Podcasts about Skynet

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Comics - Coffee - Metal
C/C/M Podcast Episode #92: Tony McMillen

Comics - Coffee - Metal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 61:33


The episode SKYNET tried to keep from you! Seriously though, from scheduling, tech issues, and illness, getting this out episode hit practically every roadblock. We have prevailed though and I am pleased to share with you a great chat I had with fantastic comic creator TONY MCMILLEN (LUMEN, SERIOUS CREATURES, ATTABOY)! We have a bunch of fun talking about some metal, his art process and influences, the backstory behind his book SERIOUS CREATURES, some guitar talk, and much more! Tony's Website! Check Tony out at: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TonyMcMillen Instagram: https://instagram.com/TonyMcMillen COMICS-COFFEE-METAL is hosted by DON CARDENAS Twitter: @doncardenasart Instagram: @doncardenasart Website: doncardenasart.com EMAIL: comicscoffeemetal@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/comicscoffeemetal/support

The Danny Bonaduce & Sarah Morning Show
Elon Shows Off His Version Of Skynet 10-4-22 Hour 1

The Danny Bonaduce & Sarah Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 30:49


Elon Musk shows off his new robots that will kill us all (5:03) and Mila Kunis poops with the door open(16:52)!

Lockdown Universe (A UFO, ALIEN, BIGFOOT, SCI FI AND PARANORMAL PODCAST!!)

Just when you thought it was safe to go back on the internet!! They throw out more bizarre and unbelievable stories at us!! Dive in to find out more about the potential of the real skynet! Tune in!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lockdown-universe/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lockdown-universe/support

