Podcasts about lifetime achievement

  • 519PODCASTS
  • 679EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Feb 6, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about lifetime achievement

Latest podcast episodes about lifetime achievement

Monsters In The Morning
TAKE YOUR VACATION DAYS

Monsters In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 38:39


MONDAY HR 4 Jeff Kaufman - What would the Monsters Do? Take your vacations days. Super Bowl vacation. Grammy's and what does Life Time Achievement award mean. To The Top with Carlos PURE CARLOS

Jason & Alexis
2/3 FRI HOUR 3: myTalk Awards w/Donna, Dawn and Lori: Lifetime Achievement, Breakout Star and Crush of the Year!

Jason & Alexis

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2023 42:28


Donna, Dawn and Lori joined us to breakdown and announce the winners of the myTalk Awards in the categories: Lifetime Achievement, Breakout Star and Crush of the Year!

Ms. InterPReted
Greg Jarboe and Katie Paine: GA4 is Coming, Are You Ready?

Ms. InterPReted

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 39:12


Greg Jarboe is president of SEO-PR, which he co-founded in 2003. Their digital marketing agency has won awards for generating results for a variety of clients, including: The Christian Science Monitor, Get City Dealz, Harlequin Romance, MarketingSherpa, Parents magazine, the SES Conference & Expo series, Southwest Airlines, and Rutgers University. He's also the author of ‘YouTube and Video Marketing' and one of the 25 successful online marketing gurus profiled in Michael Miller's Online Marketing Heroes.  Since 2003, Jarboe's written more than 1,600 posts for ClickZ, Inked, Search Engine Journal, Search Engine Watch, The SEM Post, and Tubular Insights. He's spoken at over 80 industry conferences. In addition, he's an instructor at Coursera, Rutgers Business School Executive Education, and the New Media Academy.Katie Paine, aka The Measurement Queen, has been a pioneer in the field of measurement for three decades. She was recently awarded the prestigious IPR Jack Felton Medal for Lifetime Achievement, an award made for lifetime contributions in the advancement of research, measurement and evaluation in public relations and corporate communication. Her books, Measure What Matters (Wiley, March 2011) and Measuring Public Relationships (KDPaine & Partners, 2007) are considered must-reads for anyone tasked with measuring public relations and social media.  Her latest company, Paine Publishing is the first educational publishing firm entirely dedicated to making more Measurement Mavens. In her consulting practices, she designs measurement dashboards for some of today's most admired companies. More recently, Katie was named one of “25 women who rock social media” by Lee Odden's prestigious Online Marketing Blog. She contributes to Communications World, PR Week, and Business Marketing. They talk with Fletcher Marketing PR's Director of Media Relations, Allison Lester, about the upcoming transition from Google Analytics to the new GA4. Google Analytics has been utilized by professionals for the better part of a decade and is now being transitioned due to the fast-paced growth of our world. They talk about the difference between Google Analytics and GA4 regarding: Measurement of events rather than sessions Engagement rates Adjustments in the attribution model Tracking of cohorts The process of setting up goals  Integrated Marketing  And why you shouldn't wait until Q2 to get started on transitioning your business Sessions will be held this April to provide information on GA4 to PR professionals. Visit www.painepublishing.com or email Katie at measurementqueen@gmail.com. Listen to this episode of MsInterPReted to find out more about the transition from Google Analytics to the new GA4.  Follow Katie Paine on:Follow Jill on Twitter: @queenofmetricsVisit: https://painepublishing.com/  Follow Greg Jarboe on:On Twitter: @gregjarboeOn LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/greg-jarboe-876364/ Follow Fletcher Marketing PR on:Website:  https://www.fletchermarketingpr.com/On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FletchermarketingprOn Twitter:  @fletcherprOn Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/fletcher.pr/Follow Kelly on Twitter: @KDFletcherFollow Mary Beth on Twitter: @marybethwest 

Masters of Storytelling
Bonus: Bob Rogers and Deep Story

Masters of Storytelling

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 41:28


To follow up on her interview with Joe Rohde, former Disney Imagineer and experience architect of Virgin Galactic, Maya talks to Bob Rogers, the man who puts the ‘B' 'R' in ‘BRC'. Founder and chairman of BRC Imagination Arts, Bob is our Master of Storytelling.  Over the course of his 50+ year career, Bob has developed two patents, has won over 500 international awards for creative excellence with BRC, including two Academy Award nominations. In 2006, Bob was honored with this industry's highest honor, the Themed Entertainment Association's Award for Lifetime Achievement. He's been inducted into the IAAPA Hall of Fame and has served on the Board of Directors of the Academy of Motion Pictures, Arts and Sciences. Bob was also invited by NASA to help develop its master plan for the exploration of Mars and later awarded him the NASA Public Service Medal.  Writer, innovator, teacher, scholar…Bob has many things, but we tend to think of Bob as a magician. He's made a career making people smile, suspending our disbelief long enough to help us forget ourselves or maybe to find ourselves.  To learn more about Bob Rogers: www.bobrogers.com   To learn more about BRC: www.brcweb.com

OEG Voices
OEG Voices 048: Robert Schuwer on his Lifetime Achievement OE Award for Excellence

OEG Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 32:09


Our 2023 season commences a sequence of conversations with the people recognized in the most recent Open Education Awards for...

Creativity in Captivity
LYNN AHRENS & STEPHEN FLAHERTY: The Lyrical Empirical

Creativity in Captivity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 62:32


The Tony Award winning writing team of the musicals: Ragtime, Anastasia, Seussical, Once on This Island, My Favorite Year, Rocky, Chita Rivera: The Dancer's Life, Lucky Stiff, Dessa Rose, The Glorious Ones, A Man of No Importance, Knoxville and Little Dancer. These renowned collaborators have received theater, film and music's highest honors – the Tony, Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle and Olivier Awards, as well as nominations for two Academy Awards, two Golden Globes and four Grammys. They serve on the Council of the Dramatists Guild of America and founded the DGF Fellows Program for Emerging Writers. In 2014 they received the Oscar Hammerstein Award for Lifetime Achievement and in 2015 they were inducted into the Theater Hall of Fame. 

Oncology Data Advisor
Pioneering the Field of Stem Cell Biology With Irving Weissman, MD

Oncology Data Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 36:08


At the recent American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Dr. Irving Weissman, Director of the Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University, received the 2022 Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology. In this interview, Dr. Weissman tells the story of how he entered the field, describes the monumental contributions he has made in hematology and oncology, and shares advice for medical students who are interested in becoming involved in basic science research.

The First Time
S5 Ep199: Summer Series: Helen Garner

The First Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 63:39


In our fourth episode of our Summer Series we revisit our most popular ep ever! Kate speaks to Literary Queen, Helen Garner. Helen Garner's first book, Monkey Grip, was published in 1977. She is well known for her novels, short stories, journalism and essays, and for several influential works of non-fiction. In 2006 she received the inaugural Melbourne Prize for Literature, and in 2016 she won the prestigious Windham–Campbell Literature Prize for non-fiction. In 2019 she was honoured with the Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature. The first volume of her diaries, Yellow Notebook was published by Text in 2019, followed by One Day I'll Remember This in 2020 and most recently How to End a Story in 2021. Helen lives in Melbourne. Check out this episode on our website www.thefirsttimepodcast.com or get in touch via Twitter (@thefirsttimepod) or Instagram (@thefirsttimepod). Don't forget you can support us and the making of Season Six via our Patreon page. Thanks for joining us and we look forward to bringing you brand new episodes from March 2023!

Zig at the gig podcasts
Mark Bingham

Zig at the gig podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 86:35


Interview with Mark Bingham Guitarist-singer-songwriter-arranger and esteemed producer Mark Bingham (a 2021 recipient of Offbeat magazine's Lifetime Achievement in Music Business Award), has dedicated over 50 years to pursuing creativity regardless of category. From working with seminal punk and No Wave bands MX-80 Sound and Bush Tetras to Cajun groups Michot's Melody Makers and Lost Bayou Ramblers to Beat poets Ed Sanders and Allen Ginsberg to jazz artists John Scofield, Wycliffe Gordon and Nicholas Payton to celebrated pop stars like Marianne Faithfull, Dr. John, R.E.M., Roy Orbison and Jon Batiste, Bingham has always sought out projects that get his creative juices flowing. “There's been no linear path,” he said of his storied career. “It's been up and down and all around, and you just try to find good people to work with.” A true child of the ‘60s, Bingham is from an era when ‘Question Authority' was de rigueur. He ended up taking it to heart, both politically and musically. While attending Indiana University in the early ‘70s, at the peak of the anti-war movement on the campuses all across America, the Bloomington, Indiana native formed the Screaming Gypsy Bandits, a sprawling 10-piece theatrical psych rock group with an absurdist/prankster bent that shared the renegade stance of such bands of the day as Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention, Captain Beefheart and His Magic Band and the Hampton Grease Band (led by visionary frontman Col. Bruce Hampton).   Mark's Info  https://markbingham.bandcamp.com/music    

Living With
Living With Fibromyalgia: Kristal Kent

Living With

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022


The 2022 Social Health Award for Lifetime Achievement goes to Kristal Kent, who engages in legislative and healthcare advocacy to help the fibromyalgia and veteran communities. After developing fibromyalgia during her own military service, she has worked tirelessly to provide her communities with up to date information and connect individuals living with fibromyalgia/chronic pain throughout the world.

Single Mother Survival Guide
329 – Dealing with high-conflict people in divorce, with Bill Eddy

Single Mother Survival Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 54:01


This week on the show, I have the legendary Bill Eddy joining me. Bill Eddy is a lawyer, therapist, mediator, and co-founder of the High Conflict Institute. He pioneered the High Conflict Personality Theory (HCP) and is the world's leading expert on methods for managing disputes involving people with high-conflict personalities. He provides training on this subject to lawyers, judges, mediators, managers, human resource professionals, businesspersons, healthcare administrators, college administrators, homeowners' association managers, ombudspersons, law enforcement, therapists, and others. He has worked as the senior family mediator at the National Conflict Resolution Center, a certified family law specialist representing clients in family court, and a licensed clinical social worker therapist. In 2021, he received the Lifetime Achievement award from the Academy of Professional Mediators. Bill serves on the faculty of the Straus Institute for Dispute Resolution at the Pepperdine University School of Law, and is a conjoint associate professor with the University of Newcastle Law School in Australia. He has delivered talks and training to lawyers, judges, and mediators in over 30 U.S. states and 13 countries, and has authored or co-authored 20 books. His popular blog on the Psychology Today website has more than 5 million views. He regularly consults on issues of alienation, family violence, and false allegations in family court cases. In addition, Bill is the developer of the New Ways for Families® method of managing potentially high-conflict families in and out of family court.  In this episode we talk about: What a high-conflict person is. The four characteristics of a high-conflict person. Why trying to change a high-conflict person doesn't work and what to do instead. The difference between high-conflict people and personality disorders. The characteristics of people with a personality disorder. What NOT to do when engaging with high-conflict people. Narcissistic personality disorders as one of the most common types of high-conflict personality. Some of the books he wrote relevant to single mums, in particular, are – 5 Types of People Who Can Ruin Your Life SPLITTING: Protecting Yourself While Divorcing Someone with Borderline or Narcissistic Personality Disorder (co-author Randi Kreger) BIFF for CoParent Communication: Your Guide to Difficult Texts, Emails, and Social Media Posts BIFF: Quick Responses to High Conflict People, Their Personal Attacks, Hostile Email, and Social Media Meltdowns Don't Alienate the Kids!: Raising Resilient Children While Avoiding High-Conflict Divorce Bill's New Ways for Families method to help manage high-conflict families in and out of family court.  Links mentioned in the episode:  You can connect with Bill on his Website, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, or his YouTube channel. You can also check out his Podcast, It's All Your Fault HERE. Join the Thrive Tribe waitlist HERE.  Download the E-book – Thirteen single mothers share their struggles, top tips, and their favourite things about being a single mother – HERE. To contact Julia, email: julia@singlemothersurvivalguide.com. Visit us at Single Mother Survival Guide. And join the email list there too. Or connect with Single Mother Survival Guide on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or Pinterest.

