Funnel Content, and Bottom of Funnel Content. Carly also discusses how to get customer feedback in order to understand their pain points and recommended a book as a resource. As always, the show ends with passing the baton… the wonderful Carly passes the virtual baton to Ash Nallawalla, who will be next week's incredible guest. What you'll learn from Carly J. Cais 00:00 Carly J. Cais and Jason Barnard01:35 Carly J. Cais' Brand SERP02:15 Kalicube Knowledge Panel and Support Group02:22 Kalicube's Brand SERP03:38 Knowledge Panel Done for You Services by Kalicube04:01 What Does SPARK Mean?04:14 The Process for Improving Customer Touch Points Along the Buyer's Journey04:25 Step 1: Start with a Strategy05:10 Step 2: Create a Plan05:16 Step 3: Conduct an Assessment and Audit06:15 Aligning Sales and Marketing to Improve Customer Experience08:43 Updating Website Content and General Web Information To Guide Customers on their Buyer's Journey11:09 Importance of a Consistent Marketing Message12:12 Using Tools and Manual Process to Review Content For Google and Users14:54 Step 4: Defining Roles and Responsibilities of Team Members17:00 How Do You Know Which Content to Focus on?17:11 Three Stages in the Buyer's Journey17:25 Awareness Stage: Top of Funnel Content21:34 Conversion Stage: Middle of Funnel Content22:09 Creating Multiple Content Options to Help Customers Whichever Stage They Started Their Buyer's Journey25:03 Getting Customer Feedback to Understand Their Pain Points26:17 Decision Stage: Bottom of Funnel Content26:35 Carly J. Cais' Book Recommendation29:01 Passing the Baton: Carly J. Cais to Ash Nallawalla This episode was recorded live on video November 22nd 2022 Recorded live at Kalicube Tuesdays (Digital Marketing Livestream Event Series). Watch the video now >>

Interdependence
Covid space travel and AI rabbit holes with Andy Turner (Plaid) and Emma Catnip

Interdependence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 74:17


A great joy to host Andy Turner and Emma Catnip to discuss their work in celebration of the release of Plaid's latest album Feorm Falorx. We discuss their intergalactic space travel over the covid lockdown, our mutual rabbit-holing over the latest AI tools and techniques, and the situation for touring artists as they prepare to take the record on the road.Experience Feorm Falorx, the album and graphic novel: https://plaid.warp.net/See Plaid on tour soon: https://ra.co/dj/plaid/tour-datesFollow Andy Turner: https://twitter.com/chimpandyFollow Emma Catnip's work: https://linktr.ee/emmacatnip

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 653: There’s Two Moons

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 216:20


BGO joins us, and almost bought a missile silo to live in. A brand spanking new game! How could you possibly think there are two moons? Rob reviews a hurricane. THANKSgiving. A watch party that was not great. Will twitter explode? Booby Trap Arena. Plaid. Uncle Chen and the chain-smoking marathon. Lyrebirds impersonating an evacuation […]

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 652: Rob DOES Review Movies

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 155:09


Do you have a blu-ray collection? The special drinks Andy got from Zum. The McDonalds Gaming Chair. How some local elections in Kentucky are settled. More “swords”. The VR headset designed to kill you. Twitter is off the rails. Rob reviews Wakanda Forever. Plaid. Fart Police. The man on the Jet Blue flight who just […]

Make It Count: Living a Legacy Life
Ep 160 A Legacy of Making Music with Steve Moore

Make It Count: Living a Legacy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 35:12


Music changed Steve Moore's life, and began a long life of living a legacy life for God and by God. Steve is one of my favorites and will soon become one of yours as well. His legacy is wide-sweeping and God-centered and includes the wonderful gift of music, playing and making music.  Steve says you are never too young or too old to begin playing a muscial intrument. Here's your opportunity to begin or to continue something you may have set aside due to "life" and others' needs. Trivia: the Japanese word kyotsugo  = "universal language."   He's offering three different winners a 20-minute zoom music lesson--leave comment to be entered! Steve's "music room"-- Steve says you are never too young or too old to begin playing a muscial intrument. Here's your opportunity to win. He's offering three different winners a 20-minute zoom music lesson--leave comment to be entered!   Here we are at Disneyland, the happiest place on earth especially with my siblings and the Man-in-Plaid. Steve's bio: Steven Douglas Moore "Steve" (76), married 56 years (6/11/66) to Karen Lou (Colby) Moore (76) Three daughters, one son (in heaven) 11 grandchildren 5 great grandchildren Public School Teacher grades 4-8  (13 years) classroom (all subjects) and music and band teacher Christian School Teacher grade 4/5 (1 year) Church ministry: Youth Pastor, Children's pastor, Music Pastor, Associate Pastor, Senior Pastor (35 years) Private Music teacher (6 years) Instruments taught; guitar, ukulele, piano, harmonica, banjo, bass, saxophone Lessons offered now: $40 for 30 minute lesson Since retiring from full time pastorate I have served in the church as an assistant pastor and worship pastor (6 years, continuing now) We mention his "pep talk" he gives to all new students, as any age. Click here to read.   Steve is offering three different winners a 20-minute zoom lesson in the instrument of your choice below--leave comment to be entered in drawing:   Piano Guitar  Ukulele 5 String Banjo Harmonica  Music Theory (a concentrated tutorial to aid songwriting and leading)   Steve currently has openings for regular music students on zoom or in person if you live in Arkansas! Email him for prices and times available: papasteve@gmail.com  He plays all sizes of harmonicas and writes poetry.  THIS IS THE LIFE I HAVE LONGED FOR by Papa Steve  3/25/12   This is the life I have longed for For a long, a very long time: To teach little children my music While youthful and still in their prime.   But I will take any for students Who'll seek to discover this treasure, And follow me in my life's motto: “No fear – lots of fun – for HIS pleasure!”   Strumming and humming and singing My songs and tunes and rhymes. The worst I can say about it Is that this is my best of times!   I've worked hard all of my life As a teacher and preacher and friend; But what I did in the beginning Is how I now want it to end:   To make my own kind of music, Teaching others to make their own, too. Since Jesus blest me with this favor, I'll pass on the favor to you.   This is the life I have longed for Since my earliest mem'ries and days: To revel in music – then share it, And send up to heaven my praise!   He is a hootenanny and a half!  

Podcast – The Overnightscape
The Overnightscape 1963 – Gold Dragons Dream (11/11/22)

Podcast – The Overnightscape

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 176:51


2:56:51 – Frank in NJ, plus the Other Side. Topics include: Gold Dragons Dream, Andy Serkis, cauliflower question, Emigre Mason Sans, postmodernism, Tortoise – TNT, Marvel Snap, Casino Giganto, show art, important songs, Plaid – Feorm Falorx, Crazy Alice cigar, individually in the morphic field, what pleases the observer, somewhat scary new theory, wild mushroom risotto, interestingness, […]

The Overnightscape Underground
The Overnightscape 1963 – Gold Dragons Dream (11/11/22)

The Overnightscape Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 176:51


2:56:51 – Frank in NJ, plus the Other Side. Topics include: Gold Dragons Dream, Andy Serkis, cauliflower question, Emigre Mason Sans, postmodernism, Tortoise – TNT, Marvel Snap, Casino Giganto, show art, important songs, Plaid – Feorm Falorx, Crazy Alice cigar, individually in the morphic field, what pleases the observer, somewhat scary new theory, wild mushroom risotto, interestingness, […]

DER Task Force
#25: IntDERoperability with Henrik Langeland, CEO and co-founder of Enode

DER Task Force

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 66:05


Hey there Task Force! This week, the crew sat down and with Henrik Langeland, CEO and co-founder of Enode and talked all things interoperability, walled gardens, and Henrik even breaks some exciting news on the podcast! Check out the show notes here:* (0:00) Welcome to the ThunDERdome, getting DER-pilled, learning more about Henrik, why interoperability is so important* (9:40) Enode — the origin story, the secret behind the name, the core business, James slips in an early Big Shout * (20:40) What's an integration? An analogy to Plaid, the challenges of device management APIs, hot takes on OEMs that don't want to be interoperable (hint: DERTF Bill of Rights makes an appearance), why walled gardens fail* (31:08) Digging deeper into walled gardens — is there an argument for the OEMs? Why OEMs can't grasp the shared resources across all a customer's devices and widgets vs commodities* (37:30) New consumer habits in the future (or Norway), developing instincts for an electric frame of reference * (44:10) Breaking news — Enode raised a $15M Series A! The fundraising process and the experience, how they're using the money, the European startup scene * (50:40) If energy were hyperabundant and it ceased to become a meaningful economic driver, then what? * (56:15) Does Enode exist outside of DERs?* (57:41) Henrik is energy czar of Europe, dope or nope, BIG SHOUTS Friendly reminder that you can always find us on Spotify, iTunes, or your favorite podcast player. We hope you enjoy! This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit dertaskforcenews.substack.com/subscribe

Stonks Angel Investing Podcast
Secondary Saturdays - 11/5

Stonks Angel Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 28:43


This just in, SpaceX does not have pizza parties and the weekend is here.You know what that means. No Tom this week, but Adam holds down the fort on Stonks' newest show "Secondary Saturdays"Secondary Saturdays strives to make the opaque world of private markets a bit more transparent, to thrust private discussions and professional dealmaking from cigar-smoke-filled rooms out into the public forum for all to see. From banter to bold predictions, snark to sound effects, Secondary Saturdays brings levity and insight to that which has been static, stolid, and serious for far too long.It was a tale of two layoffs this week. Hear what to make about the differences between Patrick Collison's announcement and Elon Musk's email reveal party. Adam takes you deeper into both styles while thinking long and hard about why this episode was so much longer without Tom. This week, we kicked off with headlines and then went into the ApeVue 50 data. That's right we're trying to keep you all on your toes!Also, we wrap up a full month's worth of Stonks startup valuation data. Tune in and discover: - What's got us all so Hyper- The true meaning of life and work- What to take away from Plaid's 2022 FinTech write-up- Plus hear Adam's favorite scary movie and how that even relates to VCWe didn't realize how much we'd miss Tom until we didn't have him on this week. The market truisms were too sparse and Adam was left unchecked to rule over the podcast with his new microphone.Don't worry, we'll get back to your regular scheduled program next week. Until next weekend, just remember: Saturdays are for Secondaries! 

Rain City Supercars
Going to Plaid with Steve Bortolotti

Rain City Supercars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 47:38


This week on the show we welcome Steve Bortolotti, General Manager of the IMSA winning team Pfaff Motorsports! You probably know the Pfaff livery even if you don't follow IMSA racing since they have the best looking Porsche on the track in it's clearly Canadian plaid wrap. Steve tells us all about the high and lows of racing, modding his Time Attack RX8, and a whole lot more. We can't wait to see what Pfaff does in 2023 in the new 992!