The Lunar Society
Tyler Cowen - Talent, Collapse, & Pessimism of Sex

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 94:39


It was my great pleasure to speak once again to Tyler Cowen. His most recent book is Talent, How to Find Energizers, Creatives, and Winners Across the World.We discuss:how sex is more pessimistic than he is,why he expects society to collapse permanently,why humility, stimulants, intelligence, & stimulants are overrated,how he identifies talent, deceit, & ambition,& much much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.More really cool guests coming up, subscribe to find out about future episodes!You may also enjoy my interviews of Bryan Caplan (about mental illness, discrimination, and poverty), David Deutsch (about AI and the problems with America's constitution), and Steve Hsu (about intelligence and embryo selection).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group-chats, and throw it up on any relevant subreddits & forums you follow. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00) -Did Caplan Change On Education?(1:17) - Travel vs. History(3:10) - Do Institutions Become Left Wing Over Time?(6:02) - What Does Talent Correlate With?(13:00) - Humility, Mental Illness, Caffeine, and Suits(19:20) - How does Education affect Talent?(24:34) - Scouting Talent(33:39) - Money, Deceit, and Emergent Ventures(37:16) - Building Writing Stamina(39:41) - When Does Intelligence Start to Matter?(43:51) - Spotting Talent (Counter)signals(53:57) - Will Reading Cowen's Book Help You Win Emergent Ventures?(1:04:18) - Existential risks and the Longterm(1:12:45) - Cultivating Young Talent(1:16:05) - The Lifespans of Public Intellectuals(1:19:42) - Risk Aversion in Academia(1:26:20) - Is Stagnation Inevitable?(1:31:33) - What are Podcasts for?TranscriptDid Caplan Change On Education?Tyler Cowen   Ask Bryan about early and late Caplan. In which ways are they not consistent? That's a kind of friendly jab.Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, interesting. Tyler Cowen   Garrett Jones has tweeted about this in the past. In The Myth of the Rational Voter, education is so wonderful. It no longer seems to be true, but it was true from the data Bryan took from. Bryan doesn't think education really teaches you much. Dwarkesh Patel So then why is it making you want a free market?Tyler Cowen  It once did, even though it doesn't now, and if it doesn't now, it may teach them bad things. But it's teaching them something.Dwarkesh Patel   I have asked him this. He thinks that education doesn't teach them anything; therefore, that woke-ism can't be a result of colleges. I asked him, “okay, at some point, these were ideas in colleges, but now they're in the broader world. What do you think happened? Why did it transition together?” I don't think he had a good answer to that.Tyler Cowen   Yeah, you can put this in the podcast if you want. I like the free podcast talk often better than the podcast. [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel   Okay. Well yeah, we can just start rolling. Today, it is my great pleasure to speak to Tyler Cowen about his new book, “Talent, How to Find Energizers, Creatives, and Winners Across the World.” Tyler, welcome (once again) to The Lunar Society. Tyler Cowen   Happy to be here, thank you!Travel vs. HistoryDwarkesh Patel 1:51  Okay, excellent. I'll get into talent in just a second, but I've got a few questions for you first. So in terms of novelty and wonder, do you think travelling to the past would be a fundamentally different experience from travelling to different countries today? Or is it kind of in the same category?Tyler Cowen   You need to be protected against disease and have some access to the languages, and obviously, your smartphone is not going to work, right? So if you adjust for those differences, I think it would be a lot like travelling today except there'd be bigger surprises because no one else has gone to the past. Older people were there in a sense, but if you go back to ancient Athens, or the peak of the Roman Empire, you'd be the first traveller. Dwarkesh Patel   So do you think the experience of reading a history book is somewhat substitutable for actually travelling to a place? Tyler Cowen   Not at all! I think we understand the past very very poorly. If you've travelled appropriately in contemporary times, it should make you more skeptical about history because you'll realize how little you can learn about the current places just by reading about them. So it's like Travel versus History, and the historians lose.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, interesting. So I'm curious, how does travelling a lot change your perspective when you read a work of history? In what ways does it do so? Are you skeptical of it to an extent that you weren't before, and what do you think historians are probably getting wrong? Tyler Cowen   It may not be a concrete way, but first you ask: was the person there? If it's a biography, did the author personally know the subject of the biography? That becomes an extremely important question. I was just in India for the sixth time, I hardly pretend to understand India, whatever that possibly might mean, but before I went at all, I'd read a few hundred books about India, and it's not like I got nothing out of them, but in some sense, I knew nothing about India. Now that I've visited, the other things I read make more sense, including the history.Do Institutions Become Left Wing Over Time?Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, interesting. So you've asked this question to many of your guests, and I don't think any of them have had a good answer. So let me just ask you: what do you think is the explanation behind Conquest's Second Law? Why does any institution that is not explicitly right-wing become left-wing over time?Tyler Cowen   Well, first of all, I'm not sure that Conquest's Second Law is true. So you have something like the World Bank which was sort of centrist state-ist in the 1960s, and by the 1990s became fairly neoliberal. Now, about what's left-wing/right-wing, it's global, it's complicated, but it's not a simple case of Conquest's Second Law holding. I do think that for a big part of the latter post-war era, some version of Conquest's Law does mostly hold for the United States. But once you see that it's not universal, you're just asking: well, why have parts? Why has the American intelligentsia shifted to the left? So that there's political science literature on educational polarization? [laughs] I wouldn't say it's a settled question, but it's not a huge mystery like “how Republicans act wackier than Democrats are” for example. The issues realign in particular ways. I believe that's why Conquest's Law locally is mostly holding.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, interesting. So you don't think there's anything special about the intellectual life that tends to make people left-wing, and this issue is particular to our current moment?Tyler Cowen    I think by choosing the words “left-wing” you're begging the question. There's a lot of historical areas where what is left-wing is not even well defined, so in that sense, Conquests Law can't even hold there. I once had a debate with Marc Andreessen about this–– I think Mark tends to see things that are left-wing/right-wing as somewhat universal historical categories, and I very much do not. In medieval times, what's left wing and what's right wing? Even in 17th century England, there were particular groups who on particular issues were very left-wing or right-wing. It seems to me to be very unsatisfying, and there's a lot of fluidity in how these axes play out over real issues.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. So maybe then it's what is considered “left” at the time that tends to be the thing that ends up winning. At least, that's how it looks like looking back on it. That's how we categorize things. Something insightful I heard is that “if the left keeps winning, then just redefine what the left is.” So if you think of prohibition at the time, it was a left-wing cause, but now, the opposite of prohibition is left-wing because we just changed what the left is.Tyler Cowen    Exactly. Take the French Revolution: they're the historical equivalent of nonprofits versus 1830s restoration. Was everything moving to the left, between Robespierre and 1830? I don't pretend to know, but it just sure doesn't seem that way. So again, there seem to be a lot of cases where Conquest's Law is not so economical.Dwarkesh Patel   Napoleon is a great example of this where we're not sure whether he's the most left-wing figure in history or the most right-wing figure in history.Tyler Cowen 6:00Maybe he's both somehow.What Does Talent Correlate With?Dwarkesh Patel How much of talent or the lack thereof is a moral judgment for you? Just to give some context, when I think that somebody is not that intelligent, for me, that doesn't seem like a moral judgment. That just seems like a lottery. When I say that somebody's not hard working, that seems like more of a moral judgment. So on that spectrum, where would you say talent lies?Tyler Cowen   I don't know. My default is that most people aren't that ambitious. I'm fine with that. It actually creates some opportunities for the ambitious–– there might be an optimal degree of ambition. Well, short of everyone being sort of maximally ambitious. So I don't go around pissed off at unambitious people, judging them in some moralizing way. I think a lot of me is on autopilot when it comes to morally judging people from a distance. I don't wake up in the morning and get pissed off at someone in the Middle East doing whatever, even though I might think it was wrong.Dwarkesh Patel   So when you read the biographies of great people, often you see there's a bit of an emotional neglect and abuse when they're kids. Why do you think this is such a common trope?Tyler Cowen   I would love to see the data, but I'm not convinced that it's more common than with other people. Famous people, especially those who have biographies, on average are from earlier times, and in earlier times, children were treated worse. So it could be correlated without being causal. Now, maybe there's this notion that you need to have something to prove. Maybe you only feel you need to prove something if you're Napoleon and you're short, and you weren't always treated well. That's possible and I don't rule it out. But you look at Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg without pretending to know what their childhoods were like.  It sure sounds like they were upper middle class kids treated very well, at least from a distance. For example, the Collison's had great parents and they did well.Dwarkesh Patel   It could just be that the examples involving emotional neglect stuck out in my mind in particular.  Tyler Cowen   Yeah. So I'd really like to see the data. I think it's an important and very good question. It seems to me, maybe one could investigate it, but I've never seen an actual result.Dwarkesh Patel   Is there something you've learned about talent spotting through writing the book that you wish wasn't so? Maybe you found it disturbing, or you found it disappointing in some way. Is there something that is a correlate for talent that you wish wasn't? Tyler Cowen   I don't know. Again, I think I'm relatively accepting of a lot of these realities, but the thing that disappoints me a bit is how geographically clustered talent is. I don't mean where it was born, and I don't mean ethnically. I just mean where it ends up. So if you get an application, say from rural Italy where maybe living standards are perfectly fine–– there's good weather, there's olive oil, there's pasta. But the application just probably not that good. Certainly, Italians have had enough amazing achievements over the millennia, but right now, the people there who are actually up to something are going to move to London or New York or somewhere. So I find that a bit depressing. It's not really about the people. Dwarkesh Patel   When you do find a cluster of talent, to what extent can that be explained by a cyclical view of what's happening in the region? In the sense of the “hard times create strong men” theory? I mean at some point, Italy had a Renaissance, so maybe things got complacent over time.Tyler Cowen   Again, maybe that's true for Italy, but most of the talent clusters have been such for a long time, like London and New York. It's not cyclical. They've just had a ton of talent for a very long time. They still do, and later on, they still will. Maybe not literally forever, but it seems like an enduring effect.Dwarkesh Patel   But what if they leave? For example, the Central European Jews couldn't stay where they were anymore and had to leave.Tyler Cowen   Obviously, I think war can destroy almost anything. So German scientific talent took a big whack, German cultural talent too. I mean, Hungarian Jews and mathematics-–I don't know big of a trend it still is, but it's certainly nothing close to what it once was.Dwarkesh Patel   Okay. I was worried that if you realize that some particular region has a lot of talent right now, then that might be a one-time gain. You realize that India, Toronto or Nigeria or something have a lot of talent, but the culture doesn't persist in some sort of extended way. Tyler Cowen   That might be true for where talent comes from, but where it goes just seems to show more persistence. People will almost certainly be going to London for centuries. Is London producing a lot of talent? That's less clear. That may be much more cyclical. In the 17th century, London was amazing, right? London today? I would say I don't know. But it's not obvious that it's coming close to its previous glories. So the current status of India I think, will be temporary, but temporary for a long time. It's just a very big place. It has a lot of centres and there are things it has going for it like not taking prosperity for granted. But it will have all of these for quite a while–– India's still pretty poor.Dwarkesh Patel   What do you think is the difference between actual places where clusters of talent congregate and places where that are just a source of that talent? What makes a place a sink rather than a source of talent?Tyler Cowen   I think finding a place where people end up going is more or less obvious. You need money, you need a big city, you need some kind of common trade or linguistic connection. So New York and London are what they are for obvious reasons, right? Path dependence history, the story of making it in the Big Apple and so on. But origins and where people come from are areas that I think theory is very bad at understanding. Why did the Renaissance blossom in Florence and Venice, and not in Milan? If you're going back earlier, it wasn't obvious that it would be those places. I've done a lot of reading to try to figure this out, but I find that I've gotten remarkably not far on the question.Dwarkesh Patel   The particular examples you mentioned today–– like New York, San Francisco, London, these places today are kind of high stakes, because if you want to move there, it's expensive. Do you think that this is because they've been so talented despite this fact, or because you need some sort of exclusion in order to be a haven of talent?Tyler Cowen   Well, I think this is a problem for San Francisco. It may be a more temporary cluster than it ought to have been. Since it's a pretty recent cluster, it can't count on the same kind of historical path dependence that New York and Manhattan have. But a lot of New York still is not that expensive. Look at the people who work and live there! They're not all rich, to say the least. And that is an important part of why New York is still New York. With London, it's much harder, but it seems to me that London is a sink for somewhat established talent––which is fine, right? However, in that regard, it's much inferior to New York.Humility, Mental Illness, Caffeine, and Suits Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, I want to play a game of overrated and underrated with you, but we're going to do it with certain traits or certain kinds of personalities that might come in when you're interviewing people.Tyler Cowen   Okay, it's probably all going to be indeterminate, but go on.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. So somebody comes in, and they're very humble.Tyler Cowen   Immediately I'm suspicious. I figure most people who are going to make something of themselves are arrogant. If they're willing to show it, there's a certain bravery or openness in that. I don't rule out the humble person doing great. A lot of people who do great are humble, but I just get a wee bit like, “what's up with you? You're not really humble, are you?”Dwarkesh Patel   Maybe humility is a way of avoiding confrontation–– if you don't have the competence to actually show that you can be great. Tyler Cowen   It might be efficient for them to avoid confrontation, but I just start thinking that I don't know the real story. When I see a bit of arrogance, I'm less likely to think that it may, in a way, be feigned. But the feigning of arrogance in itself is a kind of arrogance. So in that sense, I'm still getting the genuine thing. Dwarkesh Patel   So what is the difference? Let's say a 15-year-old who is kind of arrogant versus a 50-year-old who is kind of arrogant, and the latter has accomplishments already while the first one doesn't. Is there a difference in how you perceive humility or the lack thereof?Tyler Cowen   Oh, sure. With the 50-year-old, you want to see what they have done, and you're much more likely to think the 50 year old should feign humility than the 15-year-old. Because that's the high-status thing to do–– it's to feign humility. If they can't do that, you figure, “Here's one thing they're bad at. What else are they bad at?” Whereas with the 15-year-old, maybe they have a chip on their shoulder and they can't quite hold it all in. Oh, that's great and fine. Let's see what you're gonna do.Dwarkesh Patel   How arrogant can you be? There are many 15 year olds who are really good at math, and they have ambitions like “I want to solve P ≠ NP” or “I want to build an AGI” or something. Is there some level where you just clearly don't understand what's going on since you think you can do something like that? Or is arrogance always a plus?Tyler Cowen   I haven't seen that level of arrogance yet. If a 15-year-old said to me, “in three years, I'm going to invent a perpetual motion machine,”  I would think “No, now you're just crazy.” But no one's ever said that to me. There's this famous Mark Zuckerberg story where he went into the VC meeting at Sequoia wearing his pajamas and he told Sequoia not to give him money. He was 18 at a minimum, that's pretty arrogant behavior and we should be fine with that. We know how the story ends. So it's really hard to be too arrogant. But once you say this, because of the second order effect, you start thinking: “Well, are they just being arrogant as an act?” And then in the “act sense”, yes, they can be too arrogant.Dwarkesh Patel   Isn't the backstory there that Mark was friends with Sean Parker and then Sean Parker had beef with Sequoia…Tyler Cowen   There's something like that. I wouldn't want to say off the top of my head exactly what, but there is a backstory.Dwarkesh Patel   Okay. Somebody comes in professionally dressed when they don't need to. They've got a crisp clean shirt. They've got a nice wash. Tyler Cowen How old are they?Dwarkesh Patel 20.Tyler Cowen They're too conformist. Again, with some jobs, conformity is great, but I get a little suspicious, at least for what I'm looking for. Though I wouldn't rule them out for a lot of things–– it's a plus, right?Dwarkesh Patel   Is there a point though, where you're in some way being conformist by dressing up in a polo shirt? Like if you're in San Francisco right now, it seems like the conformist thing is not to wear a suit to an interview if you're trying to be a software engineer.Tyler Cowen   Yeah, there might be situations where it's so weird, so over the top, so conformist, that it's actually totally non-conformist. Like “I don't know anyone who's a conformist like you are!” Maybe it's not being a conformist, or just being some kind of nut, that makes you interested again.Dwarkesh Patel   An overall sense that you get from the person that they're really content, almost like Buddha came in for an interview. A sense of wellbeing.Tyler Cowen   It's gonna depend on context, I don't think I'd hold it against someone, but I wouldn't take it at face value. You figure they're antsy in some way, you hope. You'll see it with more time, I would just think.Dwarkesh Patel   Somebody who uses a lot of nootropics. They're constantly using caffeine, but maybe on the side (multiple times a week), they're also using Adderall, Modafinil, and other kinds of nootropics.Tyler Cowen   I don't personally like it, but I've never seen evidence that it's negatively correlated with success, so I would try to put it out of my mind. I sort of personally get a queasy feeling like “Do you really know what you're doing. Is all this stuff good for you? Why do you need this?” That's my actual reaction, but again, at the intellectual level, it does seem to work for some people, or at least not screw them up too much.Dwarkesh Patel   You don't drink caffeine, correct? Tyler Cowen  Zero.Dwarkesh Patel Why?Tyler Cowen I don't like it. It might be bad for you. Dwarkesh Patel Oh really, you think so? Tyler Cowen People get addicted to it.Dwarkesh Patel    You're not worried it might make you less productive over the long term? It's more about you just don't want to be addicted to something?Tyler Cowen   Well, since I don't know it well, I'm not sure what my worries are. But the status quo regime seems to work. I observe a lot of people who end up addicted to coffee, coke, soda, stuff we know is bad for you. So I think: “What's the problem I need to solve? Why do it?”Dwarkesh Patel   What if they have a history of mental illness like depression or anxiety? Not that mental illnesses are good, but at the current margins, do you think that maybe they're punished too heavily? Or maybe that people don't take them seriously enough that they actually have a bigger signal than the people are considering?Tyler Cowen   I don't know. I mean, both could be true, right? So there's definitely positive correlations between that stuff and artistic creativity. Whether or not it's causal is harder to say, but it correlates. So you certainly should take the person seriously. But would they be the best Starbucks cashier? I don't know.How does Education Affect Talent?Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. In another podcast, you've pointed out that some of the most talented people you see who are neglected are 15 to 17 year olds. How does this impact how you think? Let's say you were in charge of a high school, you're the principal of a high school, and you know that there's 2000 students there. A few of them have to be geniuses, right? How is the high school run by Tyler Cowen? Especially for the very smartest people there? Tyler Cowen   Less homework! I would work harder to hire better teachers, pay them more, and fire the bad ones if I'm allowed to do that. Those are no-brainers, but mainly less homework and I'd have more people come in who are potential role models. Someone like me! I was invited once to Flint Hill High School in Oakton, it's right nearby. I went in, I wasn't paid. I just figured “I'll do this.” It seems to me a lot of high schools don't even try. They could get a bunch of people to come in for free to just say “I'm an economist, here's what being an economist is like” for 45 minutes. Is that so much worse than the BS the teacher has to spew? Of course not. So I would just do more things like that.Dwarkesh Patel   I want to understand the difference between these three options. The first is: somebody like you actually gives an in-person lecture saying “this is what life is like”. The second is zoom, you could use zoom to do that. The third is that it's not live in any way whatsoever. You're just kind of like maybe showing a video of the person. Tyler Cowen   I'm a big believer in vividness. So Zoom is better than nothing. A lot of people are at a distance, but I think you'll get more and better responses by inviting local people to do it live. And there's plenty of local people, where most of the good schools are.Dwarkesh Patel   Are you tempted to just give these really smart 15-year-olds a hall pass to the library all day and some WiFi access, and then just leave them alone? Or do you think that they need some sort of structure?Tyler Cowen   I think they need some structure, but you have to let them rebel against it and do their own thing. Zero structure strikes me as great for a few of them, but even for the super talented ones, it's not perfect. They need exposure to things, and they need some teachers as role models. So you want them to have some structure.Dwarkesh Patel   If you read old books about education, there's a strong emphasis on moral instruction. Do you think that needs to be an important part of education? Tyler Cowen   I'd like to see more data. But I suspect the best moral instruction is the teachers actually being good people. I think that works. But again, I'd like to see the data. But somehow getting up and lecturing them about the seven virtues or something. That seems to me to be a waste of time, and maybe even counterproductive.Dwarkesh Patel   Now, the way I read your book about talent, it also seems like a critique of Bryan's book, The Case Against Education.Tyler Cowen   Ofcourse it is. Bryan describes me as the guy who's always torturing him, and in a sense, he's right.Dwarkesh Patel   Well, I guess more specifically, it seems that Bryan's book relies on the argument that you need a costly signal to show that you have talent, or you have intelligence, conscientiousness, and other traits. But if you can just learn that from a 1500 word essay and a zoom call, then maybe college is not about the signal.Tyler Cowen   In that sense, I'm not sure it's a good critique of Bryan. So for most people in the middle of the distribution, I don't think you can learn what I learned from Top 5 Emergent Ventures winners through an application and a half-hour zoom call. But that said, I think the talent book shows you my old saying: context is that which is scarce. And you're always testing people for their understanding of context. Most people need a fair amount of higher education to acquire that context, even if they don't remember the detailed content of their classes. So I think Bryan overlooks how much people actually learn when they go to school.Dwarkesh Patel   How would you go about measuring the amount of context of somebody who went to college? Is there something you can point to that says, “Oh, clearly they're getting some context, otherwise, they wouldn't be able to do this”?Tyler Cowen   I think if you meet enough people who didn't go to college, you'll see the difference, on average. Stressing the word average. Now there are papers measuring positive returns to higher education. I don't think they all show it's due to context, but I am persuaded by most of Brian's arguments that you don't remember the details of what you learned in class. Oh, you learn this about astronomy and Kepler's laws and opportunity costs, etc. but people can't reproduce that two or three years later. It seems pretty clear we know that. However, they do learn a lot of context and how to deal with different personality types.Dwarkesh Patel   Would you falsify this claim, though, that you are getting a lot of context? Is it just something that you had to qualitatively evaluate? What would have to be true in the world for you to conclude that the opposite is true? Tyler Cowen   Well, if you could show people remembered a lot of the facts they learned, and those facts were important for their jobs, neither of which I think is true. But in principle, they're demonstrable, then you would be much more skeptical about the context being the thing that mattered. But as it stands now, that's the residual. And it's probably what matters.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. So I thought that Bryan shared in the book that actually people don't even remember many of the basic facts that they learned in school.Tyler Cowen   Ofcourse they don't. But that's not the main thing they learn. They learn some vision of how the world works, how they fit into it, that they ought to have higher aspirations, that they can join the upper middle class, that they're supposed to have a particular kind of job. Here are the kinds of jerks you're going to meet along the way! Here's some sense of how dating markets work! Maybe you're in a fraternity, maybe you do a sport and so on. That's what you learned. Dwarkesh Patel   How did you spot Bryan?Tyler Cowen   He was in high school when I met him, and it was some kind of HS event. I think he made a point of seeking me out. And I immediately thought, “Well this guy is going to be something like, gotta keep track of this guy. Right away.”Dwarkesh Patel   Can you say more - what happened?Tyler Cowen   His level of enthusiasm, his ability to speak with respect to detail. He was just kind of bursting with everything. It was immediately evident, as it still is. Bryan has changed less than almost anyone else I know over what is now.. he could tell you how many years but it's been a whole bunch of decades.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. So if that's the case, then it would have been interesting to meet somebody who is like Bryan, but a 19 year old.Tyler Cowen   Yeah, and I did. I was right. Talent ScoutingDwarkesh Patel   To what extent do the best talent scouts inevitably suffer from Goodhart's Law? Has something like this happened to you where your approval gets turned into a credential? So a whole bunch of non-earnest people start applying, you get a whole bunch of adverse selection, and then it becomes hard for you to run your program.Tyler Cowen   It is not yet hard to run the program. If I needed to, I would just shut down applications. I've seen a modest uptick in bad applications, but it takes so little time to decide they're no good, or just not a good fit for us that it's not a problem. So the endorsement does get credentialized. Mostly, that's a good thing, right? Like you help the people you pick. And then you see what happens next and you keep on innovating as you need to.Dwarkesh Patel   You say in the book that the super talented are best at spotting other super talented individuals. And there aren't many of the super talented talent spotters to go around. So this sounds like you're saying that if you're not super talented, much of the book will maybe not do you a bunch of good. Results be weary should be maybe on the title. How much of talent spotting can be done by people who aren't themselves super talented?Tyler Cowen   Well, I'd want to see the context of what I wrote. But I'm well aware of the fact that in basketball, most of the greatest general managers were not great players. Someone like Jerry West, right? I'd say Pat Riley was not. So again, that's something you could study. But I don't generally think that the best talent scouts are themselves super talented.Dwarkesh Patel   Then what is the skill in particular that they have that if it's not the particular thing that they're working on?Tyler Cowen   Some intangible kind of intuition, where they feel the right thing in the people they meet. We try to teach people that intuition, the same way you might teach art or music appreciation. But it's not a science. It's not paint-by-numbers.Dwarkesh Patel   Even with all the advice in the book, and even with the stuff that isn't in the book that is just your inarticulable knowledge about how to spot talent, all your intuitions… How much of the variance in somebody's “True Potential” is just fundamentally unpredictable? If it's just like too chaotic of a thing to actually get your grips on. To what extent are we going to truly be able to spot talent?Tyler Cowen   I think it will always be an art. If you look at the success rates of VCs, it depends on what you count as the pool they're drawing from, but their overall rate of picking winners is not that impressive. And they're super high stakes. They're super smart. So I think it will mostly remain an art and not a science. People say, “Oh, genomics this, genomics that”. We'll see, but somehow I don't think that will change this.Dwarkesh Patel   You don't think getting a polygenic risk score of drive, for example, is going to be a thing that happens?Tyler Cowen   Maybe future genomics will be incredibly different from what we have now. Maybe. But it's not around the corner.