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Scion recognised at the Science NZ Awards

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 9:40


Scion a research company that specialises in developing science and technology for forestry, was honoured at the Science New Zealand Awards earlier this week. Among the award winners was principal researcher Dr Mike Watt, who received an individual Lifetime Achievement award for his leadership in forest science. Earlier this year he also presented at the ForestSATconference in Berlin. Dr Watt talks to Jesse.

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Dr. Joel Berger is the Barbara Cox Anthony University Chair of Wildlife Conservation at Colorado State University. He is also a longtime Senior Scientist with the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the author of multiple books, including most recently Extreme Conservation: Life at the Edges of the World. Joel is dedicated to saving animals that are off the radar of most people such as the Takin in Bhutan or the Huemul in Patagonia. These animals live in faraway places, and there are relatively few people advocating for their preservation. When he's not working, Joel enjoys hiking, watching animals, traveling to remote places, and drinking good coffee. He is also a fan of bodysurfing, but he doesn't get to do this often living in Colorado. Joel earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in biology from California State University, Northridge, and his Ph.D. in biology from the University of Colorado Boulder. He was awarded a Smithsonian Postdoctoral Fellowship to conduct research at the National Zoo's Conservation & Research Center, and he was subsequently awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship which supported his research for four years. Before joining CSU, he held the position of John J. Craighead Chair of Wildlife Conservation at the University of Montana. Joel has received numerous awards and honors over the course of his career, including the Aldo Leopold Conservation Award for Lifetime Achievement from the American Society of Mammalogists, the Life-time Achievement Award from the Institute for Parks at Clemson University, the Society of Conservation Biology's LaRue III Life-time Achievement Award, and the Conservation Biology Award from the Denver Zoological Society. He is also an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and he is a three-time finalist for the prestigious Indianapolis Prize in Conservation, one of the field's greatest honors. In this Interview, Joel shares more about his life and science.

The Danny Diess Show
Christine McVie Tribute With Music by Stevie Nicks, Cocteau Twins, Modern English & More

The Danny Diess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 86:46


This vinyl mix Danny pays tribute to the late singer songwriter Christine McVie with music by Stevie Nicks, Cocteau Twins, Modern English, and more. Christine Anne McVie (/məkˈviː/;[1] née Perfect; 12 July 1943 – 30 November 2022) was an English musician and songwriter. She was principally known as a vocalist and keyboardist with the band Fleetwood Mac.A member of several bands on the mid-1960s British Blues scene, notably Chicken Shack, she began playing with Fleetwood Mac in 1968, initially as a contract session player, before formally joining the band in 1970. She started to emerge as a songwriter by 1971, with her first compositions appearing on her fourth album with the group, Future Games. She would remain with the band through many lineup changes for the next several decades, generally writing and performing lead vocals on about half of the tracks on all of their subsequent studio albums (though she had partially retired in 1998, and only appeared as a session musician on the band's last studio album, Say You Will. She also released three solo studio albums. Steve Leggett of AllMusic described her as an "unabashedly easy-on-the-ears singer/songwriter, and the prime mover behind some of Fleetwood Mac's biggest hits". Eight songs written or co-written by her, including "Don't Stop", "Everywhere", and "Little Lies", appeared on Fleetwood Mac's 1988 Greatest Hits album.As a member of Fleetwood Mac, McVie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music in 1998. The same year, after almost 30 years with the band, she opted to leave and lived in semi-retirement for nearly 15 years. She released a solo album in 2004. She appeared on stage with Fleetwood Mac at the O2 Arena in London in September 2013, before rejoining the band in 2014 prior to their On with the Show tour.McVie received a Gold Badge of Merit Award from BASCA, now The Ivors Academy, in 2006.[9] She received the Ivor Novello Award for Lifetime Achievement from the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors in 2014 and was honoured with the Trailblazer Award at the UK Americana Awards in 2021. She was also the recipient of two Grammy Awards.

Spoken Word
Writer and activist Arnold Zable talks about his poetry

Spoken Word

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


Arnold Zable is an acclaimed writer, novelist, human rights activist, and the recipient of the 2021 Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature. His books include Jewels and Ashes, Wanderers and Dreamers, Café Scheherazade, Scraps of Heaven, Sea of Many Returns, The Fig Tree, Violin Lessons, The Fighter and most recently, The Watermill. Zable has written numerous stories, features, essays, columns, and works for theatre and radio. He has lectured widely on writing, human rights issues, the art of story, and performed as a storyteller, throughout Australia and internationally; and has a doctorate from the School of Creative Arts, Melbourne University.

Texas Business Minds
San Antonio: Lifetime Achievement Honorees for Non-Profit and Corporate Philanthropy

Texas Business Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 31:32


In a unique and engaging format, SABJ Editor Ed Arnold reflects on the past, present and future of the Alamo City's strong non-profit and corporate philanthropic community. First, he welcomes the honorees and then turns to their next generation leaders for their vision. Honorees featured:Russ Bookbinder, San Antonio SportsMike Gilliam, Lighthouse for the BlindHarvey Najim, The Najim Charitable FoundationNext Generation Leaders featured:Jenny Carnes, San Antonio SportsCindy Watson, Lighthouse for the BlindMelissa Bauman, The Najim Charitable Foundation

The HFPA in Conversation
Flashback: Carol Burnett

The HFPA in Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 61:15


To celebrate the 80 days leading up to the 80th Golden Globes, we are replaying our  conversation with television and comedy icon Carol Burnett when she sat down in 2019 with HFPA journalist Meher Tatna. The two discuss her long career from humble beginnings to breakout success with The Carol Burnett Show, her five Golden Globes wins, the newly named Carol Burnett Awrad for Lifetime Achievement in Television, which she had just received at its inaugural presentation earlier that year, and more.

Famous & Gravy
Singing Mailman

Famous & Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 66:18


Episode originally published May 4, 2022.  This person died in 2020, age 73. He was a relative unknown in 1970 when first Kris Kristofferson heard him play one night at a Chicago club. Roger Ebert, the film critic, wrote an early review of him with the headline “Singing Mailman Who Delivers a Powerful Message in a Few Words.” He won a Grammy for best new artist in 1972, and again in 2020 for Lifetime Achievement.  He died of coronavirus. Today's dead celebrity is John Prine. Famous & Gravy is created and co-hosted by Amit Kapoor and Michael Osborne. This episode was produced by Jacob Weiss. For updates on the show, please sign up for our mailing list at famousandgravy.com. Also, play our mobile quiz app at deadoraliveapp.com   Transcript of this episode New York Times Obituary for John Prine Famous & Gravy official website Dead or Alive Quiz Game Follow our show on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn John Prine official website ‘John Prine's Perfect Songs' in the New Yorker ‘John Prine Isn't Counting the Time' from The Ringer Video for ‘When I Get to Heaven' Kacey Musgraves'  “Burn One with John Prine” live version HPB.com

