Podcasts about Barrington

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  • 366PODCASTS
  • 744EPISODES
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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Barrington

Latest podcast episodes about Barrington

GTI Tours Podcast
#45 Why Context Matters — Interview with Dr. Gary Burge

GTI Tours Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 47:57


Links to recommended resources:Jesus Through Middle Eastern Eyes by Kenneth BaileyIVP Bible Background Commentary by Craig KeenerJesus the Middle Eastern Storyteller by Gary BurgeThe Bible and the Land by Gary BurgeA week in the life of a Roman Centurion by Gary BurgeOriginally from Southern California, Gary was an undergraduate at the University of California, Riverside, and The American University of Beirut, Lebanon. He attended Fuller Theological Seminary and King's College, The University of Aberdeen, Scotland. In Scotland he studied with I. Howard Marshall earning a Ph.D. in New Testament. He served on the faculties of King College (Tennessee), North Park University (Illinois) and after 25 years at Wheaton College (Illinois) he joined the faculty of Calvin Theological Seminary (Michigan) in 2017.Gary speaks widely in churches and conferences both in the United States and in various countries. He has traveled extensively, particularly in the Middle East. He is ordained in the Presbyterian Church, USA, and served as a military chaplain (USNR). For over 15 years he was a regular teacher at Willow Creek Community Church in S. Barrington, IL.  

It’s Rahr
It's Rahr! S1E76 from Barrington Distillers

It’s Rahr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 65:29


Talking dummy rounds and the Rittenhouse trial, as well as a live taste test of ghost pepper and carolina reaper moonshine. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/phillip-rahr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/phillip-rahr/support

The Dream Journal
Dreaming a New Future through Conscious Evolution with Christine Barrington

The Dream Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


The upheaval in the world today is evidence that the cultural myth that we in the western world are living under is undergoing a radical evolution. Our old myths are dying. What will be our new myth and will humanity survive the chaotic transformation? Christine shares the stories of two scientists who used astral travel to explore the nature of reality in a systematic way and developed an institute called the Monroe Institute to research the phenomenon of out of body experiences. The results of this research suggest that we each contribute to the evolution of consciousness through our own personal growth. Dreams and meditation enhance this process by reflecting back to us our own particular fears. We take a call from Lucille from Cambria who shares with us her experience of the nine dimensions meditation which leads us to a discussion of somatics or body awareness in personal evolution.  We end with Christine talking about the power of rebirthing breathwork as a healing modality. Christine mentions the books: Memories, Dreams and Reflections by Carl Jung, Quantum Questions by Ken Wilbur, The Answer to Job by Carl Jung and The Miracle of the Breath by Andy Caponigro. Lucille references the book Alchemy of Nine Dimensions by Barbara Hand Clow. BIO: Christine Barrington is a Transformational Coach and supports individuals and groups to artfully engage their inner world through exploring dreams, art, and inner visioning in order to effect potent positive change in their lives. She is highly trained in depth psychology and trauma resolution techniques and uses somatic experiencing as a basis for deep listening into the non-rational sources of wisdom that reside in the embodied subconscious. Join us and hear how she combines these multiple modalities in the service of unlocking our dreams. Contact Christine at her web page BodyBroadcasts.com We play clips from the following two guest-selected songs: (1) The First Element: I Just Dropped in to See What Condition my Condition Was In and (2) Lovely lovely day by Yaya's Kitchen Ambient music created by Rick Kleffel new every week. Many thanks to Rick Kleffel for engineering the show and to Tony Russomanno for answering the phones. Show aired on November 13, 2021. The Dream Journal is produced at and airs on KSQD Santa Cruz, 90.7 FM, streaming live at KSQD.org 10-11am Saturday mornings Pacific time.  Catch it live and call in with your dreams or questions at 831-900-5773 or at onair@ksqd.org. If you want to contact Katherine Bell with feedback, suggestions for future shows or to inquire about exploring your own dreams with her, contact katherine@ksqd.org, or find out more about her at ExperientialDreamwork.com. The complete KSQD Dream Journal podcast page is found here. You can also check out The Dream Journal on the following podcast platforms:  Rate it, review it, subscribe and tell your friends. Apple Podcasts Google Play Stitcher  Spotify

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
Veterans' silhouettes displayed in windows of Barrington home for Remembrance Day

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 5:43


Suzy Atwood, the director of marketing and tourism for the Municipality of Barrington, spoke with Mainstreet's Alex Guye about why she wanted to create a special display for Remembrance Day.

USF Bulls Unlimited Unloaded
Football Falls At ECU - Louk/Barrington Highlights, Scott postgame (from Bulls Beat 10-29)

USF Bulls Unlimited Unloaded

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 12:35


Football Falls At ECU - Louk/Barrington Highlights, Scott postgame (from Bulls Beat 10-29) by USF

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-10-28: James "Lou" Gorman, Westerly High makes playoffs, and Scott Erik Dupré

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 4:10


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, James "Lou" Gorman was an American baseball executive, and the former general manager of the Seattle Mariners and Boston Red Sox? He spent more than three decades in baseball operations, as a general manager, assistant GM, farm system director or scouting director, and at the time of his death he was the Red Sox' executive consultant for public affairs with an emphasis on community projects. He also was the coordinator of the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, to which he was inducted in 2002. Now, for our feature story: Westerly High's football team really didn't have a signature win on its mantle heading into Friday night's Division II contest with Barrington last week. Now, it does. Westerly used an opportunistic defense and the running of junior Zack Tuck to shut out the Eagles, 28-0, at Augeri Field, clinching a spot in the D-II playoffs. Barrington came into the game atop Division II-A with a 4-1 league mark. The Eagles were 5-1 overall. Westerly coach Stanley Dunbar said: "Barrington is a good team. When you watch them on film, they are probably the hardest-playing team I've seen," "They fly around and play with great effort. Our kids bounced back from last week's loss (27-20 to Classical). They played their hearts out today." Westerly's first three league wins came against teams that are a combined 4-10. Tuck scored touchdowns on runs of 3, 5 and 55 yards. He finished with 230 yards on 26 carries and surpassed the 1,000-yard mark for the year. It was his third 200-plus rushing performance of the season. He now has 1,047 yards with 13 rushing touchdowns. "It was a perfect night. We wanted it and we needed it," Tuck said. "We knew we could beat these guys. They are a hard-nosed football team. But we wanted to set the tone tonight for the rest of the season." Dunbar said it was the best win of the season for the Bulldogs. "I think we are getting better. Classical is a good football team and we played them tough and could have won the game," Dunbar said. "The boys just came out tonight, stepped it up and brought it home." For more information on all things Westerly and Rhode Island, check out this story and more at thewesterlysun.com Are you interested in a new opportunity? You're in luck! Today's Job posting comes from Randall Realtors Compass in Westerly. They're looking for real estate agents. You'll need to obtain a real estate license before you start. Pay can be $100,000 or more per year. If you're interested and think you'd be a good fit for the role you can apply using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=ca280a731c2da875&advn=7652287743140876 Today we're remembering the life of Scott Erik Dupré.  Scott was born in 1953 and raised in Jamestown. He attended elementary school there, and then in 1971 graduated from Rogers High School in Newport. Scott pursued his love of the outdoors by earning a degree in Forest Management at Paul Smith's College and graduated from The Rhode Island School of Electronics, helping him secure a position at the Raytheon Company as a Module Quality Assurance Engineer. Fulfilling yet another goal, Scott became a licensed contractor which would showcase his remarkable wood working ability. In 1996, Scott married the former Linda Beebe Keene. Until his death, he and Linda shared their passion for all things nature provided by camping, hiking and kayaking at any place their RV, "The Relentless", brought them. Scott took great pleasure maintaining their two acre homestead in Westerly. He cherished working the land and updating their small cottage house. Happily working side by side, he and Linda created their own little woodland paradise. Scott will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Scott's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast
LAB-283-Shopping for Progressive Motorcycle Riding Jackets & Gear With Guest Brad Johnston

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 80:28


Official Website: https://www.lawabidingbiker.com Recently Patron Member Brad Johnston went through an exploration of progressive motorcycle jackets. Along the road, he realized it wasn't a destination to happiness for him.  He realized he was not the only one to head down that road, after all, bikers are all a lot more alike than different.  Brad hopes that by hearing his story, he helps bikers realize they are not alone. This is part of his contribution as a biker helping other bikers.   Brad actually wrote a detailed article with links to all the gear we talk about in this episode! SUPPORT US AND SHOP IN THE OFFICIAL LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE Here is an excerpt from Brad's article: "With my first Harley, I purchased a very progressive 4 season motorcycle jacket.  The FXRG Switchback jacket.  Zip-off leather panels left it as a mesh jacket and it had zip-out rain and thermal liners.  I also ride with a Scorpion flannel with built-in kevlar panels in impact areas and pockets for armor.  All filled with D30 CE level 1 armor.  Two years ago I picked up a Street and Steel jacket that is textile and a hard finish.  It looks just like the black hard-finished fleece jackets that are so popular in the spring and fall here in the northwest.  The real difference is that it has pockets for armor and vents under the armpits.  It has been a fantastic lightweight jacket.   CHECK OUT OUR HUNDREDS OF FREE HELPFUL VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL AND SUBSCRIBE! Recently, the zipper broke on my FXRG jacket.  Because of the lifetime warranty on FXRG gear, the zipper is going to get replaced.  It got me shopping for a new progressive jacket though.  Over the last month, I have done a lot of looking and I have done some soul searching.  The conclusions I came to may be relevant to others."   READ MORE ==>  NEW FREE VIDEO RELEASED: I Just Bought & Rode My First Adventure Motorcycle? Am I Hooked? Sponsor-Ciro 3D CLICK HERE! Innovative products for Harley-Davidson & Goldwing Affordable chrome, lighting, and comfort products Ciro 3D has a passion for design and innovation Sponsor-RickRak CLICK HERE The Ultimate Motorcycle Luggage Rack Solution Forget those messy straps and bungee cords Go strapless with a RickRak quick attach luggage system & quality bag Sponsor-Butt Buffer CLICK HERE Want to ride longer? Tired of a sore and achy ass? Then fix it with a high-quality Butt Buffer seat cushion? New Patrons: Michael Cuomo of Pelham, NH Tony Luciani of Merritt Island, FL Michael Jackson of Vestavia Hills, AL Kevin Ferguson of Branchland, West Virginia Lane Gustafson of Arlington, WA  Matthew Liotta of Parin, Tennessee LeRoy Edward  Gary Lofton of Olivebranch, Mississippi Ron Settle of Tucson, Arizona Larry Johnson of Calgary, Alberta, Canada Jeff Carter of Tolleson, Arizona RICHARD VONDERLAGE of Omaha, Nebraska If you appreciate the content we put out and want to make sure it keeps on coming your way then become a Patron too! There are benefits and there is no risk. Thanks to the following bikers for supporting us via a flat donation: Lynn Santosuosso of Barrington, NH Michael Lysik of Yorba Linda, CA RODNEY CARRICO _______________________________________________________ FURTHER INFORMATION:   Official Website: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com   Email & Voicemail: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com/Contact   Podcast Hotline Phone: 509-731-3548 HELP SUPPORT US! JOIN THE BIKER REVOLUTION! #BikerRevolution #LawAbidingBiker

Jere Metcalf Podcast
243. Christie Baines: How to Grow: On-site Agent to Agent on Top

