Podcasts about Hoover Dam

Dam in Clark County, Nevada and Mohave County, Arizona, US

  • 340PODCASTS
  • 402EPISODES
  • 50mAVG DURATION
  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Nov 26, 2022LATEST
Hoover Dam

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Hoover Dam

Latest podcast episodes about Hoover Dam

That Record Got Me High Podcast
S6E261 - Sugar 'Copper Blue' with Elizabeth McCullough (Alpha Cat)

That Record Got Me High Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 65:07


When this week's guest, singer/songwriter Elizabeth McCullough (Alpha Cat), heard the song 'Hoover Dam' by the band Sugar, she broke her 3-song rule (making sure an album has at least 3 good songs before purchasing it) and ran out and bought their 1992 debut 'Copper Blue'. She was not disappointed. The record by Bob Mould's new band, released five years after the dissolution of his previous band - beloved punk titans Hüsker Dü - is an emotionally visceral, sonically fierce collection of songs that sound as fresh today as when they first appeared. Stone. Cold. Classic. Songs featured in this episode: If I Can't Change Your Mind - Tre Dabney/The Salt Flats/The Decemberists; Venus Smile, Orbit - Alpha Cat; Friend, You've Got To Fall, Celebrated Summer - Hüsker Dü; See A Little Light - Bob Mould; Never Again - Zulus; The Act We Act, A Good Idea - Sugar; Debaser - Pixies; Changes, Helpless - Sugar; Hoover Dam - Bob Mould (Live, acoustic); Hoover Dam, The Slim - Sugar; Glad To Be Gay - Tom Robinson Band; If I Can't Change Your Mind, Fortune Teller - Sugar; Come In Alone - My Bloody Valentine; In Bloom - Nirvana; Slick, Man On The Moon - Sugar; Wichita - Alpha Cat; If I Can't Change Your Mind - The Decemberists (Live acoustic, A.V. Club)

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe
This Aerospace Engineer Brought Tech and Vision to Earthbound Challenges