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 650: New York City Apple

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 190:59


Let's talk about Fen's trip. Sauce is here. Arby's booze. Indy's birthday 2022. Daylight fuck you time. Zelkikki does the sloppy swish. Down the rabbit hole… Celery Jello. Ligma. A story from Louisville and from the Twin Cities. A guy running for congress that is conspiracy porn. Plaid. Rob reviews The Barbarian. Ohh shit, you […]

Sinn Féin
Michelle O'Neill in conversation with Plaid Cymru leader Adam Price

Sinn Féin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 38:04


Sinn Féin Vice President Michelle O'Neill speaks to the Plaid Cymru – The Party of Wales conference in Wales alongside the Plaid leader Adam Price

Mission: DeFi
DeFi Lunch (Ep 221) - Oct. 21, 2022 - @opyn_ / @hodlonaut beats Wright / @DefiOrg Twitter tool / @Plaid Web3 / #SilkRoad Sleuths / @Solana Embassy / @PanckaeSwap on @AptosFoundation

Mission: DeFi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 60:29


Join our community on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/MissionDeFi/ Opyn's 'Crab Strategy' Generates 14% Return - https://www.coindesk.com/markets/2022/10/21/defi-options-platform-opyns-crab-strategy-generates-14-return-in-comatose-ether-market/ Hodlonaut Wins Norwegian Lawsuit Against Craig Wright - https://uk.sports.yahoo.com/news/hodlonaut-wins-norwegian-lawsuit-against-134311067.html?guccounter=1 Twitter sentiment tool - Twitter DeFi Trends | by defi.org - https://twitter.defi.org/ Plaid launches its first web3 product - https://www.theblock.co/post/178561/fintech-firm-plaid-launches-its-first-web3-product?utm_source=telegram1&utm_medium=social https://twitter.com/b05crypto/status/1583251284920270848?s=20&t=SvopTvyuUBuD7YvuHWpehA Electric Cars Hitting Tipping Points for Global Mass Adoption - https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2022-clean-energy-electric-cars-tipping-points/?cmpid=socialflow-twitter-climate&sref=xuVirdpv&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic&utm_content=climate&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&leadSource=uverify%20wall Rolls-Royce unveils its Spectre EV - https://finance.yahoo.com/news/rolls-royce-unveils-its-350000-spectre-luxury-ev-122114678.html Silk Road sleuths new crypto investigation firm | Fortune - https://fortune.com/crypto/2022/10/20/silk-road-sleuths-launch-naxo-a-firm-dedicated-to-the-cutting-edge-of-crypto-tracking/ Hong Kong wants to legalize crypto trading - https://cointelegraph.com/news/not-like-china-hong-kong-reportedly-wants-to-legalize-crypto-trading This is not financial advice. Nothing said on the show should be considered financial advice. This is just the opinions of Brad Nickel, Joe Cawley, and our guests. None of us are financial advisors. Trading, participating, yield farming, liquidity pools, and all of DeFi and crypto is high risk and dangerous. If you decide to participate, do your own research. Never count on the research of others. We don't know what we are talking about and you can lose all your money. Never invest more than you can afford to lose, because you probably will lose it all. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/missiondefi/support

Real Vision Crypto
Fintech Is Coming for Web3

Real Vision Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 38:18


Plaid is launching a new crypto-native product, Wallet Onboard, that will support an array of digital wallets that serve various blockchains. At the top of today's Real Vision Crypto Daily Briefing, Nico Brugge and Ash Bennington discuss the significance of the fintech giant's Web3 initiative. Nico and Ash also talk about why Celsius is getting $17 million in tokens from Prime Trust and Interpol's curious metaverse venture. And compliance is complicated stuff! That's why we invite Benjamin Whitby, who looks after strategic partnerships and regulatory affairs at Qredo Network, to talk about what's happening with crypto and the authorities of various jurisdictions. Benjamin joins Nico and Ash with his regular update.

Ethereum Daily - Crypto News Briefing
EIP-2535 Diamond Standard Now Finalized

Ethereum Daily - Crypto News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 3:58


EIP-2535 is now finalized, Ankr releases an app chain explorer, Flaave's flash lending market is now live, Plaid releases Wallet Onboard, and StarkWare releases a new version of Voyager. Newsletter: https://ethdaily.substack.com

Tech Path Podcast
818. Institutional Ethereum Trading Coming Oct 28th | Bear Market Crypto Adoption Update

Tech Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 49:50


Investment giant Fidelity, through its digital assets subsidiary, has announced plans to offer institutional users access to Ethereum (ETH) transactions. The firm noted that the decision to allow access to Ethereum comes after the successful Merge upgrade, and customers will be able to buy, sell and transfer the asset from October 28, Fidelity said. Meanwhile, Plaid — a company most known for providing open banking APIs — has launched Wallet Onboard its first web3 product and the first of a series of forthcoming products aimed at developers in the crypto space. On this episode, we're looking into bear market crypto adoption trends.~This episode is sponsored by iTrust Capital~iTrustCapital | Get $100 Funding Reward + No Monthly Fees when you sign up using our custom link! ➜ https://bit.ly/iTrustPaul

Three Cartoon Avatars
EP 36: Fivetran CEO George Fraser and Young VCs Launching Funds

Three Cartoon Avatars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 70:56 Very Popular


(0:00) Intro(0:53) Investors starting their own funds(10:05) Tiger(14:16) Choosing a VC firm(22:07) Facebook's Yahoo offer(25:04) Welcome George Fraser(30:02) Plaid comparison(39:01) Salesforce data(42:32) Finding product/market fit(46:52) Era of iterating to success(51:55) What's driving stack changes?(56:29) Mixing family and business(1:02:17) Academia to entrepreneurship(1:00:28) Lawrenceville Boarding School(1:05:56) Acquisition lessons learned(1:10:07) Closing Mixed and edited: Justin HrabovskyProduced: Andrew Nadeau and Rashad AssirExecutive Producer: Josh MachizMusic: Griff Lawson 

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.
Aydin Senkut of Felicis Ventures on angel to 9 time Midas list investor, inception to scale at Felicis, and winning in today's crowded market

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 54:30


Follow me @samirkaji for my thoughts on the venture market, with a focus on the continued evolution of the VC landscape.This week we are excited to have Aydin Senkut of Felicis Ventures, which since its founding in 2005 has become of the most successful early-stage funds in the world, having invested in companies such as Shopify, Canva, Opendoor, Guild, Flexport, Notion, and Plaid,  The Felicis portfolio has 45 Unicorns since it started in 2006 and Aydin is a 9-time Forbes Midas list investor. Outside of the outstanding track record, Aydin brings such an interesting point of view on venture investing. We went deep on the history of Felicis, his investment philosophy, and his overall perspectives on running a venture firm.A word from our sponsor:Aumni is an investment analytics company dedicated to improving private capital markets. Aumni's technology digitizes hard to track unstructured data from private transaction agreements and organizes it in a structured database through an intuitive dashboard. For investors across the board, the insights provided by this data improve the managers ability to build strategy and make better decisions. Today, Aumni tracks data from over 250 thousand private market transactions to provide anonymous, aggregated market benchmarks.As someone that works deeply in the private fund space, I'm incredibly excited that Aumni's solution helps fund managers provide more insightful accurate reporting to their investors.  Check them out at Aumni.fund.Subscribers of Venture Unlocked can sign up for 20% off when you mention Venture Unlocked.About Aydin Senkut:Aydin Senkut is the Founder and Managing Partner of Felicis. An original super angel turned multi-stage investor, he has been named on the Forbes Midas List for the past nine years (2014-2022) as well as the New York Times Top 20 Venture Capitalists list for four consecutive years (2016-2019). His recent focus areas include infrastructure, security, and future of health.He is well-known as an early backer of a number of iconic companies including Adyen, Credit Karma (Acquired by Intuit), Fitbit, Guardant Health, Guideline, Notion, Opendoor, Pluralsight, Rovio, Shopify, and Soundhound.Prior to starting Felicis, Aydin joined Google in 1999 as its first Product Manager to launch Google's first 10 international sites, its first online search licensing products, and its first Safe Search. He then became the first International Sales Manager at Google, responsible for worldwide licensing deals. Before joining Google, Aydin was the Product Manager for Data Visualization and Data Mining software MineSet at SGI.He received a bachelor's degree in Business Administration with Honors from Boston University. He also earned an MBA in Marketing from the Wharton School and a master's degree in International Studies from the University of Pennsylvania.In this episode we discuss:02:12 What led to starting Felicis05:52 Why he decided to start something new instead of staying with Google08:40 Moving from angel to “super angel”12:19 The first fund raise16:10 Takeaways from early rejections and how he kept refining his pitch20:09 What was Aydin's initial vision and how it has evolved over the years24:59 Teambuilding and early hires at Felicis29:02 How Felicis wins competitive deals through strategy35:11 When to bend a rule when it comes to unorthodox investments39:13 Commonalities of founders who create outlier opportunities42:24 How to be anti-fragile as an investor46:40 Trends in today's market that gets Aydin excited50:16 The advice he would have given himself in 2005I'd love to know what you took away from this conversation with Aydin. Follow me @SamirKaji and give me your insights and questions with the hashtag #ventureunlocked. If you'd like to be considered as a guest or have someone you'd like to hear from (GP or LP), drop me a direct message on Twitter.Podcast Production support provided by Agent Bee Agency This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit ventureunlocked.substack.com

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance
The evolution of use cases for SMB financial data with Codat's Peter Lord

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 24:42


Welcome to the Tearsheet Podcast. I'm Tearsheet's founder and editor-in-chief, Zack Miller. If we were only talking about the benefits of open finance a couple of years ago, we're already seeing open finance take root today. Firms like Plaid and Codat are showing the power of integrating customer financial data across firms and into apps. New use cases are popping up all the time. Today's guest is Peter Lord, CEO of Codat. Codat zeroes in on small business financial data. That's a very different problem to solve than, say, aggregating consumer data. Pete joins me on the podcast to talk about the challenges of wrangling SMB financial data. We also chat about how and where he decides to provide value-added services on top of the data he's sharing versus just providing the raw data. Pete shares his feedback on the evolution of use cases for SMB financial data he's seen over the past 5 years of running Codat.

Faders Up Podcast
S3 EP11 The Pros and Cons of being the artist and the producer - featuring Plaid Brixx

Faders Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 59:30


In this episode the hosts discuss the pros and cons of being an artist and a producer, and to help with the discussion this episode features an artist and producer, Plaid Brixx. In the episode Plaid Brixx answers questions such as what him decide to do both? Is there one he likes better, being an artist or producing, and how he deals with more control over the music being the artist and producer. In who's been pushing faders up, Czar shares that he's working on reviews for the following mics, Avantone Pro BV-1 mkII, Avantone Pro CV-12, Austrian Audio OC16There is now a mailing list. We will be using this mailing list to share updates, giveaways, product discounts and more. You can sign up for the mailing list at http://eepurl.com/hzwW4fAs usual this episode will be posted in theFacebook Group for discussion, Faders Up Podcast.Follow the hosts, guest, and podcast on Instagram- FadersUpPodcast- AudioCzar901- ItspronouncedOshayGuest- Plaid BrixxHave a question you want answered on the podcast? Email us at FadersUpPodcast@yahoo.com

Loud N' Loaded
Brutal Dudes Ep. 10 Dick Justice Laying Down The Plaid

Loud N' Loaded

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 10:44


The Fintech Blueprint
Eliminating payments fraud from Fintech and Web3 using AI, with Sardine CEO Soups Ranjan

The Fintech Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 32:39


In this conversation, we chat with Soups Ranjan, the co-founder and CEO of Sardine.AI, a VC funded company with the mission to “confidently load money into a digital wallet”, where Sardine takes care of fraud and compliance issues related to money movement and instantly funds the money in the wallet. Prior to founding Sardine, Soups was head of crypto for Revolut and head of data & risk for Coinbase. He has held roles in cyber security and AI/Machine Learning at many Silicon Valley companies over the last 15 years. Soups also holds a PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Rice Univ where his thesis was on preventing application layer DDoS attacks. One of his lifelong passions is matching wits against fraudsters and he founded a popular risk community called RiskSalon that allowed many companies to learn from each other.

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 646: Abraham Linksys

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 261:00


Andy's incredible birthday, his “music”, the perfect game, and the 400 dollar soda he won. Costco onions in Korea. Someone figured out how to hack the intercom on American Airlines flights. Rob's final Amazon Adventure, and Rob does Linux. The goats that shouldn't be in Olympia National Park. Plaid.  The sound of a meteoroid striking […]

VBROS Worldwide
Dressing Up Pets, Plaid Fleece, and Mikey The Magician

VBROS Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 23:40


It's a beautiful Friday and Mikey, Frankie, and Gianna are in the fall mood. They talk flannels, apple picking, dressing up pets for Halloween, and candles. Listeners are smiling over the Post Malone concert and going to a bar-cade. And people also reveal why they're excited for the weekend.