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. Maybe the sample size is just so low and somebody is like “How are you even gonna collect that data? How are you gonna get the correlates of who the super talented people are?”Tyler Cowen   That, plus how genomic data interact with each other. You can apply machine learning and so on, but it just seems quite murky.Dwarkesh Patel   If the best people get spotted earlier, and you can tell who is a 10x engineer in a company and who is only a 1x engineer, or a 0.5x engineer, doesn't that mean that, in a way that inequality will get worse? Because now the 10x engineer knows that they're 10x, and everybody else knows that they're 10x, they're not going to be willing to cross subsidize and your other employees are going to be wanting to get paid proportionate to their skill.Tyler Cowen   Well, they might be paid more, but they'll also innovate more, right? So they'll create more benefits for people who are doing nothing. My intuition is that overall, inequality of wellbeing will go down. But you can't say that's true apriori. Inequality of income might also go up.Dwarkesh Patel   And then will the slack in the system go away for people who are not top performers? Like you can tell now, if we're getting better.Tyler Cowen   This has happened already in contemporary America. As I wrote, “Average is over.” Not due to super sophisticated talent spotting. Sometimes, it's simply the fact that in a lot of service sectors, you can measure output reasonably directly––like did you finish the computer program? Did it work? That has made it harder for people to get paid things they don't deserve.Dwarkesh Patel   I wonder if this leads to adverse selection in the areas where you can't measure how well somebody is doing. So the people who are kind of lazy and bums, they'll just go into places where output can't be measured. So these industries will just be overflowing with the people who don't want to work.Tyler Cowen   Absolutely. And then the people who are talented in the sectors, maybe they'll leave and start their own companies and earn through equity, and no one is really ever measuring their labor power. Still, what they're doing is working and they're making more from it.Dwarkesh Patel   If talent is partly heritable, then the better you get at spotting talent, over time, will the social mobility in society go down?Tyler Cowen   Depends how you measure social mobility. Is it relative to the previous generation? Most talent spotters don't know a lot about parents, like I don't know anything about your parents at all! The other aspect of spotting talent is hoping the talent you mobilize does great things for people not doing anything at all. That's the kind of automatic social mobility they get. But if you're measuring quintiles across generations, the intuition could go either way.Dwarkesh Patel   But this goes back to wondering whether this is a one time gain or not. Maybe initially they can help the people who are around them. Somebody in Brazil, they help people around them. But once you've found them, they're gonna go to those clusters you talked about, and they're gonna be helping the people with San Francisco who don't need help. So is this a one time game then?Tyler Cowen   Many people from India seem to give back to India in a very consistent way. People from Russia don't seem to do that. That may relate to the fact that Russia is in terrible shape, and India has a brighter future. So it will depend. But I certainly think there are ways of arranging things where people give back a lot.Dwarkesh Patel   Let's talk about Emergent Ventures. Sure. So I wonder: if the goal of Emergent Ventures is to raise aspirations, does that still work given the fact that you have to accept some people but reject other people? In Bayesian terms, the updates up have to equal the updates down? In some sense, you're almost transferring a vision edge from the excellent to the truly great. You see what I'm saying?Tyler Cowen   Well, you might discourage the people you turn away. But if they're really going to do something, they should take that as a challenge. And many do! Like “Oh, I was rejected by Harvard, I had to go to UChicago, but I decided, I'm going to show those b******s.” I think we talked about that a few minutes ago. So if I just crushed the spirits of those who are rejected, I don't feel too bad about that. They should probably be in some role anyway where they're just working for someone.Dwarkesh Patel   But let me ask you the converse of that which is, if you do accept somebody, are you worried that if one of the things that drives people is getting rejected, and then wanting to prove that you will reject them wrong, are you worried that by accepting somebody when they're 15, you're killing that thing? The part of them that wants to get some kind of approval?Tyler Cowen   Plenty of other people will still reject them right? Not everyone accepts them every step of the way. Maybe they're just awesome. LeBron James is basketball history and past a certain point, it just seems everyone wanted him for a bunch of decades now. I think deliberately with a lot of candidates, you shouldn't encourage them too much. I make a point of chewing out a lot of people just to light a fire under them, like “what you're doing. It's not gonna work.” So I'm all for that selectively.Dwarkesh Patel   Why do you think that so many of the people who have led Emergent Ventures are interested in Effective Altruism?Tyler Cowen   There is a moment right now for Effective Altruism, where it is the thing. Some of it is political polarization, the main parties are so stupid and offensive, those energies will go somewhere. Some of that in 1970 maybe went to libertarianism. Libertarianism has been out there for too long. It doesn't seem to address a lot of current problems, like climate change or pandemics very well. So where should the energy go? The Rationality community gets some of it and that's related to EA, as I'm sure you know. The tech startup community gets some of it. That's great! It seems to be working pretty well to me. Like I'm not an EA person. But maybe they deserve a lot of it.Dwarkesh Patel   But you don't think it's persistent. You think it comes and goes?Tyler Cowen   I think it will come and go. But I think EA will not vanish. Like libertarianism, it will continue for quite a long time.Dwarkesh Patel   Is there any movement that has attracted young people? That has been persistent over time? Or did they all fade? Tyler Cowen   Christianity. Judaism. Islam. They're pretty persistent. [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel   So to the extent that being more religious makes you more persistent, can we view the criticism of EA saying that it's kind of like a religion as a plus?Tyler Cowen   Ofcourse, yeah! I think it's somewhat like a religion. To me, that's a plus, we need more religions. I wish more of the religions we needed were just flat-out religions. But in the meantime, EA will do,Money, Deceit, and Emergent VenturesDwarkesh Patel   Are there times when somebody asks you for a grant and you view that as a negative signal? Let's say they're especially when well off: they're a former Google engineer, they wanna start a new project, and they're asking you for a grant. Do you worry that maybe they're too risk averse? Do you want them to put their own capital into it? Or do you think that maybe they were too conformist because they needed your approval before they went ahead?Tyler Cowen   Things like this have happened. And I asked people flat out, “Why do you want this grant from me?” And it is a forcing question in the sense that if their answer isn't good, I won't give it to them. Even though they might have a good level of talent, good ideas, whatever, they have to be able to answer that question in a credible way. Some can, some can't.Dwarkesh Patel   I remember that the President of the University of Chicago many years back said that if you rejected the entire class of freshmen that are coming in and accepted the next 1500 that they had to reject that year, then there'll be no difference in the quality of the admits.Tyler Cowen   I would think UChicago is the one school where that's not true. I agree that it's true for most schools.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you think that's also true of Emergent Ventures?Tyler Cowen   No. Not at all.Dwarkesh Patel   How good is a marginal reject?Tyler Cowen   Not good. It's a remarkably bimodal distribution as I perceive it, and maybe I'm wrong. But there aren't that many cases where I'm agonizing and if I'm agonizing I figure it probably should be a no.Dwarkesh Patel   I guess that makes it even tougher if you do get rejected. Because it wasn't like, “oh, you weren't a right fit for the job,” or “you almost made the cut.” It's like, “No, we're actually just assessing your potential and not some sort of fit for the job.” Not only were you just not on the edge of potential, but you were also way on the other edge of the curve.Tyler Cowen   But a lot of these rejected people and projects, I don't think they're spilling tears over it. Like you get an application. Someone's in Akron, Ohio, and they want to start a nonprofit dog shelter. They saw EV on the list of things you can apply to. They apply to a lot of things and maybe never get funding. It's like people who enter contests or something, they apply to EV. Nothing against non-profit dog shelters, but that's kind of a no, right? I genuinely don't know their response, but I don't think they walk away from the experience with some deeper model of what they should infer from the EV decision.Dwarkesh Patel   How much does the money part of Emergent Ventures matter? If you just didn't give them the money?Tyler Cowen   There's a whole bunch of proposals that really need the money for capital costs, and then it matters a lot. For a lot of them, the money per se doesn't matter.Dwarkesh Patel   Right, then. So what is the function of return for that? Do you like 10x the money, or do you add .1x the money for some of these things? Do you think they add up to seemingly different results? Tyler Cowen   I think a lot of foundations give out too many large grants and not enough small grants. I hope I'm at an optimum. But again, I don't have data to tell you. I do think about this a lot, and I think small grants are underrated.Dwarkesh Patel   Why are women often better at detecting deceit?Tyler Cowen   I would assume for biological and evolutionary reasons that there are all these men trying to deceive them, right? The cost of a pregnancy is higher for a woman than for a man on average, by quite a bit. So women will develop defense mechanisms that men maybe don't have as much.Dwarkesh Patel   One thing I heard from somebody I was brainstorming these questions with–– she just said that maybe it's because women just discuss personal matters more. And so therefore, they have a greater library.Tyler Cowen   Well, that's certainly true. But that's subordinate to my explanation, I'd say. There are definitely a lot of intermediate steps. Things women do more of that help them be insightful.Building Writing StaminaDwarkesh Patel   Why is writing skill so important to you?Tyler Cowen   Well, one thing is that I'm good at judging it. Across scales, I'm very bad at judging, so there's nothing on the EV application testing for your lacrosse skill. But look, writing is a form of thinking. And public intellectuals are one of the things I want to support. Some of the companies I admire are ones with writing cultures like Amazon or Stripe. So writing it is! I'm a good reader. So you're going to be asked to write.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you think it's a general fact that writing correlates with just general competence? Tyler Cowen   I do, but especially the areas that I'm funding. It's strongly related. Whether it's true for everything is harder to say.Dwarkesh Patel   Can stamina be increased?Tyler Cowen   Of course. It's one of the easier things to increase. I don't think you can become superhuman in your energy and stamina if you're not born that way. But I think almost everyone could increase by 30% to 50%, some notable amount. Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, that's interesting.Tyler Cowen   Put aside maybe people with disabilities or something but definitely when it comes to people in regular circumstances.Dwarkesh Patel   Okay. I think it's interesting because in the blog post from Robin Hanson about stamina, I think his point of view was that this is just something that's inherent to people.Tyler Cowen   Well, I don't think that's totally false. The people who have superhuman stamina are born that way. But there are plenty of origins. I mean, take physical stamina. You don't think people can train more and run for longer? Of course they can. It's totally proven. So it would be weird if this rule held for all these organs but not your brain. That seems quite implausible. Especially for someone like Robin, where your brain is just this other organ that you're gonna download or upload or goodness knows what with it. He's a physicalist if there ever was one.Dwarkesh Patel   Have you read Haruki Murakami's book on running?Tyler Cowen   No, I've been meaning to. I'm not sure how interesting I'll find it. I will someday. I like his stuff a lot.Dwarkesh Patel   But what I found really interesting about it was just how linked building physical stamina is for him to building up the stamina to write a lot.Tyler Cowen   Magnus Carlsen would say the same with chess. Being in reasonable physical shape is important for your mental stamina, which is another kind of simple proof that you can boost your mental stamina.When Does Intelligence Start to Matter?Dwarkesh Patel   After reading the book, I was inclined to think that intelligence matters more than I previously thought. Not less. You say in the book that intelligence has convex returns and that it matters especially for areas like inventors. Then you also say that if you look at some of the most important things in society, something like what Larry and Sergey did, they're basically inventors, right? So in many of the most important things in society, intelligence matters more because of the increasing returns. It seems like with Emergent Ventures, you're trying to pick the people who are at the tail. You're not looking for a barista at Starbucks. So it seems like you should care about intelligence more, given the evidence there. Tyler Cowen   More than who does? I feel what the book presents is, in fact, my view. So kind of by definition, I agree with that view. But yes, there's a way of reading it where intelligence really matters a lot. But it's only for a relatively small number of jobs.Dwarkesh Patel   Maybe you just started off with a really high priori on intelligence, and that's why you downgraded?Tyler Cowen   There are a lot of jobs that I actually hire for in actual life, where smarts are not the main thing I look for.Dwarkesh Patel   Does the convexity of returns on intelligence suggest that maybe the multiplicative model is wrong? Because if the multiplicative model is right, you would expect to see decreasing returns and putting your stats on one skill. You'd want to diversify more, right?Tyler Cowen   I think the convexity of returns to intelligence is embedded in a multiplicative model, where the IQ returns only cash out for people good at all these other things. For a lot of geniuses, they just can't get out of bed in the morning, and you're stuck, and you should write them off.Dwarkesh Patel   So you cite the data that Sweden collects from everybody that enters the military there. The CEOs are apparently not especially smart. But one thing I found interesting in that same data was that Swedish soccer players are pretty smart. The better a soccer player is, the smarter they are. You've interviewed professional basketball players turned public intellectuals on your podcast. They sound extremely smart to me. What is going on there? Why, anecdotally, and with some limited amounts of evidence, does it seem that professional athletes are smarter than you would expect?Tyler Cowen   I'm a big fan of the view that top-level athletic performance is super cognitively intense and that most top athletes are really extraordinarily smart. I don't just mean smart on the court (though, obviously that), but smart more broadly. This is underrated. I think Michelle Dawson was the one who talked me into this, but absolutely, I'm with you all the way.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you think this is just mutational load or––Tyler Cowen   You actually have to be really smart to figure out things like how to lead a team, how to improve yourself, how to practice, how to outsmart the opposition, all these other things. Maybe it's not the only way to get there, but it is very G loaded. You certainly see some super talented athletes who just go bust. Or they may destroy themselves with drugs: there are plenty of tales like that, and you don't have to look hard. Dwarkesh Patel   Are there other areas where you wouldn't expect it to be G loaded but it actually is?Tyler Cowen   Probably, but there's so many! I just don't know, but sports is something in my life I followed. So I definitely have opinions about it. They seem incredibly smart to me when they're interviewed. They're not always articulate, and they're sort of talking themselves into biased exposure. But I heard Michael Jordan in the 90s, and I thought, “That guy's really smart.” So I think he is! Look at Charles Barkley. He's amazing, right? There's hardly anyone I'd rather listen to, even about talent, than Charles Barkley. It's really interesting. He's not that tall, you can't say, “oh, he succeeded. Because he's seven foot two,” he was maybe six foot four tops. And they called him the Round Mound of Rebound. And how did he do that? He was smart. He figured out where the ball was going. The weaknesses of his opponents, he had to nudge them the right way, and so on. Brilliant guy.Dwarkesh Patel   What I find really remarkable is that (not just with athletes, but in many other professions), if you interview somebody who is at the top of that field, they come off really really smart! For example, YouTubers and even sex workers.Tyler Cowen   So whoever is like the top gardener, I expect I would be super impressed by them.Spotting Talent (Counter)signalsDwarkesh Patel   Right. Now all your books are in some way about talent, right? Let me read you the following passage from An Economist Gets Lunch, and I want you to tell me how we can apply this insight to talent. “At a fancy fancy restaurant, the menu is well thought out. The time and attention of the kitchen are scarce. An item won't be on the menu unless there's a good reason for its presence. If it sounds bad, it probably tastes especially good?”Tyler Cowen   That's counter-signaling, right? So anything that is very weird, they will keep on the menu because it has a devoted set of people who keep on ordering it and appreciate it. That's part of the talent of being a chef, you can come up with such things. Dwarkesh Patel   How do we apply this to talent? Tyler Cowen   Well, with restaurants, you have selection pressure where you're only going to ones that have cleared certain hurdles. So this is true for talent only for talents who are established. If you see a persistent NBA player who's a very poor free throw shooter like Shaquille O'Neal was, you can more or less assume they're really good at something else. But for people who are not established, there's not the same selection pressure so there's not an analogous inference you can draw.Dwarkesh Patel   So if I show up to an Emergent Ventures conference, and I meet somebody, and they don't seem especially impressive with the first impression, then I should believe their work is especially impressive. Tyler Cowen Yes, absolutely, yes. Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, so my understanding of your book Creative Destruction is that maybe on average, cultural diversity will go down. But in special niches, the diversity and ingenuity will go up. Can I apply the same insight to talent? Maybe two random college grads will have similar skill sets over time, but if you look at people on the tails, will their skills and knowledge become even more specialized and even more diverse?Tyler Cowen   There are a lot of different presuppositions in your question. So first, is cultural diversity going up or down? That I think is multi-dimensional. Say different cities in different countries will be more like each other over time.. that said, the genres they produce don't have to become more similar. They're more similar in the sense that you can get sushi in each one. But novel cuisine in Dhaka and Senegal might be taking a very different path from novel cuisine in Tokyo, Japan. So what happens with cultural diversity.. I think the most reliable generalization is that it tends to come out of larger units. Small groups and tribes and linguistic groups get absorbed. Those people don't stop being creative and other venues, but there are fewer unique isolated cultures, and much more thickly diverse urban creativity. That would be the main generalization I would put forward. So if you wanted to apply that generalization to talent, I think in a funny way, we come back to my earlier point: talent just tends to be geographically extremely well clustered. That's not the question you asked, but it's how I would reconfigure the pieces of it.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. What do you suggest about finding talent in a globalized world? In particular, if it's cheaper to find talent because of the internet, does that mean that you should be selecting more mediocre candidates?Tyler Cowen   I think it means you should be more bullish on immigrants from Africa. It's relatively hard to get out of Africa to the United States in most cases. That's a sign the person put in a lot of effort and ability. Maybe an easy country to come here from would be Canada, all other things equal. Again, I'd want this to be measured. The people who come from countries that are hard to come from like India, actually, the numbers are fairly high, but the roots are mostly pretty gated.Dwarkesh Patel   Is part of the reason that talent is hard to spot and find today that we have an aging population?  So then we would have more capital, more jobs, more mentorship available for young people coming up, than there are young people.Tyler Cowen   I don't think we're really into demographic decline yet. Not in the United States. Maybe in Japan, that would be true. But it seems to me, especially with the internet, there's more 15-year-old talent today than ever before, by a lot, not just by little. You see this in chess, right? Where we can measure performance very well. There's a lot more young talent from many different places, including the US. So, aging hasn't mattered yet. Maybe for a few places, but not here.Dwarkesh Patel   What do you think will change in talent spotting as society becomes older?Tyler Cowen   It depends on what you mean by society. I think the US, unless it totally screws up on immigration, will always have a very seriously good flow of young people that we don't ever have to enter the aging equilibrium the way Japan probably already has. So I don't know what will change. Then there's work from a distance, there's hiring from a distance, funding from a distance. As you know, there's EV India, and we do that at a distance. So I don't think we're ever going to enter that world..Dwarkesh Patel   But then what does it look like for Japan? Is part of the reason that Japanese cultures and companies are arranged the way they are and do the recruitment the way they do linked to their demographics? Tyler Cowen   That strikes me as a plausible reason. I don't think I know enough to say, but it wouldn't surprise me if that turned out to be the case.Dwarkesh Patel   To what extent do you need a sort of “great man ethos” in your culture in order to empower the top talent? Like if you have too much political and moral egalitarianism, you're not going to give great people the real incentive and drive to strive to be great.Tyler Cowen   You've got to say “great man or great woman ethos”, or some other all-purpose word we wish to use. I worry much less about woke ideology than a lot of people I know. It's not my thing, but it's something young people can rebel against. If that keeps you down, I'm not so impressed by you. I think it's fine. Let the woke reign, people can work around them.Dwarkesh Patel   But overall, if you have a culture or like Europe, do you think that has any impact on––Tyler Cowen   Europe has not woken up in a lot of ways, right? Europe is very chauvinist and conservative in the literal sense, and often quite old fashioned depending on what you're talking about. But Europe, I would say, is much less woke than the United States. I wouldn't say that's their main problem, but you can't say, “oh, they don't innovate because they're too woke”, like hang out with some 63 year old Danish guys and see how woke you think they are once everyone's had a few drinks.Dwarkesh Patel   My question wasn't about wokeism. I just meant in general, if you have an egalitarian society.Tyler Cowen   I think of Europe as less egalitarian. I think they have bad cultural norms for innovation. They're culturally so non-egalitarian. Again, it depends where but Paris would be the extreme. There, everyone is classified right? By status, and how you need to wear your sweater the right way, and this and that. Now, how innovative is Paris? Actually, maybe more than people think. But I still think they have too few dimensions of status competition. That's a general problem in most of Europe–– too few dimensions of status competition, not enough room for the proverbial village idiot.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. You say in the book, that questions tend to degrade over time if you don't replace them. I find it interesting that Y Combinator has kept the same questions since they were started in 2005. And of course, your co-author was a partner at Y Combinator. Do you think that works for Y Combinator or do you think they're probably making a mistake?Tyler Cowen   I genuinely don't know. There are people who will tell you that Y Combinator, while still successful, has become more like a scalable business school and less like attracting all the top weirdos who do amazing things. Again, I'd want to see data before asserting that myself, but you certainly hear it a lot. So it could be that Y Combinator is a bit stale. But still in a good sense. Like Harvard is stale, right? It dates from the 17th century. But it's still amazing. MIT is stale. Maybe Y Combinator has become more like those groups.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you think that will happen to Emergent Ventures eventually?Tyler Cowen   I don't think so because it has a number of unique features built in from the front. So a very small number of evaluators too. It might grow a little bit, but it's not going to grow that much. I'm not paid to do it, so that really limits how much it's going to scale. There's not a staff that has to be carried where you're captured by the staff, there is no staff. There's a bit of free riding on staff who do other things, but there's no sense of if the program goes away, all my buddies on staff get laid off. No. So it's kind of pop up, and low cost of exit. Whenever that time comes.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you personally have questions that you haven't put in the book or elsewhere because you want them to be fresh? For asking somebody who's applying to her for the grant? Tyler Cowen   Well, I didn't when we wrote the book. So we put everything in there that we were thinking of, but over time, we've developed more. I don't generally give them out during interviews, because you have to keep some stock. So yeah, there's been more since then, but we weren't holding back at the time.Dwarkesh Patel It's like a comedy routine. You gotta write a new one each year.Tyler Cowen That's right. But when your shows are on the air, you do give your best jokes, right?Will Reading Cowen's Book Help You Win Emergent Ventures?Dwarkesh Patel Let's say someone applying to emergent ventures reads your book. Are they any better off? Or are they perhaps worse off because maybe they become misleading or have a partial view into what's required of them?Tyler Cowen   I hope they're not better off in a way, but probably they are. I hope they use it to understand their own talent better and present it in a better way. Not just to try to manipulate the system. But most people aren't actually that good at manipulating that kind of system so I'm not too worried.Dwarkesh Patel   In a sense, if they can manipulate the system, that's a positive signal of some kind.Tyler Cowen   Like, if you could fool me –– hey, what else have you got to say, you know? [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel   Are you worried that when young people will encounter you now, they're going to think of you as sort of a talent judge and a good one at that so they're maybe going to be more self aware than whether––Tyler Cowen   Yes. I worry about the effect of this on me. Maybe a lot of my interactions become less genuine, or people are too self conscious, or too stilted or something.Dwarkesh Patel   Is there something you can do about that? Or is that just baked in the gig?Tyler Cowen   I don't know, if you do your best to try to act genuine, whatever that means, maybe you can avoid it a bit or delay it at least a bit. But a lot of it I don't think you can avoid. In part, you're just cashing in. I'm 60 and I don't think I'll still be doing this when I'm 80. So if I have like 18 years of cashing in, maybe it's what I should be doing.Identifying talent earlyDwarkesh Patel   To what extent are the principles of finding talent timeless? If you're looking for let's say, a general for the French Revolution, how much of this does the advice change? Are the basic principles the same over time?Tyler Cowen   Well, one of the key principles is context. You need to focus on how the sector is different. But if you're doing that, then I think at the meta level the principles broadly stay the same.Dwarkesh Patel   You have a really interesting book about autism and systematizers. You think Napoleon was autistic?Tyler Cowen   I've read several biographies of him and haven't come away with that impression, but you can't rule it out. Who are the biographers? Now it gets back to our question of: How valuable is history? Did the biographers ever meet Napoleon? Well, some of them did, but those people had such weak.. other intellectual categories. The modern biography is written by Andrew Roberts, or whoever you think is good, I don't know. So how can I know?Dwarkesh Patel   Right? Again, the issue is that the details that stick in my mind from reading the biography are the ones that make him seem autistic, right?Tyler Cowen   Yes. There's a tendency in biographies to storify things, and that's dangerous too. Dwarkesh Patel   How general across a pool is talent or just competence of any kind? If you look at somebody like Peter Thiel–– investor, great executive, great thinker even, certainly Napoleon, and I think it was some mathematician either Lagrangian or Laplace, who said that he (Napoleon) could have been a mathematician if he wanted to. I don't know if that's true, but it does seem that the top achievers in one field seem to be able to move across fields and be top achievers in other fields. I