Hacks & Wonks
RE-AIR: Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 33:19


On this midweek show, Crystal has a delightful conversation with Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu about her path to becoming the first Asian American, first Latina, first woman of color, and first LGBTQ+ justice on the court. They discuss the importance of state supreme courts in light of recent decisions that threaten people's rights on the national level, how that translates to why we should scrutinize judicial elections, and common misconceptions people have about the state Supreme Court. Justice Yu then shares about efforts to make courts more accessible and equitable to everyone, what she's most proud of in her career, and how people can be involved in restoring confidence in the justice system. Notes:  This episode was recorded before the end of filing week in May. The candidate filing deadline passed without any challenger filing to run against Justice Yu, so she will appear unopposed on the November ballot and serve another term on our state's highest court. This episode was also recorded before the Supreme Court's Dobbs decision, hence the reference to the leaked draft about overturning Roe vs Wade. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and Justice Yu at @JudgeMaryYu.   Resources Washington Supreme Court Bio - Justice Mary I. Yu: https://www.courts.wa.gov/appellate_trial_courts/supreme/bios/?fa=scbios.display_file&fileID=Yu   Campaign Website - Justice Mary Yu: https://justicemaryyu.com/   “Who's Marrying the First Gay Couple? Judge Mary Yu” by Dominic Holden from The Stranger:https://www.thestranger.com/blogs/2012/12/08/15483647/whos-marrying-the-first-gay-couple-judge-mary-yu   Justice Mary Yu On Jimmy Kimmel Show: https://vimeo.com/673039715   State of Washington Commission on Judicial Conduct: https://www.cjc.state.wa.us/   Washington State Court Rules: Code of Judicial Conduct: https://www.courts.wa.gov/court_rules/?fa=court_rules.list&group=ga&set=CJC   Civil Right to Counsel or “Civil Gideon”: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_aid_indigent_defense/civil_right_to_counsel1/   June 4th Letter - Washington Supreme Court:https://www.courts.wa.gov/content/publicUpload/Supreme%20Court%20News/Judiciary%20Legal%20Community%20SIGNED%20060420.pdf   Washington Leadership Institute: https://www.law.uw.edu/academics/continuing-education/wli Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, I'm once again just so excited to welcome to the program another very distinguished State Supreme Court Justice - Justice Mary Yu is with us today. Thank you so much for joining us. [00:00:51] Justice Mary Yu: Oh, Crystal, thank you for the invitation. I really appreciate your interest and I'm looking forward to having a fun conversation. [00:01:00] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And so I just wanted to start off talking and ask you - what was your path to the Supreme Court? [00:01:08] Justice Mary Yu: Well, I came from the trial court - so I was a trial court judge in King County Superior Court for 14 years - that felt like a lifetime in many ways. And prior to that, I was a prosecutor in the King County Prosecutor's Office. And then before that, I was just frankly very proud to be working, doing some organizing work in social justice in Chicago. So a little crooked path, but nevertheless, it's what brought me to the court here. [00:01:38] Crystal Fincher: Well, and I have found that those crooked paths are sometimes the most useful and oftentimes give you such helpful perspectives because you're not just coming from one point of view, you've seen things from different perspectives, have walked in different shoes, and have been able to see that. And you're actually the first Asian American, first Latina, first woman of color, and first LGBTQ+ justice on our State Supreme Court. What has that meant to you and how do you think that impacts the work that you do? [00:02:08] Justice Mary Yu: Gosh, Crystal - being the first sometimes can be a real burden in the sense that I know that I worry about not messing it up for others. I'm worried that, really, my path will create more opportunities for others. And so I'm aware of the fact that when people see me, they see all of what you just described. And I think at one level for our community, there's a lot of expectations that others will be able to follow, that this has opened up the door for all of us. On the other hand, I know that with that comes a lot of assumptions about it - our community - some will be positive, some will be negative. I think some people in their own mind wonder or not - I have a packed agenda or am predisposed to do something or decide a case in a particular way because I'm first. And I don't think that that's true, other than I do bring a level of sensitivity to what it's like to not have resources, what it's like to be other, what it's like to be an outsider. And frankly, I see that that's an asset at our table because there are nine of us and it means nine different viewpoints. And frankly, I think the viewpoint that I bring of the other, the outsider, a person of color, a person with little economic resources growing up - they ought be at the table too, not to control, but to contribute. [00:03:33] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely, that's such a great point. A lot of people are just now figuring out how important our courts are, our supreme courts are - not just at a national level, but especially if we lose rights at the national level, our states are really our firewall and the only thing standing between a lot of people and their rights. So right now, when we are basically looking at the overturning of Roe vs Wade - there was the leaked draft that looks like it's going to become official at some time soon. How do you view the state of not only abortion rights, but the ability to be covered by contraception and just access to healthcare for everyone. Where do we stand here in the state? And where do you stand, as a justice, in how you approach these issues? [00:04:33] Justice Mary Yu: Yeah, well, Crystal, I think you're right in the sense that a lot of these issues are going to be decided eventually by state supreme courts. And so state constitutions are pretty important and state supreme courts are important around the country. Each one of us is different, if you will, because our constitutions are different. So there really is no exact pattern of what this all means. In the State of Washington, I think we've already had the executive and the legislative branches indicate that they intend to protect the right to abortion, that they intend to protect healthcare rights for all people. And our branch - we don't declare policies, right? We will wait for a case to come to us. So at one level, it's inappropriate for me to comment on what are we gonna do when that happens. And yet at the same time, I can say is - our court is very protective of our own State Constitution. In our own state, we have had a long history of protecting privacy and individual rights. It's a long track record that our court's not gonna step in and undo. So I think Washingtonians can feel very comfortable that our court's going to follow precedent, our court's going to continue to protect the rights of Washingtonians as we have done for the last couple of hundred years, in some ways - even the territorial courts. So, it's right to be concerned. I can see the concern that people would have of what does this all mean when you look at the United States Supreme Court? But my understanding when I have reviewed the opinion - it really is seeming to indicate that these issues should be decided at the state level. And of course, I think they would be decided by the legislative branch. [00:06:19] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely. I think one thing that surprises people still sometimes - for as much as people who are involved in politics and who do this know all of the rules and policies and everything surrounding elections - I think a lot of people, talk to a lot of people who see our federal Supreme Court being appointed, and then being very surprised that we elect our Supreme Court justices in this state. How do you think that impacts just how we should be looking at the Supreme Court, how we should be looking at these elections, and what is at stake with our State Supreme Court elections. [00:07:01] Justice Mary Yu: First of all, I do think that everybody ought to scrutinize all judges in all judicial elections. I think it's really important that Washington State has retained the right to vote for their judges. Now, what's interesting is we have a hybrid because when there's a vacancy, someone is appointed to fill the vacancy before they're subject to election. For example, I was appointed initially by Governor Locke to the Superior Court. At the Supreme Court, I was appointed by Governor Inslee and then stood for election. So in many ways we have part of the same process in terms of an appointment, but the check on it, if you will, is elections. And elections are an opportunity for the electorate to really evaluate someone and decide whether or not they want to retain that individual as a justice in our state. Unfortunately, people drop right off in the sense that they don't vote all the way down ballot. We are always at the bottom of the ballot and most people would say - I don't know anything about judges. There is an interest this year - because of all these issues that you mentioned, people are suddenly looking and saying who's on our court and what does it mean? And what's their track record and who are they? I think that's a good thing. I think it's really important for people to educate themselves, take another class on civics, and understand who's on our court - how many, who are they, what have they written, what have they said? Because they will - ultimately may be the decision makers on these important matters. It's not only in terms of healthcare, perhaps abortion, but it really includes questions related to race, incarceration, the death penalty - all the things that are important to people and touch them in every single way. So, I hope that people will pay attention, that they will bother to actually invite us to come and speak, invite us to come into classrooms, into forums. All of us are always willing to answer questions about what we do. [00:08:59] Crystal Fincher: And I do have to say - in our interactions with you, you have been exceedingly willing to talk and to share and just wanting to help people understand how the process works, how they can access and be a part of the process. And I really do appreciate just talking about how critical it is to engage in judicial elections at all levels. And even when it comes to just same-sex marriage and rights that people have to love the person who they love without penalty or consequence - was looking back, it was super fun - back in 2012, after the long and hard fought battle for marriage equality was won, you were actually on Jimmy Kimmel doing [Perfectly Named People] and you officiated the first same sex marriages in Washington State. What does it feel like - just the euphoria of that time and winning rights that so many had fought for so long to secure, to landing back where we are right now, where that looks to be in jeopardy once again? [00:10:15] Justice Mary Yu: Yeah, it's really interesting because when we talk about crooked paths, it was a crooked path to get to the place where same-sex marriage would be legal in the State of Washington. Unfortunately our court went - it had the opportunity to decide the matter, decided it incorrectly - and then it went to the people and it was really the vote of the people. It was a popular vote that really granted us the right to marry the person that we love. Again, another check on all of our systems. For me, I have to admit that my bailiff, who was a young Japanese man whose parents had to go to someplace else to get married because they lived in DC and could not marry because they were an interracial couple, said to me - Judge, we shouldn't wait one more moment for people to marry who they wanna marry, so let's start to do weddings at midnight, as soon as the law takes effect. And it was, as you described, it was a joyous moment. It was something to celebrate because finally we had equal rights, right? The right to marry who you love. I would say, Crystal, I don't think that's in jeopardy in the State of Washington, given that it is the law and there hasn't been a challenge to that law. And regardless of what may happen at the federal level, that's not going to really jeopardize the law in the State of Washington as it exists now. Now, if there's a challenge to it because of some federal action, that's a whole different matter - then it would make its way through the legal system, and perhaps somebody might challenge the law that was enacted by the citizens somehow, but that's not the pattern everywhere in the country. And despite the fact that we have a little comfort in the State of Washington, I think we should be concerned because we care about other people, and we care about other people in other states where they don't have a state protection and they did rely on federal law to grant them the right to marry someone. So what we're developing, which should be a concern to everyone, is just this big checkerboard in the country of rights being different, depending on where you live. That's a serious concern, especially for people who are transient - for example, those who are in the military - should their families have certain rights in one state and yet when they move, not have those same rights in another state. And we know that those military personnel will be moving around to different states, so it's a real concern. [00:12:46] Crystal Fincher: It is an absolute concern. One other concern that I've heard a number of people raise is just looking at the quality and the qualification of judges - there being a number of concerns at some of the judges that have been appointed, particularly in the last administration, who aside from questions of partisanship, just on questions of - do you understand the law as it is, in order to protect it. And people may have different perspectives on how to protect the law, how to decide if a case is consistent with it, but truly understanding and being just qualified enough to sit there and make those judgements is a different issue than partisanship. You happen to be rated "Exceptionally Well Qualified" by several bar associations, you're endorsed by all of the other State Supreme Court justices, and just so many people. I could spend, literally five minutes, just talking about all of the awards and accolades that you've been given. But when it comes to some of our local judicial elections that don't receive a lot of scrutiny, where a lot of times newspapers that used to cover those and that used to look into the backgrounds of judges - they've lost a lot of resources - and so there is a fear that there could be people who land in our courts here in this state that just aren't qualified, that are coming with an incorrect perspective of what the law is, who the law protects, and how it should operate. And that especially given this national climate and with some of the just extremism that we have been enduring, that that poses a real danger for local communities, potentially even when we do have a State Supreme Court that is doing its job correctly. How do you view that risk? [00:14:58] Justice Mary Yu: It's a real risk to begin with - what you described isn't something that's sort of a sci-fi movie. It's a real risk, but that's why