Jere Metcalf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 66:16


Today I'm talking to Christie Baines of the Baines Server Group at Jameson Sotheby's International Realty in Barrington Illinois, the northwestern suburbs of Chicago. A real estate agent for over 34 years, Christie started in traditional resale. It was within her first year that she was offered and transitioned to an onsite opportunity. She was the first salesperson hired for the Wynstone development in North Barrington Illinois with its highly acclaimed Jack Nicklaus Golf Course. In 13 months, she and her team pre-sold every home in the 750 acre community. After selling Wynstone, Christie was the Broker and  led the strategic planning of inception sales and marketing for 4 more new residential developments in and around Chicago, including Barrington, Long Grove, and St. Charles. In 1995 Christie transitioned to resales with her brokerage, Wynstone Realty.  In 2005, Wynstone Realty was selected and offered the esteemed and coveted opportunity to become a Sotheby's Affiliate. In 2007, she and her partner finally accepted. As part of the arrangement, she was able to sell her Brokerage to an investor who was of course agreed to and approved by Sotheby's.  Christie achieved what most real estate agents aspire to and dream of; she sold her Business.  She then continued to forge ahead as a top real estate agent still paying it forward to her team and the industry at large. In our conversation today, she shares details and stories behind the transformation of her career and how she grew from onsite agent to agent on top.Jere interviews the world's most renowned and best real estate agents around the country and the world.These outstanding Agents tell their stories, how they got into the business, and what has made them successful in one of the oldest and most competitive industries.All of this on the “Jere Metcalf Podcast, Top Real Estate Agents tell how they do it.”www.JereMetcalfPodcast.comPowered byJere Metcalf Partners404.627.7789jere@jeremetcalfpartners.comJeremetcalfpartners.com

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University
BYU Football OL Clark Barrington - Postgame Press Conference - October 23, 2021

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 4:27


BYU football offensive lineman Clark Barrington talks with the media following BYU 21-19 win over Washington State.

BYU Football
BYU vs Washington State: Postgame Interviews Allgeier, Barrington, Moore

BYU Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 9:20


BYU vs Washington State: Postgame Interviews Allgeier, Barrington, Moore

Tara Tremendous: The Secret Diaries
Ep 9: The T'N-Yon Yee

Tara Tremendous: The Secret Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 23:01


Tara's probe into a madman's mind reveals a dangerous encounter between Dr Epic, her mother — and a strange alien race. Meanwhile, Chloe and Seth are attacked by the Tara Tulpa, while Mr. Barrington reluctantly shares the secrets of Radcliff Chamber with Biddelspach and Sinclair.

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
Serving the community of Barrington is a family affair at Marc Bear's McDonald's

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


Marc Bear, a second-generation McDonald’s owner/operator talks with Steve Bertrand on Chicago’s Afternoon News about serving the community of Barrington and working his way up through the ranks, all the way from a 7-year old ice-cream server in his parents’ store. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News Personalities on Twitter:Follow @SteveBertrand Follow @kpowell720 Follow @maryvandeveldeFollow […]

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
From jazz cabaret to Condoleezza Rice, Barrington's White House is the cultural heart of ‘Your Hometown'

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


Beth Raseman, the cultural and community center manager for Barrington’s White House, joins Steve Bertrand on Chicago’s Afternoon News to talk about the center’s historical landmark-worthy history and calendar of rich cultural programming, including wine events, lectures from famous minds, and the occasional wedding. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News Personalities on Twitter:Follow @SteveBertrand Follow […]

John Howell
Main Street Smiles on WLS

John Howell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 5:08


Dr. Amar Pattani of Main Street Smiles in Barrington joins John Howell to share how they are keeping their clients safe with their aerosol extraction system. For more information and to see their new patient special, go to www.mainstreet312.com

Anna Davlantes
Your Hometown: The Lucky Monk is very serious about their beer

Anna Davlantes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Nichole Bajko, General Manager, The Lucky Monk Pub in Barrington, joins Anna to talk about what we should know about the business, some of the items that are most popular, how they managed through the pandemic, the popularity of the beer they brew in-house, their spacious outdoor patio that will be heated and open through […]

Anna Davlantes
Your Hometown: What makes Barrington an attractive place to live?

Anna Davlantes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Lisa Cokefair, VP of Brokerage Services, @properties, joins Anna to talk about the real estate market in Barrington, what homeowners are most looking for, what Barrington has to offer that some people might not know about, and her favorite places that separate Barrington from other suburbs.

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
Eleven years of decking the halls at Treetime Christmas Creations in Lake Barrington

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Treetime in Lake Barrington opens its doors each year on Labor Day weekend and has hundreds of trees to choose from. Treetime owner Laurie Kane joins John Williams to talk about this year’s hottest decorating trend, what sets them apart, the importance of choosing a new tree in-person, and how customers can find inspiration from […]

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast
Eleven years of decking the halls at Treetime Christmas Creations in Lake Barrington

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Treetime in Lake Barrington opens its doors each year on Labor Day weekend and has hundreds of trees to choose from. Treetime owner Laurie Kane joins John Williams to talk about this year’s hottest decorating trend, what sets them apart, the importance of choosing a new tree in-person, and how customers can find inspiration from […]

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast
Your Hometown: Main Street Smiles thrives after opening during the pandemic

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Main Street Smiles family dentist Dr. Amar Pattani talks about how he decided to change careers from electrical engineer to family dentist. He also talks about the success of his business and the Barrington community.

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
Your Hometown: Main Street Smiles thrives after opening during the pandemic

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Main Street Smiles family dentist Dr. Amar Pattani talks about how he decided to change careers from electrical engineer to family dentist. He also talks about the success of his business and the Barrington community.

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast
‘A hidden gem' every winter: Barrington Town-Warming with speakers and panels

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Village of Barrington director of communications and community engagement Patty Dowd Schmitz joins John Williams to describe the lecture series Barrington hosts annually in the winter. The event began in the late 1930s and continued until World War II before being revived in 2018. Past speakers have included Condoleezza Rice, Bill Daley, Doris Kearns Goodwin […]

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
‘A hidden gem' every winter: Barrington Town-Warming with speakers and panels

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Village of Barrington director of communications and community engagement Patty Dowd Schmitz joins John Williams to describe the lecture series Barrington hosts annually in the winter. The event began in the late 1930s and continued until World War II before being revived in 2018. Past speakers have included Condoleezza Rice, Bill Daley, Doris Kearns Goodwin […]

Bob Sirott
Your Hometown: The Arboretum of South Barrington is a destination for dining, shopping and more

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Marketing Manager for the Arboretum of South Barrington, Stacy Kallas, joined Bob Sirott to share what the the Arboretum of South Barrington has to offer. From dining to shopping to entertainment, the Arboretum has you covered!

Bob Sirott
Your Hometown: President of the Village of Barrington, Karen Darch

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Karen Darch, President of the Village of Barrington, joined Bob Sirott to share how the Barrington community stayed connected through the pandemic. President Darch also talked about the improving quality of life and the flourishing business scene.

Hot Pipes One Hour Podcast m4a
Hot Pipes Podcast 279 – Requests and Concert Tracks

Hot Pipes One Hour Podcast m4a

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 61:00


Requests and Concert Tracks Start Name Artist Album Year Comments Love Is Where You Find It Tom Hazleton The Alabama Wurlitzer At Its Best [Prestige 86-106] 1986 4-22 Wurlitzer, Alabama Theatre, Birmingham, AL; Crawford Special, expanded to 4-29 3:59 Love Letters Steve Schlesing Paramount 450 2021 Paramount 450 8:14 Ben Hur Chariot Race March Chris Elliott That's Entertainment [CPE 102-CD] 1990 4-48 Wurlitzer, Wilcox Residence, Gig Harbor, Seattle, WA; ex Ramish Theatre, LA (some ranks from Million Dollar Wurlitzer) 11:43 The Night Is Young And You're So Beautiful Dan Bellomy Concert: Keystone Oaks High School 1990-01-20 1990 3-19 Wurlitzer, Keystone Oaks High School, Dormont, PA 16:14 Hey, Look Me Over Dolton McAlpin Concert: 12 June 1982 1982 3-8 Robert Morton, Saenger Center, Hattiesburg MS 18:22 My Buddy Lyn Larsen Vintage Classics Vol 1 - Presenting Lyn Larsen [Musical Contrasts CD] 1965 3-27 Wurlitzer, Kearns/Carson Residence, Hollywood, CA 22:34 Copenhagen - You've Taken My Heart Bobby Pagan Cinema Organ Encores Vol 73 [Deroy 1238] 1975 4-19 Compton Noterman, Dreamland Cinema, Margate; (8 Compton 11 Noterman) Installed 1935; Public concert August 31, 1975 25:25 If He Walked Into My Life Simon Gledhill Concert: Troxy, Stepney 2020-01-04 2020 4-25 Wurlitzer, Troxy Theatre, Stepney, London; recorded by Damon Cox, Southern District Secretary, COS; Recording Equipment: Sontronics STC-1S into Zoom F8 31:53 Kismet selection - first 6 mins Walt Strony Concert: Troxy, Stepney 2019-01-05 2019 4-25 Wurlitzer, Troxy Theatre, Stepney, London; recorded by Damon Cox, Southern District Secretary, COS; Recording Equipment: 2x Sontronics STC-1S & 1x Rhode NT-1A into Zoom F8 38:37 The Place Where Lost Things Go Aaron Hawthorne Concert: S.C.O.T. Soiree 5 - 2020-10-24 2020 3-12 Wurlizter, Victoria Hall, Saltaire, Yorkshire 44:37 On A Wonderful Day Like Today Matthew Fisher Concert: Tennessee Theatre, Knoxville 2020-09-07 2020 3-17 Wurlitzer, Tennessee Theatre, Knoxville, TN 47:48 Crazy World Freddie Brabson Concert: Tennessee Theatre, Knoxville 2020-05-04 2020 3-17 Wurlitzer, Tennessee Theatre, Knoxville, TN 51:09 At Sundown Nick Renkosik Concert: Sanfilippo Halloween 2020-10-30 2020 5-85 Wurlitzer, Grand Salon, Sanfilippo Residence, Barrington, IL 53:52 Workin' My Way Back To You Justin LaVoie Concert: Fox Theatre, St. Louis 2017 2017 4-36 Wurlitzer, Fox Theatre, St. Louis, MO; concert August 13, 2017 57:04 Give Me The Simple Life Alex Jones Orpheum Memphis Jam 2021 3-13 Wurlitzer, Orpheum Theatre, Memphis, TN (2700 seats, 1928); rebuilt by Jeff Weiler Associates

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell
BYU OL Clark Barrington, Media Availability October 18

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:45


BYU offensive lineman Clark Barrington meets with reporters on Monday, October 18

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell
BYU OL Clark Barrington, Media Availability October 18

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:45


BYU offensive lineman Clark Barrington meets with reporters on Monday, October 18

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University
Clark Barrington, Offensive Lineman - Week 8 at Washington State - October 18, 2021

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 7:20


BYU offensive lineman Clark Barrington addressed the media Monday afternoon as BYU prepares to take on Washington State on Saturday.