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 25:09


Devin: What is your superpower?Evan: Something that I've always tried to do—it sort of happened naturally and unconsciously in the beginning of my career, and now I'm a lot more conscious and sort of deliberate about it—but it's finding the synergies between organizations, between teams, among technologies, among problems. There are not a lot of people that are working on water access in Africa and California. My other day job is I'm a professor of engineering at the University of Colorado in Boulder, and I'm the CEO of this company. I've gotten a lot of side-eye about that over the years. My joke is I'm the best academic in a group, in a room of entrepreneurs, and I'm the best entrepreneur in a room of academics. And there's some truth to that because the corollary is I'm not the best at any one of those things. But by being able to see the benefit of what a university can do and what research can do and what students and faculty can do, but also seeing the benefits of what capital can do, and engineers and technology development and working with nonprofits and working with government—I've benefited from being able to see how those things can be aligned with each other and can help solve problems that any one of those kinds of organizations aren't able to do by themselves.“My Ph.D. is in aerospace engineering,” Evan Thomas, CEO of Virridy and professor in the Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering Department at the University of Colorado. “The beginning of my career was at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. I worked on water recycling and air quality systems for spacecraft.”That is not the beginning of most stories about public health. It is a fascinating start to our story today. Evan was the project manager for a system on the International Space Station today measuring recycled water quality.“The astronauts have to recycle the drinking water every day, and the astronauts in the space station need the same thing we all need,” Evan says. “They need clean water. They need clean air. They need safe sanitation. They need safe food. They need a warm environment. On the space station, we do that through water recycling and scrubbing the air and making sure that the environment is safe.”“We have those challenges here on Earth, too,” he says. “It's 2022, and you still have almost half the world's population, over three and one half billion people who use firewood every day to cook and to stay warm. The use of firewood contributes to deforestation and soil erosion and black soot emissions.”“But, all of those things are secondary to the immediate emissions that people breathe in every day because of the use of fuels like firewood,” Evan says. “We have almost 5 million kids under the age of five who die every year because of respiratory disease. Still today, we have 2 billion people in the world that don't have safe sanitation. And most reasonable estimates put it at over a billion people still don't have access to clean water.”When Evan launched Virridy while still at NASA, he recognized an essential choice in his life and career. “Am I going to make a career out of being a NASA engineer, or am I going to make a career out of applying that engineering skill to the same basic necessities here on Earth?”He left NASA to focus on global health.These days, he focuses his work on two regions of the world: the Horn of Africa and California.The Horn of Africa“I'll tell you a little bit about the Horn of Africa,” Evan says. “This is a very arid region of the world. It includes Somalia and Ethiopia and northern Kenya. We've been working in that region for about ten years. I just got back from northern Kenya a few weeks ago, where they're suffering from a five-season drought. It's unprecedented.” “You have 40 million people that are relying on rains, rains for their livestock, for themselves, for their agriculture,” he says. “When you have drought, you have crop failure, you have livestock death, you have the displacement of people. And 40 million people are facing food insecurity right now in East Africa.”The challenges in East Africa differ from those in California. While aquifers are drying up in California, groundwater reserves are increasing in Africa.The challenge in Africa is often that water pumps fail due to a lack of resources, so the water isn't accessible to those who need it.“During peak drought, UNICEF estimates that as much as 45 percent of water points are actually broken,” Evan says. “It's not that the water is dried up. The water is still in the ground, but the water points are broken, the water pumps are broken. So we've been working on this seemingly easy but not-so-easy problem of how do we keep these water pumps working?”“We do it with a combination of technology, community partnerships and financing mechanisms to try to increase the maintenance and operation of these water pumps so that people have water access,” he says.“Virridy, our company, invented and has deployed sensors, satellite-connected sensors that are installed on these water pumps so that we can remotely monitor when a pump is working and when it's broken,” Evan says.Partnering with NASA, Virridy connects data from satellites with data from water pumps to help local and national governments—and international donors—determine where water is available and where to offer water trucking or send maintenance teams to repair pumps.“Our technology is currently monitoring millions of people's water supplies in the region every single day,” Evan says.He explains how the business works in Africa:So, how do we monetize that? In Africa, it's a question of making sure the pumps are working so that people have water. When we do that, and we provide clean safe drinking water, we offset the need for people to boil their water with wood. Some people boil their water, which creates a lot of emissions. Other people just drink dirty water, which causes a lot of health problems. We're able to take both of those scenarios, replace them with a company that is providing clean, safe drinking water and then generate and claim carbon credits under voluntary mechanisms that are demonstrating that reduced demand for energy. Those voluntary carbon credits can be sold on the open market; that lets us have a profitable business delivering clean water in Africa.CaliforniaThere are 40 million people facing a water crisis in the Horn of Africa. Similarly, there are 40 million people who rely on the Colorado River in the western U.S.“I'm in Boulder, Colorado,” Evan says. “The Colorado River starts just over the foothills from where I am now. Sometimes it flows to Mexico.”“In between Colorado and Mexico, there are seven states and major cities like LA and Denver that rely on the Colorado River, and it's drying up,” he says. “We're within 40 feet of what's called dead pool behind the Hoover Dam on Lake Mead.”It's as scary as it sounds.