people like you play an important role, as well as other media outlets. You do invite people to come and speak and talk with you. You have the opportunity to ask some questions and to help educate the electorate. As long as Washington remains a populous state where elections are important, you will always face the risk that there could be somebody who's not qualified or not competent to serve. It's the risk we take, it's the price we pay for the right to vote, the right to selection, the right to have a voice, and not to give up citizen power. But I would hope that the bar associations and other people would continue to try to make themselves available to rate judges, to ask questions, and to try to educate the broader community about who these people are. [00:15:54] Crystal Fincher: What do you think are the most common misconceptions that people have about the court? [00:15:58] Justice Mary Yu: Sometimes I wonder whether there are misconceptions or frankly realities, because I think a lot of people think that our courts are bureaucratic, insensitive, do not treat people of color fairly. And as much as I wanna be defensive about ourselves, I think some of that is very real - is we have to do a better job of becoming more accessible, of becoming a little less bureaucratic and simpler in our procedures. And we're trying to get there. I think some of the other unfortunate misconceptions are - is that we are groupthink or that we decide decisions together just to get along. And yet, if anybody studied our opinions, they would see that is hardly - hardly - the reality is it's hard fought, we sometimes will split 5-4 on some cases. We do our job best when we are in disagreement. So we're not a groupthink entity - none of our courts really, I would hope, are just stamping just to go along and create an assembly line. Every so often you might have a judicial officer that brings shame on the rest of us - somebody who has done something imprudent. I know there are a couple in terms of some sexual assault allegations and that's harmful because it hurts the whole judiciary when something like that occurs. But I think overall, we have a really functional system in the State of Washington and it may be because we're very transparent and open, and people can walk into our courtrooms anytime and watch the proceedings. [00:17:31] Crystal Fincher: You do bring up an interesting issue where there are a couple of judges that are the subjects of investigations or controversies, currently. There was just a recent situation where a judge had used the N-word and had some other behavior that their colleagues thought was inappropriate. Do you think our system of discipline and accountability for judges at all levels is sufficient? [00:17:59] Justice Mary Yu: I do. I do think it is. The Judicial Conduct Commission has the ability to investigate if there is a complaint. And I can say from personal experience, they are robust in scrutinizing judges and trying to really enhance confidence in terms of what we do. I think it's pretty robust and it's a very open process - anybody can file a complaint - that person's identity is protected, so there's no risk to them because judges can - right - they can punish, they can be coercive, they can manipulate. I think it's really important to protect people who would file a complaint, and we have that process. I think probably publicizing the rules might be a good thing in the sense of more people should know that in the State of Washington, we have a code of judicial conduct. We do have a code that governs how we should do what we do. We have a code that really guides us in terms of when we should recuse or not. We have a really strong board of ethics that will provide an opinion if a judge needs specific advice on a particular circumstance and probably the public does not know that. And I would say we might do a better job of letting people know. [00:19:16] Crystal Fincher: That is certainly very helpful. I do think a lot of people don't know. I'm also wondering what more can be done to help people, even if they don't come with a lot of resources, to participate in our judicial system and to be protected by it at all levels in our state. There are so many situations where - not so much at the Supreme Court, even though people are still trying to figure some stuff out there - but where a defendant may be up for eviction and they're in a tough situation, and coming in and they don't know all the rules, their landlord knows all the rules, seems to be very chummy with everyone else in there, 'cause they own a lot of properties and it seems like the system is working for them. They're all familiar with it, they're doing the same song and dance that they do all the time to the detriment of someone who still has rights and protections under the law. What more can be done to help people, especially those who are not familiar with the system or who don't have the money to hire people who are, to be able to receive all of their protections that they're entitled to. [00:20:30] Justice Mary Yu: We've been working really hard to try to increase civil legal aid. And that is to try to ensure that people have representation on the civil side as well. We've received a lot of money from the Legislature this past year to really offer representation to individuals who are being evicted. That's just one particular circumstance, but I have to admit that I'm very sensitive to the fact that there are a lot of hearings where people not only are at a loss in terms of housing, but their jobs, benefits, the inability to access healthcare at times. There are a host of issues where people need representation, so I have to admit that I'm a fan of civil representation 100%. I would love to have a case come to us that gives us the opportunity to do the same thing we did on a criminal side. And that is "Civil Gideon" - is to say that everyone deserves the right to be represented by an attorney, regardless of your income. I know it would be expensive, and yet the rights that are at risk in the civil arena are great, right? It is to be homeless, to be without a job, to be without benefits - are very real things for individuals. So we're trying, I think - our court and along with others are big advocates of trying to ensure that there is civil legal aid available to individuals. [00:21:54] Crystal Fincher: That would be tremendously helpful, and certainly would cost more. I do hope that we get better as a society. And as we - we're having legislative elections and conversations right now, but that we also examine the cost of going without it and what it means to potentially push someone into homelessness, or out of a job, or into financial crisis because they don't have healthcare or the services that they need - it is so costly. And often in ways that can't be compensated or reimbursed. So I just - I completely agree with you and thank you so much for bringing that up. What are other challenges you think the Court is suited to address within the justice system? [00:22:48] Justice Mary Yu: Well, I would say two areas I know that I have spent a lot of energy on that I think are very important is - one, has to do with funding of our courts. As you may know, our courts charge for everything, and you have to pay a filing fee, we also use monetary sanctions. And why do we do that? Because we have to fund ourselves. So I'm a big advocate that some day - there has to be some heavy lifting - and our courts really should be part of the general fund, so that we are not the cash registers. So we don't have to collect the funds in order to pay for the services that we're providing. We're a branch of government that ought to be, again, accessible and available to everyone. I know of no other branch where you have to pay before you get served, and yet that's what happens in our court systems. I know the judges, who are in our municipal courts or in our district courts, feel awful about having to constantly collect money in order to sustain therapeutic courts or any other kind of court that serves people. So that's one that I think is really important and we're working very hard on. The second is we're really wrestling with how do we eradicate racism from our system? It's systemic, it's institutional, and it's taking a lot of work to invite everyone to say - how do we do this better? How do we examine ourselves and our practices and how do we change? So we look at jury diversity, we've looked at legal financial obligations. We are trying very hard at every level to say - this is our responsibility, it is our duty to ensure that every single person can be guaranteed truly not only access, but a fair process. So we're doing a lot of education at this point. And as you may know, in 2020, our court issued a letter to the entire legal community inviting everyone to join us in examining our systems and to eradicating racism at every level. So we're doing that heavy work - those are the two things that I have as a priority, and that I think are important. [00:24:54] Crystal Fincher: And I appreciate that in our recent conversation with Justice Whitener, we talked about that letter and just how important it was in the role that our court took in leading the country, really and acknowledging that and stating plainly this is a problem that we are responsible to solve. It is widely acknowledged - I certainly believe we can't start to solve problems until we acknowledge them, and so having that acknowledgement and having people who are, who seem to be doing the work to fix it is something that I appreciate and I'm thankful for. You - again. I could go on about all of the accolades that you've received for quite some time. You received the 2019 Crosscut Courage in Elected Office award. You recently, just late last year, had your portrait unveiled at Seattle University. You have - my goodness, there's so much - you received the 2020 Latino Bar Association Trailblazer Award, the "Established Leader" Pride Award from Mayor Jenny Durkan in the City of Seattle, the 2018 "Voice of Social Justice" from the Greater Seattle Business Association, the 2017 "Lifetime Achievement" - and I'm telling you, I - this is literally about a sixth of the things that I could list from you. As you look at your career, what are you most proud of? [00:26:34] Justice Mary Yu: It's a hard question. It's hard because when I think about my life and not just a career, I think I am most proud that I think I fulfilled my parents' dream. And that's because both of my parents came to this country very, very poor with nothing. My mother was a farm worker. My father grew up on a ship that just floated around the world for years - he was a boy without a parent. And their dream when they came together, I think, was simply to provide an opportunity for their children to have food on the table, to have a decent job, and to maybe have an education. So when I look back and I look at my life, I think I'm most proud that I fulfilled their dream of in one generation, having the opportunity to be successful. When I look at my career, I would say the thing that I'm most proud of is having been a mentor to so many young people of color who have grown up and who are now judges. I am proud to be the co-chair of the Leadership Institute with Mr. James Williams, where we have graduated 196 lawyers from our leadership program and our focus is on underrepresented lawyers. And what we do is just really enable and empower them to see their gifts and talents. And we have a lot of them who have become judges. And we have one who is the US Attorney for Western Washington - Nick Brown was one of our graduates. So I would say I'm most proud of those acts because it's about giving back and it's about enabling others to do this work, so I would be very happy to rest on those laurels, is to say - you paid it back, Mary, and that's what it's all about. [00:28:33] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely, and they would be so proud and that you are also helping to enable that for so many other people in this state - I certainly appreciate. And I guess as we are looking forward and your continuing service on the court, assuming you're going to be re-elected, assuming all of us get out there and vote to make sure that happens. What do you most want to accomplish moving forward? [00:29:06] Justice Mary Yu: I wanna continue to do what I am doing, 'cause I think that's really important. And I'd like to put some more energy into restoring confidence in our courts. I'm trying to respond to Eric Liu's call to be concerned about the health of our democracy. His call has really resonated with me that we can't live with just accepting polarization - this is not the future of our country and the future of who we are. And that all of us, as judges and lawyers, we should be very, very concerned about keeping our democracy alive, keeping it healthy, and frankly being engaged. [00:29:47] Crystal Fincher: And if you give people some advice on how they can help ensure that within our judicial system, what would you say? [00:29:57] Justice Mary Yu: Crystal, can you pose that question again? I'm sorry. [00:29:59] Crystal Fincher: Oh, sure - no problem. If you were to give folks, one piece of advice for how they could engage with our judicial system, or something that they could do to help it be more equitable and healthier and to restore that trust - what advice would you get for people for what they could do to help that? [00:30:19] Justice Mary Yu: I'd say come to jury service - come to jury service and be a part of the decision making. Restore confidence in what we do - when I was a trial judge, I remember talking to the whole pool of jurors, 70 people who were just dying to get outta there. And I would just say before you raise your hand and ask to leave, I just want you to imagine and think about this - that if it were you, would you not want somebody like yourself to be sitting there to be the decision maker? Because all the people who come into our court system, they're there because there's something really important to them. The things that they hold most near and dear - and it could be innocence in a criminal trial, injury that they haven't been compensated for, some unfair contract, whatever it might be - it's something important to those individuals. And who would you want to be seated, sitting there, listening to this. Would you not want somebody like yourself? And I'd just say - just pause and think about that. And I'd have to say hands went down and people became a little embarrassed and thought - well, yeah, I guess I could do this. I can't do it for 10 weeks, I could do it for two days or three days. So I would say to everyone is - please, if you have the opportunity to serve as a juror, do so. You become the fact finder, which is the most important part of a trial - is somebody who determines what is true and what is not, or what you wanna believe or what you don't wanna believe. It doesn't even matter if it's truthful or not. What do you believe and how do you determine credibility should rest in the hands of other people? So I would say that's something everyone can do - is please come to jury service when you can. And if you get that summons, that's the beginning. From there, you'll be able to see the rest of the flaws and then maybe you can help us figure out the rest. [00:32:17] Crystal Fincher: Great advice. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with us today - sincerely appreciate this conversation and all of the work you've done and continue to do. Thank you so much, Justice Yu. [00:32:29] Justice Mary Yu: Crystal, thank you so much. [00:32:31] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