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ArtiFact: Books, Art, Culture
ArtiFact #32: Terminator vs. Terminator 2 - Judgment Day | Ethan Pinch, J. Schneider, A. Sheremet

ArtiFact: Books, Art, Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 94:01


James Cameron's "Terminator" film series combines the best of Hollywood while remaining unburdened by its convention and cliche. In “Terminator” (1984), Cameron casts an apparently reluctant Arnold Schwarzenegger into the role of T800. From the opening shots of a nude, physically unfamiliar, almost biblical figure surveying Los Angeles, to the slow, complex, yet satisfying buildup of drama/plot machinations, the first Terminator is an example of novelty and craftsmanship in genre film, while “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” takes it all a step further through deeper explorations of character. In ArtiFact #32, Alex Sheremet, Ethan Pinch, and Jessica Schneider compare the two films as they try to imagine seeing them for the first time. Questions discussed include: how does Arnold Schwarzenegger, as actor, add to the films without much acting? How does his character (even if programmed) change? Are human beings becoming more efficient thinkers and killers to compete against Skynet? Are narrative arcs “enough” to make a good film? You may also watch this discussion on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIRS9DIl3bk If you found this video useful, support us on our Patreon page and get the 2+ hour, patron-only “B side” to this conversation: https://www.patreon.com/automachination B side topics: Jessica learns the final piece of her Zoom puzzle; why Ethan Pinch's pet rabbit made Alex think differently of him; explaining why Bruce Ario's (as well as Walt Whitman's) poems creep up upon the reader; Jessica assesses Bruce Ario's Enneagram types via his novel Cityboy; how death de-fangs “threatening” artists; Ethan Pinch goes off on the British Monarchy, explains Queen Elizabeth's hidden, understated power; the monarchy's control of British media; Prince Andrew's arms sales to dictators; Aleksandr Dugin's “The Fourth Political Theory” doesn't differentiate between strains of liberalism; Jessica on Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story on Netflix; thinking about psychopathy, human violence; debating the best artist biopics: Vivian Maier, Amadeus, Into The Deep (on Herman Melville), Emily Dickinson; making fun of Amanda Gorman; art & futurity Subscribe to the ArtiFact podcast on Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3xw2M4D Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3wLpqEV Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3dSQXxJ Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/2SVJIxB Podbean: https://bit.ly/3yzLuUo iHeartRadio: https://ihr.fm/3AK942L Read Jessica Schneider's article on Terminator 1: https://www.automachination.com/great-action-great-storytelling-james-cameron-terminator-1984/ Read Jessica Schneider's latest book of poetry, Ekphrasm: https://www.amazon.com/Ekphrasm-French-Painters-Paintings-Natures-ebook/dp/B0B53ZB2TV Subscribe to Ethan Pinch's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/AnthropomorphicHorse Read the latest essays from the automachination universe: https://www.automachination.com/ Read Alex's (archived) essays: https://alexsheremet.com Timestamps: 0:18 – introduction; how James Cameron's early films were formative for Jessica and Alex; arguments for why Terminator 2: Judgment Day is the superior film; Ethan on the shifting stakes between films 9:38 – craft in the Terminator films; symbolism, psychology, how Arnold Schwarzenegger realized over time this was a worthwhile film; seeing the film for the first time; Ethan on the Cold War and Freudian themes; Alex on the use of death, humanoids in Terminator 2 as a nightmarish factor; the comparison to Chris Market's “Le Jetee”; the Hitchcock connection 25:32 – Jessica on the characterization of Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton); smaller scenes as interstitial character-building; how Terminator and well-crafted genre films separate consistent thinking from mere aesthetic preference; 40:43 – Alex on capturing the logic of AI, computer programming; object-oriented behavior in human beings vs. machines; the Freudian / Cold War themes as under the auspices of competition, survival; the attempted Dyson killing as Terminator-like; sociopathy, narcissism vs. robotic behavior; Ethan on the films' haunted future; The Prisoner and the “white ball” as the sum of incipient human fears; the cliches in the first film's ending vs. the fact that “the real action” hasn't been shown from the future; the introduction of behavioral constraints 01:03:15 – cynical apocalypticism into Terminator 2: Judgment Day; the Philip K. Dick connection; how the film makes fun of answers and non-answers, such as John Connor's interruption of his mother's spoken/writerly cliches about motherhood; the use of music; do cultural references date James Cameron's films? 01:15:00 – the use of Los Angeles as both topical, as well as prophetic; turning LA's Hollywood back upon it across films; Jessica on 90s culture Tags: #Terminator, #JamesCameron, #scifi

ITmedia ビジネスオンライン
スーパーでよく聞く「ポポーポポポポ」 今度は「ボサノバ調メロディー」を搭載

ITmedia ビジネスオンライン

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 0:20


スーパーでよく聞く「ポポーポポポポ」 今度は「ボサノバ調メロディー」を搭載。 青島文化教材社(静岡市)のブランド「SKYNET(スカイネット)」は、「スーパーサウンド『呼び込み君』ミニ DX」の予約受注を9月26日に開始した。発売は2023年2月の予定。

Course Wizards
How AI Image Generators Can Help Your Course Creation

Course Wizards

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 25:30


Artificial Intelligence is taking over the world! But before we have a Skynet situation, discover how you can use AI to effectively create unique, custom, non-copywritten images for use on your course website. In this episode of Course Wizards, Amit and Chris discuss how you can use AI image creation and compare two of their favorite services. Links:  - Apps for Authors - https://writing.fyi/apps - New Zenler - https://www.newzenler.com/invite/zmnfZZ - 5K Course Launch Blueprint - https://getnzlr.com/5k-launch-blueprint - Course Launch Secrets Facebook Group - facebook.com/courselaunchsecrets

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
From Chinese Linguist to Chief Medical Officer

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 29:55


My guest today is Dr. Richard Parker, Chief Medical Officer at Arcadia, an exciting venture focused on using "big data" to ensure the right information about care is delivered to the right patient when needed. What a concept! For the math nerds out there, they harness millions of data points—like your diagnosis, medications, zip code, etc.—to create a sort of flowchart and navigation tool. Rich tells me it's not Skynet, and we are not at the dawn of a robot apocalypse. What's even more interesting is how Rich got started in his career in Chinese linguistics and how that enabled him to his role as Chief Medical Officer for Beth Israel Deaconess in Massachusetts. Oh, and we rifle through the 1980s and compare notes on how dangerous playgrounds used to be. Enjoy the show.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

No Fate: A Terminator Podcast
Episode 31 - The Sarah Connor Chronicles: "Complications"

No Fate: A Terminator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 29:10


After a nearly two-month hiatus (at least, since we've recorded), the new season of NO FATE is here! In this week's unedited episode, the guys cover the ninth episode of Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles - Season 2, “Complications.” That means lots of discussion about time travel, the three dots, Ellison's apparent betrayal, the human responsiveness of machines, and Derek and Jesse! All this and more on this week's episode of NO FATE.

La Ciencia Pop
S03E25 | ¡Ay! Ahí hay AI

La Ciencia Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 35:43


La historia de esta semana comienza a fin 18 cuando en la apareció un inventor que aseguraba tener una máquina capaz de jugar ajedrez de manera autónoma la primera máquina pensante de la historia. Este invento tan curioso y especial nos llevará a conversar sobre inteligencia artificial y las amenazas que esta nueva tecnología puede presentar las que no se vinculan con Skynet o HAL9000, son un poco más sutiles pero ciertamente más urgentes _Música:Cambo - Coffee (Licencia Creative Commons, no comercial)Support the show

Press Play and Scream
Jeepers Creepers For Life (Jeepers Creepers with Victor Varnado)

Press Play and Scream

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 64:34


Josh and Kelly discuss Jeepers Creepers with Victor Varnado (actor, comedian, writer, patent-holder and podcast co-host). Topics include our roles in a Skynet situation (no, you're not missing anything; we really do start the episode in the middle of a conversation), the Creeper's hobbies and whether the locals are in on it. We also discuss WikiListen (Victor's podcast with Rachel Teichman and the best idea ever). NOTE: There are spoilers in this episode. Listen to WikiListen: https://wikilisten.com/ (available across podcast platforms!)Follow us:Twitter: https://twitter.com/PressPlayScream Website: https://pressplayandscream.buzzsprout.com/ 

Troubled Minds Radio
Skynet Family Reunion - Advanced Artificial Agents in Latent Space

Troubled Minds Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 137:50


Superintelligent AI is likely to cause an existential catastrophe for humanity, according to a new paper. What agents will carry out these plans? Why is there such disagreement in the tech sector about this?http://www.troubledminds.org Support The Show! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/troubledminds https://rokfin.com/creator/troubledminds https://troubledfans.com https://patreon.com/troubledminds#aliens #conspiracy #paranormalRadio Schedule Mon-Tues-Wed-Thurs 7-9pst - https://fringe.fm/iTunes - https://apple.co/2zZ4hx6Spotify - https://spoti.fi/2UgyzqMStitcher - https://bit.ly/2UfAiMXTuneIn - https://bit.ly/2FZOErSTwitter - https://bit.ly/2CYB71UFollow Algo Rhythm -- https://bit.ly/3uq7yRYFollow Apoc -- https://bit.ly/3DRCUEjFollow Ash -- https://bit.ly/3CUTe4ZFollow Daryl -- https://bit.ly/3GHyIaNFollow James -- https://bit.ly/3kSiTEYFollow Jennifer -- https://bit.ly/3BVLyCMFollow Joseph -- https://bit.ly/3pNjbzb Matt's Book -- https://bit.ly/3x68r2d -- code for free book WY78YFollow Nightstocker -- https://bit.ly/3mFGGtxRobert's Book -- https://amzn.to/3GEsFUKFollow TamBam -- https://bit.ly/3LIQkFw--------------------------------------------------Google Deepmind Researcher Co-Authors Paper Saying AI Will Eliminate Humanityhttps://www.vice.com/en/article/93aqep/google-deepmind-researcher-co-authors-paper-saying-ai-will-eliminate-humanityAdvanced artificial agents intervene in the provision of reward - Cohen - AI Magazine - Wiley Online Libraryhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aaai.12064Influencers inadvertently exposed the horrors of AI surveillancehttps://thenextweb.com/news/ai-stalks-instagram-influencers-to-expose-high-tech-surveillanceOn Skynet's 20th birthday, it's time to admit AI isn't the real threat | Mashablehttps://mashable.com/article/skynet-20-anniversary-terminatorTerminator? Skynet? No way. Machines will never rule the world, according to book by UB philosopherhttps://www.wnypapers.com/news/article/current/2022/08/22/152011/terminator-skynet-no-way.-machines-will-never-rule-the-world-according-to-book-by-ub-philosopherNetDragon Appoints its First Virtual CEO, Skynet Vibes are Realhttps://beincrypto.com/netdragon-appoints-first-virtual-ceo-skynet-vibes-real/Skynet Wiping Out Humanity "Would Look A Lot Like What's Going On Right Now" Says James Cameron | IFLSciencehttps://www.iflscience.com/skynet-wiping-out-humanity-would-look-a-lot-like-whats-going-on-right-now-says-james-cameron-62354James Cameron: Skynet Would Destroy Humanity With Deepfakes, Not Nukes | PCMaghttps://www.pcmag.com/news/james-cameron-skynet-would-destroy-humanity-with-deepfakes-not-nukesTerminator's Humans Were Totally Wrong About How to Beat Skynethttps://screenrant.com/terminator-how-humans-beat-skynet-john-connor-peace/China casts its 'SkyNet' far and wide, pursuing tens of thousands who flee overseas — Radio Free Asiahttps://www.rfa.org/english/news/china/skynet-repatriation-05042022151054.htmlSkynet (Terminator) - Wikipediahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skynet_(Terminator)SkyNet | Terminator Wiki | Fandomhttps://terminator.fandom.com/wiki/SkynetIs Skynet finally here? DJI Dock shows what's possible with autonomous drones | Digital Camera Worldhttps://www.digitalcameraworld.com/features/is-skynet-finally-here-dji-dock-shows-whats-possible-with-autonomous-dronesTECHNOLOGY: Skynet is upon us, the sky is falling | The Starhttps://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2022/06/14/technology-skynet-is-upon-us-the-sky-is-falling2022 Cyberdeck Contest: The Black Beast Will Help You Survive A Robot Apocalypse | Hackadayhttps://hackaday.com/2022/09/04/2022-cyberdeck-contest-the-black-beast-will-help-you-survive-a-robot-apocalypse/The AI Threat Isn't Skynet. It's the End of the Middle Class | WIREDhttps://archive.ph/4un3FWelcome Our Robot Overlords: Why I Think AI Creative Apps Are About to Disrupt the Business of Content – Rolling Stonehttps://www.rollingstone.com/culture-council/articles/welcome-robot-overlords-why-i-think-ai-creative-apps-are-about-to-disrupt-the-business-of-content-1392809/A terrifying AI-generated woman is lurking in the abyss of latent space | TechCrunchhttps://techcrunch.com/2022/09/13/loab-ai-generated-horror/loab, explained - by Alexander J. Zawacki - it's only darkhttps://itsonlydark.substack.com/p/loab-explainedA terrifying AI-generated woman is lurking in the abyss of latent space | TechCrunchhttps://techcrunch.com/2022/09/13/loab-ai-generated-horror/Understanding Latent Space in Machine Learning | by Ekin Tiu | Towards Data Sciencehttps://towardsdatascience.com/understanding-latent-space-in-machine-learning-de5a7c687d8dhttps://youtu.be/1ewWTo0IXJ0