A-Players - Build teams of top performers.
40. How to be a coach to your recruiting team. Chris Ahsing, Head of Support Recruiting @Plaid.

A-Players - Build teams of top performers.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 30:07


Yelling at your recruiting team “be better” will never make them better.Having a right-minded coach above them, will.I've been wanting to do an episode on this topic for a while:  how to coach your recruiting team well, to make them outperform. So I decided to bring Chris Ahsing on the podcast.Why Chris?Because in addition to having been a recruiter at Google and Dropbox, he is also... a football coach.In this episode, Chris Ahsing reveals us :-the first principle to know to be a good coach-the simple technique Chris use to understand people better-how to gain ICs trust faster-the framework to give effective feedback-the difference between focusing on the process VS on the resultsAnd much more.To follow Chris on LinkedIn, click here. To follow me, click here.To know more about HireSweet, click here. 

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket
The next generation of tech is on TikTok with Aaroh Mankad

PodRocket - A web development podcast from LogRocket

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 45:00


Aaroh Mankad, Developer Experience Engineer at Plaid, talks about how developers can leverage TikTok to learn about web development, get jobs in the industry, and how the tech community in general is moving to the platform. Links https://mobile.twitter.com/aarohmankad https://github.com/aarohmankad https://www.tiktok.com/@seattletechbro Tell us what you think of PodRocket We want to hear from you! We want to know what you love and hate about the podcast. What do you want to hear more about? Who do you want to see on the show? Our producers want to know, and if you talk with us, we'll send you a $25 gift card! If you're interested, schedule a call with us (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/contact-us) or you can email producer Kate Trahan at kate@logrocket.com (mailto:kate@logrocket.com) Follow us. Get free stickers. Follow us on Apple Podcasts, fill out this form (https://podrocket.logrocket.com/get-podrocket-stickers), and we'll send you free PodRocket stickers! What does LogRocket do? LogRocket combines frontend monitoring, product analytics, and session replay to help software teams deliver the ideal product experience. Try LogRocket for free today. (https://logrocket.com/signup/?pdr) Special Guest: Aaroh Mankad.

Equity
Stanford moonshot promises near-term profitability with no-code magical mushrooms, ft. Plaid of X

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 32:01 Very Popular


Hello and welcome back to Equity, a podcast about the business of startups, where we unpack the numbers and nuance behind the headlines. As you can tell by the headline of this episode, this is a bonus episode all about Y Combinator Demo Day (and the terms we heard most often during the two-day affair).Natasha and Alex jumped on Twitter Spaces to talk through our favorites of the batch, geography changes, and diversity shake-up that included less women getting funded batch over batch. Below are some of the posts we pulled from:The biggest moonshots in YC's S22 batchOur 11 favorite companies from YC's S22 Demo Day: Part 1 Our 10 favorite startups from YC's S22 Demo Day: Part 2Delving into YC's diversity data following a category shakeupWhere is Y Combinator startup-hunting in 2022?Y Combinator week is busy, but we made it through! Talk Monday!Equity drops every Monday at 7 a.m. PDT and Wednesday and Friday at 6 a.m. PDT, so subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Overcast, Spotify and all the casts.

Etsy Entrepreneur's Podcast
Etsy Rolls Out 24/7 Chat, Video Reviews & More + A New Freaky Friday!

Etsy Entrepreneur's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 17:06


It's an all-new Etsy seller news packed full of all the updates you need to know!  Here's what's covered in this episode: -Are bad reviews being displayed in a way that hurts your Etsy shop?   -Don't forget to verify your bank account with Plaid to keep getting paid -Etsy rolls out 24/7 live chat support... but there's a catch -Etsy buyers can now post video reviews... get all the deets  Don't miss the Freaky Friday Segment to see all my funny, weird, and cool Etsy finds!  Here are the listings I cover today: Chicken Daddy Calender: https://www.etsy.com/listing/1275479620/chicken-daddies-wall-calendar-2023-the?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=funny&ref=sr_gallery-1-26&frs=1&sts=1&organic_search_click=1 Wine Vessel & Cover From 1050 BC: https://www.etsy.com/listing/1217715390/usd-600000-a-rare-bronze-ritual-wine?ga_order=price_desc&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=funny&ref=sr_gallery-1-7&frs=1&cns=1&organic_search_click=1 The MOST Hilarious Coffee Mug You've Ever Seen: https://www.etsy.com/listing/225308515/funny-mug-secret-message-mug-coffee-mug?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=funny&ref=sr_gallery-3-45&etp=1&organic_search_click=1

We Are Auto
113. Lucid Air Sapphire, Bugatti Mistral, Rivian Vasectomy | News

We Are Auto

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 28:19


Thank you for listening to We Are Auto, the podcast about cars - for enthusiasts, by enthusiasts! Please leave a 5 Star rating and write a review!   In episode 113: - Lucid's new Plaid killer - Bugatti send's off the W16 with the Mistral - Doctor uses a Rivian R1T to power a vasectomy            and more! Follow us on Instagram @weareauto_ and like us on Facebook!

The Entrepreneur Ethos
It's Better To Be Early with Troy Bannister

The Entrepreneur Ethos

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 53:47


Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I'll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Troy Bannister, founder of Particle Health, an API platform that collects and integrates health data.  Troy's interest in entrepreneurship was sparked when he was growing up on an island near Seattle, where he made money cleaning boats. He saw firsthand the opportunity entrepreneurship provided, with income possibilities and time flexibility, as opposed to most other jobs his friends had. His interest in medicine led him to first becoming an EMT in college, where, he says, he learned a lot. He went to medical school but dropped out, leaving with a master's degree. He moved to New York City, where he did research at hospitals, then moved to working with a venture capital firm that focused on health care companies. Troy started to ask questions about the use of data in the healthcare industry, where fax machines are still used to share patient files. Using Stripe, Plaid, and Twilio as models, he founded Particle Health four and a half years ago. Troy's timing for founding Particle Health was strategic. He knew that health care was in need of better data access for providers as well as consumers, and that legislation was passing to make this more of a possibility. While companies are supposed to share data when it is legally requested, they often don't. New legislation now mandates fines for companies who don't comply. Much of the future success of Particle Health will rest on how the legislation will be enforced and how companies choose to comply. Meanwhile, Troy and Particle Health are offering data integration solutions to health care companies that understand the importance of being able to collect patient data in order to better serve them. Eventually, Troy sees Particle Health also offering consumers the opportunity to collect and keep their data in ways where it can be used more effectively, in order to give them more choice and power in their own health care.  Now, let's get better together. Actionable Insights Troy says when he saw the legislation coming through, he knew he had to act. "It's better to be early than late," he says.  Troy discusses the importance of aligning incentives. He doesn't think it will be the fines so much that will change institutional behavior, but the fear of looking bad. The legislation, he believes, will go a long way to incentivizing hospitals to share data. Consumers are starting to want more flexibility, and being able to easily access their data from various providers will enable more freedom of choice. Learn the various sides of the industry. Though his experiences in working in the medical field, then in working with startups in the venture capital firm, Troy has fairly quickly gained significant insight into being an entrepreneur in this industry.   Links to Explore Further Particle Health Troy Bannister on LinkedIn Particle Health on YouTube Particle Health on Twitter Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 643: Axe-Throwing Andy

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 211:12


It's Andy, all the way down. Afroman gets raided. Swallowing a fly on live TV. Mailbag. The you-know-what box has arrived. Airdropping nudes on a plane will get your flight cancelled. Rob's sleep study. Wordle's list and you can just do whatever you want. The bathtub time machine. Plaid. Spray painting genitalia. The nighttime coughing […]

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 642: Esta Appleseed

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 229:43


A game for the ages. Esta has a pear tree? The nightmare. Oscar Mayer's new frozen treat, and Snoop's new cereal. Poisoned by a napkin stuck in a car door handle. Rob's Amazon Adventure continues. Chicken wings, and is there a plant based meat that tastes like a human? Plaid. How did the naked guy […]

Album ReBrews
Ep 49: Art Angels - Grimes (feat. Calico Plaid)

Album ReBrews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 95:34


C-A-L-I-C-O impressed us!! This week, Nic and Camille, the cutie couple behind Chicago soft punk band Calico Plaid, ran with us through the 7-layer genre dip that is Grimes' 2015 album "Art Angels." We'll also talk about weirdly specific state laws, Grimes being a gamer, and whether it's pronounced "sherbert" or "sherbet."  Check out Calico Plaid here!Stream "Art Angels" by Grimes here!Thank you to Cameron Bopp for editing our show and writing our theme song!You can find Album ReBrews on Instagram here and Twitter here. (@albumrebrews)TW/CW: Explicit language, alcohol use and references, brief mention of violence. Fair Use Disclaimer: Under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education, and research.Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statutes that might otherwise be infringing.Logo Attribution: Thank you to Vecteezy for providing free vectors used as part of our podcast art.

Kilowatt: A Podcast about Tesla
Home Battery Talk with Allison and Steve Sheridan

Kilowatt: A Podcast about Tesla

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 81:57


Merch:Kilowatt StoreAllison and Steve:Podfeet WebsiteSteve's YouTubeAllison's TwitterSteve's TwitterSara Polton:Sara's TwitterStay the NightLinks:Hyundai looks to start U.S EV production early to catch new incentivesHyundai wants to build EVs in the US, looks to speed up the timelineNIO is testing swap stations that reduce peak demand by sending energy back to the gridLucid Motors' (LCID) Air Sapphire could smoke Tesla's Plaid and hold its own with the Rimac NeveraFormer Apple Car Engineer Stole Secrets He Hoped To Give To XpengTesla on Instagram: “If you can run faster than 5mph, you'll be fine”Tesla announces AI Day will be held in Palo AltoTesla to raise FSD Beta price up to $15k by September 5Tesla owners raise over $2K for children's hospitalElon Musk slows down rollout of Tesla's next 'Full Self-Driving Beta' updateSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/kilowatt. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/kilowatt.

The Scoop
Plaid executive breaks down the future of digital finance

The Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 44:14


Plaid, a fintech infrastructure and payments provider aiming to simplify the digital financial ecosystem through a single API, recently announced big crypto players such as Gemini and Binance.US are joining its network of financial institutions. The move is part of Plaid's broader effort to integrate both legacy institutions and crypto service providers into its platform, which was valued at more than $13 billion last year after a $425 million fundraise. In this episode of The Scoop, Plaid's head of UK, Keith Grose, joins host Frank Chaparro to discuss how its integration with crypto platforms is helping bring new users into the ecosystem, and to break down what the future of digital finance will look like. According to Grose, users' digital financial interactions will increasingly be controlled by a single wallet that is able to move seamlessly between different platforms: "You are essentially, as a user, going to have this back end wallet, whether it's your bank account or your crypto wallet, that you control the keys to and you can take wherever you want to use it around the digital world. That's where we're headed." While Plaid is built to cater to a range of digital financial platforms, Grose points out that all financial transactions ultimately come down to trust: "What we're really talking about when you're talking about payments is trust… and I think we're more and more moving to a place where trust is becoming digital, and proving trust online in the digital world is very different than proving trust in a physical, community based system that most of humanity has been in for most of history." Episode 78 of Season 4 of The Scoop was recorded remotely with The Block's Frank Chaparro and Plaid head of UK/EU Keith Grose. Listen below, and subscribe to The Scoop on Apple, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you listen to podcasts. Email feedback and revision requests to podcast@theblockcrypto.com. This episode is brought to you by our sponsors Tron, Chainalysis &IWC Schaffhausen About Tron On August 1st, 2022, Poloniex launched a faster and more stable trading system along with a brand new user interface. Poloniex was founded in January 2014 as a global cryptocurrency trading platform. With its world-class service and security, it received funding in 2019 from renowned investors, including H.E. Justin Sun, Founder of TRON. Poloniex supports spot and margin trading as well as leveraged tokens. Its services are available to users in nearly 100 countries and regions with various languages available. For more information visit Poloniex.com. About Chainalysis Chainalysis is the leading blockchain data platform. We provide data, software, services, and research to government agencies, exchanges, financial institutions, and insurance and cybersecurity companies in over 60 countries. Backed by Accel, Addition, Benchmark, Coatue, Paradigm, Ribbit, and other leading firms in venture capital, Chainalysis builds trust in blockchains to promote more financial freedom with less risk. For more information, visit www.chainalysis.com. About IWC Schaffhausen IWC Schaffhausen is a Swiss luxury watch manufacturer based in Schaffhausen, Switzerland. Known for its unique engineering approach to watchmaking, IWC combines the best of human craftsmanship and creativity with cutting-edge technology and processes. With collections like the Portugieser and the Pilot's Watches, the brand covers the whole spectrum from elegant timepieces to sports watches. For more information, visit IWC.com.