Folkscene Radio Show
Loudon Wainwright III Interviewed on FolkScene. Recorded 8-25-22

Folkscene Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 49:59


FolkScene welcomes back Loudon Wainwright III to the program., who discusses his new album "Lifetime Achievement" and more. Hosted by Allen Larman. Produced by Peter Cutler. ©FolkScene. It is cool to share FolkScene recordings with your friends, but the reproduction of our programs for commercial purposes is illegal. FolkScene airs on Sunday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m.(PDT) at KPFK 90.7 Los Angeles and online. at www.kpfk.org

The Art Career Podcast
Eileen Myles: New York, Meditation, and Cigarettes

The Art Career Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 47:08


On Season 2 Episode 5 of The Art Career Podcast, Emily McElwreath interviews Eileen Myles prior to the release of Pathetic Literature, a global anthology of pieces from lesser-known classics by luminaries like Franz Kafka, Samuel Delany, and Gwendolyn Brooks to up-and-coming unpublished writers that examine pathos and feeling, giving a well-timed rehab to the word “pathetic”. During the interview the two discuss meditation, Marfa, cigarette smoking and the best city in the world, New York. The Art Career podcast is available on all podcast platforms. Eileen Myles (they/them) came to New York from Boston in 1974 to be a poet, subsequently novelist, public talker and art journalist. A Sagittarius, their 22 books include For Now, evolution, Afterglow, I Must Be Living Twice/new & selected poems, and Chelsea Girls. In 2019 they wrote and directed an 18-minute super 8 film, The Trip, a puppet road film. See it on youtube. Eileen is the recipient of a Guggenheim, a Warhol/Creative Capital Arts Writers grant, 4 Lambda Book Awards, the Shelley Prize, and a poetry award from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. In 2016, they received a Creative Capital grant and the Clark Prize for excellence in art writing. In 2019 Myles received a poetry award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters. In 2020 they got the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Publishing Triangle. They live in New York and Marfa, TX. This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Visit BetterHelp.com/TAC today and get 10% off your first month. theartcareer.com Follow us: @theartcareer Follow Eileen: @eileen.myles Podcast host: @emilymcelwreath_art Music: Chase Johnson Editing: Zach Worden

IN CONVERATION: Podcast of Banyen Books & Sound
Episode 108: Naomi Shihab Nye - An Evening of Poetry & Conversation

IN CONVERATION: Podcast of Banyen Books & Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 58:39


​Banyen Books & Sound and Word Vancouver host Naomi Shihab Nye for a conversation on the art of poetry and creativity, with readings from her new inspirational collection, 'Voices in the Air — Poems for Listeners'. Naomi Shihab Nye, Palestinian American, was born in St. Louis, Missouri and grew up there, in Jerusalem, and in San Antonio, Texas. A graduate of Trinity University, Nye is the recipient of numerous honors and awards for her work, and was recently the Young People's Poet Laureate for the United States (Poetry Foundation.) She has received the Ivan Sandrof Award for Lifetime Achievement from the National Book Critics Circle, and the Lon Tinkle Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Texas Institute of Letters, along with many other awards, and has served as a Chancellor for the Academy of American Poets, as well as a National Council Member for the National Endowment for the Humanities. She was poetry editor for the New York Times from 2019-2020.

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Angela Lansbury 10/21/2022

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 82:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/J3vu4QyhCDU In an illustrious career that included notable stage, film, and television roles, Ms. Lansbury first performed on Broadway in 1957's Hotel Paradiso and throughout her many years performing on Broadway, she was nominated for seven Tony Awards, winning six for the following: Mame (1966); Dear World (1969); Gypsy (1975); Sweeney Todd (1979); Blithe Spirit (2009); and was the recipient of the 2022 Special Award for Lifetime Achievement. She also hosted or co-hosted The Tony Awards five times, more than any other individual. On Broadway Ms. Lansbury's credits include: Hotel Paradiso (1957); A Taste of Honey (1960); Anyone Can Whistle (1964); Mame (1966); Dear World (1969); Gypsy (1974 Revival); The King and I (1977 Revival); Sweeney Todd (1979); A Little Family Business (1982); Mame (1983 Revival); Deuce (2007); Blithe Spirit (2009 Revival); A Little Night Music (2009 Revival); Gore Vidal's The Best Man (2012 Revival). On Tour Ms. Lansbury's credits include: Mame (1968); Gypsy (1974 Revival); Sweeney Todd (1980); Blithe Spirit (2014 Revival). Some of the highlights of this celebration will include discussing Gaslight and The Manchurian Candidate, as well as the 1982 filmed production of Sweeney Todd. National Velvet, Dear Heart, The Harvey Girls, The Manchurian Candidate, etc.

Fresh Air
Remembering Angela Lansbury

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 44:16 Very Popular


The legend of stage and screen died Oct. 11 at age 96. She starred in the TV series Murder, She Wrote, and in such films as The Manchurian Candidate and Disney's Beauty and the Beast. She won Tony Awards for her performances as Mama Rose in Gypsy and the pie shop owner Mrs. Lovett in Sweeney Todd. Earlier this year, she received the Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement. We'll hear Terry Gross's interviews with Lansbury from 2000 and 1980.

Fresh Air
Remembering Angela Lansbury

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 44:16


The legend of stage and screen died Oct. 11 at age 96. She starred in the TV series Murder, She Wrote, and in such films as The Manchurian Candidate and Disney's Beauty and the Beast. She won Tony Awards for her performances as Mama Rose in Gypsy and the pie shop owner Mrs. Lovett in Sweeney Todd. Earlier this year, she received the Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement. We'll hear Terry Gross's interviews with Lansbury from 2000 and 1980.

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!
Shane Mitchell - Co-Founder Of Dervish, World Renowned Irish Traditional Folk Band. Talks About The History Of Irish Music, The Chieftains, U2, And More!

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 33:14


Shane Mitchell is the accordionist and co-founder of Dervish, the award winning traditional Irish folk band. The group has been together for 33 years, all hailing from County Sligo. They've toured the world playing the Great Irish Songbook. In 2019 Dervish received a Lifetime Achievement award from the BBC, and the band has been described by the BBC as “an icon of Irish music”.My featured song is “Country Drive” from the Trippin' album by my band, Project Grand Slam. Spotify link here.“Dream With Robert Miller”. Click here.---------------------------------------------If you enjoyed the show, please Subscribe, Rate, and Review. Just Click Here. Shane and I discuss the following:Dervish has been together for 33 yearsAll hail from County SligoAll had day jobs before forming the groupTraditional Irish folk music definedIrish pub jamsGreat Irish Songbook In the Songfest portion we play and discuss:The May Morning DewOn Ragland Road (ft. Vince Gill)The Green Gowned LassThe Boots Of Spanish Leather “Live At SteelStacks” is the new 5-song EP by Robert and his band, Project Grand Slam. The release captures the band at the top of their game in performance at the SteelStacks concert venue in Bethlehem, PA. The EP features five of the band's Greatest Hits written by Robert: “Redemption Road”, “I'm Falling Off Of The World”, “Aches And Pains”, “The One I'm Not Supposed To See” and “Yeah Yeah”, which collectively show off the breadth, scope and sound of the band.  The EP has been highly praised by musicians and reviewers alike. Elliott Randall, of Steely Dan fame, the guitarist who recorded the unforgettable solos in ‘Reelin' In The Years', calls Live At SteelStacks “Captivating!”. Tony Carey, the incredible multi-talented artist who has produced Joe Cocker, Eric Burden and John Mayall, says “PGS burns down the house!”. Alan Hewitt of the Moody Blues says “Full of life!” Melody Maker says simply “Virtuoso musicians!”, and Hollywood Digest says “Such a great band!”.  “Live At SteelStacks” can be streamed on Spotify, Amazon, Apple and all the other streaming platforms, and can be downloaded at The PGS Store. “All Of The Time” is Robert's most recent single by his band Project Grand Slam. It's a playful, whimsical love song. It's light and airy and exudes the happiness and joy of being in love. The reviewers agree. Melody Maker gives it 5 Stars and calls it “Pure bliss…An intimate sound with abundant melodic riches!”. Pop Icon also gives it 5 Stars and calls it “Ecstasy…One of the best all-around bands working today!”. And Mob York City says simply “Excellence…A band in full command of their powers!” Watch the video here. You can stream “All Of The Time” on Spotify, Apple, Amazon or any of the other streaming platforms. And you can download it here. “The Shakespeare Concert” is the latest album by Robert's band, Project Grand Slam. It's been praised by famous musicians including Mark Farner of Grand Funk Railroad, Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March, Joey Dee of Peppermint Twist fame, legendary guitarist Elliott Randall, and celebrated British composer Sarah Class. The music reviewers have called it “Perfection!”, “5 Stars!”, “Thrilling!”, and “A Masterpiece!”. The album can be streamed on Spotify, Apple and all the other streaming services. You can watch the Highlight Reel HERE. And you can purchase a digital download or autographed CD of the album HERE.  “The Fall Of Winter” is Robert's single in collaboration with legendary rocker Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March and formerly with Survivor. Also featuring renowned guitarist Elliott Randall (Steely Dan/Doobie Brothers) and keyboard ace Tony Carey (Joe Cocker/Eric Burden). “A triumph!” (The Indie Source). “Flexes Real Rock Muscle!” (Celebrity Zone). Stream it on Spotify or Apple. Watch the lyric video here. Download it here. Robert's “Follow Your Dream Handbook” is an Amazon #1 Bestseller. It's a combination memoir of his unique musical journey and a step by step how-to follow and succeed at your dream. Available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.  Audio production:Jimmy RavenscroftKymera Films Connect with Shane at:https://www.dervish.ie Connect with the Follow Your Dream Podcast:WebsiteFacebookLinkedInEmail RobertYouTube Listen to the Follow Your Dream Podcast on these podcast platforms:CastBoxSpotifyApple Follow Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, and his music:WebsiteInstagramPGS StoreYouTubeFacebookSpotify MusicApple MusicEmail

Smoky Mountain Air
Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music—E5: Amythyst Kiah with Jack Tottle

Smoky Mountain Air

Play Episode Play 28 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 50:08 Transcription Available


Dr. William Turner and Dr. Ted Olson talk to Amythyst Kiah, an acclaimed musician and songwriter whose work is redefining genre boundaries and has established her as a distinctive new voice of Appalachia. Reconnecting with Amythyst in this episode is her mentor, Jack Tottle, an accomplished musician with a long career as a singer, songwriter, author, and educator.Amythyst Kiah has won critical acclaim as a member of the group Our Native Daughters and for her most recent album, Wary + Strange, which melds roots traditions with alternative rock in songs of personal revelation. She is a native of Chattanooga, TN, and a graduate of East Tennessee State University's Bluegrass, Old-Time, and Roots program. She received a Grammy nomination in 2020 for “Black Myself," a song she wrote to confront the oppression of her ancestors and to honor their strength.Jack Tottle is a multi-instrumentalist, recording artist, songwriter, author, and educator whose career has allowed him to share the stage with some of America's most revered bluegrass artists. He founded the first comprehensive bluegrass music studies program at a four-year university, East Tennessee State's Bluegrass, Old-Time, and Roots Music Studies program, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. For many years, he has examined the significant influence of Black Appalachian music on the bluegrass canon.Dr. William Turner is an African American studies scholar and retired Distinguished Professor of Appalachian Studies and Regional Ambassador from Berea College. He was also a research assistant to Roots author Alex Haley and co-editor of the groundbreaking Blacks in Appalachia. In 2021, Turner received Western Carolina University's individual Mountain Heritage Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions to Southern Appalachian studies. His memoir The Harlan Renaissance, available from West Virginia University Press, was awarded the prestigious Weatherford Award at the 2022 Appalachian Studies Association Conference.Dr. Ted Olson is a music historian and professor of Appalachian Studies at East Tennessee State University. He is the author of many books, articles, reviews, encyclopedia entries, and oral histories. Olson has produced and compiled a number of documentary albums of traditional Appalachian music including GSMA's On Top of Old Smoky and Big Bend Killing. His work has received a number of awards, including seven Grammy nominations. The East Tennessee Historical Society honored Olson with its Ramsey Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2021.Music featured includes:1.    “John Henry” and “Pretty Polly” performed by Amythyst Kiah and Roy Andrade from GSMA's album Big Bend Killing2.    “The Bluegrass Sound” by Jack Tottle, from a collaborative album he produced called The Bluegrass Sound and Other Stories3.    “Black Myself” performed live by Amythyst Kiah for our podcast. Recordings are available on Songs of Our Native Daughters and Wary + Strange4.    “Goin Down this Road Feelin' Bad” performed by Amythyst Kiah and Roy Andrade from GSMA's album On Top of Old Smoky: New Old-Time Smoky Mountain Music