RANGE ANXIETY
#229 - SKYNET

RANGE ANXIETY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 21:40


August 24th 1997

China Unscripted
#178 China Is Sending Its Police Overseas

China Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 58:18


China is sending its police overseas, and it could soon spread to every corner of the globe. In this just us episode of China Unscripted, we talk about China's overseas police bureaus, Hong Kong's subtle protest of CCP rule, and what to call China's form of colonialism.

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #529 - Who Retaliates the Retaliators?

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 199:04


An upstanding podcaster uncovers a dark and twisted underworld of aggression as he searches for allies during an intense emotional debate. On Episode 529 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss The Retaliators from directors Samuel Gonzalez Jr., Michael Lombardi, and Bridget Smith! We also talk about heavy metal soundtracks, the 27th anniversary of Hackers and the impact it had on pause buttons everywhere, and if you like when we argue we've got something special for you! So grab your favorite soundtrack to retaliate to, hold on tight to your christmas tree and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Critiquing the new video feed design, Thor: Love and Thunder, AI Art Creation, Midjourney, Skynet, latitudes and gratitudes, technical difficulties, Chris Hemsworth, BSO or HSO, Meatballs 2, Cobra Kai, Johnny 5, Hackers, Short Circuit, Fisher Stevens, Jonny Lee Miller, Angelina Jolie, Matthew Lillard, John Constantine, Foxfire, David Duchovny, Playing God, What We Do in the Shadows, Taiki Waititi, Wellington Paranormal, DC's Superpets, how hard is it to watch a movie start to finish?, Michael Ravenshadow presents: Jackers, Reservation Dogs, Terriers, the great Donal Logue, Memento, Silver Scream Convention, The Retaliators, Samuel  Gonzalez Jr., Bridget Smith, Ice Nine Kills, Motley Crue, Nikki Sixx, Shocker, Demon Knight, Escape from LA, The Crow, Judgment Night, heavy metal horror, The HU, “I could fold laundry to that”, The Last Action Hero, Tommy Lee, nothing good happens in New Jersey, Brian O'Halloran, Rescue Me, cocksmoking clerk Dante, Stryper, hitting a heavy bag, Bas Rutten's Self Defense, Hal Jordan and Dracula, Keanu Reeves, King's X, dUg Pinnick is 71?!, Ares the White, Evil Dead, Sam Raimi, Robocop 3, Robert John Burke, Dennis Leary, Rescue Me, The Chain Gang War, Azrael Batman, Saloum, Shudder, Picard, Lord of the Rings: Rings of Power, cutting pizza with scissors the Cobra way, Nope, the Apparatus in the Parlance of Our Times, and a Heavy Metal Hybrid of Rock, Revenge, and Radness.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show

Movies We Missed
The Terminator

Movies We Missed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 106:01


This week Brandon and Jane head back to 1984 (don't tell Skynet!). We are revisiting the James Cameron joint that launched the career of Arnold Schwarzenegger and a movie empire. Topics include bitchin' 80s fashion, the irrelevance of phone books and the dangers of wearing a Walkman during dare I say it…coitus! We are asking the hard questions and you'll be cackling before you can say “hasta la vista.” That's technically not this film but you get the drift. It's The Terminator!

Press X to Start
Level 6.35 - The Assassin Creed Global Takeover

Press X to Start

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 76:32


SUBSCRIBE NOW!!!! on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher & Audible. This week on the Press X to Start Podcast: DJ, Sean, Marcus & Avery talk about D23, the big Ubisoft event, Overwatch 2's questionable Battle Pass plans & much more! Gaming News - Time code: 2:43 We take in-depth looks at the gaming side of D23 & Ubisoft's big event; Tencent strategically raises their stake in Ubisoft post event; Overwatch 2's rumored Battle Pass plans upset fans; Matt Booty has dreams of A.I. QA testers which will inevitably bring us closer to Skynet; PlayStation & Xbox continue to publicly slapbox over Call of Duty. What We've Been Playing - Time code: 1:01:15 Avery closes in on finally getting the Platinum trophy for TLOU; Sean runs around taking pictures in Toem and then joins DJ for more gushing about the wonderful chaos that is the Yakuza franchise. If you're enjoying the show, please take a moment to rate/review it on whatever service you're using. Every little bit helps!  Want to ask a question, ask us at PressX2start.com/Questions Join/Follow Us: Youtube: Press X To Start TV Twitch: pressxtostarttv Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pressx2start Twitter: @PressX2S  Instagram: @PressX2Start TikTok: @pressx2start You can find more info about the Press X and who we are at www.PressX2start.com. If you have any questions or just want to tell us how great (or just slightly okay) we're doing or how we can be better, be a friend and reach out and email us at pressxtostartpodcast@gmail.com End music by @MarcoMavy on Twitter & IG Be good to each other, Peace!