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Why Market Always Wins Over the Founder & Why I Do Not Do Market Sizing | Why it is not the Best Time to be Investing but it is the Best Time to Have a Fund & The Type of Deals to do Today | Why The Best Founders Have 100 Year Plans with Wes

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 48:42 Very Popular


Wes Chan is the Co-Founder and Managing Partner at FPV Ventures, a $450M early-stage fund, launched earlier this year. Wes is an investor in five $10B+ "decacorns," his most notable being Canva where he is a member of the board of directors and led the Series A and C rounds. Wes also wrote the first or very early check into Plaid, Flexport, Gusto, Lucid, and RobinHood. Before FPV Wes was a Managing Director at Felicis Ventures and before Felicis Wes founded GV's seed investing program. If that was not enough, as an operator, Wes co-founded Google Analytics and Google Voice and holds 18 US patents for his work in creating Google AdWords. In Today's Episode with Wes Chan 1.) From Founding Google Analytics to Venture: How did Wes make his way from founding Google Voice and Google Analytics to starting GV's seed investing program? What are 1-2 of the single biggest product takeaways from working closely with Larry and Sergey @ Google? How did Wes make his way from Google to Felicis and scaling the firm with Aydin Senkut? 2.) Market vs Founder: Why Market Sizing is BS: Why does Wes believe that the market always wins over the founder? That said, what does Wes mean when he says "the best founders have 100 year plans?" How does Wes question and analyse 100 year plans? What makes the best? What makes the worst? Why does Wes not do market sizing? Why does Wes not do outcome scenario planning? What does Wes believe is the biggest fallacy of outcome scenario planning? 3.) The Venture Landscape: Does Wes believe that now is really the best time to be investing? Why does Wes believe there are some treacherous deals being done now? What are the signs that these deals are challenging? What advice does Wes give founders fundraising in these markets? What does Wes believe are elements that traditional VCs decide to do, which prevents founders from choosing to work with them? Does Wes believe VCs on board truly provide value? If so, which ones and why them? 4.) FPV: Firm Building and Portfolio Construction: With the new $450M fund, what is the portfolio construction that Wes chose? Why does Wes prefer to have more lines in the portfolio than a concentrated portfolio? Does Wes believe you can increase your ownership in your best companies over time? How does Wes think about capital concentration on a per company basis? What have been Wes' biggest lessons from his biggest hits and misses? Items Mentioned in Todays Episode: Wes' Favourite Book: Liar's Poker

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
656. News: Can Klarna become a Super App?

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 57:02


Our expert hosts, David M. Brear and Nicole Perry, are joined by some great guests to talk about the most notable fintech, financial services and banking news from the past week. This week's guests include: Jenny Miller, Head of US Product, Wise Evgenii Kondratev, Product Director, Klarna With soundclips from: Bruno DIniz, Co-founder, Spiralem We cover the following stories from the fintech and financial services space: Wise partnership with Plaid gives customers access to 6000 US apps - 5:35 Klarna strives for Super App status by helping UK customers track all online orders in one place - 14:00 QED makes its first African investment, backing Nigerian fintech TeamApt - 28:35 Brazil's central bank chief predicts end of credit cards - 37:30 NatWest's Payit hits £1bn processed - 48:05 UK fintech Griffin lands £12.5m in latest funding round - 49:45 WeWork co-founder lines up $350 million A16Z investment for a new billion-dollar real estate venture - 51:10 Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. It's hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David M. Brear, Simon Taylor, Jason Bates and Gwera Kiwana, as well as a range of brilliant guests. We cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: @fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, or email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Bruno DIniz, Evgenii Kondratev, and Jenny Miller.

Plaid Skirts & Basic Black
Plaid Skirts and Fluffy Snuggies

Plaid Skirts & Basic Black

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 48:19


With just a few weeks until Fall, the ladies snuggle up with their top three cozy movies for the hit of seratonin we all need at the end of a long day.OffertoryShannon - Noelle on Disney+, The Alice Network by Kate QuinnMarcia - Finding Me by Viola Davis, Midnight Sun by Stephanie Meyer, The Twilight Saga by Stephanie MeyerSupport the Pod!Patreon - www.patreon.com/psbbpodcastBuy our merch! - psbbpodcast.myspreadshop.comFollow Us!Podcast: @psbbpodcastMarcia: @stylishlyciaShannon: @teamquarterblack

Three Cartoon Avatars
EP 30: Conversation with Plaid & Column Founder William Hockey, Covering Adam Neumann with Author Maureen Farrell and Common Founder Brad Hargreaves

Three Cartoon Avatars

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 112:35 Very Popular


(1:55) Introducing William(4:48) Kids today(6:22) William's first pitch to Zach(10:44) Data prioritization(12:21) Providing services others don't want to do(21:29) Strategic decisions(25:48) Organizing a new UI(31:38) Selling Plaid to Visa(33:13) Fintech in current market conditions(38:27) William bought a bank(44:00) Running Column as a couple(52:03) Crypto's role in finance(59:57) Funding(1:05:45) A changing path for entrepreneurs(1:11:21) Neumann and Flow(1:13:46) Introducing Maureen and Brad(1:15:30) WeWork recap(1:22:06) Common vs WeLive(1:27:23) Community Narrative(1:33:21) Flow's potential use cases(1:36:36) Why Andreessen would back this(1:42:58) Does it help when founders are crazy?(1:47:38) What will Neumann need to do?(1:52:03) Outro Mixed and edited: Justin Hrabovsky Produced: Andrew Nadeau and Rashad Assir Executive Producer: Josh Machiz Music: Griff Lawson  