The Catholic Culture Podcast
145 - Catholic Imagination Conference poetry reading

The Catholic Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 68:16


The Catholic Culture Podcast Network sponsored a poetry reading session at the fourth biennial Catholic Imagination Conference, hosted by the University of Dallas. Thomas Mirus moderated this session on Sept. 30, 2022, introducing poets Paul Mariani, Frederick Turner, and James Matthew Wilson. Paul Mariani, University Professor Emeritus at Boston College, is the author of twenty-two books, including biographies of William Carlos Williams, John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Hart Crane, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Wallace Stevens. He has published nine volumes of poetry, most recently All that Will be New, from Slant. He has also written two memoirs, Thirty Days and The Mystery of It All: The Vocation of Poetry in the Twilight of Modernism. His awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA and NEH. He is the recipient of the John Ciardi Award for Lifetime Achievement in Poetry and the Flannery O'Connor Lifetime Achievement Award. His poetry has appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines, including Image, Poetry, Presence, The Agni Review, First Things, The New England Review, The Hudson Review, Tri-Quarterly, The Massachusetts Review, and The New Criterion. Frederick Turner, Founders Professor of Arts and Humanities (emeritus) at the University of Texas at Dallas, was educated at Oxford University. A poet, critic, translator, philosopher, and former editor of The Kenyon Review, he has authored over 40 books, including The Culture of Hope, Genesis: An Epic Poem, Shakespeare's Twenty-First Century Economics, Natural Religion, and most recently Latter Days, with Colosseum Books. He has co-published several volumes of Hungarian and German poetry in translation, including Goethe's Faust, Part One. He has been nominated internationally over 40 times for the Nobel Prize for Literature and translated into over a dozen languages. James Matthew Wilson is Cullen Foundation Chair of English Literature and Founding Director of the MFA program in Creative Writing at the University of Saint Thomas, in Houston. He serves also as Poet-in-Residence of the Benedict XVI Institute for Sacred Music and Divine Worship, as Editor of Colosseum Books, and Poetry Editor of Modern Age magazine. He is the author of twelve books, including The Strangeness of the Good. His work has won the Hiett Prize, the Parnassus Prize, the Lionel Basney Award (twice), and the Catholic Media Book Award for Poetry.

Opening the Box of Knowledge Podcast
Episode 5 – Lisa Murkowski

Opening the Box of Knowledge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 59:07


In Episode 5 we were so lucky to have Senator Lisa Murkowski with us for an engaging conversation! Born in Ketchikan, Alaska, Senator Murkowski is a lifelong Alaskan whose family heritage goes back three generations. Senator Murkowski was adopted into the Deisheetaan (Beaver) clan and given the Tlingit name Aan shaawátk'I, which means ‘Lady of the Land'. She is the first member of the Alaska congressional delegation to earn the National Indian Health Board's Jake White Crow Award for Lifetime Achievement and the National Congress of American Indians' Congressional Leadership Award. We hope you enjoy the conversation and we can't wait continue this journey of Opening the Box of Knowledge!

Leading Improvements in Higher Education with Stephen Hundley
s03e01: Recognizing the Center for Assessment and Research Studies, 2022 Recipient of the Trudy W. Banta Lifetime Achievement in Assessment Award

Leading Improvements in Higher Education with Stephen Hundley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 56:53


This episode features three colleagues James Madison University's (JMU) Center for Assessment and Research Studies, or CARS, all of whom are also faculty members in JMU's Department of Graduate Psychology:  Sara Finney, Keston Fulcher, and Megan Good.  Sara is an Associate Director in CARS.  Keston previously served as Executive Director of CARS and is an Improvement Strategist.  Megan currently serves as Interim Executive Director of CARS.The Center for Assessment and Research Studies is recipient of the 2022 Trudy W. Banta Lifetime Achievement in Assessment Award.  Keston is the inaugural recipient of the Improvement Influencer Award.  Both of these awards are bestowed by the Assessment Institute in Indianapolis. This season of Leading Improvements in Higher Education is sponsored by the Center for Assessment and Research Studies at James Madison University; learn more at jmu.edu/assessment.Episode recorded:  September 2022.  Host:  Stephen Hundley.  Producers:  Chad Beckner, Caleb Keith, and Shirley Yorger.  Original music:  Caleb Keith.  This award-winning podcast is a service of the Assessment Institute in Indianapolis; learn more at assessmentinstitute.iupui.edu.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Judy Woodruff honored with Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 1:10


Our own Judy Woodruff was honored with the Emmy Award for Lifetime Achievement in Television News. She shared some words of wisdom as she accepted the award at the News and Documentary Emmys ceremony in New York on Wednesday. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn
Loudon Wainwright

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 49:54


Loudon Wainwright III is a singer and songwriter. He began his folk career in the late 60s, and released his self-titled debut in 1970. He's occasionally referred to as a novelty singer, but his broad musical catalog has proven that to be untrue. Loudon has recorded 26 studio albums, six compilations, and four live albums. His album High Wide and Handsome: The Charlie Poole Project brought him his first Grammy in 2010 for Best Traditional Folk Album. He recently turned 75 and commemorated this milestone with his newest album called Lifetime Achievement. He stops by to chat about the album and plays some music.

Everything Co-op with Vernon Oakes
Gary Oakland, former Executive Director of BECU, discusses his Career in Cooperatives

Everything Co-op with Vernon Oakes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 46:50


August 11, 2022 Everything Co-op continues its recognition of the 2022 Cooperative Hall of Fame Inductees, with Gary Oakland, former Executive Director of BECU. Vernon and Gary discuss his 32-year career at BECU, and how he helped grow BECU to become the 4th largest Credit Union in the Country. After earning a degree in economics from Washington State University in 1975, Gary started his cooperative journey as a teller at Seattle Telco Federal Credit Union. He went on to work for BECU in 1980 where he began his 32-year tenure, first as Director of Finance and then as CEO in 1986. When he took over BECU, it had around $700 million in assets. Gary helped grow Washington-based BECU to the 4th largest credit union in the country, with 700,000 members and $10 billion in assets when he retired as CEO in 2012. While Gary led BECU to unprecedented growth, it was his commitment to improving the financial lives of members and serving the needs of other cooperatives and communities, that make him a true cooperator. He helped found two low-income-designated credit unions to help ensure people in those communities had access to safe and affordable financial services. He located the funds to keep more than a dozen low-income credit unions afloat during times of hardship and created a credit union service organization that provides mortgage solutions to approximately 600 credit unions.  Gary's commitment to financial education, and education in general, was not limited to BECU's membership. Gary raised the first $500,000 to fund the PBS syndicated show Biz Kid$ and encouraged a coalition of credit unions to bring $2.6 million to support the program. This Emmy Award-winning television program, and now popular website, teaches financial literacy and entrepreneurship to middle school and high school aged children.  The impact of Gary's work is felt well beyond BECU and its members and communities. A dedicated and loyal credit union leader, his generosity and selflessness were recognized when he was awarded the Herb Wegner Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2013. Gary Oakland's legacy will inevitably be his unwavering commitment to member service.

Front Row
Loudon Wainwright III performs live, the Booker Prize shortlist, studying English Literature

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 42:21


American singer songwriter Loudon Wainwright III performs live in the studio and talks about his decades-long career, his current UK tour and his latest album titled Lifetime Achievement. Tonight the six books on this year's Booker Prize for Fiction shortlist will be announced. The literary critic Max Liu joins us to comment. One of these six shortlisted authors will be chosen as the overall winner on 17 October when the ceremony will be broadcast live on Front Row. English Literature has dropped out of the top ten A-level subjects in England for the first time. What does it reveal about the status of the subject and its importance in the creative industries? Samira hears from Vicky Bolton, head of English at Wales High school in Sheffield; Sam Cairns, co-director of The Cultural Learning Alliance; and Geoff Barton, a former English teacher and head teacher, now the general secretary of the teaching union, the Association of School and College Leaders. Presenter: Samira Ahmed Producer: Paul Waters Image: Loudon Wainwright III Photographer credit: Shervin Lainez

Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine's Fiction Podcast
Episode 155: EPISODE 155: “Sit. Stay. Die.” by Michael Bracken and Sandra Murphy

Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine's Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 38:00


EQMM was brought into the world by two writers who collaborated on nearly every piece of fiction they wrote, Frederic Dannay and Manfred B. Lee. This month we feature a story by two writers who have collaborated with each other several times, most recently on a story for EQMM. Michael Bracken is the author of well over a thousand published short stories and he's a recipient of the Edward D. Hoch Memorial Golden Derringer Award for Lifetime Achievement, among other honors. Sandra Murphy is a Derringer Award winner who has had a collection of stories published by Untreed Reads. She is the reader for this recording of “Sit. Stay. Die.” by Michael Bracken and Sandra Murphy, first published in the July/August 2022 issue of EQMM. http://www.crimefictionwriter.com

A Mick A Mook and A Mic
Lesley Visser – The most accomplished female broadcaster of all time.