Buscadores de la verdad
UTP167 El acoso electrónico más cerca de lo que crees

Buscadores de la verdad

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 69:48


Buenos días, buenas tardes o buenas noches, se que muchos de vds nos escucharan luego desde sus casas, el lugar de trabajo, conduciendo o quizás a la orilla de la playa tomando un refrigerio, muchísimas gracias por estar ahí y seguir buscando la verdad con nosotros. Hoy les hablaremos de un tema peliagudo del que el periodismo que calla huye como de la peste y del cual en el mejor de los casos tan solo se dedica a desinformar y a ridiculizar a las seres humanos que lo padecen. Estoy hablando de las víctimas de acoso y tortura electrónica que en inglés se denominan Targeted Individual. Yo vengo desde hace tiempo hablándoles de que estamos bajo una LIBERTAD INDIVIDUAL VIGILADA o LIV por parte de los poderes oscuros que manejan este mundo. Que nos vigilan esta mas que claro leyendo artículos míos como ¿ESTAMOS EN CIBERGUERRA EN LOS FOROS? o LO QUE NO DEBERÍAS SABER SOBRE EL PNR. Artículos que desgraciadamente han pasado bastante desapercibidos incluso por la gente habitual que lee mi blog. El PNR o Passenger Name Report que traducido al castellano vendría a ser algo así como registro del nombre del pasajero es una de las herramientas imprescindibles para poder llevar a cabo esa LIBERTAD INDIVIDUAL VIGILADA que nos afecta a todos. Con la excusa de perseguir a terroristas que nunca son detenidos en los aeropuertos nos van a recortar a todos nuestros derechos para así poder protegerlos y garantizarlos, absolutamente retorcido. Pero no vamos a hablar del PNR o exclusivamente de la vigilancia a la que estamos sometidos, hoy les hablaremos de un paso más, del acoso al que están siendo sometidos personas de todo tipo y en todo el mundo. Yo he tocado el tema en algunos artículos antiguos como EL CASO DEL INGENIERO LEOPOLDO RIDRUEJO MIRANDA GANGSTALKING Y ACOSO POR DESCUBRIR UN SECRETO SOBRE EL 11M. Donde como su nombre indica esta persona en un principio anónima tuvo que exiliarse del pais dado el nivel de acoso al que fue sometido para evitar que saliera a la luz lo que había visto. Como he dicho antes no solo personas que tengan algo interesante para los poderes del estado profundo son hostigadas, también gentes sencillas a las que someten a torturas electrónicas como RICARDO JIMENEZ BENGOETXEA, un simple trabajador. Desgraciadamente una gran mayoría de seres humanos no ven la deriva totalitaria que están tomando los acontecimientos. Esa misma élite que nos ha traído hasta aquí ya tiene pensado y planificado lo que la gente que nos oponemos a esta dictadura sanitaria/ecológica vamos a hacer. La lucha violenta, el enfrentamiento de hermanos contra hermanos, hijos contra padres, alumnos contra profesores...PERO CUIDADO! Todos los ejércitos y policías del mundo llevan preparándose para este evento desde hace muchos años. Tienen previsto utilizar un armamento que se denomina ARMAS NO LETALES Están deseando utilizar sus cañones de microondas que ya han estado probando por todo el mundo con personas. Cobayas humanas que han estado sufriendo hostigamiento electrónico sin que nadie les ayudase. En un pdf de 62 páginas titulado Plan estratégico 2016-2025 Programa de armas no letales que podrán encontrar en la descripción de ivoox de este podcast podemos leer: “Casi todos los documentos pronostican que Estados Unidos seguirá ocupándose de grupos terroristas y la delincuencia transnacional, pero lo hará aumentando el número de operaciones expedicionarias y "ligeras", en lugar de campañas militares sostenidas. Sus previsiones para el periodo de 2025 también incluyen tendencias menos conocidas que podrían afectar a los próximos años en la evolución de las armas no letales y en su empleo. Estos impulsores estratégicos incluyen Megaciudades Compromiso y operaciones especiales Énfasis en los fuegos no cinéticos Campos de batalla dispersos/no lineales Sistemas no tripulados” O sea, tienen bien claro que tendrán que combatir en las ciudades contra nosotros, contra la población en general utilizando armamento que no mate pero si cause daños o molestias graves. En este podcast, en esta charla, vamos a intentar que todos vds comprendan que significa ser marcado como un target individual y que es el acoso electrónico y el Gangstalking. Conocerán que son las armas no letales, como se vienen utilizando desde hace mucho tiempo y porque interesa que la población en general no sea sabedora de estas cosas. Por eso hoy vamos a hablar con la asociación VIACTEC de víctimas de cibertortura para que nos cuenten un poco quienes son y de que trata todo esto del ciberacoso. ………………………………………………………………………………………. 001R Bienvenidos, me gustaria empezar preguntando sobre que es el acoso electrónico en general y luego que nos describieras las diferentes técnicas que emplean. 1- La tortura electrónica o cibertortura es un crimen actual que se está cometiendo ahora mismo, no un eventual peligro futuro de un mundo distópico. ¿Se entiende eso? Una vez dicho esto, te puedo decir los efectos que sufren las víctimas, cómo dificultad para mantener el equilibrio, tinitus, falta de coordinación, bloqueos cognitivos, pérdida de memoria de corto plazo, o de largo plazo, según sea el caso. Hay muchísimos. … 002Y Por ejemplo podrías explicarnos más a fondo en lo que consiste la técnica voice to skull (v2k) Voz hacia el craneo del que les dejare un video censurado de desmontando a Babylon donde el dispositivo de v2k es usado EN DIRECTO en un lugar público. 2- En realidad no te puedo decir mucho de la forma cómo funcionan las tecnologías de acceso y comunicación cerebro -ordenador, o las tecnologías militares de comando de voz, porque no soy científica. Pero hay bastante documentación al respecto. La gente tiene que leer y dejar de hacer el tonto. Si se dedicaran a eso en vez de poner videos tontos en tictoc, se darían cuenta de la gravedad del problema. EL V2 K es sólo una de esas tecnologías. Aparentemente es un sistema de transmisión de mensajes por transducción ósea, pero hay muchos sistemas que hacen lo mismo. Yo sólo soy una víctima y no los conozco todos. … 003R ¿Cuántos afectados calculáis que hay en el mundo y en España? ¿Tenéis alguna estadística que permita estimarlo? ¿Cuántos miembros tenéis contabilizados? 3- En Viactec somos 200 víctimas asociadas tan sólo en ESPAÑA Y AMÉRICA LATINA. En EEUU hay 170.000 víctimas asociadas en distintas organizaciones, según fuentes serias. Y las víctimas de ataques neuronales conocido como SINDROME DE LA HABANA, en distintas embajadas de EEUU en todo el mundo, ya son más de 200 también. Todas estas víctimas refieren lo mismo, describen efectos similares, sin ni siquiera conocerse entre sí. Te puedo decir que en mi cuenta de Twitter @VIATEC me siguen víctimas de todo el mundo, incluso chinas, japonesas, inglesas o italianas. … 004Y ¿Qué síntomas son los más frecuentes en vuestro caso? 4- En primer lugar tengo que aclararte que no hablamos de síntomas, sino de efectos, porque no se trata de una enfermedad, en principio. Aunque las secuelas que deja en la víctima si se pueden llegar a convertir en patologías, e incluso se pueden llegar a cronificar. Te enumero algunas de las más comunes, (LEER EL CUADRO DE EFECTOS D LAS ARMAS NEURONALES) … 005Y ¿Existe algún tratamiento en el mundo para aliviar vuestra situación? 5-No conozco ningún tratamiento paliativo, ni terapia de rehabilitación física o neuronal que se esté aplicando para ayudar a las víctimas. Tal vez alguien debería ocuparse de ello. 006R Es sumamente interesante leer la pestaña Tecnologías de Lectura de Pensamientos en la web de VIACTEC ya que en ella se muestran múltiples experimentos que nos demuestran que pueden leer nuestros pensamientos, algo que debería ponernos los pelos de punta, pero que parece que ya muchas personas tienen asumido como algo normal. Yo he hablado algunas veces del libro del Dr Delgado titulado "Control físico de la mente” Hacia una sociedad psicocivilizada” escrito en 1972. Vosotros mostráis experimentos modernos como los llevados a cabo por el equipo de Rafael Yuste director de “Iniciativa Cerebro”. ¿Creéis que las élites psicopatocraticas dejarían de usar la posibilidad de controlar a la población si poseyeran la tecnología adecuada? 6- La tecnología ya existe y está siendo usada de forma subrepticia. Especialistas militares como el Coronel Baños las describen en sus libros. El senado de EE UU ha interpelado a militares sobre su uso. Si el resto del mundo pretende hacer creer que esto no existe, es porque les mueven intereses políticos y económicos inconfesables. Te quiero citar lo que dice: “No me gusta hablar de elítes psicopáticas, porque eso podría servir a los criminales perpetradores de este delito para despistar al público y banalizar el tema. Estamos hablando de armas de tecnologia militar aplicadas a la población civil y su uso debe ser prohibido y regulado en todo el mundo de la misma manera que se hace con las armas nucleares. La guerra neurocognitiva se enfoca en las vulnerabilidades cognitivas, fisiológicas y de comportamiento del adversario. Según the International Defense Security & Technology Inc, las capacidades armadas a nivel táctico se centrarán en DEGRADAR las capacidades y las características cognitivas, fisiológicas y conductuales del 'enemigo' y los efectos localizados de estas armas las hacen 'ideales' para el empleo en áreas urbanas.” … 007R En la pagina web de la asociación se habla de control mental más conocido por la denominación en ingles Mind control o MK. ¿En este caso estamos hablando de algo diferente al MK ultra que se utiliza para programar a personas que trabajan para las elites oscuras? 7- Te repito que lo de las élites oscuras me parece una estrategia para desviar la atención de la sociedad civil, banalizar el asunto y desacreditar a las victimas haciéndolas pasar por locas, o paranoicas. Ese discurso no ayuda. No estamos en la edad media y no podemos seguir hablando así. Necesitamos que este tema se tome en serio. … 008Y Mucho se habla de la introducción de los neuroderechos en la Constitución de Chile pero poco de que en España, el presidente del Gobierno, Pedro Sánchez, presentó la Carta de Derechos Digitales, en julio de 2021: "uno de los compromisos más importantes del Gobierno", que tiene como objetivo "proteger los derechos de los ciudadanos y ciudadanas en la nueva era de Internet y la Inteligencia Artificial" dijo. La carta de derechos digitales que en su capítulo de igualdad articulo 5 dice con respecto a los niños: “Las personas menores de edad pueden expresar libremente sus opiniones e ideas a través de medios tecnológicos, así como participar y expresar su opinión en los asuntos públicos que les afectan, conforme a los derechos que les son inherentes, incluyendo la libertad de pensamiento, de conciencia, de religión, de asociación y de celebrar reuniones con fines pacíficos en el entorno digital. Se potenciará el uso de las tecnologías para el pleno desarrollo de este derecho.” ¿Llegados a este punto nos preguntamos dónde queda la patria potestad de los padres? En el art 6 sigue: “Se impulsará el estudio del impacto en el desarrollo de la personalidad de personas menores derivado del acceso a entornos digitales, así como a contenidos nocivos o peligrosos. Dicho estudio prestará particular atención a sus efectos en la educación afectivo-sexual, las conductas dependientes, la igualdad, la orientación sexual e identidad de género, así como a los comportamientos antidemocráticos, racistas, xenófobos, capacitistas, machistas, discriminatorios o propios del discurso del odio.” ¿Qué estudio es éste y en qué condiciones se realizará? ¿Con qué base de datos? Es cierto que esta carta no es vinculante pero es la base de futuras leyes. ¿Están apoderándose de nuestros niños en el ámbito digital? ¿Lo vamos a permitir? En cuanto a los Derechos ante la inteligencia artificial dice: “La inteligencia artificial deberá asegurar un enfoque centrado en la persona y su inalienable dignidad, perseguirá el bien común y asegurará cumplir con el principio de no maleficencia.” Se habla de la IA como una entidad propia sin embargo se define como los sistemas o máquinas que imitan la inteligencia humana para realizar tareas y que pueden mejorar a partir de la información que recopilan. ¿Quién controla estás máquinas? Toda esta situación recuerda la película Terminator donde Skynet, la inteligencia artificial iniciará un holocausto nuclear en el «Día del Juicio Final» y continuará creando las máquinas que acabarán con la humanidad. La Comisión Europea presentó en abril de 2021 su legislación sobre Inteligencia Artificial. Se trata del primer marco legal sobre esta tecnología acompañada de otra normativa sobre maquinaria y robots, creando cuatro niveles de riesgo y prohibiendo los sistemas de puntuación ciudadana por los estados o el reconocimiento facial en determinadas situaciones. Todos los sistemas de "identificación biométrica remota" serán considerados de alto riesgo. La Comisión Europea no ha decidido prohibir directamente los sistemas de reconocimiento facial, aunque sí describe que aplicará requisitos estrictos. Se dice que dicho reconocimiento no debe ser usado en espacios públicos pero está justificado en casos como la búsqueda de menores desaparecidos o el terrorismo. Lo que se desprende de esto es que las grabaciones siempre estarán activas y se usarán en estos casos pero ahí está la vigilancia siempre. ¿Quién tiene acceso a esta vigilancia? Explicanos que piensa sobre los neuroderechos y de donde ha surgido esta idea. 8- En relación a este tema, he escrito un artículo que puedes leer en este link: https://marca.org/1569-son-necesarios-los-neuroderechos/ . Muchos opinan, yo entre ellos, que los derechos a los que se refiere el proyecto de ley ya existen, y que son directamente identificables con derechos fundamentales que ya están asegurados en la actual legislación occidental, tratados sobre derechos humanos y demás legislación internacional. Pero, obviamente, el desconocimiento general acerca de las tecnologías emergentes que permiten la violación de estos derechos, y las formas cómo pueden y están siendo usadas contra la población civil, hace que se corra el peligro de desestimar la crucial importancia de este tema para la continuidad de la humanidad tal como la conocemos. En mí opinión no se trata tanto de establecer nuevos derechos, cómo de garantizar los derechos humanos ya consagrados y reconocidos mundialmente, los mismos que están siendo violados impunemente en este momento mediante nuevas tecnologías y dispositivos. No se trata de prevenir un eventual crimen de una futura sociedad distópica. No, porque el delito contra la humanidad ya está siendo cometido en todo el mundo, ante la indefensión de las víctimas de estas armas tecnológicas, dispositivos de manipulación neuronal remota y empresas neurotecnológicas de todo tipo. Así que en principio sería un poco extraño estar en contra de regular los derechos neuronales. Sin embargo, hay que tener en cuenta que reformular los derechos actuales, en función de las nuevas tecnologías que ya se están aplicando pudiera resultar en detrimento de conceptos más amplios sobre derechos humanos y civiles. Es decir, lo que me preocupa del tema, es la ambigüedad y falta de precisión técnica con la cual se está legislando sobre este tema, y hasta que punto estas legislaciones se tratan más bien de restringir derechos universales preexistentes, para facilitar la aplicación de tecnologías de acceso y monitorización remota del cerebro, o de manipulación y neuromodulacion de la conducta, que violan principios de privacidad y autodeterminación del individuo, o hasta para justificar crímenes que, de hecho, ya se han cometido. … 009R Habláis en vuestra web de DARPA y de un proyecto llamado DARPA Silent Talk (el silencio habla) - Un programa capaz de identificar patrones EEG de palabras y capaz de transmitirlos para comunicaciones encubiertas. También se que los militares han estado utilizando cascos que al parecer podían alterar la conducta de los soldados, dándose algunos casos de soldados que han asesinado a sus propias familias y/o se han suicidado tras volver del combate. ¿Qué me puedes contar de esto? 9- No puedo contestarte realmente a ésa pregunta, porque no conozco nada acerca de armamentos ni proyectos militares, ni de los creados por Estados Unidos de Norteamérica, ni de ningún país. Cómo ya te he comentado a tí y a tu audiencia, soy una víctima civil. No tengo nada que ver con ejércitos, ni con agencias de inteligencia, ni con gobiernos. Soy docente y artista ‘plástico. Soy un creador. En la cuenta de Twitter de VIACTEC pueden encontrar mucha información de la que aparece en medios serios de internet, o la que publican los propios gobiernos, congresos y ministerios de defensa de los distintos países y que compartimos allí para ayudar a difundir, informar y educar a la población. Hay todo un equipo de víctimas que dedica a investigar estos temas. Cada quien debe leer, informarse y sacar sus propias conclusiones. … 010Y Se sabe que la agencia militar de desarrollo de armamento DARPA ha invertido en empresas como Moderna para la creación de estos líquidos experimentales de creación de moléculas a través de modificar nuestro ARN que algunos han denominado vacunas. ¿Creéis que también exista la posibilidad de que hayan introducido nanotecnología para alterarnos, vigilarnos o incluso acosarnos a distancia? 10- Eso sin duda. No porque yo me lo imagine, sino porque lo dicen los propios científicos cómo Rafael Yuste, del Proyecto BRAIN. Que por cierto, tampoco es el único sino tal vez el más conocido. Existe otro proyecto similar en la Unión Europea denominado HUMAN BRAIN, enfocado a lo mismo. Y habrá muchos más de los que no sabemos nada. Es que ya esto se está comenzando a comercializar. Existe NEURALIK y su competencia SYNCROM. Existe un proyecto comercial Chino. De nuevo, no estamos hablando del futuro. Estamos hablando del presente. Haría muy bien nuestra audiencia en comenzar a escuchar las conferencias y foros científicos que ya se están llevando a cabo sobre estos temas. He publicado algunos pocos artículos que se han publicado en español, y traducido la mayoría de esta información, que está en inglés. Y, te digo, sorprende verdaderamente que nuestros científicos y gobiernos hispano hablantes no se ocupen de llenar este vacío informativo. Porque no es culpa de la gente no estar informada, es que se nos está ocultando la información. Y desde luego, aprovecho la oportunidad ‘para agradecerte esta entrevista y la oportunidad de tocar estos temas. Ojalá hubiese más técnicos preocupados hablando. … 011R No se si conoces el concepto denominado mind war o guerra mental acuñado por los especialistas en guerra psicológica norteamericanos mayor general Paul E. Valley y teniente coronel Michael A. Aquino. Curiosamente en wikipedia solo existe como mención de un episodio de la serie de ciencia ficción Babylon 5. Ellos mismos nos explican en un texto de 1980 titulado De PSYOP a MindWar (La Guerra de las Mentes) lo siguiente: “Nos desharemos del autoconcepto consciente, casi “avergonzado” de “operaciones psicológicas”. En su lugar, se crea MindWar. El término es duro e inspirador de miedo, y debería serlo: es un término de ataque y victoria, no uno de racionalización, persuasión y conciliación. El enemigo puede ofenderse por ello; eso está bastante bien mientras sea derrotado por él. En su contexto estratégico, MindWar debe llegar a amigos, enemigos y neutrales por igual en todo el mundo, no a través de primitivos folletos y altavoces de “campo de batalla” de tipo PSYOP, ni a través de los débiles, imprecisos y esfuerzos estrechos de psicotrónica, sino a través de los medios poseídos por los Estados Unidos que tienen la capacidad de llegar a prácticamente todas las personas en la faz de la Tierra. Estos medios son, por supuesto, los medios electrónicos: televisión y radio. Estado de desarrollos artísticos en comunicación por satélite, técnicas de grabación de video y láser y la transmisión óptica de emisiones hace posible una penetración de las mentes del mundo como hubiera sido inconcebible hace unos pocos años.” En otro apartado del texto al referirse a las condiciones optimas para controlar las mentes dice lo siguiente: “…en medidas de receptividad hay algunas condiciones puramente naturales, bajo las cuales las mentes pueden ser más o menos receptivas a las ideas, y MindWar debería aprovechar al máximo tales fenómenos como: la actividad electromagnética atmosférica, la ionización del aire, y las ondas de extremadamente baja frecuencia” ¿Pudiera ser que la utilización de la geoingenieria con la dispersión de metales pesados en la atmósfera y el empleo de cada vez más complejas y potentes emisiones de frecuencias electromagnéticas tenga que ver con la experimentación en vosotros de técnicas de tortura electrónica? 11- Es muy probable y bastante posible. Pero no me gusta contestar este tipo de preguntas tan técnicas para no exponerme a hacer el ridículo. Hay otros miembros de VIACTEC que conocen un poco más de física y de armamentos debido a su formación. Tal vez les puedas entrevistar en un futuro. … 012R Existe un relator de la ONU para la cibertortura lo cual es gracioso ya que sabemos de sobra que esta organización es parte de la elite oscura que maneja la propia cibertortura. Tenemos por ejemplo al Tte. Cnel. de Inteligencia Militar Michael Aquino especializado en Operaciones Psicológicas y condecorado en múltiples ocasiones por ello como podemos leer en el articulo de Desmontando a Babylon donde publican su curriculum vitae. Nos contaban allí: “Años 80, el ejército de los EEUU pide un informe a sus especialistas en “Guerra Psicológica”, quiere saber como mejorar en la ejecución de las conocidas como PSYOPS u Operaciones Psicológicas, un tipo de intervenciones que actualmente forman parte de lo que conocemos como Guerra de 4ª Generación. Entre los expertos en la aplicación de técnicas y teorías en la manipulación mental del enemigo y de los de casa, seleccionaron el Teniente Coronel de Inteligencia Militar, ahora retirado, Michael Aquino. Quien además por esa época, ejercía como sacerdote en el culto de la Iglesia de Satán, algo que como bien dirá él mismo, le colocó en el ojo del huracán de todas las investigaciones sobre la importancia que el satanismo, había tomado para el Pentágono. ¿Por qué elegir entre tantos alguien que había sido ordenado Alto Sacerdote de un culto satánico? El control piscológico o control mental sobre una población o grupo de individuos, ha sido dirigido desde tiempos muy lejanos, por los sacerdotes de los diferentes cultos que se han sucedido a lo largo de la historia. Nada hay mejor para el control mental que ofrecer respuesta a “necesidades espirituales o del alma” que todos como seres humanos tenemos. El campo de batalla por nuestra mente abarcaría todo lo que escapa a nuestros sentidos y razonamientos, un amplio espectro donde se conjuga el conocimiento ancestral con buenos trucos de prestidigitación. El espectáculo funciona un tiempo y deja de hacerlo, la historia de las religiones muestra un culto que sucede a otro.” ¿Crees que estas nuevas técnicas de control de la mente por medios electrónicos serian la ultima frontera para neutralizar definitivamente a los humanos libres y me gustaria preguntar por el papel que crees que tiene el satanismo en todo esto? 12 -La existencia misma de la humanidad entera está en peligro a causa de estas nuevas y no tan nuevas tecnologías. He publicado hace poco en nuestra cuenta de Twiiter un informe de la BBC acerca de este tema, que data de la década de los cincuenta. Esto no es nuevo, lo que pasa es que ahora es cuándo nos estamos enterando. Lo que estamos presenciando en este momento es la implementación masiva a nivel global de un proyecto tecnológico y político global. Pero se viene trabajando en ello desde hace más de cincuenta años. Se ha cruzado una frontera que pone en peligro la propia existencia de la humanidad tal cómo la conocemos. Y algunos científicos se siente muy orgullosos de ello. Tu has mencionado a dos, que son españoles. Pero hay científicos ocupandose de ese objetivo en todo el mundo que han desarrollado patentes y tecnologías en China, Alemania, Canadá o Japón. Eso sin hablar de los países del ex bloque sovietico, de los que no sabemos nada porque no se permite hablar. Ojalá la ciencia y la tecnología nunca hubieran cruzado esa frontera. Pero lo han hecho y pronto comenzaremos a ver las consecuencias. Con respecto al satanismo, ya te dicho mi opinión: NO ES MAS QUE UNA CORTINA DE HUMO. Es irrelevante para mí, y debería serlo también para la ley. Si son o no son parte de un culto satánico es asunto de ellos, UN CRIMEN ES UN CRIMEN. Olvidemos el tema religioso, porque no ayuda en nada. No estamos en la edad media dónde todo se le achacaba al demonio. Estamos hablando de delincuentes, de criminales. De científicos criminales que desarrollan armas neuronales que se aplican a la población civil indefensa, a niños. Si los inspira Satán o no, es irrelevante. Deben ser juzgados por sus crímenes. Estamos en pleno siglo XXI, por DIOS, esta entrevista se está llevando a cabo de forma remota y usando una aplicación gratuita de conversión de texto a voz, que se descarga en un dispositivo móvil, porque existe otra tecnología capaz de inhibir y manipular el habla. ¿Y me van a venir a hablar de satanismo? Lo siento pero paso de eso. … 013Y Es un hecho que se están vulnerando los derechos fundamentales en esta materia al ver casos como el Síndrome de la Habana que, desde 2016, afecta a alrededor de 200 diplomáticos y funcionarios de inteligencia de Estados Unidos con síntomas como dolores de cabeza, mareos y un sonido intenso de cigarras debido supuestamente a tecnología por microondas pero ¿existe jurisprudencia favorable? ¿Sentencias que apoyen la veracidad de estos hechos q estáis padeciendo? ¿Estáis denunciando esta situación en el marco legal y si es así en cuál? 13- En primer lugar, la veracidad de los hechos ya no necesita ser probada. Es cómo si a estas alturas me pidieran una sentencia legal que apoyara la veracidad de la existencia del teléfono como instrumento de vigilancia y acoso, por ejemplo. O la veracidad de la existencia del agente amarillo como arma letal. Hasta ahora hay algunos casos aislados de jurisprudencia en Estados Unidos y alguno que otro de electrosensibilidad en Europa, que yo sepa. Pero cada vez habrá más, en la medida que la gente se informe, y los gobiernos se vean obligados a ocuparse del tema, porque se les va a convertir en un problema de salud y de seguridad nacional. Nosotros, las víctimas, venimos denunciando desde hace mucho tiempo ante la prensa y ante todas las instituciones posibles, de forma individual y colectiva. Se han reído de nosotros, es cierto. Pero en algún momento se darán cuenta del peligro al cual se enfrenta la humanidad, la libertad, y los derechos civiles proclamados durante el siglo XX, y a los cuales habíamos llegado después de milenios de evolución como especie, en las antiguas sociedades libres … 014Y Sabemos que vuestros síntomas son algo subjetivos y los mass media o las personas del entorno intentan desacreditarles haciéndoles quedar como enfermos mentales. ¿Qué hacéis para palear estos daños? ¿Lleváis terapias psicológicas? 14.-En primer lugar te repito, no son síntomas son efectos. Y, no, no son subjetivos. Son medibles y observables con los métodos adecuados. Ya lo han demostrado los médicos de Estados Unidos de Norteamérica, quienes ya han determinado los efectos en el cerebro de las víctimas del llamado SINDROME DE LA HABANA. Te voy a citar sólo uno de ellos: DISMINUCIÓN DE LA MATERIA GRIS DEL CEREBRO ¿ Te parece que eso es algo subjetivo? ¿Sabes las implicaciones que eso tiene en el desempeño de un individuo humano? Para paliar e intentar revertir los daños físicos y psicológicos probamos muchas cosas. Algunas funcionan y otras no. No las voy a compartir por aquí, por razones obvias. Pero las víctimas intentamos ayudarnos entre nosotros y las compartimos de forma privada. Bueno, todo lo privado que es posible, dentro de la situación en la que nos encontramos. Con respecto a la ultima pregunta, mi respuesta es contundente. NO. Ninguna terapia psicología ayuda cuando te están torturando. ………………………………………………………………………………………. Participantes VIACTEC ESPAÑA @viactec Cuenta oficial de Viactec, asociación de víctimas de acoso y tortura electrónica en España. http://www.viactec.es/ Un Tecnico Preocupado https://twitter.com/tecn_preocupado Canal telegram https://t.me/UnTecnicoPreocupado ………………………………………………………………………………………. Enlaces utilizados en este podcast: LIV: LIBERTAD INDIVIDUAL VIGILADA https://tecnicopreocupado.com/2015/10/01/liv-libertad-individual-vigilada/ ¿ESTAMOS EN CIBERGUERRA EN LOS FOROS? https://tecnicopreocupado.com/2014/03/23/estamos-en-ciberguerra-en-los-foros/ LO QUE NO DEBERIAS SABER SOBRE EL PNR https://tecnicopreocupado.com/2019/03/14/lo-que-no-deberias-saber-sobre-el-pnr/ EL CASO DEL INGENIERO LEOPOLDO RIDRUEJO MIRANDA GANGSTALKING Y ACOSO POR DESCUBRIR UN SECRETO SOBRE EL 11M https://tecnicopreocupado.com/2017/02/05/el-caso-del-ingeniero-leopoldo-ridruejo-miranda-gangstalking-y-acoso/ RICARDO JIMENEZ BENGOETXEA, HISTORIA DE UN ACOSO NO CONTADO https://tecnicopreocupado.com/2017/09/13/ricardo-jimenez-bengoetxea-historia-de-un-acoso-no-contado/ Armas no letales https://twitter.com/tecn_preocupado/status/1424272988489363461 VIACTEC - Victimas de Cibertortura http://www.viactec.es/ Maria Gamez https://twitter.com/mariagamezroman/status/1547865021635444736 V2SK Voces al craneo, dispositivo usado EN DIRECTO en lugar público DaB Doblado Esp. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyFRCwzoYi4 DaB Radio 3.0 Episodio 4 – Nuevas tecnologías para el control https://desmontandoababylon.com/2016/11/21/dab-radio-3-0-episodio-4-nuevas-tecnologias-para-el-control/ https://archive.org/download/DaBRadio3punto0Episodio4TecnologiasParaElControlParte1/DaB%20Radio%203punto%200%20Episodio%204%20%20Tecnologias%20para%20el%20control%20Parte%201.mp3 https://archive.org/download/DaBRadio3punto0Episodio4TecnologiasParaElControlParte1/DabRadio3punto0Episodio4TecnoligasParaElControlParte2.mp3 https://archive.org/download/DaBRadio3punto0Episodio4TecnologiasParaElControlParte1/DabRadio3punto0Episodio4TecnologasParaElControlParte3.mp3 Guerra Futura neuro cognitiva se centrara en las vulnerabilidad cognitivas, fisiologicas y conductuales del adversario https://idstch.com/threats/future-neuro-cognitive-warfare-shall-target-cognitive-physiological-behavioral-vulnerabilites-adversary/ Dr. James Giordano: The Brain is the Battlefield of the Future https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N02SK9yd60s 2º Directo d@b desde YT - Guerra Cognitiva Informe OTAN Marzo 2022 https://www.ivoox.com/2-directo-dab-desde-yt-guerra-cognitiva-audios-mp3_rf_91837199_1.html Control fisico de la mente Dr Delgado https://twitter.com/tecn_preocupado/status/1311226270039052289 https://twitter.com/tecn_preocupado/status/1311963662857523200 José Manuel Rodríguez Delgado, neurofisiólogo | Necrologicas | EL PAÍS https://elpais.com/diario/2011/10/13/necrologicas/1318456801_850215.html Ha muerto José Manuel Rodríguez Delgado, el hombre que intentó el ”control de la mente” https://www.lainformacion.com/tecnologia/ha-muerto-jose-manuel-rodriguez-delgado-el-hombre-que-intento-el-control-de-la-mente_4wAdLA18xaR1nb6b6254i7/ Equipo de Rafael Yuste director de "Brain Initiative" en el 2019 https://www.reuters.com/article/us-global-tech-lawmaking-analysis-trfn-idUSKBN2BL1RH Rafael Yuste: Descifrar el cerebro nos permitirá educar mejor. (video del BBVA) https://aprendemosjuntos.elpais.com/especial/descifrar-el-cerebro-nos-permitira-educar-mejor-rafael-yuste/ Rafael Yuste, el hombre que descifra el cerebro | EL PAÍS Semanal | EL PAÍS https://elpais.com/elpais/2017/01/25/eps/1485299124_148529.html Michael Persinger - Wikipedia https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Persinger Publicaciones del Dr. MA Persinger y sus colegas (inventor del 'casco de Dios’ utilizado por militares) http://neurosciarchive.byethost12.com/mob.index.htm?i=2 Informe del relator especial de la ONU Niels Meltzer del 20 de marzo del 2020 https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/RegularSessions/Session43/Documents/A_HRC_43_49_AdvanceEditedVersion.docx C.V.: Tte. Cnel. de Inteligencia Militar Michael Aquino (Subversión satánica de los militares de los EE. UU.) https://desmontandoababylon.com/2018/04/30/c-v-tte-cnel-de-inteligencia-militar-michael-aquino-subversion-satanica-de-los-militares-de-los-ee-uu/ MINDWAR, Más allá de las PSYOP, por Michael Aquino: Tte. Cnel. de Inteligencia Militar y Sacerdote de la Iglesia de Satán https://desmontandoababylon.com/2018/04/29/mindwar-mas-alla-de-las-psyop-por-michael-aquino-tte-cnel-de-inteligencia-militar-y-sacerdote-de-la-iglesia-de-satan/ Tanques de Pensamiento (Think Tanks) – La Batalla por el Control de Nuestra Mente https://desmontandoababylon.com/2017/08/08/tanques-de-pensamiento-think-tanks-la-batalla-por-el-control-de-nuestra-mente/ Derechos digitales España https://www.lamoncloa.gob.es/presidente/actividades/Paginas/2021/140721-derechos-digitales.aspx ¿Por qué te acosamos? Para mantenerte fuera de la cárcel | Molly Baldwin | TEDxPennsylvaniaAvenue https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ulLFP8axZVQ Informe especial de CNN 1985 Armas de frecuencia electromagnética (informe de 1985) https://archive.org/details/CNNSpecialReport1985ElectromagneticFrequencyWeapons Armas de energía dirigida https://www.mentealternativa.com/12-investigaciones-sobre-armas-de-frecuencia-y-energia-dirigida-usadas-contra-los-seres-humanos/ Tecnologías de inducción de imágenes directamente al tálamo cerebral https://twitter.com/viactec/status/1563101650835095553 Getting visual data from a cat's brain in realtime (TechnoCalyps) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLb9EIiSyG8 Los científicos usan imágenes cerebrales para revelar las películas en nuestra mente https://news.berkeley.edu/2011/09/22/brain-movies/ Computadora que lee la mente decodifica instantáneamente los pensamientos de las personas https://www.livescience.com/53535-computer-reads-thoughts-instantaneously.html Reconstrucción profunda de imágenes a partir de la actividad del cerebro humano https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006633 ………………………………………………………………………………………. Música utilizada en este podcast: Tema inicial Heros …………………………… Canción de los Clones - Señales del fin del mundo https://youtu.be/EKO-5nQ8EdA jcurtis (gang stalking) https://youtu.be/7F4bxTYYnvs MUSE | The Handler | Español | HD Ver. Album https://youtu.be/oXkp_eDt78k Muse - The Handler [Official Lyric Video] https://youtu.be/BF1DQr5dKW8 Sotomayor - Eléctrico https://youtu.be/acIBo01teCQ We're the Gang Stalkers (Official Video) - Rusty Cage https://youtu.be/ZOzHCa-_PMs Epílogo Muse Uprising Cover Español https://youtu.be/_Ri2-q5bFhY