The Bike Shed
350: 21 Bell Salute

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 52:09


It's Steph and Chris' last show. Steph found a game, and if you've been following the journey, all of the Test::Unit test files are now live in RSpec. JWTs really grind Chris' gears. They wrap up with things they've learned, takeaways they've had, and their proudest podcasting moments. They also thank all the folks who've helped make The Bike Shed happen. This episode is brought to you by Airbrake (https://airbrake.io/?utm_campaign=Q3_2022%3A%20Bike%20Shed%20Podcast%20Ad&utm_source=Bike%20Shed&utm_medium=website). Visit Frictionless error monitoring and performance insight for your app stack. Microservices (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8OnoxKotPQ) Transcript: CHRIS: One more round of golden roads, our golden. So here we go. STEPH: Oh, one more round of golden roads. Okay, maybe that's going to get to me today. [laughs] CHRIS: [singing] Golden roads take me home to the place. STEPH: [singing] I belong. CHRIS: Yeah, there you go. Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way, at least one more time. So with that [chuckles] as an intro, Steph, what would you say is new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris. Well, today is the big day. It is the day that you and I are recording our final Bike Shed episode, which we have all the feels about, and we will definitely dive into. But to ignore some of that for now, I have another small fun update I can provide about a new game that I found. So one of the things that's new in my world is I started playing a new board game with Tim; it's called Ticket to Ride. Have you heard of that? CHRIS: I have. I don't know if I've played it. I feel like it's a particularly popular one now. But I don't know if I've ever had the pleasure. STEPH: It's a very cute game, so we have the smaller version of it. For anyone that's not familiar, it's essentially a map. And then there's a bunch of spots where you can build trains and connect them, and then you get tickets. So your goal is that you're going to connect one location to another location. And then you get points and yada yada, but it's so much fun and especially the two-player version. It's like this perfect 20, maybe 30-minute game. I'll be honest; I'm not really a board game person. I always enjoy it. Once I get into it, then I'm like, this is great. I don't know why I was resistant to this. But every time someone's like, "Do you want to play a board game?" I'm like, "Not really." [laughs] I first have to get into it. But I have really enjoyed Ticket to Ride. That's been a really fun game to play. And it's been a nice way to, like, even during the day, we'll break for lunch and squeeze in a game. CHRIS: Well, I love good two-player games. They're hard to find. But when you find a good one, and it's got that easy pickup and play...I believe I'm going to now purchase this. And thank you for the tip. STEPH: Yeah, this is definitely one of those where it's easy to pick up, and then you can get the expanded board. So there's a two-player version, but then yeah, you can get one that's a map of the U.S. or a map of Europe. And I think it accommodates up to five players as the maximum, so not a huge group but definitely more than two. On a slightly more technical note, I have something that I'm very excited to share. It is a journey that you have been on with me, that everybody listening has been on this journey with me. And I'm very excited. I see you nodding your head, so I'm guessing that you're going to know where I'm headed with this. But I'm very excited to announce that all of the Test::Unit test files now live in RSpec. So that is a big win. I'm very, very excited for that to be a previous state of life and not an ongoing state of life. Because I have certainly developed too much niche knowledge around migrating these tests, and that became apparent to me when I was pairing with another developer that works with the client because they had offered...they had some time. They're like, "Hey, do you want help migrating a test file?" And I was like, "Sure." I was like, "But this is wonky enough, like, we should pair and work on this together because I just know some ins and outs. And I don't want you to have to learn a lot of the hard lessons that I've learned." And the test that we happened to pick up was very gnarly. It had a lot of mystery guests. And we spent, I think it was a good two hours. And we only migrated one of the tests, so not even a full file but one of the tests. And at the end of it, I was like, I know way too much about some of the oddities and quirkiness of this. And we got through it, but we decided that wasn't a good use of their time for them to go at this alone. So that's why I'm extra excited and relieved because I didn't want this task to carry on to someone else. So, hooray, we did it. CHRIS: Hooray. Just in time. You're Indiana Jones grabbing your hat right as you roll out and off to [laughs] be away from the project for a bit. So you stuck the landing. Well done, Steph. STEPH: Thank you. Thank you. So that's some great news. And then also, everything else in life is pretty much focused around getting ready for maternity leave. That's about to happen soon, and I am so ready. I have thoroughly enjoyed a lot of the things that I'm doing, [laughs] but goodness, being pregnant is hard. And I am very much ready for that leave. So also, a lot of the things that I'm doing right now are very focused on making sure everything's transitioned and communicated and that I just feel really good about that day of departure. That covers all the newness in my world other than the big thing that we're just not talking about yet. How about you? What's new in your world? CHRIS: Well, continuing to skirt the bigger topic that we will certainly get to in the episode, what is new in my world? I'm actually quite excited workwise right now. We have a much larger body of work that finally we got the clarity. All the pieces fell into place, and now we're sort of everybody rowing in the same direction. There's interesting, I think, really impactful code that we're writing for Sagewell right now. So that's really fantastic. We've got the whole team back together on the engineering side. And so we're, I think, in the strongest and most interesting point that I have experienced thus far. So that's all really fantastic. On a slight technical deep dive, you know what really grinds my gears? It's JWTs. JSON Web Tokens and I have never gotten along. It's never been a match made in heaven. And we have a webhook that comes from Plaid. Plaid is a vendor for connecting bank accounts and whatnot. And they have webhooks like many people do. So they can inform us when things change, lovely feature of how we build web apps these days. But often, there's a signature that says, "This is definitively from us, and you can trust us." And usually, it's some calculated signature, HMAC, or something like that. For some reason, Plaid's uses JWTs, and more than that, they use JWKs. So there's JWT which is the signature. That JWT itself is signed with a JWK. You have to fetch the JWK from their server based on the key ID in the header of the JWT. But how do you know if you can trust the JWT before you've gotten the JWK? All of this broke in a recent upgrade. We went from Heroku-20 to Heroku-22 to the new platform with Heroku, which bumped us to OpenSSL 3.0, and it turns out JWT doesn't work with it. And so that's sad. It's a no. It's going to be a no. It turns out the way that OpenSSL 3.0 works is incompatible with some of the code paths in JWT. And so I was like, wait, we just can't do this? And it's low-level cryptographic primitive stuff that I'm not comfortable messing around with. I'm not going to hop in there and roll up my sleeves. And even just getting to the point that I understood what was broken about this took like an hour and a half just to sort of like, wait, which is okay...so the JWT signs and encodes. And this will be a theme that we come back to later, but I think web development should be simpler. I think we should strive for simplicity. And this is a perfect example where I'm guessing Plaid uses JWTs and that approach to communicating security things often, but I've not seen it used much for signing webhooks. And, oof, it led to a complicated day. And it's unfixable now as far as I can tell. There is a commit on the JWT Ruby repo as of five days ago, but it doesn't build in our system. And it's not released. And it's just a mess. So yeah, engineering is complicated. I'm both wildly excited about what we're doing at Sagewell, and then today was this local minimum of like, oh, JWTs again. Again, we find ourselves battling. And you won today, but hopefully not for too long. STEPH: Oof, how did this manifest that you first noticed? So is it because a webhook suddenly stopped working, and that was like the error that rose up, and that's what helped you dive into it? CHRIS: Yeah, we have a little bit of code in the controller for where Plaid events come in. We calculate and verify the signature of the webhook to make sure that it's valid, and we reject it otherwise. And we alert ourselves via Sentry, and then we also have a Datadog scan that can show what's the status code of the response. Because these are incoming HTTP payloads or requests, and so we can see there were 200 up until this magical day when suddenly everything changed. And that was when we switched Heroku stacks. And then we can see it also in Sentry. So we're able to look at it, and we're like, why are none of the Plaid webhooks able to verify the signature anymore? That seems weird. And so then Datadog confirmed that it consistently was broken from this point in time. And then we were able to track that back. It was also pretty easy to guess because the error was "pkeys are immutable in OpenSSL 3.0," and that was the data. And I was like, oh, cool, that sounds fun. Let me go figure out what that means. STEPH: [laughs] Well, it's a nice use of Datadog. I remember in the past you were talking about adding it. And I was excited because I've never been at that point where a team has just introduced it; either a team doesn't have it, and they wish they had more insights, or they have it and don't use it. And nobody ever checks the board. So that's a nice anecdote for Datadog helping you out. Yeah, I'm not envious of your situation, friend. CHRIS: I do love the cup half full take [laughs] that you have on the overall situation, but that's nice how Datadog worked out for you. And you know what? It was. Thank you, Steph, for once again being that voice of positivity. STEPH: I appreciate that you enjoy it because there are times that when someone points it out to me that I do that, I have to be like, "I'm sorry, I'm not trying to be toxic positivity over here. [chuckles] That's just how my brain works." CHRIS: Oh, you are definitively not toxic positivity. That's a different thing. Because you ended with but also, I feel bad for you, and I'm glad that I'm not in your shoes. So you are the right level of positivity. I don't think I could have talked to you for three and a half years as co-host on a podcast if I didn't appreciate the level of positivity or the general approach that you bring to thinking about stuff. STEPH: Okay. Well, to borrow a phrase from Matt Sumner, who has been a guest on the show, cool, cool, cool, cool. I'm glad my positivity has been well calibrated. And I was about to say I'm interested to hear how this turns out for the team. [laughs] But we're in an awkward spot where I mean, you and I, we can still totally chat. But listeners won't get to hear the rest of that particular saga. I mean, you can share. I mean, you do you. I'm setting all sorts of boundaries for you right now. Okay. And now I'm just rambling, and I'm getting weird with it. Because the truth is that, you know, we won't be back. And this is our final episode together. So I think let's just go ahead and rip off the Band-Aid. Let's dive into it. Let's talk about it. Given that it's our last episode that we are recording, we thought of a couple of things that we'd like to talk about. You brought up a great idea that I'm excited to dive into. Do you want to lead us in? CHRIS: Sure. Well, if we go back all the way to Episode 172, that is the first episode that you came on as a guest. I actually continue to really love the title of that episode, which is What I Believe About Software. And it both captured that conversation really well, but also, more generally, it's actually become the tagline of the show when we do our little introduction. What do we believe about building great software? Et cetera. And I think that's been the throughline of the conversations that we've had is what remains true. What are the themes? Not necessarily the specific technologies, although we certainly talk about that. But what do we believe about building great software? And so today, I thought it would be fun for us to talk about what do we still believe about building great software? It's roughly three and a half years or so that we've been doing this. What's still true? STEPH: Oh, well, I have the first unequivocal one, the thing that I still believe about building great software, and that's you should hire thoughtbot. That's definitely the way to go. We'll help you get it done, not that I'm biased in any way. CHRIS: No. I'd say collectively between us; there's zero bias with regard to thoughtbot or any other web development shop out there. But thoughtbot is the best. STEPH: All right, perfect. So we've got the first one, the clutch one of hire thoughtbot. And then I also really like this topic. And I still think back to that first episode that I recorded with you and how much fun that was and how that really got me to start thinking about this. Because it was something that, at the time, I didn't really reflect on a lot in terms of what does it take to build great software? I was often just doing the day-to-day actions but then not really going high-level think about it. So I'm excited this is one of the topics that we're revisiting. So for the next one, this one is, I don't know, maybe it's a little cutesy, but I was trying to think of an alliteration that I enjoyed. And so this one is be an assumption assassin. So what assumptions are you making? And then how can you validate or disprove them? And that is something that I find myself doing constantly. And it always yields better work, better questions, better software, better code, better code reviews. And that's my first one is be an assumption assassin and identify what assumptions you have. And I had a really good example come up today while I was having a conversation with Joël about something that I was looking to merge. But I was a little hesitant about it because there are some oddities that I won't dig in too deeply. But essentially, there's a test that I migrated that highlights an existing concern in the code. And I was like, should I go ahead and merge this test that documents it, or should I wait to fix that concern and address it? And he brought up a good point. And he's like, "Well, we're assuming it's a bug and an issue, but it may not actually be depending on how the software is being used." And so then he was encouraging me to reevaluate that assumption that I had where I'm like, oh, this is definitely a problem to, like, I don't know, is it a problem? Let's ask somebody. CHRIS: First off, I love that as a theme, as one of the things that you still believe about software. Second, I believe you correctly said that you were looking for an alliteration, but my brain heard acronym. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And so then I was like, B-A-A-A. Is it BAAA? What are you going for there? Oh, you just wanted a bunch of As. Okay, I got it now. Secondly or thirdly, I think I'm on my third now. Apparently, within Sagewell team culture, one of the things that I'm most known for is... there are two phrases: one is just to name it, and the other is to be clear. And these are the two things that I do apparently constantly so much that it's become a meme within the team. It's just like, okay, everybody's been talking. But I just want to make sure we're on the same page here. So just to be clear, or just to name it, here's what I'm seeing. But I agree; I think taking those things...what are the implicit bits? What are the assumptions? And making them more explicit. Our job as developers is just to yell at computers all the time and make them try and do human stuff. And there's so much room for lossy conversions at every point in that conversation chain. And so yeah, being very clear, getting rid of assumptions, love it. It's all great stuff. Actually, in a very related note, the first on my list is that code is for humans to read. This is one of the things that I believe most deeply and most impacts the way that I write software. Any given piece of functionality that we want to author in our code feels like 10, 20, 50, frankly, almost infinite different versions of the code that would produce nearly identical functionality. So at the end of the day, the actual symbols and strings of text that we bring together to write the code is all about other humans, other people on your team, you five months from now, you a week from now, frankly, or me. I'm going to say me, me a week from now. I want to do future me and everyone else on the team a solid and spend that extra 10% of okay, I have something that works now, but let me try and push it around and try and massage it into a shape that is a little more representative of how we're actually thinking about the code, how we talk about it as an organization. Is that the word that we use to describe that domain concept? Maybe we could change that just a little bit. Can I push more of this into the private API? What actually needs to be known here? And I think that's where I'm happiest is in those moments because that's where all of the parts of the job come together, the bit where I trick a computer into doing what I want and simultaneously making it so that that code is revisitable, clear, expressive, all of those things. So yeah, code is for humans. And that's true across every language, and framework, and domain that I have worked in. And I've only believed it more and more so over time. So yeah, that's mine. STEPH: Yeah, I love that one. That's one of the things that comes to mind when people talk about disliking code reviews. And I can imagine there are a number of reasons that people may have had a poor experience with a code review process. But at the end of the day, if you're not getting that feedback or validation from fellow humans, then how do you know that you've been successful, that you've written something that other people can follow up on? Which goes back to the assumptions in terms of like, you're assuming that you have written something that your future self or that other people are going to be able to read and maintain down the road. So yeah, I love that one. One of the other things that I still hold really true to building great software is prioritize early and often. So always be checking in to understand with your users, with your tech concerns, with data that you may have, new insights, and then just confirm that yes, you and the team are constantly working on the thing that has been prioritized and that is the most important. And also, be ready to let go. That can be