A Mick A Mook and A Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 83:52


Lesley Visser is the most highly acclaimed female sportscaster of all time.Lesley was the first women recognized by the Pro Football Hall of Fame, as she was the 2006 recipient of the Pro Football Hall of Fame's Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award. The award is given annually by the Hall of Fame to recognize “long-time exceptional contributions to radio and television in professional football.”In six Halls of Fame, Visser is often recognized as the “First” – the first woman enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame; the first woman to report from a Super Bowl sideline; the first woman to cover the NFL as a beat; the first and only woman to present the Championship Lombardi Trophy at the Super Bowl; the first female sportscaster to carry the Olympic Torch, the first woman on “Monday Night Football”, and the first female analyst in both Radio and TV.Lesley is also the only sportscaster, male or female, to have worked on the Network Broadcasts of the Final Four, the Super Bowl, the NBA Finals, the Olympics, the World Series, the Triple Crown, the World Figure Skating Championship, and the US Open Tennis.She was voted the No. 1 Female Sportscaster of All-Time by the National Sportscasters of America.Lesley's career began at the Boston Globe in 1974, after she won a Carnegie Foundation Grant, given to only 20 women in the country who wanted to go into jobs that were 95% male.She has been named a Muhammad Ali “Daughter of Greatness” and was honored for her achievements by the 18th World Congress of Sport. In 2016, she won the Newseum Award for Lifetime Achievement, which was first given to Walter Cronkite.Lesley had the privilege of reporting from the ‘Fall of the Berlin Wall' in 1989. She also had the honor of throwing out the first pitch for her beloved Red Sox in 2013.Lesley was elected to the Sportswriters Hall of Fame for her work at the Boston Globe, magazines and CBS.com. She was voted to the Sports Broadcasters Hall of Fame for her work at CBS, ABC and HBO.Be sure to join Frank and Billy on August 24th for this special episode of ‘A Mick A Mook and A Mic', as they interview Lesley Visser, a great person and an iconic sportscaster. 

Serious Privacy
Let's Talk Apprenticeships with Barry Moult

Serious Privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 34:32


This episode of Serious Privacy, co-host Ralph O'Brien joins Dr. K Royal of Outschool while Paul Breitbarth is on vacation for the last of his 3 weeks. This week, Dr. K and Ralph chat with Barry Moult, Director at BJM IG Privacy Ltd. Barry is well known in the data protection industry, especially in the UK, where he has been recognized for his tremendous work and efforts. His awards include: ICO Excellence in DP Award winner 2020, the NHS SIGN IG Professional of the Year Award 2021, named an IRMS Fellow, and recognized with the AMIRMS & Life Time Achievement 2020. Barry entered the privacy world as the Data Protection Act was passed and was a nurse at the time. We discuss how privacy grew and the IG apprenticeship program that just launched.Join us as we discuss some boots on the ground work and hopes for the future.. As always, if you have comments or questions, let us know - LinkedIn, Twitter @podcastprivacy @euroPaulB @heartofprivacy @trustArc Ralph as @IGrobrien and email seriousprivacy@trustarc.com. Please do like and write comments on your favorite podcast act so other professionals can find us easier. 

The Caring Economy with Toby Usnik
Richard Quest, Anchor and Correspondent, CNN Business Editor

The Caring Economy with Toby Usnik

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 32:12


Richard Quest is CNN's foremost international business correspondent and anchor of Quest Means Business, the definitive word on how we earn and spend our money. Based in New York, he is one of the most instantly recognizable members of the CNN team. Additionally, Quest is the host of two of CNN International's signature monthly feature programs: Business Traveller, which covers global business travel trends, issues and innovations of the travel industry, and Quest's World of Wonder, an immersive travel series that finds Quest exploring a new destination each month and meeting fascinating people who reveal the heart of the city. Quest also serves as CNN Business editor-at-large and often hosts the digital live financial show "Markets Now" live streamed from the floor of the NYSE every Wednesday at 12:45pm ET at CNNMoney.com/MarketsNow. Quest Means Business, which airs weekdays at 3pm ET / 8pm BST on CNN International, destroys the myth that business is boring, bridging the gap between hard economics and entertaining television. Quest is also the face of CNN's coverage of major UK events. He led CNN's coverage of the 'Brexit' vote in 2016, and has continued to report on the impact the historic vote is making on markets, economies and businesses. He used his expert knowledge of the British Royal Family to front the channel's coverage of the 2018 marriage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle; the Queen's Diamond Jubilee celebrations in 2012 live from the banks of the River Thames; and the 2011 marriage of Prince William and Kate Middleton, now the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. His coverage of breaking news, which has spanned more than two decades, has seen him report on a range of stories from the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, the death of Yasser Arafat, the Lockerbie Pan Am 103 crash to the death of Michael Jackson. Quest is more than just business; there are few journalists who have had guests as varied, from His Holiness, The Dalai Lama to actress Joan Collins to founder of Playboy Magazine, Hugh Hefner. The United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) awarded Quest the 2013 UNWTO Award for Lifetime Achievement in recognition of his work as a business journalist reporting on the tourism industry. Prior to joining CNN, he worked at the BBC, where he was the North America business correspondent, based on Wall Street for 12 years. Quest is British, holds an LLB (Hons) degree in Law from Leeds University, and was called to the Bar. The Caring Economy made it onto FeedSpots Top 30 CSR Podcasts Don't forget to check out my book that inspired this podcast series, The Caring Economy: How to Win With Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/toby-usnik/support

Movers & Shapers: A Dance Podcast
MSP 138: Joan Myers Brown and Kim Bears-Bailey

Movers & Shapers: A Dance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 65:42


Today's guest on Movers & Shapers are Joan Myers Brown and Kim Bears-Bailey of Philadanco. Joan is the founder of Philadanco which was created in 1970 out of a need to provide performance opportunities and training for Black dancers. PHILADANCO!  has since grown into a professional dance company that is recognized around the world for its artistic integrity, superbly trained dancers, and captivating performances. Of her many honors, she is the honorary chairperson for the International Association of Blacks in Dance (IABD), an organization she established in 1991, and she received the prestigious National Medal of Arts Award and 2019 Bessie Award for Lifetime Achievement in Dance for her choreographic influence on black dance in America.  Kim joined Philadanco in 1981 and its current Artistic Director. She is a Bessie's award recipient and Associate Professor of Dance at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Kim is one of few artists granted permission to remount the works of many world-renowned choreographers including Talley Beatty, Pearl Primus and Gene Hill Sagan. For more in this episode of Movers & Shapers: themovingarchitects.org/podcasts Follow us on Facebook and Instagram!

Writers on Writing
Novelist Susan Straight, Mecca

Writers on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


Susan Straight, author of the novel, Mecca, which Michael Connelly called "a masterpiece," talks with Barbara DeMarco-Barrett about her new novel and how it came to be. Susan Straight was born in Riverside, CA, and still lives there with her family. She's passionate about home, California, the Santa Ana River, the foothills and the deserts, and has been writing about southern California and the inland area for forty years. From her kitchen window, she can see the hospital where she was born, which her three daughters find kind of hilarious and pathetic; most days, she walks her dog Angel beside the Santa Ana River as she has since childhood, and then past the classrooms at Riverside City College, where she wrote her first short story, at 16, which is also kind of hilarious, but hopeful. She has written about the people of California for her new memoir, In the Country of Women, based on women's stories told for five generations to Straight and her daughters, in driveways and trucks, at parks and funerals. She's published that memoir, eight novels, and two books for children. Her short stories and essays have been published everywhere from The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and The Guardian to Alta, The Believer, McSweeneys, Zoetrope, Reader's Digest, Real Simple, and Family Circle. She's been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Lannan Prize for Fiction, a California Gold Medal for Fiction, and the Kirsch Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes. Download audio. (Recorded on July 12, 2022) Music and sound design by Travis Barrett Support the show on Patreon! Barbara DeMarco-Barrett: www.penonfire.com Marrie Stone: www.marriestone.com Travis Barrett: https://travisbarrett.mykajabi.com

You Just Have To Laugh
267. X and O gets the Square as Hollywood Squares Host Peter Marshall (now 96) shares his amazing show business career.

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 29:13


Ralph Pierre LaCock (born March 30, 1926), better known by his stage name Peter Marshall, is an American former game show host, television and radio personality, singer, and actor. He was the original host of The Hollywood Squares from 1966 to 1981 and has almost fifty television, movie, and Broadway credits. Peter Marshall hosted a popular mid-day radio show for more than 15 years on the Music of Your Life radio network. Broadway Peter Marshall's Broadway credits include Skyscraper, La Cage aux Folles and The Music Man. West End In London's 1962 West End production, Marshall appeared in the stage musical Bye Bye Birdie, staring the lead character of Albert Peterson. The production ran for 268 performances. Peter also won the Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show Host four times. In 2006 he received the annual Bill Cullen Award for Lifetime Achievement, from the non-profit organization, Game Show Congress. On October 13, 2007, Marshall was one of the first inductees into the American TV Game Show Hall of Fame in Las Vegas.  

Smoky Mountain Air
Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music—E4: Dom Flemons, The American Songster

Smoky Mountain Air

Play Episode Play 29 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 58:25 Transcription Available


On this episode of our mini-series Sepia Tones, Dr. William Turner and Dr. Ted Olson welcome Dom Flemons, a renowned performer of American folk music and a founding member of The Carolina Chocolate Drops. Citing a variety of musical influences—including the legendary Howard Armstrong and the inimitable Elizabeth Cotten—Flemons shares his journey into becoming a tradition-bearer of old-time music and demonstrates the subtleties of rural black musical styles he's learned along the way. Dom Flemons is a founding member of the Grammy-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops, a two-time Emmy nominee, and the creative force behind a number of solo works including, most recently, Black Cowboys and Prospect Hill: The American Songster Omnibus. He is a multi-instrumentalist whose repertoire spans the history of American folklore, ballads, and tunes.Dr. William Turner is a long-time African American studies scholar and retired Distinguished Professor of Appalachian Studies and Regional Ambassador from Berea College. He was also a research assistant to Roots author Alex Haley and co-editor of the groundbreaking Blacks in Appalachia. In 2021, Turner received Western Carolina University's individual Mountain Heritage Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions to Southern Appalachian studies. His memoir called The Harlan Renaissance, available from West Virginia University Press, was awarded the prestigious Weatherford Award at the 2022 Appalachian Studies Association Conference.Dr. Ted Olson is a music historian and professor of Appalachian Studies at East Tennessee State University. He is the author of many books, articles, reviews, encyclopedia entries, and oral histories. Olson has produced and compiled a number of documentary albums of traditional Appalachian music including GSMA's own On Top of Old Smoky and Big Bend Killing. His work has received a number of awards, including seven Grammy nominations. The East Tennessee Historical Society honored Olson with its Ramsey Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2021.Music featured includes:1.    "John Henry" performed by Amythyst Kiah and Roy Andrade from GSMA's album Big Bend Killing2.    “Going Down the Road Feelin' Bad” and “Knox County Stomp,” both from Dom Flemons' most recent album, Black Cowboys, from Smithsonian Folkways Recordings3.    “Po' Black Sheep” performed by Dom Flemons as part of the African American Legacy Recordings series, co-produced with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Courtesy of the Library of Congress4.    “Dona Got a Ramblin' Mind” and "Cornbread and Butterbeans" both by The Carolina Chocolate Drops and Joe Thompson, from their collaborative album released by Music Maker Foundation5.    And a selection of music performed for our podcast by Dom Flemons

The Dude Therapist
How be create Thrivers and Unselfish Kids w/ Dr. Michele Borba