The Office Grunts
Ep 119 - The Terminator Series (Ranked)

The Office Grunts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 72:54


Stew and John Wayne rank the 6 movies in the Terminator series from worst to first. Plus, a 20-year class reunion, and John Wayne's fantasy TV talk.

Podcast Notes Playlist: Business
In the Ops Room with Palmer Luckey

Podcast Notes Playlist: Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 47:20


Mark Pesce - The Next Billion Seconds ✓ Claimed Podcast Notes Key Takeaways The United States does not have a great history of exporting things to countries before conflicts happen “The big defense primes are not in the position to build the right things, partly because the government has created the wrong incentives for them to do so.” – Palmer Luckey“The point of high-end defense technology is not to win a war that has already started; it's to deter that war from happening, to make the cost of engaging in that war so high that it never happens.” – Palmer Luckey “The real reason that these tech companies were not doing work with the United States military, or foreign allied militaries, was that they were afraid of upsetting China.” – Palmer Luckey Until Anduril became the third unicorn in 2019, there were only two unicorns in the defense industry since the Cold War: Palantir and SpaceXIt took billionaire-founders with previous success starting companies for venture capitalists to invest in the defense industry Russia's invasion of Ukraine forced many venture capitalists to reconsider their assumptions about investing in defense tech Some countries are willing to do irrational things that disrupt their economic relationships with other countries; irrational wars and conflicts are prevalent throughout history “I think the odds of a direct, hot war between the U.S and China are very very low. I think the odds of a proxy conflict over minerals in South America, South Africa, or Southeast Asia are quite high.” – Palmer Luckey Anduril is the answer to the question: “What would a next-generation Lockheed Martin look like?”Without giving away Anduril's entire roadmap, the future of defense will have a lot of autonomous things across air, land, sea, subsea, and space all working togetherPalmer is more concerned about evil people using very basic AI than extremely advanced AI taking over the world in a Skynet scenario The U.S. must be involved in the technology (nuclear, autonomous weapons, etc.) if it wants to lead and potentially regulate how those technologies are used in the rest of the world “I want to save taxpayers hundreds of billions of dollars a year while we [Anduril] make tens of billions of dollars a year.” – Palmer Luckey Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgIn this live interview with Oculus and Anduril founder Palmer Luckey - joined by Anduril Chief Engineer Shane Arnott - we look at the future of defense, geopolitics, and Australia's future in a transformed Indo-Pacific region. Have we shifted toward a defense-driven future? For more information about this and all our other Next Billion Seconds content, please check out https://nextbillionseconds.com Mark Pesce - The Next Billion Seconds is produced by Ampel - visit https://ampel.com.au to find out what Ampel could do for you! If you are interested in sponsoring The Next Billion Seconds podcast, reach out to our Director of Media and Partnerships Lauren Deighton at lauren@ampel.com.au If you enjoyed this show, please leave a rating and/or review on Apple, Spotify or any other podcast platform. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcast Notes Playlist: Startup
In the Ops Room with Palmer Luckey

Podcast Notes Playlist: Startup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 47:20


Mark Pesce - The Next Billion Seconds ✓ Claimed Podcast Notes Key Takeaways The United States does not have a great history of exporting things to countries before conflicts happen “The big defense primes are not in the position to build the right things, partly because the government has created the wrong incentives for them to do so.” – Palmer Luckey“The point of high-end defense technology is not to win a war that has already started; it's to deter that war from happening, to make the cost of engaging in that war so high that it never happens.” – Palmer Luckey “The real reason that these tech companies were not doing work with the United States military, or foreign allied militaries, was that they were afraid of upsetting China.” – Palmer Luckey Until Anduril became the third unicorn in 2019, there were only two unicorns in the defense industry since the Cold War: Palantir and SpaceXIt took billionaire-founders with previous success starting companies for venture capitalists to invest in the defense industry Russia's invasion of Ukraine forced many venture capitalists to reconsider their assumptions about investing in defense tech Some countries are willing to do irrational things that disrupt their economic relationships with other countries; irrational wars and conflicts are prevalent throughout history “I think the odds of a direct, hot war between the U.S and China are very very low. I think the odds of a proxy conflict over minerals in South America, South Africa, or Southeast Asia are quite high.” – Palmer Luckey Anduril is the answer to the question: “What would a next-generation Lockheed Martin look like?”Without giving away Anduril's entire roadmap, the future of defense will have a lot of autonomous things across air, land, sea, subsea, and space all working togetherPalmer is more concerned about evil people using very basic AI than extremely advanced AI taking over the world in a Skynet scenario The U.S. must be involved in the technology (nuclear, autonomous weapons, etc.) if it wants to lead and potentially regulate how those technologies are used in the rest of the world “I want to save taxpayers hundreds of billions of dollars a year while we [Anduril] make tens of billions of dollars a year.” – Palmer Luckey Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgIn this live interview with Oculus and Anduril founder Palmer Luckey - joined by Anduril Chief Engineer Shane Arnott - we look at the future of defense, geopolitics, and Australia's future in a transformed Indo-Pacific region. Have we shifted toward a defense-driven future? For more information about this and all our other Next Billion Seconds content, please check out https://nextbillionseconds.com Mark Pesce - The Next Billion Seconds is produced by Ampel - visit https://ampel.com.au to find out what Ampel could do for you! If you are interested in sponsoring The Next Billion Seconds podcast, reach out to our Director of Media and Partnerships Lauren Deighton at lauren@ampel.com.au If you enjoyed this show, please leave a rating and/or review on Apple, Spotify or any other podcast platform. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
In the Ops Room with Palmer Luckey