really hard. I have definitely had those moments in my career where I've spent two weeks working really hard on something. And then we've realized that the thing that we were pursuing isn't that valuable, or it's something that users don't need or actually want. And so it was better to let go of it than to pursue it and ship it anyways. So that's one of my other mantras that I have adopted now is prioritize, prioritize, prioritize. CHRIS: Unsurprisingly, I agree wholeheartedly with all of that. We're still searching for that thing, that core thing that we disagree on other than Pop-Tarts and IPAs. But I don't know that today is the episode that we're actually going to find that. But yeah, prioritizing is such a critical activity. And it is this interesting collaboration point. It gets different groups together. It's this trade-off. It's this balance. And it's a way to focus on and make explicit the choices that we're making. And we're always making choices. We're always making trade-offs. And so being more explicit, being more connected and collaborative around those I believe in so, so, so much. So love that that was something on your list. Let's see, next up on my list is reduce complexity, just sort of as an adage, just always be reducing complexity. It is amazing to me in my time, particularly as a consultant, but even now, this is something that I hold very true is just it's so easy to grow a system in anticipation of future complexity or imagine that the performance concerns that we're going to run into will be so large that we must switch from Postgres and a nice, simple atomic database into a sharded, clustered Kafka queue adventure. And there are absolutely cases that make sense for that sort of thing. But at a minimum, I beg of you, anyone starting a new system, don't start with microservices. Don't start with an event queue-based system. These are wildly complex versions of what often can be done with so much simpler of an application. And this scales through to everything. What's the complexity of an API? Do we need caching in that API layer? Or can we just be a little bit inefficient for a little while and avoid the complexity and the overhead of caching? Turns out caching is a tricky thing to get right, just as an aside. And so the idea of like, oh, let's just sprinkle in a little bit of caching. It'll be easy, and then we'll get better performance, like, yeah, but did you get it right? Or did you introduce a subtle bug into your program that's going to be really hard to debug later? Because do you cache in development? Well, maybe, I'm not sure, could be. So over time, this is something that I've sort of always felt, but I've only ratcheted it up. It's only something that I've come to believe in more and to hold more firmly to. I think earlier in my career, it was something that I felt, but I would more easily be swayed by aspirational ideas of the staggering amounts of traffic that we would be getting soon or the nine different ways that the data model will expand. And so, we should code the current version in anticipation of that. And I have become somewhat the old man on his lawn yelling at the clouds like, "Nah, we don't need it yet. We can grow to that." And there's a certain category of things that are useful to try and get out in front of and don't introduce additional complexity, but they're a tiny, tiny list. And so, for most things, my stance is what's the simplest thing that we can get away with right now, that still provides a meaningful experience to our users, that doesn't compromise on security or robustness or correctness but just solves the problem we have right now? And over and over and over again, that has served me incredibly well. So yeah, keep that complexity at bay. STEPH: That is one that I've definitely struggled with. And frankly, it works in my favor, that idea of keeping things simple. Because I'm terrible when it comes to predicting the future or trying to build things in a way that I just don't have enough information to really drive the architecture or the application that I'm building. So anytime I'm trying to then stretch and reach for the future in those ways unless I really have a concrete understanding of I am building for these particular scenarios, it's really hard to do. So I very much like keeping it simple and not optimizing before you need to. And it reminds me of I think it's Mark Twain, who has a quote, "Worrying is like paying a debt that you don't owe." And that's something that comes to mind for me when also writing code and building features and software is that I tend to be someone who will worry about stuff. And I'm like, oh, is this going to be easy to extend? Is it going to be what it needs to be six months from now if we need to add more features to this and build on top of it? And I have to remind myself it's like, well, let's just wait. Let's wait till we get there and we know more. One of my other ideas that couples nicely with the one that you just shared in regards to keeping things simple and then waiting for those needs to arise is that mistakes are going to happen. They are a part of the process. As we are learning and growing and we're stretching our skills and trying things out, things are going to go wrong. We're going to introduce bugs. And to take those opportunities, that's when we start to use that feedback to then improve things like observability, like capturing logs, and how we handle error reporting or having a plan for emergencies. So maybe that's the part of worrying that can pay off is thinking through, all right, if something does break, or if something gets shipped that shouldn't, then what is our plan in how we handle that? How do we roll back? Or how do we get things back to a stable build? CHRIS: It's funny. I was actually visiting with a friend this past weekend, and we were chatting more generally about life things but the idea of worrying and anticipation and trying to prepare for every bad outcome. And there's the adage of an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. But increasingly, both in life, depending on the context, and in code, I've found that I've shifted to the opposite of it's impossible to stop everything. There are going to be bugs that are going to get out there. There are going to be places where we code things incorrectly. And I would rather...I still want to try as hard as I can to get things right, to be clear. I'm not giving up on trying. But I'm all the more focused on how do we know and how do we recover when those things happen? So it's interesting that you just described exactly that, which, again, is a very human life conversation, and yet it applies to the code. STEPH: I love that rephrasing of it. Instead of the mistakes are going to happen, it's, like, how do we know, and how do we recover? I think that's perfect. I've also found that by answering the how do we know and how do we recover, that really helps you build trust with clients as well. Because again, things are going to happen, things are going to break. And the more prepared you are for that and then the better plan that you have, and then they can watch how you execute that plan, and it's going to establish a lot of deep trust with other engineers and also the team that you're working with, that you have been thoughtful and that you have ideas on how are we going to address this? Instead of waiting for that moment to happen. That's going to happen too. You're going to make decisions in the heat of the moment. But I have found that to be a really useful way to establish yourself with a team in terms of I care about this team and these processes and this application. So how do we handle the bad times, not just the good times? I do want to circle back because you alluded to the fact that you and I, we've tried to find things that we disagree on. And so far, Pop-Tarts and beer have been the two things that we disagree on. But I do have a question for you that maybe I will disagree with you on. But I need to know some more about it first. You have alluded to there's the Brussels snack, (Oh, I'm going to get this wrong.) Brussels sprout snack hour or working lunch, something combination of those words. [laughs] And it's the working lunch that has stuck out to me, and I've wanted to ask you about it. So here I am. I'm asking you about it. What's a working lunch? What's the Brussels snack happy hour, snackariffic working lunch look like? CHRIS: This is fantastic. I love that you waited until the last episode that this was rolling around in the back of your head. And you're like, are you making the team work through lunch? And now, on this final episode, we get to address the controversy that has been brewing in the back of your head. Spoiler alert, no, this is just ridiculous nomenclature. These are two meetings that we have that are more like, let's get the dev team together and talk about stuff that's in our platform sort of developer experience. Or stuff in observability often is talked about in this context because it doesn't quite impact users, but it's how we think about the work. And so there are two different meetings that alternate every other week. So every Friday afternoon, we do this, but it's one of two meetings depending on the day. So there's a crispy Brussels snack hour that was the first one that was named, which was named purely for nonsense reasons because we don't have anything else that's named nonsensically in our organization. And so I was like, oh when we name this meeting, we should make it nonsense because we don't have any other...We don't have, you know, an SOA microservices fleet with Barbie doll and Galactus and all of the other wonderful names. Those are references to the greatest video ever about microservices; if you've not seen it, that will be in the show notes. It's required reading. But anyway, we don't have that. And so we thought, let's be funny with the name of this. So the crispy Brussels snack hour is one, and the crispy Brussels we wanted something that was...the first one is a planning meeting. The second is like, let's actually sort of ensemble program. Let's get the four of us together, and we'll work on some of the stuff that we're talking about here but as a group. And so I wanted the idea of we're working, and so I was like, oh, this will be the crispy Brussels work lunch. But it's purely a name. It's the same time slot. It's 3:00 o'clock on a Friday afternoon. [laughs] So it is not at all us working through lunch. I don't think we should work through lunch. I'm concerned that you thought that for a while, and you were just like, I'm a little worried, but I'm not going to bring it up. But I'm glad we got to cover this before we wrapped up this whole Bike Shed co-hosting adventure together. STEPH: I feel relieved and also a little robbed of an opportunity for us to have something that we disagree on because I thought this might be a thing. [laughs] CHRIS: We can continue searching for that thing. But maybe it's okay that we agreed on most stuff for the run [laughs] of this fun, little show that we did together. STEPH: Yeah, that's gone on quite a time. We've got like three years together that we have managed to really only find two, I mean, very important of course, two things. But yeah, it's been pretty limited to those two areas. And each time that you'd mentioned the work lunch, I was like, huh, I need to ask about that because I have feelings about it. But then, you always would dive into very interesting stories of things that came out of it, and I quickly forgot about it. So this feels good. This feels like very good important closure. I'm glad that this finally surfaced. But circling back, since I took us on a detour for a little bit, what are some other things that you still hold deeply about building great software? CHRIS: I've really got one last thing on the list. It's interesting, there's not a ton technically in this list, which I think represents broadly how I feel about software, and I think how you feel about software. It's like, it's actually mostly about how the people interact at the end of the day. And you can program in any language or framework, and you can get the job done. We certainly have our preferences and things that we enjoy. But the last one really rounds us out, which is think about the users. I always want to be anchoring the conversations that we're having, the approach that we're taking to building the software in what do the users think? Who are our users? What do we know about them? What do they care about? How are they using this technology? How is it impacting their lives? We've talked a number of times about potentially actually watching the sales demo as an engineering team, trying to understand what's the messaging that we're putting out into the world for this piece of software that we're building? Or write along with customer support and understand what are the pain points that people are hitting? And really, like, real humans, what are they experiencing? Potentially with a name attached. And that just changes the way that you think about the software. There's also even the lower-level version of it. As we're building classes or modules, what are the public facets of that, and what are the private API? What's the stuff that we're hiding away? And what's the shape that we are exposing to the outside world for varying definitions of outside? And how can we just bring in a little bit of empathy to try and think about, again, in the case of like the API for a class, it's probably you on the other side of it, but it's future you in a slightly different mindset with a little bit less information and context on the current problem that you're working on. And so, how can we make things easier for ourselves in the code, for our users at the end of the day? How can we deliver real value that is not mired in the minutiae of technical complexity and whatnot but really is trying to help people live better lives? That's a little too fancy as I say it out loud. But it is kind of the core of what I believe, so I'm not going to take it back. STEPH: I love how you've expanded users where more traditionally, it's people that are then using the software. But then you've expanded it to include developers because that is something that is often on my mind and something that I just agree with wholeheartedly in terms of when you're writing software; as you mentioned before, software is for people. And so we want to include others. And it does improve people's lives. People show up to work every day, and if you've been thoughtful if your past you has been thoughtful, it's either going to give you your future self a better day, or it's going to give other people a better day. So I think that's a very fair statement, improving lives by being thoughtful in regards to focusing on the users, people consuming software, and working in the codebase. CHRIS: I know we've talked about this before, but I was having a conversation with one of the developers on the team at Sagewell just last week, and they were mentioning how they really loved working on admin features. And I was like, oh, that's interesting. Let's talk more about that. And it was really it's that same thing that I think you and I have discussed of like there's that immediacy. There's that connection. These are actually colleagues, but you can build software to make their day better. You can understand in detail what the pain points are. What's the workflow that as you watch it, you're like, oh, I could put a button up in the corner of the screen that would automate almost all of this and your day would be that much faster? Oh, let me do that. That's exciting. And so I love that as another variation of it, like, yeah, there's for other developers. There's also for the admin team or other users in the organization of the software. There are so many different versions of users, but I think I think we build a better thing if we think about them more. STEPH: I have definitely worked with teams where I can tell that certain people are demoralized, and it comes down to they feel frustrated and often disconnected from the people that they are building for. And so then you really feel isolated. I'm pushing code around, but I don't really see the benefit or the purpose of it. And I think that's very hard for developers who typically want to build something that's going to be useful and not feel like it's just going to be thrown away. So connecting your team to those users, I certainly understand. Getting to build something for your colleagues and then they get to say how much they like it is an incredible, rewarding experience. You also touched on something that I really appreciate, where you highlighted that a lot of the technical decisions that we make are important, but they're not at the center of the things that we believe when it comes to building great software. And that's something that I will often reflect on. Like, as we were thinking through these particular ideas that we still hold true today, how mine are more people and process-focused and rarely deep in the technical weeds. And there are times that I think, well, shouldn't there be something that's more technical, something that's very concrete? Yes, you should build your code this way or build your application or use a specific technology. But after all the projects and teams that I've been a part of, that's just usually not the most important part. And so I appreciate that you highlighted that because sometimes I have to remind myself that, yes, those things can be challenging, but it's often with people and process. 