Lake Forest Illinois
Cindy & Lisa Pasquesi from Pasquesi Home and Gardens

Lake Forest Illinois

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 22:49


Cindy & Lisa Pasquesi Stopped by to chat with Skoo and Pete. They learned about the Pasquesi Family and the American Success Story that they are! Notes: Get your Holiday Gifts now supplies are dwindling! Christmas Tree Time is coming (Pete got an education on the tree shortage) Oct 28-31 Bring in your Dog in a costume and get Free Goody Bag! They have Pet Supplies! Awesome Ecommerce Site get stuff delivered or pick it up order online! 975 North Shore Dr. Lake Bluff, IL 60044 847.615.2700 Edward Pasquesi and his wife, Marie, started the business in 1975—evolving from a small hardware store in Highland Park, Illinois into the retail business that is known today as Pasquesi Home and Gardens—which is currently located in Lake Bluff, Illinois. In 1984, they bought an existing farm and feed store in Lake Forest that became Pasquesi Home and Farm Suppliers—at a time when Lake Forest had more open lands and farms. When the garden industry started to expand, the business evolved with the customers' changing needs. It became Pasquesi Home & Gardens with more emphasis on gardening. Another store in Barrington was opened in 1988. And, in 2006, the Lake Forest store relocated to a new and larger store in Lake Bluff, in order to give customers a better shopping experience. In 2012, a third "small scale" store was opened in downtown Lake Forest selling select plants, home and garden items. Currently, they operate one full-service store in Lake Bluff. (There are some fun historical photos on our Pinterest page.) The heart of the business grew out of Ed Pasquesi's early interest in plants and ‘growing living things.' The retail gardening business gave Ed and Marie an opportunity to create a family business that seeks to provide exceptional customer service to Chicago's North Shore suburbs. He and his family have been part of the Lake Forest/Lake Bluff community for over 40 years. Mike Pasquesi joined the family business after college in 1992 as manager of the Barrington store before becoming President and General Manager of Pasquesi Home & Gardens. He sums up his philosophy, “We are always challenging ourselves and looking for ways to improve our business. We will never standstill. We are constantly learning and trying new and different things.” Cindy Pasquesi Thorsen joined the family business in 1996 as Director of Human Resources with a background in corporate sales and project planning. At Pasquesi Home and Gardens, her work focuses on employee development. “I mainly focus on recruiting and training employees... Great people help create great experiences, and that will keep the customers coming back.” Lisa Pasquesi came aboard in 2003 with skills in business from the corporate world. She now oversees the Accounting Office and directs the Marketing for Pasquesi's print and web communications. “My main objective is to keep our name and message out there—and we do this through a variety of marketing efforts that show how we think and believe when it comes to our product selections. We strive to create an experience that people want to repeat.” Store Hours Monday - Friday 8 am - 6 pm Saturday 8 am - 6 pm Sunday 9 am - 5 pm Do you Have an idea for a topic or guest? pete@lakeforestpodcast.com Thanks to our Patreon Supporters Church of the Holy Spirit, Reverend Luke Back and MATT A https://www.patreon.com/LakeForestPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lakeforestpodcast/message

Hot Pipes Half-Hour Broadcast m4a
Hot Pipes Half Hour Broadcast 341 – 57th Anniversary of Cole Porter’s Death

Hot Pipes Half-Hour Broadcast m4a

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:00


57th Anniversary of Cole Porter's Death (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) Name Artist Album Year Comments Just One Of Those Things Richard Hills ATOS 2016 Cleveland Highlights 2016 4-34 Wurlitzer, Senate Theatre, Detroit, MI I Love You Stan Kann and Ralph Wolf Anything Goes! [Piping Hot CD] 1996 3-16 Wurlitzer, San Gabriel Civic Auditorium, CA; ex Albee Theatre, Brooklyn, NY; plus grand piano on stage Don't Fence Me In Tom Hazleton Concert: Sanfilippo Residence 1989-03-10 1989 4-28 Wurlitzer, Sanfilippo Residence, Barrington, IL It's All Right With Me Len Rawle Wurlitzer Magic [TWS 1000] 1972 4-20 Wurlitzer, Tonawanda, Len & Judith Rawle Residence, Chorleywood, Herts Kiss Me, Kate: So In Love; Wunderbar; Why Can t You Behave?; Another Op nin , Another Show; Always True To You In My Fashion; So In Love Chris Elliott Shuffle Off To Buffalo: Volume 1 [CPE CD] 1991 4-28 Wurlitzer, Shea's Buffalo Theatre, Buffalo, NY My Heart Belongs To Daddy Ann Leaf The Very Thought Of You [Westminster WP 6065] 4-17 Wurlitzer, Byrd Theatre, Richmond, VA

Locked On Cougars
BYU vs. Boise State game preview & Campbell Barrington 1-on-1 - October 8, 2021

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 33:20


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Friday, October 8, 2021 Friday's show began with a game preview as Jake Hatch broke down what he sees from the 10th-ranked Cougars against beat-up Boise State Broncos squad. Jake sees the gameplan as simple, but also adds that this series has taught us to expect the unexpected as well Attention then turned to a one-on-one conversation that Jake had with BYU offensive lineman Campbell Barrington, who is in line to make his second career start Saturday afternoon against BSU in relief of an injured Harris LaChance at right tackle Finally, the show wrapped up with a look at the other BYU sports in action, including ninth-ranked BYU women's volleyball crushing Portland, women's soccer gearing up to take on San Diego and the golf programs getting ready to hit the links again as well as Jake's score prediction for the Boise State game Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline.AG - There is only one place that has you covered and one place we trust to place our wagers. That's BetOnline! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use the promo code "LOCKEDON" for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. SweatBlock - Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code "LOCKEDON," or at Amazon and CVS. Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University
Clark Barrington, Offensive Lineman - Week 6 vs. Boise State - October 6, 2021

The Zone Sports Network - Brigham Young University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 6:15


BYU offensive lineman Clark Barrington addressed the media Wednesday in advance of No. 10 BYU's home game against Boise State.

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell
BYU OL Clark Barrington, Media Availability October 6

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 5:31


Offensive Lineman Clark Barrington meets with reporters on Wednesday, October 6

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell
BYU OL Clark Barrington, Media Availability October 6

Behind the Mic with Greg Wrubell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 5:31


Offensive Lineman Clark Barrington meets with reporters on Wednesday, October 6

Real Estate Revealed

“Avoiding Curve Balls that Can Delay a Closing” by the Premier Real Estate Attorney, yes Vincent Auriccho! Are Buyers backing out of the market now? In studio to educate us as she always does, is the Premier Realtor in Barrington and the Principal at Compass, yes, Kim Alden! What Buyers and Sellers need to know […]

Tara Tremendous: The Secret Diaries
Ep 8: Close Encounters Of The Mind Kind

Tara Tremendous: The Secret Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 1:06


Tara's probe into Dr Epic's mind intensifies. Meanwhile, Chloe turns to a friend for help in finding the renegade Tara Tulpa, while Mrs. Biddelspach forces Mr. Barrington's hand.Listen On Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/tara-tremendous/id1413333566

Real Estate Revealed

How to Avoid Buyer’s Remorse! In studio to educate us as she always does, is the Premier Realtor in Barrington and the Principal at Compass, yes, Kim Alden! What is a Credit Score? in studio is the Premier Mortgage Consultant from the Loan Depot, ye, Pat Cannone! What is going on behind the scenes in […]

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online
ENCORE - Elizabeth Rush Author Interview and Reading for RARI 2021

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 81:25


This encore episode features our interview with the 2020 Reading Across Rhode Island author Elizabeth Rush of Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore as well as a reading of the opening chapter titled The Password. Book Recommendations from Elizabeth Rush: Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teaching of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains by Kerri Arsenault Getting Involved with Climate Activism: Surging Seas mapping tools Anthropocene Alliance & Higher Ground flood survivor network Nationalize Grid Sunrise Movement This episode was originally planned as a live in-person event on March 12, 2020. It was canceled due to COVID-19. You can learn about the original partner organizations that were working with the library to bring Elizabeth Rush to Barrington. Barrington Land Conservation Trust Change for the Better Friends of Barrington Public Library Ink Fish Books Reading Across Rhode Island & Center for the Book Podcasting in Seven Easy Steps: A Video Series This podcast is a project of the Office of Library & Information Services and is made possible by a grant from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rhodyradio/message

Train Hard Live Strong
Moving the body in the most effective way with Meghan Barrington

Train Hard Live Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 55:46


The average person has about 1 - 3 injuries that effect them daily. Maybe 1 out of every 3 people know why there is an injury, how to fix it, and then how to strengthen/prevent it from happening again. A lot of athletes or average people, will not know where their imbalances are and will begin to train with insane resistance which then leads to injury. This injury would be blamed on training when in reality, the imbalances were already their but you didn't notice them.  Today we have an incredible guest speaker, Meghan Barrington, coming to the show to explain to us all "how to move the body in the most effective way" to prevent injury, improve performance, and improve your knowledge on your own body!  Key Takeaways: What type of training is most effective for lifestyle, performance, and training progress out of body building movements (isolation exercises) and functional training What is the best way to train your brain in understanding how to perform the squat Eccentric & concentric movements, which one is best to focus on to build muscle, functional movement, and stronger tendons/ligaments Check out Meghan's Podcast: Move your brain move your body If you have any questions you want answered or wanting to talk to me directly, head over to: https://www.trainhardlivestrong.com/ask Check out all our partnerships: https://www.trainhardlivestrong.com/Partnerships Flex Pro Meals: https://www.flexpromeals.com/ : Code/ TrainHard to save 20% OFF Host: https://www.instagram.com/matthew_fitness_trainer/ Athletic Beings Training & Apparel: www.athleticbeings.com / www.athleticbeingstraining.com Podcast Website: www.trainhardlivestrong.com/podcast LiquidIV: Liquidiv.com / Code: TrainHard / Save 25% off your entire purchase FNX Fit: https://fnx.grsm.io/TrainHard / Code:Trainhard / Save 15% off your entire purchase Flex Pro Meals / 20% off your 1st order / Code: TrainHard: https://www.flexpromeals.com/ YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/MatthewFitnessTrainer Train with Coach Matt Anywhere: www.EliteHIITPerformance.com

#HashtagFinance
Sean Bovingdon on TGOD and Delivering Craft Cannabis at Scale | The CSE Podcast Ep4-S2

#HashtagFinance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 21:04


CSE's Barrington Miller is joined by Sean Bovingdon, CEO of The Green Organic Dutchman Holdings Ltd. (CSE:TGOD) to discuss how his company's expanded focus on the US and recent listing on the Canadian Securities Exchange is setting course for a bright future for the firm. Here's an overview of what Barrington and Sean cover in this edition of the "Exchange for Entrepreneurs" podcast:0:00 - Introducing Sean Bovingdon and TGOD1:45 - Sean's past experience in global growth companies4:30 - The features of organic cannabis6:54 - Delivering "craft cannabis" at scale9:20 - Shifting focus to local markets, the US and paying debt13:53 - Growing revenue and being agile during COVID16:50 - Prospects for Germany and Mexico19:00 - What really matters in the cannabis industryAbout The Green Organic Dutchman HoldingsThe Green Organic Dutchman Holdings Ltd. is a premium certified organically grown cannabis company focused on the health and wellness market. Its organic cannabis is cultivated in living soil, as nature intended. The Company is committed to cultivating a better tomorrow by producing its products responsibly, with less waste and impact on the environment. In Canada, TGOD sells dried flower and oil, and recently launched a series of next‐generation cannabis products such as hash, vapes, organic teas and dissolvable powders.Learn more at https://thecse.com/en/listings/life-sciences/the-green-organic-dutchman-holdings-ltd

Cut the Bull
Cut The Bull - Ep. 21 - Barrington Martin II

Cut the Bull

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 71:05


This week, Barrington Martin II, former congressional candidate (GA-f5) and host of The Barrington Report, joins the home team. They discuss the cultural/moral problems in America including: creating monsters to fight, patriarchy (or faux toxic masculinity), race, gender roles, and what women really want.Shemeka offends feminists along with the fat and the ugly.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/cutthebullpodcast)

The Shark's Broadcast Podcast
Barrington NH Pondside Home Worth A Half Million

The Shark's Broadcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 21:42


Realtor Sarah had her gold jacket on this morning and showcased a quaint yet beautiful home for sale on Ayers Pond in Barrington. Worth a HALF MILLION BUCKS!

The Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast
Crushing Competition BBQ | Daniel Barrington | Smoked Beyond Smoked

The Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 59:25


Daniel Barrington from Smoked Beyond Smoked joins me in The Confessional for this episode of the Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast. We recorded this shortly after he was awarded Grand Champion on the second day of the incredible Brisbane BBQ Festival. This was an Australasian Barbecue Alliance double-header event, an Australian first, and just makes Daniel's feat even more incredible - he won the second competition of the weekend, meaning he outcooked AND outlasted many other BBQ pitmasters there with more experience than himself.  With a lifelong passion for food and a dream of being a chef, competition BBQ came naturally to Daniel and he's dedicated his life to becoming the best pitmaster he can be, and wanting to turn out some of the best BBQ in the world. In fact his dedication to Southern food has been recognised by many others in the industry and Daniel was recently hired as head pitmaster at the new Phat Boyz Smokehouse & Kitchen in Walloon.  In this full episode of the Smoking Hot Confessions BBQ Podcast, Daniel and I get into: Baking cheesecakes in a smoker (4:49) His love for cooking on his OzPig (7:59) How he prepared for the Brisbane BBQ Festival (15:58) What he learned from his Mum about cooking (24:23) How he came to be at Phat Boyz Smokehouse & Kitchen (32:59) Daniel's best tips and tricks for getting into competition BBQ (40:14) If you would like to become a Podcast Partner we'd love to hear from you. Send Ben an email at ben@smokinghotconfessions.com and let's get that conversation started! To get your free copy of 'The Beginners Guide to Real BBQ', including some smoked meat recipes, head to: https://smokinghotconfessions.com 

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk
Ep. 111: Nathaniel Philbrick on George Washington

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 51:43


"We have to remain open and empathetic when examining the past and each other or we risk siloing ourselves into a self-reinforcing of our preconceptions." Historian Nathaniel Philbrick joins the podcast, armed with his new book in hand Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy. Does George Washington still matter? Philbrick argues for Washington's unique contribution to the forging of America by retracing his journey as a new president through all thirteen former colonies, which were then an unsure nation. When George Washington became president in 1789, the United States of America was still a loose and quarrelsome confederation and a tentative political experiment. Washington undertook a tour of the ex-colonies to talk to ordinary citizens about his new government, and to imbue in them the idea of being one thing–Americans. This trip is what Daniel refers to as "The original political listening tour." Daniel and Nathaniel also discuss, of course, the role music played in Washington's life and why, now more than ever, it is essential to study the humanity, the foibles, the flaws of historical figures rather than to cancel or whitewash. Support Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk. Nathaniel Philbrick was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he attended Linden Elementary School and Taylor Allderdice High School. He earned a BA in English from Brown University and an MA in America Literature from Duke University, where he was a James B. Duke Fellow. He was Brown University's first Intercollegiate All-American sailor in 1978, the same year he won the Sunfish North Americans in Barrington, RI. After working as an editor at Sailing World magazine, he wrote and edited several books about sailing, including The Passionate Sailor, Second Wind, and Yaahting: A Parody. In 1986, Philbrick moved to Nantucket with his wife Melissa and their two children. In 1994, he published his first book about the island's history, Away Off Shore, followed in 1998 by a study of the Nantucket's native legacy, Abram's Eyes. He was the founding director of Nantucket's Egan Maritime Institute and is a research fellow at the Nantucket Historical Association. In 2011 Philbrick's Why Read Moby-Dick? was a finalist for the New England Society Book Award and was named to the 2012 Listen List for Outstanding Audiobook Narration from the Reference and User Services Association, a division of the ALA. That year Penguin also published a new edition of his first work of history, Away Off Shore. In 2013 Philbrick published the New York Times bestseller, Bunker Hill: A City, a Siege, a Revolution, which was awarded both the 2013 New England Book Award for Non-Fiction and the 2014 New England Society Book Award as well as the 2014 Distinguished Book Award of the Society of Colonial Wars. Philbrick's writing has appeared in Vanity Fair, The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, and The Boston Globe. He has appeared on the Today Show, the Morning Show, Dateline, PBS's American Experience, C-SPAN, and NPR. He and his wife Melissa still live on Nantucket.

Cross Street Coaching
Leadership: Growth w/ Ani Trejo Barrington + Peri Bolts

Cross Street Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 36:04


How do you grow and expand a collaborative-based artistic community? I was able to have two strong female small business owners, Peri Bolts and Ani Trejo Barrington co-owners of Eclectic CO. (https://shopeclecticco.com/), come on the show to talk about their leadership journey as they expand into their third retail location in Colorado. They both share their journey into becoming a leader duo in this space, empowering artists and makers to thrive in a collaborative retail space and using servant leadership as fuel to make the system work without directly managing each contributor. Eclectic CO. was founded in 2018 by Peri Bolts, who has a background in corporate operations but a passion for social impact left her feeling like there was a better way to do business than the grind of pop-up life that most artisans experience. Ani Trejo Barrington is the owner of Two Wolves Vintage (https://www.instagram.com/twowolvesvintage/) has been an Eclectic CO. vendor since day one. In the fall of 2020, the two of them decided to take their partnership and their dreams to the next level and become true business partners. Their third location in Littleton, CO opens in October 2021. You can connect with Peri and Ani via Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/eclecticcolorado Or learn more about their stores and vendors on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/eclecticco._/ https://www.instagram.com/eclecticocc._/ https://www.instagram.com/eclecticlittleton._/ --- I'm Jacen from Hawthorne Union, a professional coach. Join me as I discuss career development, personal and professional growth, and leadership from a coach's point of view. Contact: jacen@hawthorneunion.com

American Conservative University
American Thought Leaders- PART 1. Dr. Robert Malone, mRNA Vaccine Inventor, on Latest COVID-19 Data