The Dude Therapist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 39:50


Michele Borba, Ed. D., is the author of UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World and is an internationally renowned educational psychologist, and an expert in parenting, resilience, and character development. A sought-after motivational speaker, she has spoken in 19 countries on five continents and served as a consultant tohundreds of schools and corporations including Sesame Street, Harvard, U.S. Air Force Academy, 18 US Army bases in Europe and the Asian-Pacific, H.R.H. the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, a TEDx Talk: “Empathy Is a Verb” and is the recipient of Sanford N. McDonnell Award for Lifetime Achievement in Character Education. She offers realistic, research-based advice culled from a career working with over one million parents and educators worldwide. Dr. Borba is a regular NBC contributor who appears regularly on Today and has been featured as a parenting expert on Dateline, The View, Dr. Phil, NBC Nightly News, Fox & Friends, Dr. Oz, and The Early Show, among many others. She lives in Palm Springs, California, with her husband, and is the mother of three grown sons.Support the show

Relentless Health Value
EP374: How to Grade a Health Plan and a Few Validated Success Stories, With Dave Chase, Cofounder of Health Rosetta

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:34


So, let's put the last, I don't know, 300 episodes of Relentless Health Value into perspective here. The USA wastes about $1.5 trillion a year on some combination of paying way too much for low-value care, fraud, and waste—$1.5 trillion down the drain. As my guest, Dave Chase, says in this healthcare podcast, if this was a country, what we waste would be the 11th biggest GDP in the world. We could call it Healthcare-istan. Meanwhile, outcomes aren't anything to brag about on the world stage, and 41% of American adults have medical debt in this country. Also, all across the country, people making all kinds of healthcare decisions to save money that are clinically toxic. Financial toxicity is clinical toxicity, right? You know this already. You listen to this show. I just saw yet another study the other day—actually this one about cancer outcomes and how they are appreciably worse when patients are worried about how much money their treatment will cost. And a lot of people in this country—many people with a Part D plan, commercial insurance with big deductibles—there's a lot of people in this country who cannot afford tens of thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket spend every year. But let's change gears and talk about some good stuff, some inroads that are being made. Let's talk about Rosen Hotels for a moment. Rosen Hotels is a bright spot, for sure, in all of this. They are a leading indicator of what is possible. Rosen Hotels, which is a hotel chain in Florida, they saved over $450 million in healthcare costs and have healthier, happier employees. They spend 55% less per capita on health benefits despite having an employee population with significant health challenges. They saved so much money that Rosen was able to set up a scholarship fund so that not only kids of employees (and employees themselves) but also kids in the community can go to college. Turnover there is lower. Retention is higher. Employees are healthier. I mean, the ROI of a CEO and a CFO getting engaged and taking back control over their health benefits from third parties? It's huge. Check out this article about Rosen and also Dave Chase's TED Talk about Rosen.   My guest today, Dave Chase, says that what they did at Rosen Hotels was actually an inspiration for Health Rosetta, which is the organization that he founded to help employers take control of the out-of-control dysfunctional health benefits market in this country. Dave Chase says that the Health Rosetta community knows something that most don't (yet). Dave Chase has said that healthcare is fixed/fixable. He said that healthcare actually isn't expensive. Clinicians only receive $0.27 of every $1 that's ostensibly spent on healthcare. What is expensive is price gouging, profiteering, administrative bloat, fraud, and inappropriate treatment. And Dave Chase has also said that we're already investing more than enough money to not only fund world-class healthcare for everyone but also take all that money from Healthcare-istan and fund what drives 80% of health outcomes (ie, income, education, career opportunities, and clean air and water). There's so much money that is being wasted in healthcare. But all of this other stuff could be funded if we simply pay what we should be paying. (See Dave Chase's LinkedIn post to learn more about this.)   Health Rosetta currently has about five million lives stewarded through plans managed by their Health Rosetta advisors. That's probably another bright spot right there—five million lives. Another bright spot is the work of the Nuka System in Alaska. Listen to EP312 with Douglas Eby, MD, MPH, CPE. The Nuka System has won award after award for being one of the best health systems in the country, and it serves a challenging patient population for less money than most Medicaid plans.   So, here you have two entities, Rosen Hotels and the Nuka System, dealing with (on a good day) patient populations with multiple chronic conditions, high maternal mortality … At Rosen, 56% of their pregnancies are categorized as high risk, which not only has generational human consequences, of course, but is also a notorious budget-buster, as Dave Chase has said. There's substance abuse issues. These are patient populations who are doing appreciably better and cost far less than if they were covered by almost any other health plan in this country. Here's yet one more bright spot example company, and that's Pacific Steel. During our conversation, Dave Chase mentioned that the CFO of Pacific Steel said that when they went from spending $8 million in health benefits a year to spending under $3.5 million—basically cutting their healthcare costs in less than half—the CFO said that in order to make that same amount of net income, Pacific Steel would have had to raise their top-line sales revenue by 25% to 30%. So, okay … you're a CEO, and here's your choice to appease your shareholders or make your own bonus. Option A: Go out right now and figure out how to sell 30% more. Or Option B: Get your healthcare house in order, which may also improve retention if you do it right. To me, this doesn't seem like a head-scratcher. Two things that Dave Chase also brought up during our conversation that I thought were thought provoking. First, change is happening regionally and seems to adhere to the so-called “rule of three,” meaning that if three employers have worked with a qualified employee benefit consultant (EBC) and really fixed up their health benefits, then a cascade will start in that region. And secondly—and I never thought about this before—we spend over $4 trillion through various health plans (employer, ACA, Medicare, Medicaid), and yet have little to no objective mark of value for how good any given health plan is. The closest thing, as Dave Chase says, might be Medicare Advantage Star Ratings. To address this problem, Health Rosetta invested seven figures to build a Plan Grader™. This really helps employers make sure that the plan they put in place is a win-win the whole way around. You can learn more at healthrosetta.org or by emailing Dave at dave@healthrosetta.org.   Dave Chase leads the mission for Health Rosetta, which is to empower community-owned health plans (COHPs) with the vision of COHPs everywhere. Health Rosetta's purpose is creating and reinvesting the Health Rosetta Dividend (ie, redeploying the currently wasted $1.5 trillion in healthcare to a higher and better use—the social determinants of health such as income, better food, etc). Health Rosetta makes health plans local, organic, and sustainable transforming health plans from the number one driver of inflation, poverty, and bankruptcy to drivers of well-being and wealth. Health Rosetta ends the 30-year heist of stolen income from the working middle class. Health Rosetta plans have restored the American Dream for tens of thousands of people, giving them raises/bonuses and healthcare they can access without fear of bankruptcy. Individuals that had sky-high deductibles and co-pays no longer have that as a barrier (typically they are $0). School districts that once couldn't give teachers raises or had to have school levies to pay for music, art, and sports programs now have the funds (due to healthcare savings) to pay teachers more, have bigger class sizes, avoid cutting extracurricular programs, and more—all while giving teachers much better care outcomes. Health Rosetta's Plan Grader™ assesses the 40 most important attributes of a health plan “prescribing” proven strategies to transition into local, sustainable, world-class health plans. Health Rosetta community's transparency set a new industry standard and became the law of the land due to changes in laws that represent the largest change in employee health benefits since 1943. Through best-selling books, writing for various media outlets, TED Talk, and TV/film, Dave has reached over 10 million people with the goal of engaging, equipping, and empowering a broad grassroots movement designed to restore hope, health, and well-being to our communities. Dave received the Health Value Awards' Lifetime Achievement for Health Benefits Innovation at the World Health Care Congress. Prior to Health Rosetta, Dave cofounded Avado, which was acquired by and integrated into WebMD/Medscape, and founded Microsoft's $3-billion, 28,000-partner healthcare ecosystem. Outside of work, Dave coaches the next generation of leaders as a high school track and cross-country coach of state champion teams and individuals. Dave was a PAC-12 800 meter and 4×400 competitor. Most importantly, devotion to faith, family, and friends underpin a desire to be a servant leader to the five million lives (and growing) stewarded through the Health Rosetta community. 06:57 Why did Dave Chase start Health Rosetta? 07:42 EP312 with Douglas Eby, MD, MPH, CPE.07:51 How does Health Rosetta deem which health plans are succeeding? 11:07 What are the most important areas and factors for grading health plans? 11:22 EP365 with Scott Haas.11:38 “That $1.5 trillion of waste, how is that possible? Well, it's all codified in the contracts.” 12:18 “You can't manage what you can't measure.” 16:59 “What could be more disruptive than 30 years of wage gains stolen by the status quo health plans?” 17:39 “This is the last major area to modernize inside of corporate America.” 18:15 “This is not small dollars; there's a tremendous opportunity.” 19:04 “Go back to PBM. That's the first thing that starts to get at the care delivery side.” 21:52 “Can we even call it primary care if you can't get in to that doc for weeks?” 25:03 Where does Health Rosetta get their data to assess health plans? 27:00 Who are these self-insured employers, typically? 29:48 “3.5% [is] where the market flips.” 31:57 EP367 with Doug Hetherington.32:03 EP350 with Katy Talento.33:13 “We like to fetishize big in this country.” You can learn more at healthrosetta.org or by emailing Dave at dave@healthrosetta.org.   @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth Why did Dave Chase start Health Rosetta? @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth How does Health Rosetta deem which health plans are succeeding? @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth What are the most important areas and factors for grading health plans? @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “That $1.5 trillion of waste, how is that possible? Well, it's all codified in the contracts.” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “You can't manage what you can't measure.” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “What could be more disruptive than 30 years of wage gains stolen by the status quo health plans?” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “This is the last major area to modernize inside of corporate America.” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “This is not small dollars; there's a tremendous opportunity.” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “Go back to PBM. That's the first thing that starts to get at the care delivery side.” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “Can we even call it primary care if you can't get in to that doc for weeks?” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth Where does Health Rosetta get their data to assess health plans? @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth Who are these self-insured employers, typically? @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “3.5% [is] where the market flips.” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “We like to fetishize big in this country.” @chasedave of @HealthRosetta discusses #healthplans in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth   Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! Cora Opsahl (EP373), Cora Opsahl (EP372), Dr Mark Fendrick (Encore! EP308), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP371), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP370), Keith Hartman, Dr Aaron Mitchell (Encore! EP282), Stacey Richter (INBW34), Ashleigh Gunter, Doug Hetherington, Dr Kevin Schulman, Scott Haas, David Muhlestein, David Scheinker, Ali Ucar, Dr Carly Eckert, Jeb Dunkelberger (EP360), Dan O'Neill, Dr Wayne Jenkins, Liliana Petrova, Ge Bai, Nikhil Krishnan, Shawn Rhodes, Pramod John (EP353), Pramod John (EP352), Dr Eric Bricker, Katy Talento, Stacey Richter (INBW33)