“The estimates are if nothing is done by next summer, by less than a year from now, there will be no more water running through the Hoover Dam, delivering water to the lower basin or generating electricity,” Evan says.For decades, Californians have addressed water shortages by pumping water out of the ground. As noted above, California differs from Africa in that groundwater is being depleted.“Those groundwater reserves are being used at a really unsustainable rate,” he says. “There are areas in the Central Valley in California that have physically dropped 40 feet in 80 years. So, just in the past 80 years, in a human lifetime, the level of the ground has dropped 40 feet because we're pumping out that water. It's not sustainable. At some point, we're going to run out of that groundwater.”Evan explains Virridy's work in California using the same technology with an almost opposite goal:Virridy has introduced the same sensors, the same satellite-connected sensors that are monitoring groundwater pumps in Africa are also monitoring groundwater pumps here in Colorado and in California. We're working with landowners, farmers and local irrigation districts and regulators to try to make sense of who's using the water and to see if we can support incentives to conserve that water.We try to better manage groundwater. Well, one of the big challenges with groundwater is data. You can't measure groundwater from space, at least not very easily. So, we use our sensors to instrument these pumps so that we know who's pumping where, when and how. In the United States, it's almost the mirror image [of Africa]. But instead of trying to make sure more water is pumped, we're trying to make sure less water is pumped. Evan explains the model in California:There's the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act that requires conserving water. But you need to actually measure how much water is being used. So we offer a service. More directly out in California—you saw this during the recent heat wave just a few weeks ago—they had ten straight days of almost record heat. When that happens—it's in the middle of the summer—all the agricultural farms and ranches are pumping water. They're pumping groundwater, which takes a lot more energy than pumping surface water, because the surface water is run out during this drought. Everybody in LA, everybody in San Francisco, everybody in San Diego has their season. So the utility gets overwhelmed. There are programs called Demand Response that will pay people to reduce their energy use. Our technology can take control of pumps. So we have customers where we control their water pumps with their permission. We turn them off during peak demand, and the energy utility actually pays us and our customers for the inconvenience of reducing pumping.Tremendous amounts of electricity are used to pump water in California—more so during the drought. “When you have wet years, and you have water in the rivers, gravity helps you,” Evan says. “Gravity helps move the water around. So it doesn't take a lot of energy to maybe move it over small hills or between fields.”“During drought like we have now—22 years of drought—now it's a lot more energy intensive to pump up groundwater—a lot more,” he says. “These are really, really big pumps pumping up a lot of water. We can help those users of that water, conserve the water and get paid because they're also conserving electricity.”In his work, Evan has employed his superpower—finding synergies—to increase his impact.How to Develop Finding Synergies As a SuperpowerEvan used his superpower, “finding the synergies between organizations, between teams, among technologies, among problems,” to significant effect while at NASA. He shares the story of his epiphany that led to the creation of Virridy:About 15 years ago, when I still worked at NASA, we came up with this idea. Can we get carbon credits for water treatment in Africa in a way that generates revenue to pay for a service so that you don't always have to write grants to donors forever? Because that's often how the water sector works. That required thinking about business and public health and engineering and international development. But to implement it, to actually make it happen, we had to be really good at the technology and the implementation, but we also had to be really good at the research. So, in partnership with a number of universities and researchers, we ran a randomized controlled trial of our work in Rwanda, where we experimentally established the health benefits of these water interventions. We showed that we reduced exposure to parasites by almost 50 percent among children, and we reduced diarrheal incidence by over 30 percent. If I were only wearing one hat, the academic hat or the business hat or the implementer hat, we wouldn't have done a comprehensive program like that. You see very few large-scale business businesses, operating programs that also are trying to generate best-in-class research at the same time.His finding synergies superpower was on full display. Learning that skill isn't easy. Teaching t is part of the program he oversees at the University of Colorado. He explains:As much as our students would love to go straight to the machine shop or into the lab to tinker. We don't start there. We start with why does poverty exist? We start with one who is poor in the world today. And why did that happen? It's not random. It's not an accident. It's because of history, and it's because of, unfortunately, exploitation and even more unfortunately, exploitation often done by Western countries like ours. So we go pretty heavy pretty fast. I have 78 freshmen this year, and they're learning about the impact of how how how colonialism still reverberates today in Africa in terms of very basic things, like why is it that a water pump is broken? And so we start there. We don't get to the engineering for a while. We start with the history, the economics, the social issues. Before we even start talking about what some of the solutions could be. So, our students are trained in economics, in public health, in history before they even think about turning a wrench.Evan assigns tremendous value to understanding context to learn to find synergies. He also sees value in developing your own unique superpowers and not relying on your general competence. Your ability to develop his superpower requires the ability to develop your own and put yours in context.There's always a risk in the jack of all trades, master of none. You still need to be really good at a few things in order to add value. If you're just a generalist, you're not necessarily making a big contribution to any team. So it's still important to be really good, at least at a couple of things. But then also conversant, maybe even fluent in a few other things as well. So you understand how your piece of the puzzle fits into the whole picture.You can develop finding synergies as a superpower by following Evan's example and his counsel. Get full access to Superpowers for Good at devinthorpe.substack.com/subscribe