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 41:21


American Thought Leaders- PART 1. Dr. Robert Malone, mRNA Vaccine Inventor, on Latest COVID-19 Data AMERICAN THOUGHT LEADERS https://www.theepochtimes.com/c-american-thought-leaders  PART 1: Dr. Robert Malone, mRNA Vaccine Inventor, on Latest COVID-19 Data, Booster Shots, and the Shattered Scientific ‘Consensus' “We need to confront the data [and] not try to cover stuff up or hide risks,” says mRNA vaccine pioneer Dr. Robert Malone. What does the most recent research say about the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines? In this two-part episode, we sit down again with Dr. Malone for a comprehensive look at the vaccines, booster shots, repurposed drugs like ivermectin, and the ethics of vaccine mandates. Jan Jekielek: Dr. Robert Malone, it's such a pleasure to have you back on American Thought Leaders. Dr. Robert Malone: Always my pleasure, Jan, and thank you for the chance to come back and visit. Mr. Jekielek: I want to read you a few headlines that I've come across in the last few weeks since we did our recent interview, and give you a chance to speak to them. This is a drophead: “Robert Malone claims to have invented mRNA technology. Why is he trying so hard to undermine its use?” How do you react to this? Dr. Malone: That's the Atlantic hit piece. It was a very interesting article because it has a number of logic jumps and irregularities. Then it ends up contradicting itself in the last paragraph, and basically confirming that my assertions about having being the originator of the core technology are valid. I'm subjected to this meme that you didn't really do the things that you did in the late 1980s almost continuously, usually from internet trolls.  So really what the young author was picking up on was some internet memes that have been wrapped around the prior press push that Katie Kariko and Drew Weissman were the ones that had originated the technology. Now that was clearly false, but it was very actively promoted by their university, which holds a key patent, and then advanced through Stat News, Boston Globe, CNN, and then finally the New York Times. We challenged that, and in the case of the New York Times, they actually recut their interview and podcast with Katie Kariko to cut out the parts where she had claimed that she was the original inventor.  But how do I react to it, this kind of pejorative use of language to cast shade? It doesn't really bother me. I know what the facts are, and I have this massive amount of documentation. When people come at me with those things, I just say, “Hey, look, here it's on the website. Here are the documents, you can make your own assessment.”  The thing that bothers me about all of this, when they're personalizing character assassination on me and character attacks, is that it distracts from the issues. And it's not about me, this kind of chronic questioning of why would I be saying things about the ethics of what's going on? Why would I be raising concerns about the safety signals? I must have some ulterior motive.  There's an underlying theme to all this, that I must have some ulterior motive. This particular journalist asked me again, and again, and again, trying to get at, “What was my ulterior motive for trying to undermine these vaccines based on my technology?” It was so paradoxical, the push of a whole series of questions that he raised with me.  I don't know what it says about journalism or what it says about our culture, that we always assume that someone must have an ulterior motive. It's not sufficient to just be addressing an issue because it matters, because it is the ethically correct thing to do. There seems to be this assumption that everybody's got an angle. It says more about the author than it says about me.  This kind of casting shade and aspersions on me personally as a way to avoid addressing the underlying issues, I just see it as a kind of noise and also a little bit sad. It's almost an affirmation. If the strongest thing they can come up with is to try to attack and cast shade on whether or not I made a significant contribution that led to over nine patents during the late 1980s—if that's the worst they can throw at me, I'm doing pretty good. So that's how I see it. Mr. Jekielek: So you're not trying, “So hard to undermine the use of this vaccine technology.” Dr. Malone: No. My concern here, as I said in our prior interview, is that there's been a series of actions taken, policies taken, regulatory actions taken, that are at odds with how I've been trained with the norms as I've always understood them. The regulatory norms, the scientific norms—these things have been waived. For a lot of people, it doesn't make sense.  And recall, reeling back, what triggered this was this amazing podcast with Bret Weinstein and Steve Kirsch, where I don't think at that point in time the world had really heard anyone questioning the underlying safety data assumptions and ethics of what was being done. There was a widespread sense of unease about these mandates and efforts to force vaccinations, and expedite the licensure of this and deploy it globally on the basis of very abbreviated clinical trials. There was a widespread sense of uneasiness.  But people didn't really have language to express it. When that podcast happened, for some reason, it catalyzed global interest in a way that I didn't expect. I still have people writing me, “I just saw the Bret Weinstein DarkHorse Podcast.” Something happened there, where events came together. I expressed some things that I had just been observing that I felt were anomalous in how the government was managing the situation, in the nature of the vaccines, in the testing of the vaccines, and in the ethics of how they were being deployed and forced on children, plus other things in various countries, including the United States.  That triggered a whole cascade, but it wasn't because I had concerns about the technology or was casting shade on the technology, I've repeatedly made it clear that, in my opinion, these vaccines have saved lives. I get challenged on that all the time, by the way. There's a whole cohort that says, “Oh no, these aren't worth anything. They shouldn't be used at all. They're not effective.”  In my opinion, they've saved a lot of lives and they're very appropriate at this point in time. The risk benefit favors administration of these vaccines, even with all we've learned since in these last few months, it favors their administration to the elderly and the high-risk populations. So contrary to this thread of I'm trying to denigrate these and tear them down—no, I'm trying to say I'm all in favor, strongly in favor of ethical development and deployment of vaccines that are safe, pure, effective, and non-adulterated.  I'm really strongly dug in that we need to confront the data as it is, and not try to cover stuff up or hide risks or avoid confronting risks. In my opinion, the way that we get to good public policy  in public health is we not only recognize those risks, but we also constantly take the position of looking forward, looking for leading indicators of risk, performing risk mitigation, and monitoring for black swans and unexpected events surrounding that. That's where I come from, strongly believing that the norms that have been developed over the last 30 to 40 years in vaccinology should be maintained. We shouldn't jettison them just because we're having a crisis. Mr. Jekielek: Why don't we do a review? There's been a number of very significant papers in the last week or two that have come out with very robust data sets telling us, to my less educated eye, some very valuable information. If you agree, maybe you can review some of these for us. I know you've been studying every one of these in some detail. Dr. Malone: The emergence of the Delta variant, whether originally in India and then subsequently in the UK and then in Israel, has really thrown back the public health enterprise globally and in these countries, because there were assumptions made about the effectiveness of the current vaccines and their ability to contain the outbreak. There was almost a social contract set up between the vaccine recipients and the governments and public health authorities. That social contract was, “Despite what you may have heard about the risks of some of these products and the fact that we admittedly did rush them, we're protecting your health. If you take these products, you will be safe.” That's the social contract. “Despite all these other concerns, you will be safe, and you won't have to retake them. You'll be protected.” People believed they had a shield if they bought in and did this. And then the Delta variant came along, and suddenly that was no longer valid. The assumption that had been made, the social contract, was somehow broken. First we found out, if you'll recall this cascade of events—we had Pfizer disclose that the durability, the length of time that the vaccine would provide protection was not as expected. It was something like six months. This came out of the Israeli data. Mr. Jekielek: Just to be clear, are we talking about protection from infection or protection from disease? Dr. Malone: That's a whole other rabbit hole. It really was protection from infection and spread that was the main parameter of concern with the six month data. You may recall that announcement was made unilaterally by Pfizer based on the Israeli data, and then immediately contradicted by Dr. Fauci saying that this wasn't true and Pfizer had no right to make these statements, and they hadn't discussed it with him. Pfizer then apologized and backed down.  And a week later, the U.S. government announced, that in fact, we were going to need to have boosters. Then there was the announcement that the government had contracted to buy the boosters that were going to be deployed at eight months. Then more data came out. Now most recently the government is saying, “We may have to have boosters at five months.” There was emergency use authorization that this third dose would be deployed to elderly and immunocompromised. And now we're talking about everybody needing it.  So this was the logic, “Take the dose, take the two shots or the one-shot for J&J and you'll be protected. We'll get out of this because we'll reach herd immunity. The whole problem is that we just don't have enough people that are being compliant with this.” Remember, this goes back to July 4th.  July 4th was the goal when we were going to have 70 per cent vaccine uptake. We didn't meet that. And there was a lot of discomfort with the Israeli data. Then all of this new information is rolled out, the Israeli data in particular, having to do with the increasing number of infections and hospitalizations.  At first the position was that this was only occurring in the unvaccinated cohort. Then that became increasingly untenable and it became clear that it was occurring in the vaccinated cohort. The same became true with the UK data set, which is stronger than the American monitoring system. They do a lot more sequence analysis.  So now we had this paradox that those that had been vaccinated, while the data still suggested that they're largely protected from disease and death and more protected than the unvaccinated from disease and death, they're no longer protected from infection. It became clear within the data, and through multiple sources, that the levels of virus replication in the individuals, even who had been vaccinated previously, was the same or higher as the levels of virus replication in those that had been un-vaccinated. And also that those that had been vaccinated and had breakthrough infections, which is what we're talking about, were also shedding virus and able to spread virus.  So that raised the prospect that they were kind of the new super spreaders, because they would have less apparent disease and yet still be shedding high levels of virus. Then we started to see some signs suggesting that there may be some differences in the nature or onset or titers of disease in those that had been infected beyond six months after their vaccination point. This is the waning phase.  That set up a situation where a lot of folks were on edge. There were still a lot of media pushing that this was a pandemic of the unvaccinated, but that became increasingly untenable as the data rolled in. You've referred to this paper that came out. There were actually three in a row that came out almost immediately after the license was issued for the BioNTech product.  There was a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine that had an odd structure in which they related adverse events associated with the virus infection and a much more comprehensive assessment of adverse events associated with the vaccines. By juxtaposing these two data sets in the same manuscript, the case was made that, “Yes, we have this significantly enhanced spectrum of adverse events associated with the vaccine beyond what had been previously disclosed. We were all focused on the cardio-toxicity.”  But now, additional adverse events, and things that we discussed when we had our last chat as parent adverse events, these are now fairly well-documented in this New England Journal article, things like viral reactivation. So this is the shingles, for instance.  The paper attempts to make the case that, “The vaccines have a lot of adverse events, but the disease has a lot of adverse events also, and the disease is worse. Also there's a lot of overlap between these adverse events associated with the disease and the vaccine.” But the messaging was focused in that manuscript that it was far worse to get the disease than to have the adverse events associated with the vaccine.  That's a little bit of a false analogy, because the vaccine ostensibly would be deployed to 80 or 90 per cent of the population. And in terms of this wave of Delta, we might see something like 20 or 30 per cent of the population infected if we're lucky. Then there's an imbalance of who's at risk with the vaccine versus who's at risk for the infection, but that was the construct. Mr. Jekielek: And just to be clear, what do you mean by 20 to 30 per cent, if we're lucky? Where do those numbers come from? Dr. Malone: I've seen data suggesting that the total population right now that's been infected in the United States is something like about 20 per cent of the total population. We don't have that widespread of an uptake of infection in the U.S. or in the UK. UK data also shows those kinds of numbers. They're reflected in a cohort that have had a natural infection and recovered from that, and then acquired the immune response associated with that.  It's seen in the numbers, for instance, in those cases where there is an accounting, such as in the Great Britain database, the British database, where they say the fraction of the population that's been vaccinated, and then the fraction of the population that's acquired natural immunity. It's also covered in the CDC slide deck that was leaked. I don't think that was available when we had our last conversation.  At the early outset, at the front edge of the Delta outbreak here in the United States, there was a key slide deck that was disclosed to the Washington Post without approval by a CDC employee. Within that slide deck, it showed a number of confidential internal assessments that weren't intended to be shared with the public. Those assessments also included an estimate that we had something like 50 per cent of the population that had accepted vaccine at that point in time. In addition, there was something like 20 per cent of the population that had been infected.  So if you add those two, if you were to consider natural infection as providing some degree of protection against the virus, then we would move from something like 50 per cent vaccine uptake to something like 70 per cent of the population at that point in time that had actually acquired some form of immunity either through vaccination or infection. So that's the basis of my seat-of-the-pants estimate.  In addition, in the CDC slide deck, the government revealed in two key slides that were at the center of that deck, that their epidemiologic calculations and projections were such that the reproductive coefficient of Delta was something in the range of eight. There's other papers that suggest it's more like a little over five, that it was as infectious as chickenpox approximately, which is highly infectious, about two to three times more infectious than the Alpha strain was.  Based on those projections and some assumptions about the percent of the population that had been naturally infected, and the percent of the population that had taken up vaccine, and some assumptions about the effectiveness of mask use in protecting either an individual from being infected by a third party that wasn't using masks or protecting a third party from infection from somebody that was using a mask and was infected—there were a series of projection curves about how that could impact on the spread of the virus.  Basically when you work through those curves, what they demonstrated was that even if we had 100 per cent vaccine uptake with these vaccines, where the technical term is leaky, that do not provide perfect protection against infection, that we would not be able to stop the spread of the virus through the U.S. population. We would slow it. So that's where those estimates come from.  That's where that assessment that is being used as the basis for advocating widespread mask deployment throughout the United States, that's where that policy comes from. It's a CDC analysis that if we don't use masks, then the virus will spread quite rapidly. If we do have full compliance with mask use, we can slow it down a bit. And so that's why we have these various mask mandates throughout the United States now. Mr. Jekielek: Fascinating. You started talking about natural immunity here. I thought it was some of the most interesting, robust data, at least to my eye. Again, you're the one who's going to be speaking on this. Dr. Malone: I agree, and a lot of people agree. It was covered in Science magazine. It's still a pre-print, but it was robust enough, and well enough constructed that even on the basis of the pre-print, Science magazine went ahead and made the clear point. Really, throughout the world, there was recognition that this new data coming out of Israel, as I recall, demonstrated that the term that's often used is natural immunity. It's an odd term, but it's now in common language.  What that means is protection afforded by having been infected and recovered from infection, which will generate a broad immune response. And it's now been shown in that paper and others that the breadth of that immune response in terms of memory T and B cell populations is more diverse and more long lasting than the breadth of immune response elicited by the spike based vaccines alone.  That data that you're alluding to showed that this natural immunity is broader and more durable, which contradicted some studies that the CDC had developed. So we were in a kind of tension. Which is the real data, the CDC data, or these other papers that are evaluated memory T and B cell populations? Which is true? We have multiple truths or multiple pieces of data, plus different groups claiming it's one way or the other.  Then this data was dropped about the evidence of protection. It seems to indicate and be consistent with the claims that the breadth and durability of the immune response was superior with the natural infection in recovery. There's also evidence that there's a significant, depending on the timeframe, six to twenty-fold improvement in protection from infection and disease associated with the natural immunity acquired from prior infection, compared to that conferred by the vaccine.  So now the public, in their social contract with the public health agencies, is faced with the situation where they had been told that natural immunity was not as protective, and that they can't rely on that. If you've been previously infected, you should still get both doses of vaccine, and this vaccination would provide broad, durable protection. It would protect you, and it would protect your elders from you potentially spreading disease to them.  Now, those things have all come into question. The population is still reeling from that. We have kind of dug into these camps. My sense is that people haven't really fully processed what this means. It is profound.  We were discussing before we started shooting, that I had a long podcast interview today and a kind of advisory session with a group of Latin American physicians and scientists that were evaluating public policy for vaccine rollout versus early treatment options for the different cohorts that they have to protect. They were seeing this data from the eyes of folks that really haven't had good access to vaccines, but are facing the prospects that their countries could execute vaccine contracts and bring in these vaccines. They are asking the question, “Does this make sense for us? Is this good policy? Should our country invest in these mRNA vaccines?”  That is why they were talking to me. “What are we going to get for it if we do this? What's going to be the benefit to our population?” It was a very level-headed discussion. But they were pushing me in this, getting back to this theme of me being the vaccine skeptic. They were the ones pushing me saying, “We just don't see the value here for our populations. We don't see a compelling case when these products aren't stopping the spread. They are going to have to be re-administered fairly frequently if they're to be effective?”  Now, the other thing that comes out of this, a concern that the World Health Organization hasn't really come to terms with—I'm speaking of the CDC and the WHO and the whole global infrastructure, including the Israeli government—is one of now mandating a third jab. So in Israel, if you haven't received all three, you're not considered fully vaccinated. Mr. Jekielek: You have a six month window, if I'm not mistaken. Dr. Malone: Precisely. But one of the things about the Israeli data is that they vaccinated in such a bolus, in such a short push, because they have such a compliant population, that essentially, they have a spike in vaccinated persons. So they're all moving concurrently through that six month window now.  There was a pivotal interview with the director of the CDC and she was asked, “Do we have any data? Do we have data, or do we just have hope about the benefits of the third dose?” And she, to her credit, acknowledged that we don't have data. All we have is hope.  Here's the problem with that. Vaccine responses are not linear. More is not better. There are many cases where if you dose more or dose more frequently or move beyond a prime and a boost, you can actually quench the immune response. You can move into “high zone tolerance.” You can move into a situation where your immune responses drop.  Now there's a little bit of foreshadowing on this in another paper that's out where they looked at the effects of vaccination post-infection. Remember this was the policy, that those like me that have been infected should go ahead and take two jabs, take two doses of vaccine. Mr. Jekielek: Which you did. Dr. Malone: Which I did, hoping that it would be helpful for a long COVID period. That data hasn't really played out that way. And there's a paper showing that you can actually quench T-cell responses. You get an improved kind of a super immune response, they assert in that manuscript, after a single dose when you've been previously infected. But with the second dose, your T-cell population actually gets quenched, which is consistent with high zone tolerance.  So if that paper was to be expanded and verified with more robust numbers, it would suggest that one dose after natural infection would be a good thing. Two doses would be a bad thing. Now that's the equivalent of three doses if you think about it, natural infection being dose one. So to say that we don't have any data is a little misleading. We have some leading indicators that suggest that it might not be such a good idea. And now, that data will come out from Israel. The conservative position to take is time will tell, and then we will know.  The Israelis continue to be in the throes of a very active Delta virus infection surge right now. There's some other very intriguing tidbits going on here in this whole public policy of vaccines versus no vaccines, versus universal vaccines, versus the Barrington position that we should selectively vaccinate those that are at high risk. Mr. Jekielek: The Great Barrington Declaration? Dr. Malone: Yes, the Great Barrington Declaration. After that whole matrix of decisions, in comes Sweden. You may recall that Sweden was roundly criticized for this naive notion that they weren't going to vaccinate. They were going to allow the virus to have its will with the population. They have backtracked from that now, to be technically accurate. They have about 40 per cent vaccine uptake and they've acknowledged that position was naive and counterproductive. They had excess deaths initially in the high-risk cohorts.  But what they did do was have a lot more natural infection with alpha and beta strains. And now that Delta is moving through the region, they have an extremely low mortality rate, often hitting zero on any one day—in comparison to some of their neighbors that didn't take that policy, and didn't have such widespread natural infection. Like Finland, for example, where they deployed vaccine very avidly and had good uptake, they're having the exponential growth rate curve that's happening in many other Northern European countries right now. Mr. Jekielek: I'm going to comment here. This is very interesting because you're interpreting this data a bit differently than Dr. Martin Kulldorff, who is from Sweden.  His commentary in a recent interview we did was simply that there were no mandates of any sort ever in Sweden, yet their vaccine use is actually quite high. He said it's one of the higher rates that exist. But he didn't factor in this time period that you said at the beginning, where there was this idea of letting the natural infections happen. And you're saying the reason their rates are zero mortality is because of that. Dr. Malone: Yes. It is a very reasonable explanation for what's happened there. It's a differentiator between them and some of their neighboring countries. They did have that early policy and they did have fairly widespread infection. So that would be consistent with the data suggesting that natural infection is providing broader and more durable immunity.  This gets to the logic of a selective deployment of vaccines to those that are at highest risk. For that fragment of the population, let's say below 65, depending on where you want to cut the line, 60, 65, 70, some people go down to 55, not providing vaccine coverage to those individuals unless they're in a very high risk population, morbidly obese, or with immunologic deficiencies—that may be a more enlightened public policy.  By the way, it is one more consistent with the WHO position that we still have limited vaccine supply, and it would be far more appropriate and equitable to deploy that vaccine supply more broadly globally to protect the elders in particular throughout the world, rather than this focus on universal vaccination.  Now with a booster, a third booster, a third dose, there's been multiple statements by the WHO that they believe this is not ethical. Now, I had another interview today with a journalist podcaster who is from South Africa but living in France, and very aware of the French resistance that's developing now to vaccines with all those protests. Mr. Jekielek: To vaccine mandates, correct? Dr. Malone: In particular, yes. His point was that if you look at this through the eyes of emerging economies, this Western focus on universal vaccination of their populations and now a third vaccine for their populations and their unwillingness to share the technology is a form of imperialism and hegemony. The Western nations have access to this technology and these doses and they're not willing to share it with the rest of the world.  So we've got a series of things here where this kind of imbalance in distribution of these vaccines as a resource is creating or exacerbating concerns that exist widely in economically disadvantaged countries. There's just not a level playing field and we're all in this boat together with this disease. Yet we're not being equitable in distribution of the countermeasures that are available. Mr. Jekielek: This is fascinating, even as others that you're speaking with are asking, “Do we even need these at this point?” That's fascinating. Dr. Malone: Yes, I agree. So what does this mean? I don't know. What I sense is, again, we're in one of those moments where there is chaos. There's lack of structure and consensus about how to move forward. And my sense is, getting back to the U.S. government, we're in a position now where a lot of the core assumptions underlying the vaccine strategy have been called into question. We don't really know what's on the other side.  Then on top of that, it's becoming increasingly apparent that these repurposed drugs and other agents that could provide protection and mitigate death and disease, if they were deployed early in outpatient environments, access to those that are being actively suppressed. That's another one of those, “This doesn't make sense,” kind of problems. It is causing a lot of questioning about the motivations of those that are guiding public policy right now. The second part of this episode will be released on Saturday, Sept. 4, at 7 p.m. ET. Below is a list of references mentioned or related to the discussion in this episode:  “Vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals have similar viral loads in communities with a high prevalence of the SARS-CoV-2 delta variant” (Note: This is a preprint). “Fauci: Amount of virus in breakthrough delta cases ‘almost identical' to unvaccinated” — The Hill CDC: “Outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 Infections, Including COVID-19 Vaccine Breakthrough Infections, Associated with Large Public Gatherings — Barnstable County, Massachusetts, July 2021” “Predominance of antibody-resistant SARS-CoV-2 variants in vaccine breakthrough cases from the San Francisco Bay Area, California” (Note: This is a preprint) “New delta variant studies show the pandemic is far from over” — ScienceNews “Read: Internal CDC document on breakthrough infections” — The Washington Post “New UCSF study: Vaccine-resistant viruses are driving ‘breakthrough' COVID infections” — The Mercury News “Comparing SARS-CoV-2 natural immunity to vaccine-induced immunity: reinfections versus breakthrough infections” (Note: This is a preprint) “Having SARS-CoV-2 once confers much greater immunity than a vaccine—but vaccination remains vital” — Science “Differential effects of the second SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine dose on T cell immunity in naïve and COVID-19 recovered individuals” (Note: This is a preprint) “SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern and variants under investigation in England” — Public Health England “Safety of the BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine in a Nationwide Setting” — The New England Journal of Medicine “Real-World Study Captures Risk of Myocarditis With Pfizer Vax” — MedPage Today CDC: “Effectiveness of COVID-19 Vaccines in Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Infection Among Frontline Workers Before and During B.1.617.2 (Delta) Variant Predominance — Eight U.S. Locations, December 2020—August 2021” “CDC: Covid-19 Vaccine Effectiveness Fell From 91% To 66% With Delta Variant“ — Forbes “SARS-CoV-2 infection induces long-lived bone marrow plasma cells in humans” — Nature CDC: “Reduced Risk of Reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 After COVID-19 Vaccination — Kentucky, May-June 2021” “Causes and consequences of purifying selection on SARS-CoV-2” — Genome Biology and Evolution “The reproductive number of the Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2 is far higher compared to the ancestral SARS-CoV-2 virus” — Journal of Travel Medicine “Mutation rate of COVID-19 virus is at least 50 percent higher than previously thought” — Phys.org “Differential effects of the second SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine dose on T cell immunity in naïve and COVID-19 recovered individuals” (Note: This is a preprint) Subscribe to the American Thought Leaders newsletter so you never miss an episode. You can also follow American Thought Leaders on Parler, Facebook, or YouTube. If you'd like to donate to support our work, you can do so here. Follow Epoch TV on Facebook and Twitter. 