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 47:20


Mark Pesce - The Next Billion Seconds ✓ Claimed Podcast Notes Key Takeaways The United States does not have a great history of exporting things to countries before conflicts happen “The big defense primes are not in the position to build the right things, partly because the government has created the wrong incentives for them to do so.” – Palmer Luckey“The point of high-end defense technology is not to win a war that has already started; it's to deter that war from happening, to make the cost of engaging in that war so high that it never happens.” – Palmer Luckey “The real reason that these tech companies were not doing work with the United States military, or foreign allied militaries, was that they were afraid of upsetting China.” – Palmer Luckey Until Anduril became the third unicorn in 2019, there were only two unicorns in the defense industry since the Cold War: Palantir and SpaceXIt took billionaire-founders with previous success starting companies for venture capitalists to invest in the defense industry Russia's invasion of Ukraine forced many venture capitalists to reconsider their assumptions about investing in defense tech Some countries are willing to do irrational things that disrupt their economic relationships with other countries; irrational wars and conflicts are prevalent throughout history “I think the odds of a direct, hot war between the U.S and China are very very low. I think the odds of a proxy conflict over minerals in South America, South Africa, or Southeast Asia are quite high.” – Palmer Luckey Anduril is the answer to the question: “What would a next-generation Lockheed Martin look like?”Without giving away Anduril's entire roadmap, the future of defense will have a lot of autonomous things across air, land, sea, subsea, and space all working togetherPalmer is more concerned about evil people using very basic AI than extremely advanced AI taking over the world in a Skynet scenario The U.S. must be involved in the technology (nuclear, autonomous weapons, etc.) if it wants to lead and potentially regulate how those technologies are used in the rest of the world “I want to save taxpayers hundreds of billions of dollars a year while we [Anduril] make tens of billions of dollars a year.” – Palmer Luckey Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgIn this live interview with Oculus and Anduril founder Palmer Luckey - joined by Anduril Chief Engineer Shane Arnott - we look at the future of defense, geopolitics, and Australia's future in a transformed Indo-Pacific region. Have we shifted toward a defense-driven future? For more information about this and all our other Next Billion Seconds content, please check out https://nextbillionseconds.com Mark Pesce - The Next Billion Seconds is produced by Ampel - visit https://ampel.com.au to find out what Ampel could do for you! If you are interested in sponsoring The Next Billion Seconds podcast, reach out to our Director of Media and Partnerships Lauren Deighton at lauren@ampel.com.au If you enjoyed this show, please leave a rating and/or review on Apple, Spotify or any other podcast platform. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Evil Lawyer's Guide to Life
Skynet Becomes Self Aware

The Evil Lawyer's Guide to Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 28:44


The WEF, the Biden administration and the social media companies have a terrifying way of controlling the entire internet, and it begins with a self aware AI.

Comite de Lectura
[Hora Libre] T.2, E.9: La inteligencia artificial y el “escenario SKYNET”

Comite de Lectura

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 25:07


Mario Zúñiga conversa con Juan David Gutiérrez, experto en regulación, competencia y políticas públicas, sobre la denominada “inteligencia artificial” y sus posibilidades, así como sobre los riesgos o dilemas éticos que nos presenta y, por supuesto, cómo podríamos gestionarlos.

Flawedcast - CLE
Flawedcast Ep. # 134: "Skynet Ascending"

Flawedcast - CLE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 43:56


In tis episode, we talk about the hours of Moore's Law, A.I., and if the tide can be turned. GET IN THE ARENA!! Get your copy of SMITH'S Heart Of Man Repair Manual: https://www.amazon.com/Smiths-Heart-Man-Repair-Manual-ebook/dp/B0949HKJ2Y/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=smith%27s+heart+of+man+repair+manual&qid=1662493566&sprefix=Smith%27s+heart+of+man+repair+man%2Caps%2C108&sr=8-1 Emailus at: FlawedInkCLE@Gmail.com

Friday Night Lites
Guest Takeover ft. Mom

Friday Night Lites

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 99:18


I miss Mac, Weekend Recap (Rambling), Skynet, Drones and a whole lot of bullshit

The Secret Teachings
The Secret Teachings 9/6/22 - Immaculate Conception of the Beast

The Secret Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 120:01


In 2001 scientists announced they could fertilize an egg without sperm. In 2019 scientists announced they could create sperm from a woman's cells and impregnate her directly without need of sex or a donor. Now scientists at Cambridge are recreating the first stages of life by modeling embryos from mouse stem cells to form brains, hearts, and other critical organs. China's Academy of Sciences also announced at the same time that they produced the first mammal with fully reprogrammed genes. As of early 2022 MIT further reported on a collaboration which mapped human genes to their direct functions, but only within the tiny band of understood genetics. In worldly terms, the small segment of coded genes in humans can be isolated and programmed to turn humans into what amount to “smart” devices connected to the Internet of Things. In esoteric terms, scientists are attempting to recreate Genesis, replace organic life with synthetic life, and replicate the physical world by copying it into a digital version of itself. This system is the META, the ‘breath' into ATEM in which all future generations will be born within the artificial womb of the matrix. In this system, the Immaculate Conception of Christ is replaced with the ‘clean' conception of the Anti-Christ within an artificial womb; human energy will then extracted to power the beast. In this scenario, humans never reach their full potential.

The Anime Freshmen Podcast
Episode #72: Skynet Reviews: Beezlebub

The Anime Freshmen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 61:22


In today's episode of Anime Freshmen Z, we review the anime known as Beezlebub, sponsored and chosen by our in-house Skynet. Do you dare to Bub your Beezle?? We do! Join us. This episode will contain anime-specific spoilers. Catch our Fresh Bites Review Show and AMVs on our YouTube channel: The Anime Freshmen Be sure to rate and subscribe to the show & follow on our socials:  How to connect: Website: https://animefreshmen.com/ Email: hello@animefreshmen.com  Instagram: @AnimeFreshmen Facebook: @AnimeFreshmen Twitter: @AnimeFreshmen Keep It Fresh! TAGS: Anime, Otaku, Manga, Anime Podcast, Anime Reviews, Anime Recommendations, Pokemon, Black Clover, Attack On Titan, Dragon Ball, Demon Slayer, Bleach, Fire Force, Kengan Ashura, One Piece, Naruto, Bleach, Hunter x Hunter, Jojo's Bizzare Adventure, Full Metal Alchemist, Vinland Saga, Seven Deadly Sins, Food Wars, Cowboy Bebop, One Punch Man, Haikyuu, Tokyo Ghoul, My Hero Academia, Tokyo Revengers, Mob Psycho 100, Boruto, Jujutsu Kaisen, That Time I Got Reincarnated As A Slime, Spy x Family, MCM Comic Con

Upper Lot Podcast
49. T2 3-D: Battle Across Time

Upper Lot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 30:43


Zal de wereld worden overgenomen door Skynet? In deze aflevering bespreken Dennis en Nicky de film én attractie: T2 3-D: Battle Across TimeSteun onze podcast hier

The Fellowship of the Geeks Podcast
It's Either Earthlink or Skynet - Week of 9/7/22

The Fellowship of the Geeks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 105:02


The Fellowship is pleased to present our discussion of Three's Company (1977-1984) to wrap up our classic TV month. It's a little strange that a remake of a British show could be so groundbreaking, but that's actually nothing new. Plus our usual random talk, geek news, and tangents

Battle4Freedom
Battle4Freedom - 20220902 Service Temporarily Unavailable - Skynet Is Online

Battle4Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 55:55


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11170283/Pictured-Mother-New-Jersey-toddler-died-hot-car.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11170963/Former-NYPD-cop-handed-10-year-sentence-role-January-6.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11170813/House-Republicans-push-bill-block-Biden-promoting-social-media-censorship.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11170309/CHRISTIAN-WHITON-Biden-thinks-Republican-voters-fascists-borderline-terrorists.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11171019/Mississippi-capitals-water-disaster-developed-decades.htmlhttps://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/may/18/amazon-ring-largest-civilian-surveillance-network-ushttps://www.geekwire.com/2021/amazon-maintains-big-lead-google-apple-u-s-smart-speaker-market-new-study-says/https://comfyliving.net/smart-home-statistics/https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11165279/Californians-urged-not-charge-electric-cars-just-weeks-ban-gas-cars.htmlhttps://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/contact-denver7/thousands-of-xcel-customers-locked-out-of-thermostats-during-energy-emergency

Watchdog on Wall Street
Watchdog on Wall Street: Podcast for Weekend of September 3-4

Watchdog on Wall Street

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 117:43


Look out below?? Crystal ball put to work. Calamity watch. Rules of the road. Bears and retirement. Inflation...What if the Fed can't fix it? WOPR and Skynet. Energy tales. Minimum wage malarkey. Politics.

RBCS Podcast
Skynet Has Arrived!

RBCS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 91:40


What would John Connor, son of Sarah Connor, hero of the resistance in the “Terminator” movie series, say about the Internet of things, the ubiquity of mobile devices, the fact that we almost ran out of IP addresses, software that updates itself, and other signs of the coming computer apocalypse? He'd probably tell us to pull the plug, quickly! Beyond the nightmare scenario of the “Terminator” films, what are the implications of quality, and lack of quality, for the now-real situation that everything is connected to everything else? Will it be Neuromancer, “Terminator,” androids dreaming of electric sheep, or something more benign? Join us for some fun and interesting speculation and prediction on the future of limitless connectivity.

The VOHeroes Podcast
0082: Let's Settle On "Synthetic Voices," Not "AI"

The VOHeroes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 8:08


Hey there, hero!I get it. "AI" has two short syllables, and "synthetic voices" has five longer ones, so it's a bit more time-consuming to say.But it might be useful to try to commit to using the latter, rather than the former, despite its slightly longer length, when we start feeling concerned about our future as human voice talent.Artificial intelligence (AI) is used in almost every facet of our creative process, from script management to casting to recording to production to proofing...and on to email, social media and just about everything else.AI is a broad, generic category of technology.Synthetic voices, on the other hand, is a pretty specific use of machine learning, data mining, digital modeling and yes, AI.Can we all agree to use accurate terminology for the dangers we observe that doesn't throw the baby out with the bath water?Lots of technology (I'm looking at you, Pozotron) is getting a bad rap because they happen to use aspects of AI in their workflow. People have made grossly inaccurate statements about AI-based products and services because...well...they don't know any better.We can and should know better.Once I've made my case for this in this episode, answer this for me: do you agree? Or do you simply feel that Skynet will soon be self-aware, so who cares what we call it? Discuss, if you would, in the comments below.REQUEST: Please join this video's conversation on VOHeroes, where the comments are moderated and civil:https://voheroes.com/lets-settle-on-synthetic-voices-not-ai/#acting #voice #voiceover #onboarding #performance #productivity #tips #art #commerce #science #mindset #success #process #options #bestpractices #marketing

Web Tales a Spider-man Podcast
Spidey vs Skynet - Amazing Spider-Man #155 (1976)

Web Tales a Spider-man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 23:20


Jonah is on assignment with Peter but it all ends very quickly with the introduction of a dead scientist. Peter is determined to find the killer as this scientist was a friend of Dr. Science. So he checks out the new super crime computer and finds 3 suspects. Will Spidey be able to find the real killer?

Watchdog on Wall Street
When WOPR and Skynet take over...

Watchdog on Wall Street

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 33:48


Economic news unfiltered. Abuse of power. EV reality. We are paying for the Ukraine.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 8/19/22: The Friday Five - COVID Jumps the Shark

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 18:00


News that First Lady Jill Biden and Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla tested positive for COVID-19, despite being fully vaxxed and boosted, barely caused a blip in the news cycle this week. The CDC's new COVID guidelines basically say the pandemic is over. 5) Trump raid a political hit; 4) IRS expansion not likely to target the wealthy; 3) Growing body of evidence suggests monkeypox spreads mainly through sexual contact; 2) Smart devices building infrastructure for Skynet; 1) Russia, Ukraine pointing fingers over potential disaster at nuclear plant.

Anarchy Among Friends
Anarchy Among Friends Roundtable Discussion #190 - Just Say No To Armed #SkyNet Robodogs

Anarchy Among Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 120:00


The Bois talk about a Kansas cop getting denied immunity, a schools new cellphone policy, a woman gets fined for finding a lost dog, Alec B has some explaining to do, 87,000 IRS agents, whitehat hackers helping save us from #Skynet, a Mises.org article titled 'Rising "Constitutional Carry" Is a Sign of Failing Trust in Government, and whatever else we stumble into. Dyreka's Crochet Pattern - https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hungry-caterpillar-educational-toy Dyreka's book - https://www.amazon.com/Think-Yourself-Critical-Thinking-Beginners/dp/1791936172/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_1 Andrew's YT - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYuYw7aFnaJBc8F6NCn-CKg/videos "InkedAnarchist15" for 15% off at https://www.thebeardstruggle.com/?rfsn=4064657.9a3f66&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=4064657.9a3f66 Inkedanarchist25 at www.shopvalerio.com for 25% off RK Sppokware https://rkspookware.com?aff=11 Jeremy at The Quartering's new coffee company: https://coffeebrandcoffee.com/?ref=0juh6r1T Check out Road to Autonomy https://rtamagazine.com/ Poppins Patches - https://www.facebook.com/poppinspatches Find the homie @boogboogie79 on twitter for all your hibicus related appearal Anarchy Among Friends Telegram - https://t.me/AAFRTD Anarchy Among Friends FB - https://www.facebook.com/AAFRTD Anarchy Among Friends Odysee - https://odysee.com/@AnarchyAmongFriendsRoundtableDiscussion:5 Anarchy Among Friends Rumble - https://rumble.com/user/Valhallarchist Anarchy Among Friends MeWe - https://mewe.com/p/anarchyamongfriendsroundtablediscussion Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/0pqbeHBmWPN1sG0e6L28Uv Apple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/anarchy-among-friends/id1459037636?ign-mpt=uo%3D4 Stitcher - https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/anchor-podcasts/anarchy-among-friends GooglePodcasts - https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9hNGZmNzQwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Breaker - https://www.breaker.audio/anarchy-among-friends Overcast - https://overcast.fm/itunes1459037636/anarchy-among-friends PocketCasts - https://pca.st/CDH3 RadioPublic - https://radiopublic.com/anarchy-among-friends-Wkzzjl Brandenburg v. Ohio, 395 U.S. 444 (1969), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case, interpreting the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The Court held that government cannot punish inflammatory speech unless that speech is "directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brandenburg_v._Ohio THIS PODCAST IS COVERED BY A BipCot NoGov LICENSE. USE AND RE-USE BY ANYONE EXCEPT GOVERNMENTS OR THEIR AGENTS IS OK. MORE INFO: https://bipcot.org/ $500 Fine - https://news.yahoo.com/trying-good-citizen-woman-fined-035434824.html Kansas Bludgie - https://www.yahoo.com/news/kansas-supreme-court-denies-self-183658554.html Phone Policy - https://www.yahoo.com/news/kansas-supreme-court-denies-self-183658554.html 'Rust' Shooting - https://www.yahoo.com/gma/gun-rust-shooting-could-not-015300975.html IRS - https://freebeacon.com/policy/dems-poised-to-make-irs-larger-than-pentagon-state-department-fbi-and-border-patrol-combined/ Robotdogs - https://www.vice.com/en/article/akeexk/hacker-finds-kill-switch-for-submachine-gun-wielding-robot-dog Constitutional Carry - https://mises.org/wire/rising-constitutional-carry-sign-failing-trust-government

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