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CHRIS: Actually shifting gears a little bit, so we've just talked about what we still believe about building great software. I'm intrigued. We've been chatting for a number of years here on this microphone, these microphones. We have separate ones because we're in different states. But I'm interested; what have we changed our minds about? What have you changed your mind about, Steph? I got a couple of ideas, but I'm intrigued to hear yours. STEPH: Nothing. I've never been wrong. I've stuck to everything that I've ever thought. CHRIS: That must be boring. STEPH: [laughs] Yeah, that's totally not true there. There are definitely things that I've changed my mind about. One of the things that I've changed my mind about is that people who know the most will ask the fewest questions. That's something that I used to consider the trademark of someone who is a more experienced senior developer in terms of you really know what you're doing. And so you typically don't ask for help or need help very often. And so, I'm going way back in terms of things that I have changed my mind about. But I have definitely changed my mind where people who know the most are actually the ones that do a really great job of constantly asking questions and asking for feedback. And I think that is still a misconception that people still carry forward. The idea that if you're asking a lot of questions or asking for help that you are not as skilled in your work, and I view it as quite the opposite, that you are very good at what you do and that you know precisely the value of your time. And then also reaching out to others for help, and then also just getting validation on things that you may have concerns around. So that's one I've changed my mind on is that I think the more experienced you are, the more questions you tend to ask. CHRIS: Oh, I love that one. It's a behavior that I know...I think we've talked about this before. But as consultants, we try and model it just the like; it's totally fine to ask questions. And because we often come in with less context, it makes sense for us to be asking questions, but I will definitely intentionally lean into it in those contexts to be like, everybody keeps throwing around this acronym. I don't actually know what that is. Let me raise my hand. And my favorite moment is when people disagree on what the acronym or what the particular word or what the particular project is. Like, I ask the question, and people are like, "Oh, it's this," and someone across the room is like, "Wait, that's what it means? I thought it was this totally other thing." I'm like, cool, glad that we sorted that out. Glad that we got that one up in the air. But I actually remember many, many, many years ago, at this point, there was a video series of...PeepCode was the company, and there was the Play by Play series. And so there were particular prominent developers, particularly in the Ruby community. And they would come and sort of be interviewed and pair program. And it was amazing getting to watch these big names that you had heard of, like Yehuda Katz is the one that stands out in my mind. He was one of the authors of merb, which was a framework that was merged with Rails, I want to say around the 3.0 time. And just an absolute, very big name in this world and someone that I looked up to and respected. And watching this video, they had to Google for particular API signatures and Rails methods. They were like, "Oh, how does that work? Is it link to and then you pass the name?" I forget what it was specifically. But it was just this very human normalizing moment of this person who has demonstrably done incredible work in our community and produced very complex software still needs to Google for the order of arguments to a particular method within Rails. I was like, oh, okay, that's good to know. And with complete humility in the moment, I was just like, yeah, this is normal. Like, it's impossible to hold all of that in your head. And seeing that early on shook me off the idea that that's the thing to do is just memorize everything. It's like no, no, get good at asking the questions. Get good at debugging. Get good, yeah, asking questions. It's a core skill rather than a thing that you grow out of. But I definitely shared early on I was like, not allowed to ask questions, that'll be scary. STEPH: I love that example. Because counterintuitively, to me, it demonstrates confidence when someone can say, "Oh, I don't remember how this works," or "Let me go look it up." And so I just very much appreciate when I see someone demonstrating that level of confidence of let's keep going. Let's keep making progress. I'm going to ask for help because that is totally fine, and we are in a safe space. Or I'm going to create a safe space for us to do that. One of my favorite versions of this where you shared like if you ask about an acronym and then people disagree, one of my favorite versions is to ask about a particular area of the codebase and be like, what would you say this code is doing here? What do you think users do here? Like, what is the purpose? What's the point of this? [chuckles] And then having people be able to say, "Oh, yeah, this definitively does this thing." Or people are like, "You know, I'm not sure. I don't even know if that code is getting run." That's one of my favorite outcomes of asking questions. How about you? What's something you've changed your mind about? CHRIS: I made a list of a couple of things like remote is on there. I didn't know if I'd like remote. I wanted to try it for a while. Tried it, turns out I like it a lot. It's complex. You got to manage it, whatever. But that I think everybody's talked about that a bunch. I think probably the most interesting one is deadlines. Initially, in my career, I didn't really feel anything about them. And then I experienced the badness of deadlines. Deadlines are bad. Deadlines are things that come down from on high and then you fail to hit them, and then you're sad. And maybe along the way, you're very stressed and work long hours to try and get there. But they're perhaps arbitrary. And what do they even mean? And also, we have this fixed scope, and they're just bad. And then there was a period of my time where, like, deadlines are bad. The only thing that we do is we show up, and we make the software as quickly as we can. But in reality, there are times that we need that constraint. And in fact, I have found a ton of value in deadlines when used intentionally. So we can draw a line in the sand, and we can say, at this point in time, we will have a version of the software. We have a marketing campaign that we need to align with this. So we got to have something at that point. And critically, if you're going to have a deadline, you've now fixed a point in time. You need to flex other things. And critically, I think the thing to flex is the scope. So we need to have team management. We have user accounts right now, but now we need to organize them into teams. That is like a category of functionality. It's not a singular feature. And so yeah, we can ship teams in the next quarter. What exactly that means is up in the air. And as long as we're able to have conversations essentially on a day-to-day at least weekly cadence as to what will make it in by that deadline and what won't, and we're able to have sometimes the hardest conversations but the very necessary conversations of the trade-offs that we have to make as we're building that software, then I find deadlines are absolutely fantastic tools for focusing and for actually reducing scope but in a really useful way. And getting something out there in the hands of users so that you start to get real feedback so that you start to learn, is this useful? What are the ways that people are using this? What should we lean into and do more of? What maybe should we roll back, actually? So yeah, deadlines. First, I didn't know them, then I feared them. Now I love them but only under the right circumstances. It's a double-edged sword, definitely. STEPH: I, too, have felt the terribleness of deadlines and railed against them pretty hard because I had gone through a negative experience with them but have also shifted my feelings about them where they can be incredibly useful. So I really liked that's one of the things that you've changed your mind about. It also reminds me of one of the other things...I'm going to circle back for a moment to one of the things that I believe about creating great software is to not wait for perfection, and deadlines are a really good tool that helps you not wait for perfection. Because I have also seen teams really struggle or sometimes fail because they waited until there was something perfect to present, and then you realize that you've built the wrong thing. So I do want to transition and talk a bit about the show because it's our last episode, and we should talk about it, and the fun adventures that we've had and some of the things that we've learned or things that we're feeling in the moment. So given that it's been a wonderful three years for me, it's been four years for you since you've been a host on the show. How are you feeling? CHRIS: I'm feeling a bunch of different things sort of all at once. I am definitely going to miss this immensely. Particularly, I loved when I started, and I got to interview a bunch of thoughtboters and other people from the community. But frankly, three-plus years of getting to chat with you has been just such a delight. There's been an ease to it. We kind of just show up and talk about what we're doing. And yet there are these themes that have run through it. And it has definitely helped me hone and shape my thinking and my ability to communicate about what I'm thinking. I've learned that you have a literal superpower to remember the last thing that you were talking about. Listeners, you may not know this, but we are not quite the put-together folks that we may sound like in these recordings. We have a wonderful editor, Mandy Moore, who makes us sound so much better than we are. But we'll often pause and stop and then discuss what we want to talk about next. And Steph always knows the exact phrase that she or I left off on. And it has been so valuable to the team. But really, it's been just such a pleasure getting to have these conversations. It's also been something that has just gently been in the back of my mind at all times. And so, I'm observing the work in any given week as I'm doing it. It's almost like meditation in a certain way, whereas I'm working on something, like, oh, this is actually really cool. I want to take a note about this and talk about it on The Bike Shed with Steph. And having this outlet, having this platform to be able to have those conversations and knowing that there are people out there is fantastic, although it's very weird because really, every one of these recordings is just you and I on a video call. And so there is an audience, I'm pretty sure. I think people listen to the show; I don't know, occasionally they write in, so it seems like they do. But at the end of the day, this really just feels like a conversation with a friend, and that has been so valuable to have. And yeah, I'm definitely going to miss that. It's been a wonderful run, you know, four years is a long time. It's about as long as I've done most things in my career. And so I'm very happy with what we have done here. And there's a trite saying that isn't...yeah, whatever; I'll just say it, which is, "Don't be sad that it's over. Be glad that it happened." And I guess I'm still going to be sad that it's over. But I am so glad that I got the opportunity to do this, that you joined in this adventure and that we got to chat each week. It's been really delightful. STEPH: I really liked how you refer to this as being a meditative state. And that is something that I have certainly picked up from you and thoroughly enjoyed that I have this space that I get to show up and bring these ideas and topics and then get to talk them out with you. And that has been such a nice way to either end the week or start a week. I mean, it doesn't matter. Anytime that we record, it's this very nice moment of the week where we get to come together and talk through some of the difficulties and share our stories. And that's been one of my favorite moments is because you and I get to show up and share everything that's going on. But then when someone writes into the show or if they send a tweet or something and they share their story or their version of something that happened, or if they said that we made them laugh, that was one of my favorite accomplishments is the idea that something that we have done was silly enough or fun enough that it has brought them joy and made them laugh. So I, too, I'm very, very much going to miss this. It has been a wonderful adventure. And I thank you for encouraging me to come on this adventure because I was quite nervous in the beginning. And this has definitely been an aspect of my life that started out as something that was very challenging and stretching my limits, and now it has become this very fun aspect and something that I get to show up and do and then get to share with everyone. And I do feel very proud of it, very much in part to Thom Obarski, who was our initial producer and helped us have that safe space to chat about things. And now Mandy, who keeps the show running smoothly and helps us sound our best week to week. So it's been a wonderful adventure. This is going to be hard to let go. And I think it's going to hit me most. Like, this was one of those things as we're talking about it, it's, like, I'll see you next week. This will be fine. But I think it's going to hit me when there's something that I want to talk about where I'm like, oh, this would be great to talk about, and I'll add it to The Bike Shed Trello board. And I'll be like, oh yeah, that's not a thing anymore, at least not quite in the same way that it was. CHRIS: So what I'm taking away from this is that you're immediately going to delete my phone number the minute we hang up this call and stop recording. [laughs] STEPH: Oh yeah. I preemptively deleted. So that's already done. Friendship is over at this point. CHRIS: That's smart. Yeah, because you might forget otherwise in the heat of the moment as we're wrapping this whole thing up. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: But actually, on that note, in a slightly more serious vein, again, there's this weird aspect where the audience is out there. But we're very sort of disconnected, particularly at the moment in time where we're recording. But it has been so wonderful getting various notes from listeners, listener questions, but also just commentary and the occasional thanks and focusing; oh, you pointed me in the direction, or you helped me think through a complicated piece of work or process a problem that we were having. And so that has been just so, so rewarding. And one of the facets of this that has been so interesting to me is being able to connect to people and basically put out there what we believe about software, and for the folks that resonate with it and be able to have that connection instantly. And meeting people, and they're like, "Oh, I've listened to The Bike Shed. I like all these things." I'm like, oh, cool, we get to skip way further into the conversation because I've already said a bunch, and you say you like that thing. So, cool, we're halfway through our introductory chat. And I know that we agree about a bunch of things, and that's really wonderful. And frankly, I'm going to miss that immensely. So for anyone out there who's found something valuable in this, who's enjoyed listening week to week, or perhaps even back to Upcase for things, I would love to hear from you. I'd love to connect to folks. Send me an email, Twitter. I'm on all the places. I'm Chris Toomey in various spots or ctoomey.com on the internet. Chris Toomey on GitHub. I'm findable, I think. Chris Toomey developer will probably get you there. But I would really love to hear from folks, to connect to folks, you know, someday down the road; I think I'll be hiring again. And that'll be fun. I would love to work with some of the folks that have listened to this show or meet you at a conference, or if I happen to be traveling to a city or you're traveling to Boston. Really for me, so much of what this show is about is connecting with people around how we think about building great software. And so, I would love to continue that forward into the future. So yeah, say hi, if you're interested. STEPH: I agree. That's been one of the most fun aspects of being co-host of the show. And I'll be honest, you are welcome to contact me, but I am going to be off-grid for probably six months. [laughs] So just know that there will be a bit of a delay before you hear back from me. But I would definitely love to hear from you. I also want to say a very heartfelt thanks to a couple of people, just folks that have made this journey incredible and have made it so much fun. One, in particular, is everyone at thoughtbot for their continuous stream of knowledge. I mean, frankly, my software opinions wouldn't be half as interesting if it wasn't for everyone at thoughtbot constantly sharing their knowledge and being a source of inspiration. So I deeply appreciate everyone that has contributed to topics and ideas and just constantly churning out blog posts because those are phenomenal. And I also want to give a shout-out to my husband, Tim, because he has listened to The Bike Shed for many years and even helped out with a number of show notes when that was something that you and I used to do before Mandy made our life so much easier and took that over for us. And has intervened a number of times when Utah mid-recording would decide it's time to play. So I want to give a very special thank you to him because he has been a very big supporter of the show and frankly helped me manage through a lot of the recordings for when I had an 80-pound dog that was demanding my attention. CHRIS: I think continuing on the note of thanks; similarly, I'm so grateful to thoughtbot as an organization for everything that is represented in my career. It's a decade-plus that I have been following and then listening to the podcasts and then joining the organization, and then getting so many wonderful opportunities to learn about this thing called web development. And then, even after I left the organization, I was able to stay on here on The Bike Shed and hang out and still chat with you, Steph, which has been really wonderful. So thank you, thoughtbot, so much. Thank you to Joël Quenneville, who will be the continuing host of the show. This show is not going anywhere. And, Steph, you and I aren't really going anywhere, but we won't be around anymore. But we are leaving it in the very, very capable hands of Joël, and I'm super excited to hear the direction that he takes it and Joel's incredibly thoughtful and nuanced approach to thinking about programming and communicating. So I think that will be really wonderful. And lastly, I definitely want to thank Derek Prior and Sage Griffin, the two original hosts of this show, who really produced something wonderful, and for many years, I think it was about four years that they hosted together. I was an avid listener despite actually working at the company the whole time and really loved the thing that they produced and was so grateful that they entrusted me with continuing it forward. And hopefully myself and then with the help of you along the way, we've...I think we've done an okay job, but now it is time to pass the torch or the green lantern. That's the adage I've been going with. Gotta pass the lantern, pass the mantle on to the next one. So, Joël, it's going to be in your hands now. STEPH: Yeah, I'm so looking forward to future episodes with Joël Quenneville. They are going to be fabulous. So I've been thinking in terms of this being our finale episode and then a fun ending for it, so there's a thing called the 21-gun salute, which is the military honor that's performed by firing cannons or artillery. Not to be confused with the three-volley salute, which I definitely confused earlier that is reserved and used at funerals, which this is not. So using the 21-gun salute, I was like, hmm, it is The Bike Shed, and we have this cute ring ring that goes. So I think for our finale, we should have a 21-bell salute as we exit the shed and right off into the sunset. CHRIS: I love it. I couldn't imagine a more perfect send-off. So with that, what do you think? Should we wrap up? STEPH: Yes, but I have one more silly thing to add. I've thought of a new software idiom that I'm excited about. And so, this may be my final send-off into glory that I'd like to share with you. And I think that we should make like a shard and split. CHRIS: [laughs] I so appreciate that in this moment, this final moment that we have together, you choose to go with a punny joke. It is so on brand for the show. It is absolutely perfect. And I think with that note, shall we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review on iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. ALL: Byeeeeeeeeee!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Episodes – Ventchat
Podcast 640: Too Much As A Kid