American Conservative University
American Thought Leaders- PART 1. Dr. Robert Malone, mRNA Vaccine Inventor, on Latest COVID-19 Data

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 41:21


American Thought Leaders- PART 1. Dr. Robert Malone, mRNA Vaccine Inventor, on Latest COVID-19 Data AMERICAN THOUGHT LEADERS https://www.theepochtimes.com/c-american-thought-leaders  PART 1: Dr. Robert Malone, mRNA Vaccine Inventor, on Latest COVID-19 Data, Booster Shots, and the Shattered Scientific ‘Consensus' “We need to confront the data [and] not try to cover stuff up or hide risks,” says mRNA vaccine pioneer Dr. Robert Malone. What does the most recent research say about the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines? In this two-part episode, we sit down again with Dr. Malone for a comprehensive look at the vaccines, booster shots, repurposed drugs like ivermectin, and the ethics of vaccine mandates. Jan Jekielek: Dr. Robert Malone, it's such a pleasure to have you back on American Thought Leaders. Dr. Robert Malone: Always my pleasure, Jan, and thank you for the chance to come back and visit. Mr. Jekielek: I want to read you a few headlines that I've come across in the last few weeks since we did our recent interview, and give you a chance to speak to them. This is a drophead: “Robert Malone claims to have invented mRNA technology. Why is he trying so hard to undermine its use?” How do you react to this? Dr. Malone: That's the Atlantic hit piece. It was a very interesting article because it has a number of logic jumps and irregularities. Then it ends up contradicting itself in the last paragraph, and basically confirming that my assertions about having being the originator of the core technology are valid. I'm subjected to this meme that you didn't really do the things that you did in the late 1980s almost continuously, usually from internet trolls.  So really what the young author was picking up on was some internet memes that have been wrapped around the prior press push that Katie Kariko and Drew Weissman were the ones that had originated the technology. Now that was clearly false, but it was very actively promoted by their university, which holds a key patent, and then advanced through Stat News, Boston Globe, CNN, and then finally the New York Times. We challenged that, and in the case of the New York Times, they actually recut their interview and podcast with Katie Kariko to cut out the parts where she had claimed that she was the original inventor.  But how do I react to it, this kind of pejorative use of language to cast shade? It doesn't really bother me. I know what the facts are, and I have this massive amount of documentation. When people come at me with those things, I just say, “Hey, look, here it's on the website. Here are the documents, you can make your own assessment.”  The thing that bothers me about all of this, when they're personalizing character assassination on me and character attacks, is that it distracts from the issues. And it's not about me, this kind of chronic questioning of why would I be saying things about the ethics of what's going on? Why would I be raising concerns about the safety signals? I must have some ulterior motive.  There's an underlying theme to all this, that I must have some ulterior motive. This particular journalist asked me again, and again, and again, trying to get at, “What was my ulterior motive for trying to undermine these vaccines based on my technology?” It was so paradoxical, the push of a whole series of questions that he raised with me.  I don't know what it says about journalism or what it says about our culture, that we always assume that someone must have an ulterior motive. It's not sufficient to just be addressing an issue because it matters, because it is the ethically correct thing to do. There seems to be this assumption that everybody's got an angle. It says more about the author than it says about me.  This kind of casting shade and aspersions on me personally as a way to avoid addressing the underlying issues, I just see it as a kind of noise and also a little bit sad. It's almost an affirmation. If the strongest thing they can come up with is to try to attack and cast shade on whether or not I made a significant contribution that led to over nine patents during the late 1980s—if that's the worst they can throw at me, I'm doing pretty good. So that's how I see it. Mr. Jekielek: So you're not trying, “So hard to undermine the use of this vaccine technology.” Dr. Malone: No. My concern here, as I said in our prior interview, is that there's been a series of actions taken, policies taken, regulatory actions taken, that are at odds with how I've been trained with the norms as I've always understood them. The regulatory norms, the scientific norms—these things have been waived. For a lot of people, it doesn't make sense.  And recall, reeling back, what triggered this was this amazing podcast with Bret Weinstein and Steve Kirsch, where I don't think at that point in time the world had really heard anyone questioning the underlying safety data assumptions and ethics of what was being done. There was a widespread sense of unease about these mandates and efforts to force vaccinations, and expedite the licensure of this and deploy it globally on the basis of very abbreviated clinical trials. There was a widespread sense of uneasiness.  But people didn't really have language to express it. When that podcast happened, for some reason, it catalyzed global interest in a way that I didn't expect. I still have people writing me, “I just saw the Bret Weinstein DarkHorse Podcast.” Something happened there, where events came together. I expressed some things that I had just been observing that I felt were anomalous in how the government was managing the situation, in the nature of the vaccines, in the testing of the vaccines, and in the ethics of how they were being deployed and forced on children, plus other things in various countries, including the United States.  That triggered a whole cascade, but it wasn't because I had concerns about the technology or was casting shade on the technology, I've repeatedly made it clear that, in my opinion, these vaccines have saved lives. I get challenged on that all the time, by the way. There's a whole cohort that says, “Oh no, these aren't worth anything. They shouldn't be used at all. They're not effective.”  In my opinion, they've saved a lot of lives and they're very appropriate at this point in time. The risk benefit favors administration of these vaccines, even with all we've learned since in these last few months, it favors their administration to the elderly and the high-risk populations. So contrary to this thread of I'm trying to denigrate these and tear them down—no, I'm trying to say I'm all in favor, strongly in favor of ethical development and deployment of vaccines that are safe, pure, effective, and non-adulterated.  I'm really strongly dug in that we need to confront the data as it is, and not try to cover stuff up or hide risks or avoid confronting risks. In my opinion, the way that we get to good public policy  in public health is we not only recognize those risks, but we also constantly take the position of looking forward, looking for leading indicators of risk, performing risk mitigation, and monitoring for black swans and unexpected events surrounding that. That's where I come from, strongly believing that the norms that have been developed over the last 30 to 40 years in vaccinology should be maintained. We shouldn't jettison them just because we're having a crisis. Mr. Jekielek: Why don't we do a review? There's been a number of very significant papers in the last week or two that have come out with very robust data sets telling us, to my less educated eye, some very valuable information. If you agree, maybe you can review some of these for us. I know you've been studying every one of these in some detail. Dr. Malone: The emergence of the Delta variant, whether originally in India and then subsequently in the UK and then in Israel, has really thrown back the public health enterprise globally and in these countries, because there were assumptions made about the effectiveness of the current vaccines and their ability to contain the outbreak. There was almost a social contract set up between the vaccine recipients and the governments and public health authorities. That social contract was, “Despite what you may have heard about the risks of some of these products and the fact that we admittedly did rush them, we're protecting your health. If you take these products, you will be safe.” That's the social contract. “Despite all these other concerns, you will be safe, and you won't have to retake them. You'll be protected.” People believed they had a shield if they bought in and did this. And then the Delta variant came along, and suddenly that was no longer valid. The assumption that had been made, the social contract, was somehow broken. First we found out, if you'll recall this cascade of events—we had Pfizer disclose that the durability, the length of time that the vaccine would provide protection was not as expected. It was something like six months. This came out of the Israeli data. Mr. Jekielek: Just to be clear, are we talking about protection from infection or protection from disease? Dr. Malone: That's a whole other rabbit hole. It really was protection from infection and spread that was the main parameter of concern with the six month data. You may recall that announcement was made unilaterally by Pfizer based on the Israeli data, and then immediately contradicted by Dr. Fauci saying that this wasn't true and Pfizer had no right to make these statements, and they hadn't discussed it with him. Pfizer then apologized and backed down.  And a week later, the U.S. government announced, that in fact, we were going to need to have boosters. Then there was the announcement that the government had contracted to buy the boosters that were going to be deployed at eight months. Then more data came out. Now most recently the government is saying, “We may have to have boosters at five months.” There was emergency use authorization that this third dose would be deployed to elderly and immunocompromised. And now we're talking about everybody needing it.  So this was the logic, “Take the dose, take the two shots or the one-shot for J&J and you'll be protected. We'll get out of this because we'll reach herd immunity. The whole problem is that we just don't have enough people that are being compliant with this.” Remember, this goes back to July 4th.  July 4th was the goal when we were going to have 70 per cent vaccine uptake. We didn't meet that. And there was a lot of discomfort with the Israeli data. Then all of this new information is rolled out, the Israeli data in particular, having to do with the increasing number of infections and hospitalizations.  At first the position was that this was only occurring in the unvaccinated cohort. Then that became increasingly untenable and it became clear that it was occurring in the vaccinated cohort. The same became true with the UK data set, which is stronger than the American monitoring system. They do a lot more sequence analysis.  So now we had this paradox that those that had been vaccinated, while the data still suggested that they're largely protected from disease and death and more protected than the unvaccinated from disease and death, they're no longer protected from infection. It became clear within the data, and through multiple sources, that the levels of virus replication in the individuals, even who had been vaccinated previously, was the same or higher as the levels of virus replication in those that had been un-vaccinated. And also that those that had been vaccinated and had breakthrough infections, which is what we're talking about, were also shedding virus and able to spread virus.  So that raised the prospect that they were kind of the new super spreaders, because they would have less apparent disease and yet still be shedding high levels of virus. Then we started to see some signs suggesting that there may be some differences in the nature or onset or titers of disease in those that had been infected beyond six months after their vaccination point. This is the waning phase.  That set up a situation where a lot of folks were on edge. There were still a lot of media pushing that this was a pandemic of the unvaccinated, but that became increasingly untenable as the data rolled in. You've referred to this paper that came out. There were actually three in a row that came out almost immediately after the license was issued for the BioNTech product.  There was a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine that had an odd structure in which they related adverse events associated with the virus infection and a much more comprehensive assessment of adverse events associated with the vaccines. By juxtaposing these two data sets in the same manuscript, the case was made that, “Yes, we have this significantly enhanced spectrum of adverse events associated with the vaccine beyond what had been previously disclosed. We were all focused on the cardio-toxicity.”  But now, additional adverse events, and things that we discussed when we had our last chat as parent adverse events, these are now fairly well-documented in this New England Journal article, things like viral reactivation. So this is the shingles, for instance.  The paper attempts to make the case that, “The vaccines have a lot of adverse events, but the disease has a lot of adverse events also, and the disease is worse. Also there's a lot of overlap between these adverse events associated with the disease and the vaccine.” But the messaging was focused in that manuscript that it was far worse to get the disease than to have the adverse events associated with the vaccine.  That's a little bit of a false analogy, because the vaccine ostensibly would be deployed to 80 or 90 per cent of the population. And in terms of this wave of Delta, we might see something like 20 or 30 per cent of the population infected if we're lucky. Then there's an imbalance of who's at risk with the vaccine versus who's at risk for the infection, but that was the construct. Mr. Jekielek: And just to be clear, what do you mean by 20 to 30 per cent, if we're lucky? Where do those numbers come from? Dr. Malone: I've seen data suggesting that the total population right now that's been infected in the United States is something like about 20 per cent of the total population. We don't have that widespread of an uptake of infection in the U.S. or in the UK. UK data also shows those kinds of numbers. They're reflected in a cohort that have had a natural infection and recovered from that, and then acquired the immune response associated with that.  It's seen in the numbers, for instance, in those cases where there is an accounting, such as in the Great Britain database, the British database, where they say the fraction of the population that's been vaccinated, and then the fraction of the population that's acquired natural immunity. It's also covered in the CDC slide deck that was leaked. I don't think that was available when we had our last conversation.  At the early outset, at the front edge of the Delta outbreak here in the United States, there was a key slide deck that was disclosed to the Washington Post without approval by a CDC employee. Within that slide deck, it showed a number of confidential internal assessments that weren't intended to be shared with the public. Those assessments also included an estimate that we had something like 50 per cent of the population that had accepted vaccine at that point in time. In addition, there was something like 20 per cent of the population that had been infected.  So if you add those two, if you were to consider natural infection as providing some degree of protection against the virus, then we would move from something like 50 per cent vaccine uptake to something like 70 per cent of the population at that point in time that had actually acquired some form of immunity either through vaccination or infection. So that's the basis of my seat-of-the-pants estimate.  In addition, in the CDC slide deck, the government revealed in two key slides that were at the center of that deck, that their epidemiologic calculations and projections were such that the reproductive coefficient of Delta was something in the range of eight. There's other papers that suggest it's more like a little over five, that it was as infectious as chickenpox approximately, which is highly infectious, about two to three times more infectious than the Alpha strain was.  