Who Smarted?
Do beaver Dams generate electricity?

Who Smarted?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 13:54


Why do we build Dams? What different kinds of Dams are there? What makes the Hoover Dam one of the greatest engineering feats of all-time?For free home activities sign-up at www.WhoSmarted.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin
Megan Singleton: BloggerAtLarge writer on her road trip around Las Vegas, Nevada

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 5:44


Megan Singleton, writer for BloggerAtLarge.com, has recently been travelling around Las Vegas, Nevada on a four day road trip, and she's explored all that the region has to offer. The obvious draw of the location is the casinos and the iconic Strip, but Megan explained that the state has more to offer prospective travellers. The desert is home to Area 51, the Hoover Dam and the most haunted hotel in America. Megan also highlighted that Nevada is home to some historic mining towns and the spectacular Red Rock Canyon- as you can see on her blog! https://www.bloggeratlarge.com/4-day-road-trip-from-las-vegas/ LISTEN ABOVE  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Earth Wise
The Bengal Water Machine | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 2:00


Over the past three decades, the owners of 16 million small farms in the Bengal Basin of Bangladesh have been pumping shallow groundwater during dry seasons to irrigate rice paddies.  By lowering groundwater levels in this way during the dry season, the ability of leakage from rivers, lakes, and ponds to replenish the groundwater was […]

EsGAYpe From Reality | A Simon Snow podcast
15. I'm Blue: Wayward Son chapters 38-40

EsGAYpe From Reality | A Simon Snow podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 47:45


Today we are discussing chapters 38-40 of Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell, in which we meet the water spirit Blue, debate the pros and cons of the Hoover Dam, express our love for Shepard Love, and so much more!Want even more Hashtag Ruthless? Of course you do! Join our Patreon for oodles of bonus content!Listen to our Harry Potter podcast and our Our Flag Means Death podcast!Follow us on instagram and twitter!Get some sweet sweet merch!Intro music: Professor and the Plant by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4244-professor-and-the-plant License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Water Water Everywhere
The History of the Haunted Hoover Dam

Water Water Everywhere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 42:06


It's time to get spooky! Listen this week to learn about the history of the mighty Hoover Dam and Lake Mead. Carly uncovers the mysteries hidden in the 4,360,000 cubic yards of solid concrete used to create what was the largest dam in the world. We're talking bodies, ghost towns, and paranormal activity.  So dive in, and let's get wet!  

NOBODY LIKES ONIONS
NLO 1435: A Night of Apologies

NOBODY LIKES ONIONS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 90:36


Patrick is fresh off his appearance on the Laugh After Dark podcast and he's going to spill all the dirt. Our chat room members are all hiding something. Patrick has a big announcement about the Overdose to kick off the night on the right foot. There's a word of warning for people thinking about home invading Patrick in the future. Johnny Brim spent his Monday trying to find enough signal out at Hoover Dam to post multiple cope fits about the recent show that covered his roast with Casper. There's been a giant misunderstanding and tonight we get to the bottom of it. Johnny Brim shows up in the chat and the boys bury the hatchet like gentlemen of means. Casper the Comic might be more insidious than we originally realized. ...

This Day in History
This Day in History - October 9, 2022

This Day in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 1:03


The Hoover Dam lit up Los Angeles on this day in 1936.

The Newest Olympian
52 | The Titan's Curse Ch. 14 w/ Sherry Guo

The Newest Olympian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 60:37 Very Popular


Our lovely editor and newly-minted Tik Tok account runner, Sherry Guo, makes her TNO return to cover a highly-anticipated chapter of Percy Jackson Book 3! Topics include: the NYC live show, Pokémon, famous dams, empathy links, animal hiking, Chuck E. Cheese, John Wick, drachma logic, reaching the pedals, Ted Lasso, Brett Goldstein, The Hoover Dam, The Gateway Arch, Skate (the video game), guardians, The Pigeon Union, Will Smith, Tower of Terror, The Last of Us, David S. Pumpkins, Rachel Elizabeth Dare, and more!— Find The Newest Olympian Online —• Website: www.thenewestolympian.com• Patreon: www.thenewestolympian.com/patreon• Twitter: www.twitter.com/newestolympian• Instagram: www.instagram.com/newestolympian• Facebook: www.facebook.com/newestolympian• Reddit: www.reddit.com/r/thenewestolympian• Merch: www.thenewestolympian.com/merch— Production —• Creator, Host, Producer, Social Media, Web Design: Mike Schubert (https://schub.es)• Editor: Sherry Guo• Music: Bettina Campomanes and Brandon Grugle• Art: Jessica E. Boyd• Multitude: www.multitude.productions— About The Show —Is Percy Jackson the book series we should've been reading all along? Join Mike Schubert as he reads through the books for the first time with the help of longtime PJO fans to cover the plot, take stabs at what happens next, and nerd out over Greek mythology. Whether you're looking for an excuse to finally read these books, or want to re-read an old favorite with a digital book club, grab your blue chocolate chip cookies and listen along. New episodes release on Mondays wherever you get your podcasts!