Episodes – Ventchat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 205:44


“I've rubbed a few balls in my life” – the story of baseball mud. Sleep Studies and new beds. Police? The celery Jello guy. Two doctors who both think they're smart enough to off their spouses (they aren't). Head on a swivel, your beach umbrella is trying to kill you. The Kentucky Mullet Contest. Plaid. […]

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: 13 of the Great Investing Minds on When to Pay Up vs When To Remain Disciplined and Walk Because the Price is too High: The Ultimate Guide to Price Sensitivity

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 28:03


Marcelo Claure is an entrepreneur and investor who has founded and led some of the world's most iconic businesses. He is currently the Chairman & CEO of Claure Capital, a newly founded multi-billion-dollar global investment firm. Before this, Marcelo was COO @ Softbank Group, the world's largest technology investment company. Bill Gurley is a General Partner @ Benchmark, one of the most successful funds of the last decade with a portfolio including Uber, Twitter, Dropbox, Modern Treasury, Snapchat, StitchFix, and many more. Michael Eisenberg spent 15 years as a General Partner @ Benchmark working alongside Bill and the Benchmark partnership. Following Benchmark, Michael co-founded Aleph, one of the leading Israeli venture funds of the last decade. David Tisch is the Founder and Managing Partner @ Box Group, one of the leading seed focused firms of the last decade with a portfolio including Airtable, Glossier, PillPack, Plaid and many more. Cyan Banister is one of the most successful and renowned early-stage investors in the last decade. Her portfolio includes the likes of SpaceX, Uber, Affirm, Opendoor Postmates, Niantic and Thumbtack to name a few. Zach Weinberg is a Co-Founder of Operator Partners, operators funding operators, with no outside LPs, just their own capital. Luciana Lixandru is a Partner @ Sequoia, one of the world's most renowned and successful venture firms with Sequoia-backed companies accounting for more than 20% of NASDAQ's total value. Jeff Lieberman is the Managing Director @ Insight Partners, one of the leading investing franchises of the last 25 years with their most recent flagship fund announced earlier this year being a staggering $20BN. Nick Shalek is a General Partner @ Ribbit Capital, specializing in fintech they are one of the most successful venture firms of the last decade with a portfolio including Robinhood, Coinbase, Revolut, Nubank and more. Frank Rotman is a founding partner of QED Investors, one of the leading fintech-focused venture firms investing today with a portfolio including the likes of Klarna, Kavak, Quinto Andar, Credit Karma and more. Geoff Lewis is the Founder and Managing Partner @ Bedrock, now with over $1BN in AUM, Bedrock invests in breakout technology companies that are incongruent with popular narratives. Justin Fishner-Wolfson is founder and the managing partner of 137 Ventures. Their portfolio includes SpaceX, Wish, Anduril, Flexport, and WorkRise (formerly Rigup) to name a few. David Sze is a General Partner @ Greylock where he has led some of the firms most notable investments including Facebook, LinkedIn and Pandora. In Today's Episode We Discuss Price Sensitivity: 1.) How do you assess your relationship to price and price sensitivity? 2.) When is the time to pay up and have less price discipline? 3.) When should we remain disciplined and not pay up for a deal and walk away because of price? 4.) Of the deals you have paid up for, did their growth rate justify the high entry price? 5.) Knowing all you know now on price, how do you advise younger investors today?

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Investing Lessons from Fred Wilson and Why Small Funds Outperform Large Funds | Why the Secret to Winning in Venture is Splitting Deals |Learnings From the Biggest Hits and Biggest Losses | Why Anyone That Always Does Their Pro-Rata is Wrong with Mo

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 48:33


Mo Koyfman is the Founder and General Partner @ Shine Capital, who announced earlier this year Shine II, a $200M early-stage fund, and Shine Opportunities I, a $100M vehicle. Prior to founding Shine, Mo was the Managing Member @ Moko Brands where he made angel investments in Coinbase, Polychain, Harry's to name a few. Before Moko, Mo spent over 7 years as a General Partner @ Spark Capital where he made investments in Plaid, Warby Parker, Skillshare and Hivemapper, to name a few. Finally prior to Spark, Mo spent over 5 years at IAC where he oversaw group of companies that included Connected Ventures, parent of Vimeo, CollegeHumor & BustedTees. In Today's Episode with Mo Koyfman: 1.) From Entrepreneurial Parents to IAC, Spark Capital and Founding Shine: How did Mo make his way into the world of venture having worked with Dara Khros, Barry Diller and Jeremy Liew? What were some of the biggest takeaways from his time with Barry Diller and IAC? How did Mo's time at Spark impact his investing mindset? What did he learn that he took with him to founding Shine? 2.) Investment Firm vs Investment Partnership: What are the biggest differences between investment firms and investment partnerships? What are the biggest risks founders are taking when they take money from investment firms? Mo has very strong beliefs, how does he manage and inspire debates within his firm without shutting down or intimidating younger, less experienced team members? What does Mo mean when he says, "firms are great but partners matter". 3.) How To Win in Venture: Why does Mo always believe that small funds outperform large funds? What have been some of Mo's biggest lessons from Fred Wilson on fund strategy and sizing? How much of an emphasis does Mo place on the importance of ownership? Why does Mo believe the way to win in venture is to be collaborative? Why does Mo believe in the macro conditions we are entering, the landscape is about to become a lot more collaborative? Why does Mo believe any firm that says they will always do their pro rata is lying? 4.) The Lessons: Success and Failure: What are some of Mo's biggest lessons from his biggest wins, like Plaid at seed? That said, why does Mo believe it is so dangerous to try and learn lessons from the wins? What failures have been most impactful to Mo? What did he take away from them? Why does Mo believe that making great burgers is like building great companies? Items Mentioned in Today's Episode: Mo's Favourite Book: Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.
Ravi Viswanathan of New View Capital on the secondary and growth markets, and raising a unique $1B+ (modified) GP led secondary fund I

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 39:19


Follow me @samirkaji for my thoughts on the venture market, with a focus on the continued evolution of the VC landscape.This week we are joined by Ravi Viswanathan, Founder and Managing Partner of NewView Capital, a growth and secondaries focused fund founded in 2018 with over $2.2 billion under management. NVC invests in technology companies through both direct investments and curated portfolio acquisitions, pairing funding with significant operational support. Focusing primarily on growth-stage companies, the NVC portfolio includes Plaid, Duolingo, Forter, Hims & Hers, MessageBird, and Scopely.Ravi brings a wealth of experience around growth and secondary markets to the conversation, and it was really fun to discuss both of those areas in detail, particularly in light of the change in the markets over the last year. First, a word from our sponsor:Allocate is the digital operating system for investors looking to build and manage world class private portfolios within venture capital and other technology focused private assets. Despite the enormous growth of the private markets and the rapid increase of retail demand for private alternatives, investing in the highest quality private assets within the innovation sector remains inaccessible and opaque.Go to allocate.co to apply to be a member and join 400+ active Allocate users. About Ravi Viswanathan:Ravi is an experienced company builder and dedicated partner to entrepreneurs and investors. In 2018, Ravi raised $1.35B to architect an innovative portfolio acquisition of 31 companies from NEA to found NewView Capital (NVC).Prior to founding NVC, Ravi was a General Partner at NEA, where he oversaw investment in enterprise software and fintech companies and co-led the firm’s Technology Venture Growth Equity effort. His investments of note include Braintree (acquired by PayPal), MuleSoft (acquired by Salesforce), GlobalLogic (acquired by Apax Partners), TeleAtlas (Euronext: TA, acquired by TomTom), Cyence (acquired by Guidewire), Acquia (acquired by Vista Equity Partners), Scout (acquired by Workday), Plaid, and Forter. Ravi spent several years at Goldman Sachs in the Private Equity Technology Practice before joining NEA. He began his career in consulting at McKinsey & Co and as a scientist at Raychem Corporation.Ravi holds an MBA from Wharton, a PhD in Chemical Engineering from University of California Santa Barbara, and a BS in Bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania. He is also the Chair of the Wharton Entrepreneurship Advisory Board.In this episode we discuss:01:29 How the 2022 downturn compares to 2000 and 200803:20 The effect of market conditions on growth investing06:51 Why VCs keep making the same mistakes in bull markets and factors that lead to the most recent one09:22 What led to the launch of NVC in 201813:24 How Ravi sold the unique structure of NVC to founders and LPs15:55 Team building through the transition into NVC18:51 How Ravi managed communication around his conviction to close20:45 Navigating different LP considerations when putting together NVC23:38 What the next 6-12 months will look like in the venture markets28:06 State of the secondary markets in 202232:15 The stigma of selling positions early as managers and LPs35:50 The types of firms that are well-positioned for success in the current marketI’d love to know what you took away from this conversation with Ravi. Follow me @SamirKaji and give me your insights and questions with the hashtag #ventureunlocked. If you’d like to be considered as a guest or have someone you’d like to hear from (GP or LP), drop me a direct message on Twitter.Podcast Production support provided by Agent Bee Agency This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit ventureunlocked.substack.com