Based on those projections and some assumptions about the percent of the population that had been naturally infected, and the percent of the population that had taken up vaccine, and some assumptions about the effectiveness of mask use in protecting either an individual from being infected by a third party that wasn't using masks or protecting a third party from infection from somebody that was using a mask and was infected—there were a series of projection curves about how that could impact on the spread of the virus.  Basically when you work through those curves, what they demonstrated was that even if we had 100 per cent vaccine uptake with these vaccines, where the technical term is leaky, that do not provide perfect protection against infection, that we would not be able to stop the spread of the virus through the U.S. population. We would slow it. So that's where those estimates come from.  That's where that assessment that is being used as the basis for advocating widespread mask deployment throughout the United States, that's where that policy comes from. It's a CDC analysis that if we don't use masks, then the virus will spread quite rapidly. If we do have full compliance with mask use, we can slow it down a bit. And so that's why we have these various mask mandates throughout the United States now. Mr. Jekielek: Fascinating. You started talking about natural immunity here. I thought it was some of the most interesting, robust data, at least to my eye. Again, you're the one who's going to be speaking on this. Dr. Malone: I agree, and a lot of people agree. It was covered in Science magazine. It's still a pre-print, but it was robust enough, and well enough constructed that even on the basis of the pre-print, Science magazine went ahead and made the clear point. Really, throughout the world, there was recognition that this new data coming out of Israel, as I recall, demonstrated that the term that's often used is natural immunity. It's an odd term, but it's now in common language.  What that means is protection afforded by having been infected and recovered from infection, which will generate a broad immune response. And it's now been shown in that paper and others that the breadth of that immune response in terms of memory T and B cell populations is more diverse and more long lasting than the breadth of immune response elicited by the spike based vaccines alone.  That data that you're alluding to showed that this natural immunity is broader and more durable, which contradicted some studies that the CDC had developed. So we were in a kind of tension. Which is the real data, the CDC data, or these other papers that are evaluated memory T and B cell populations? Which is true? We have multiple truths or multiple pieces of data, plus different groups claiming it's one way or the other.  Then this data was dropped about the evidence of protection. It seems to indicate and be consistent with the claims that the breadth and durability of the immune response was superior with the natural infection in recovery. There's also evidence that there's a significant, depending on the timeframe, six to twenty-fold improvement in protection from infection and disease associated with the natural immunity acquired from prior infection, compared to that conferred by the vaccine.  So now the public, in their social contract with the public health agencies, is faced with the situation where they had been told that natural immunity was not as protective, and that they can't rely on that. If you've been previously infected, you should still get both doses of vaccine, and this vaccination would provide broad, durable protection. It would protect you, and it would protect your elders from you potentially spreading disease to them.  Now, those things have all come into question. The population is still reeling from that. We have kind of dug into these camps. My sense is that people haven't really fully processed what this means. It is profound.  We were discussing before we started shooting, that I had a long podcast interview today and a kind of advisory session with a group of Latin American physicians and scientists that were evaluating public policy for vaccine rollout versus early treatment options for the different cohorts that they have to protect. They were seeing this data from the eyes of folks that really haven't had good access to vaccines, but are facing the prospects that their countries could execute vaccine contracts and bring in these vaccines. They are asking the question, “Does this make sense for us? Is this good policy? Should our country invest in these mRNA vaccines?”  That is why they were talking to me. “What are we going to get for it if we do this? What's going to be the benefit to our population?” It was a very level-headed discussion. But they were pushing me in this, getting back to this theme of me being the vaccine skeptic. They were the ones pushing me saying, “We just don't see the value here for our populations. We don't see a compelling case when these products aren't stopping the spread. They are going to have to be re-administered fairly frequently if they're to be effective?”  Now, the other thing that comes out of this, a concern that the World Health Organization hasn't really come to terms with—I'm speaking of the CDC and the WHO and the whole global infrastructure, including the Israeli government—is one of now mandating a third jab. So in Israel, if you haven't received all three, you're not considered fully vaccinated. Mr. Jekielek: You have a six month window, if I'm not mistaken. Dr. Malone: Precisely. But one of the things about the Israeli data is that they vaccinated in such a bolus, in such a short push, because they have such a compliant population, that essentially, they have a spike in vaccinated persons. So they're all moving concurrently through that six month window now.  There was a pivotal interview with the director of the CDC and she was asked, “Do we have any data? Do we have data, or do we just have hope about the benefits of the third dose?” And she, to her credit, acknowledged that we don't have data. All we have is hope.  Here's the problem with that. Vaccine responses are not linear. More is not better. There are many cases where if you dose more or dose more frequently or move beyond a prime and a boost, you can actually quench the immune response. You can move into “high zone tolerance.” You can move into a situation where your immune responses drop.  Now there's a little bit of foreshadowing on this in another paper that's out where they looked at the effects of vaccination post-infection. Remember this was the policy, that those like me that have been infected should go ahead and take two jabs, take two doses of vaccine. Mr. Jekielek: Which you did. Dr. Malone: Which I did, hoping that it would be helpful for a long COVID period. That data hasn't really played out that way. And there's a paper showing that you can actually quench T-cell responses. You get an improved kind of a super immune response, they assert in that manuscript, after a single dose when you've been previously infected. But with the second dose, your T-cell population actually gets quenched, which is consistent with high zone tolerance.  So if that paper was to be expanded and verified with more robust numbers, it would suggest that one dose after natural infection would be a good thing. Two doses would be a bad thing. Now that's the equivalent of three doses if you think about it, natural infection being dose one. So to say that we don't have any data is a little misleading. We have some leading indicators that suggest that it might not be such a good idea. And now, that data will come out from Israel. The conservative position to take is time will tell, and then we will know.  The Israelis continue to be in the throes of a very active Delta virus infection surge right now. There's some other very intriguing tidbits going on here in this whole public policy of vaccines versus no vaccines, versus universal vaccines, versus the Barrington position that we should selectively vaccinate those that are at high risk. Mr. Jekielek: The Great Barrington Declaration? Dr. Malone: Yes, the Great Barrington Declaration. After that whole matrix of decisions, in comes Sweden. You may recall that Sweden was roundly criticized for this naive notion that they weren't going to vaccinate. They were going to allow the virus to have its will with the population. They have backtracked from that now, to be technically accurate. They have about 40 per cent vaccine uptake and they've acknowledged that position was naive and counterproductive. They had excess deaths initially in the high-risk cohorts.  But what they did do was have a lot more natural infection with alpha and beta strains. And now that Delta is moving through the region, they have an extremely low mortality rate, often hitting zero on any one day—in comparison to some of their neighbors that didn't take that policy, and didn't have such widespread natural infection. Like Finland, for example, where they deployed vaccine very avidly and had good uptake, they're having the exponential growth rate curve that's happening in many other Northern European countries right now. Mr. Jekielek: I'm going to comment here. This is very interesting because you're interpreting this data a bit differently than Dr. Martin Kulldorff, who is from Sweden.  His commentary in a recent interview we did was simply that there were no mandates of any sort ever in Sweden, yet their vaccine use is actually quite high. He said it's one of the higher rates that exist. But he didn't factor in this time period that you said at the beginning, where there was this idea of letting the natural infections happen. And you're saying the reason their rates are zero mortality is because of that. Dr. Malone: Yes. It is a very reasonable explanation for what's happened there. It's a differentiator between them and some of their neighboring countries. They did have that early policy and they did have fairly widespread infection. So that would be consistent with the data suggesting that natural infection is providing broader and more durable immunity.  This gets to the logic of a selective deployment of vaccines to those that are at highest risk. For that fragment of the population, let's say below 65, depending on where you want to cut the line, 60, 65, 70, some people go down to 55, not providing vaccine coverage to those individuals unless they're in a very high risk population, morbidly obese, or with immunologic deficiencies—that may be a more enlightened public policy.  By the way, it is one more consistent with the WHO position that we still have limited vaccine supply, and it would be far more appropriate and equitable to deploy that vaccine supply more broadly globally to protect the elders in particular throughout the world, rather than this focus on universal vaccination.  Now with a booster, a third booster, a third dose, there's been multiple statements by the WHO that they believe this is not ethical. Now, I had another interview today with a journalist podcaster who is from South Africa but living in France, and very aware of the French resistance that's developing now to vaccines with all those protests. Mr. Jekielek: To vaccine mandates, correct? Dr. Malone: In particular, yes. His point was that if you look at this through the eyes of emerging economies, this Western focus on universal vaccination of their populations and now a third vaccine for their populations and their unwillingness to share the technology is a form of imperialism and hegemony. The Western nations have access to this technology and these doses and they're not willing to share it with the rest of the world.  So we've got a series of things here where this kind of imbalance in distribution of these vaccines as a resource is creating or exacerbating concerns that exist widely in economically disadvantaged countries. There's just not a level playing field and we're all in this boat together with this disease. Yet we're not being equitable in distribution of the countermeasures that are available. Mr. Jekielek: This is fascinating, even as others that you're speaking with are asking, “Do we even need these at this point?” That's fascinating. Dr. Malone: Yes, I agree. So what does this mean? I don't know. What I sense is, again, we're in one of those moments where there is chaos. There's lack of structure and consensus about how to move forward. And my sense is, getting back to the U.S. government, we're in a position now where a lot of the core assumptions underlying the vaccine strategy have been called into question. We don't really know what's on the other side.  Then on top of that, it's becoming increasingly apparent that these repurposed drugs and other agents that could provide protection and mitigate death and disease, if they were deployed early in outpatient environments, access to those that are being actively suppressed. That's another one of those, “This doesn't make sense,” kind of problems. It is causing a lot of questioning about the motivations of those that are guiding public policy right now. The second part of this episode will be released on Saturday, Sept. 4, at 7 p.m. ET. Below is a list of references mentioned or related to the discussion in this episode:  “Vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals have similar viral loads in communities with a high prevalence of the SARS-CoV-2 delta variant” (Note: This is a preprint). “Fauci: Amount of virus in breakthrough delta cases ‘almost identical' to unvaccinated” — The Hill CDC: “Outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 Infections, Including COVID-19 Vaccine Breakthrough Infections, Associated with Large Public Gatherings — Barnstable County, Massachusetts, July 2021” “Predominance of antibody-resistant SARS-CoV-2 variants in vaccine breakthrough cases from the San Francisco Bay Area, California” (Note: This is a preprint) “New delta variant studies show the pandemic is far from over” — ScienceNews “Read: Internal CDC document on breakthrough infections” — The Washington Post “New UCSF study: Vaccine-resistant viruses are driving ‘breakthrough' COVID infections” — The Mercury News “Comparing SARS-CoV-2 natural immunity to vaccine-induced immunity: reinfections versus breakthrough infections” (Note: This is a preprint) “Having SARS-CoV-2 once confers much greater immunity than a vaccine—but vaccination remains vital” — Science “Differential effects of the second SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine dose on T cell immunity in naïve and COVID-19 recovered individuals” (Note: This is a preprint) “SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern and variants under investigation in England” — Public Health England “Safety of the BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine in a Nationwide Setting” — The New England Journal of Medicine “Real-World Study Captures Risk of Myocarditis With Pfizer Vax” — MedPage Today CDC: “Effectiveness of COVID-19 Vaccines in Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Infection Among Frontline Workers Before and During B.1.617.2 (Delta) Variant Predominance — Eight U.S. Locations, December 2020—August 2021” “CDC: Covid-19 Vaccine Effectiveness Fell From 91% To 66% With Delta Variant“ — Forbes “SARS-CoV-2 infection induces long-lived bone marrow plasma cells in humans” — Nature CDC: “Reduced Risk of Reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 After COVID-19 Vaccination — Kentucky, May-June 2021” “Causes and consequences of purifying selection on SARS-CoV-2” — Genome Biology and Evolution “The reproductive number of the Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2 is far higher compared to the ancestral SARS-CoV-2 virus” — Journal of Travel Medicine “Mutation rate of COVID-19 virus is at least 50 percent higher than previously thought” — Phys.org “Differential effects of the second SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine dose on T cell immunity in naïve and COVID-19 recovered individuals” (Note: This is a preprint) Subscribe to the American Thought Leaders newsletter so you never miss an episode. You can also follow American Thought Leaders on Parler, Facebook, or YouTube. If you'd like to donate to support our work, you can do so here. Follow Epoch TV on Facebook and Twitter. 