The Wizard of iPhone Speaks (20-22)
Episode 111: More Medical Trauma in a Sanctuary City — The Free "Medical" Lunch Counter is in trouble

The Wizard of iPhone Speaks (20-22)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 13:46


Music courtesy of Bellevue Bluegrass Trio at Bellevue Presbyterian Church, used with permission, recorded by iPhone.California's electric problems may soon be over — Two months ago (July 25) it was reported that a turbine exploded at Hoover Dam. The report was incorrect — it was a transformer fire. Generating Turbines are not off-the-shelf equipment, of course neither are transformers, but there are many of them, and they are much easier to repair they are an exterior part, not like a turbine and interior part.Instead of not charging Tesla's, perhaps housewives in LA can “line dry” their clothes, go back to hand washing dishes or turn off every other light in their home. Any one of these strategies will ease the shortage.PS You may not use solar energy to charge your Tesla, it requires 220V & we live in a 110V society.

Facts Matter
The 100-Year-Old ‘Political Scheme' Behind the Lake Mead Disaster | Facts Matter

Facts Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 15:38


Lake Mead is the largest water reservoir in the United States. Not only is it just big, but it's also quite old as well. It was formed about a hundred years ago, back in the 1930s, due to the construction of the Hoover Dam: when the Hoover Dam was put up on the Colorado River, Lake Mead was formed behind the dam. In fact, Lake Mead is so large that one of its reservoirs contains enough water for over 5.5 million acres of farmland, as well as over 40 million people across seven different states—but that was when the water level was at 95 percent capacity. Over the past two decades, the lake has experienced a significant drop in water volume, going from being almost full in 2000 to dwindling to only 28 percent capacity today. These current water levels are the lowest they've been since the year 1937—which was when the reservoir was being filled up for the very first time. ⭕️ Sign up for our NEWSLETTER and stay in touch

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源
Level 4-Day 21.The Grand Canyon