Then This Happened: Musical Stories

A coyote bit a little boy, Chicagoans wanted the coyote dead, but Flint Creek Wildlife Rehabilitation in suburban Barrington, IL stepped in to show everyone Mercy.Listen to the unedited podcast and help support the episodes at --> https://www.patreon.com/mattgriffo 

Tara Tremendous: The Secret Diaries
Ep 5: When th Bough Breaks

Tara Tremendous: The Secret Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 1:06


Tara's quest to learn the secret behind the haunted melody leads to a shocking revelation. Mr. Barrington discovers the truth behind Mrs. Biddelspach's visit.

One and One Podcast
Tommy Massimino Jr.

One and One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 72:29


Tommy Massimino Jr. works in Operations for the Orlando Magic of the NBA.  Previously, he was a student manager for the Villanova Men's Basketball Team from 2009-2013, an Assistant Video Coordinator for the Iowa Men's Basketball Team from 2014-2015 and worked in Operations for the Denver Nuggets from 2015-2017.  He talks about growing up in Barrington, Illinois, being the grandson of the late Rollie Massimino, being from a basketball family, and his basketball career through high school.  Tommy explains why he chose to attend Villanova, the process of becoming a student manager, all of the duties involved, learning to cut film, and what it was like working for Head Coach Jay Wright.  He then details his time at Iowa working under Head Coach Fran McCaffery, making the jump to the NBA, his time working for the Denver Nuggets, and working with Ed Pinckney.  Tommy describes his current position with the Orlando Magic, what it's been like working during the pandemic, the exciting young Magic roster, and his continued support for both the Villanova and Iowa programs.