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 3:18


词汇提示1.course 流动2.stretches 绵延3.worn 磨损4.layers 层次5.limestone 石灰岩6.granite 花岗岩7.cacti 仙人掌8.sub-tropical 亚热带9.mules 驴10.zigzag Z字形11.harness 利用12.irrigate 灌溉13.mighty 巨大原文The Grand CanyonThe Grand Canyon is one of the most spectacular sights in nature.It is found in one section of the valley of the Colorado River.The river begins its course high in the Rocky Mountains of the State of Colorado.The river travels a total of 1,400 miles through Colorado, Utah and Arizona and into the Gulf of California.It forms part of Arizona's border with Nevada and California.The Colorado River is a very swift and muddy river.It carries dirt and rocks down from the mountains.The story is told of an old fur trader who was attacked by Indians high up the river.His only escape was down the Colorado River in a small boat.It was a terrifying trip through rapids and around rocks at top speed.The fur trader was found some days later in very rough shape hundreds of miles down the river.No one would believe that he had come so far so fast.The Grand Canyon stretches for about 250 miles in the State of Arizona.The canyon was carved out by the flow of the river itself.In places the canyon is more than a mile deep.It stretches from four to 18 miles wide at the top.The canyon valley contains worn rocks that rise up like a mountain range.The canyon has been worn down through many layers of rock.The river has cut its way down through layers of sandstone, limestone and shape to the granite bedrock.The different layers are of different colors and the rocks appear very beautiful, especially at sunrise and sunset.At the top, the climate is typical of a mountain area, with evergreen trees.Next, you have typical forest trees.Third, there are plants like cacti that grow in warm deserts.Finally, there are sub-tropical plants at the valley bottom.Tourists can ride down the narrow trails to the bottom of the valley on mules.On one side is the rock wall of the canyon, and on the other side is a steep drop down to the bottom.Tourists have to trust their guide, and the mule that they are riding, to get them down safely.The trails zigzag back and forth, and the tourist going down travels much more than a mile.Some 1,000 square miles of the area became the Grand Canyon National Park in 1919.Because the Colorado River is very swift and runs through dry country, several dams have been built along it.These are designed to harness its power, save its water and provide recreational opportunities.The best-known dam is Hoover Dam, formerly Boulder Dam, on the Arizona-Nevada border.This impressive structure is 727 feet high, and 1,282 feet long.Elevators are used to carry workers up and down inside the dam.The water, which is backed up by the Hoover Dam, forms Lake Mead.Lake Mead is used to irrigate nearby land, as well as for boating and fishing.The dam itself is a major source of electric power for this section of the country.Visitors to the Grand Canyon are often filled with awe by the size and beauty of the canyon.People seem very small in comparison to the immense cliffs, valleys and the mighty river.翻译大峡谷大峡谷是自然界最壮观的景观之一。它位于科罗拉多河流域的一段。这条河发源于科罗拉多州的落基山脉。这条河全长1400英里,穿过科罗拉多州、犹他州和亚利桑那州,进入加利福尼亚湾。它是亚利桑那州与内华达州和加利福尼亚州边界的一部分。科罗拉多河是一条湍急而泥泞的河流。它把泥土和岩石从山上带下来。有个故事讲的是一个老毛皮商人在河的上游遭到印第安人的袭击。他唯一的逃生途径是乘坐小船沿科罗拉多河顺流而下。这是一次以最高速度穿越急流和岩石的可怕旅程。几天后,人们在河下游数百英里处发现了一个皮毛商人,他的形状非常粗糙。没人会相信他走得这么远这么快。大峡谷绵在亚利桑那州延约250英里。峡谷是由河流本身的水流切割而成的。在一些地方,峡谷超过一英里深。它的顶部从4到18英里宽。峡谷里有磨损的岩石,它们像山脉一样隆起。峡谷已被许多岩石层冲垮。这条河穿过砂岩、石灰岩层,形成花岗岩基岩。不同的层有不同的颜色,岩石看起来非常漂亮,尤其是在日出和日落时。顶部的气候是典型的山区气候,常绿树木。接下来,您将看到典型的森林树木。第三,像仙人掌这样的植物生长在温暖的沙漠中。最后,谷底还有亚热带植物。游客们可以骑着骡子沿着狭窄的小路走到谷底。一边是峡谷的岩壁,另一边是一个陡坡,一直延伸到底部。游客必须相信他们的向导和他们骑的骡子,才能安全地把他们带下来。这些小径蜿蜒曲折,游客下山的路程远不止一英里。1919年,约1000平方英里的区域成为大峡谷国家公园。由于科罗拉多河非常湍急,流经干燥的乡村,因此沿途修建了水坝。这些设施旨在利用其电力、节约用水和提供娱乐机会。最著名的大坝是胡佛大坝,原名博尔德大坝,位于亚利桑那州-内华达州边界。这座令人印象深刻的建筑高727英尺,长1282英尺。电梯用于在大坝内上下运送工人。湖水由胡佛大坝支撑,形成米德湖。米德湖用于灌溉附近的土地,以及划船和钓鱼。大坝本身是该地区的主要电力来源。参观大峡谷的游客常常对峡谷的大小和美丽充满敬畏。与巨大的悬崖、山谷和浩瀚的河流相比,人们显得非常渺小。

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E50 - This Month In The Apocalypse

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 74:57


Episode Notes Episode Summary For this This Month in the Apocalypse episode Brooke, Margaret, and Casandra all researched different topics and discuss them. Margaret talks about climate collapse, droughts, floods, wildfires, the cost of wheat, and the dangers of rising humidity for wet bulb temperatures. Casandra talks about Monkey Pox, rises in other viral and vector borne illness, and discovers why rain might actually be a bad thing for your food. Brooke talks about student loan forgiveness and things you, brave listener, might not be aware you are forgiven for. Everyone attempts to get us sponsored by 'Big' Rain Barrel. If you're out there 'Big' Rain Barrel. Please sponsor us. Host Info Casandra can be found on Twitter @hey_casandra or Instagram @House.Of.Hands. Margaret can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Brooke is just great and can be found at Strangers helping up keep our finances intact and on Twitter @ogemakweBrooke Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Next Episode Come out Friday, September 23rd, and every two weeks there after. Might be about thru-hiking, Parenting, or Archiving. Transript An easier to read version is available on our website TangledWilderness.org. Margaret 00:16 Hello, and welcome to Live Like The World Is Dying, your podcasts for what feels like the end times. I'm one of your hosts, Margaret killjoy. I have Brooke and Casandra with me as well as cohosts today, because today, you will be very excited to know that the world's still ending...that we are doing our second monthly This Month in the Apocalypse and we're going to be talking about basically the last month and the I guess that's in the name. Okay. So, Brooke, Casandra, do you want to introduce yourselves? Possibly with Brooke going first. Casandra 00:52 Your name was first. Brooke 00:53 Yeah. Okay, alphabetically. Hi, everybody, it's Brooke Jackson again, coming to you live? Oh, wait, no, this will be recorded by the time you hear it. From the sunny lands of the Willamette Valley in Oregon. Casandra Johns 01:11 We're all in the Willamette Valley right now. Margaret 01:14 It's true. Casandra 01:15 It's true. This is Casandra. That's me. Margaret 01:19 Okay, and so this will be a very short episode, because actually, nothing bad has happened in the world, certainly not nything that feels end times ish, nothing out of the ordinary. I'm under the impression we have reversed most of the major...I mean, I think Biden passed a bill. So, I'm pretty sure climate change is over. And COVID is over. I learned that just the other day walking into a place where I thought everyone would be wearing masks, but it's over. So that's cool. Or, alternatively, let's talk about how China's in the worst heatwave in human history...in recorded history. We're gonna cut it up into segments. And I'm gonna go first with my segment. Casandra Johns 02:06 Do we need to say "Du duh duh duhh, Channel Zero? As part of the intro? Brooke 02:13 Do a Jingle? Margaret 02:16 Yes. Okay. You want to do it? Brooke 02:20 She just did. Casandra 02:21 Oh, yeah, I did. Duh duh duh duh! Margaret 03:19 Okay, and we're back. Okay, so, China...70 Day heatwave as of several days ago, now. And by the time you all are hearing this, I believe we're recording this about five days before this episode comes out. So, who knows what will have happened? There has been a lot of heat waves and floods all over the world this summer. And so China's in the middle of a 70 day heatwave. The drought has reduced hydroelectric output, which huge areas were reliant on the electricity because the water levels are so far down. And of course the electricity is what powers the AC. So no air conditioning is really fun as things get really hot. AC has been turned off in a lot of office buildings. It's cut power to tons of industry, including a bunch of car manufacturers where I'm a little bit like "Eh, whatever. Cars are bad." I mean, I drive cars so I'm kind of an asshole and hypocrite. Anyway. But also solar panel output and EV battery plants and like lots of stuff that's like being pitched as the alternative to things...y'all can feel free to cut me off too as I talk about these things. I'm just like going through my notes. And I don't know, it's breaking records all over the place by like four degrees in a lot of places. It's four degrees Fahrenheit. Brooke 04:44 What is heatwave in this context? Like are they having like, you know, 115 degree temperatures, are they just? Margaret 04:53 I mean, so. I mean, I believe in localized places. It's getting like crazy hot but what's interesting about this is that it's it's more the length of it and the abnormality to its usual that is, like, it's a lot of this stuff is like 106 degrees Fahrenheit and things like that. You know, things that are very not nice, but are...well, human survivable. Although we should probably at some point talk about wet bulb temperatures and how dry places are survivable at substantially higher temperatures than humid places. But yeah, so it's it's, it's an it's an abnormality causing problems as far as I understand, rather than like, just specifically, if you step outside, you will be scorched by the heatray that is the sun. It's affecting over a billion people, which is a lot of people. The area of the heatwave is 530,000 square miles, which for context is Texas, Colorado and California combined. Casandra Johns 05:57 Does that overlap with the area...like, isn't there like a massive wildfire happening in China right now? Margaret 06:04 I think you know, more about the wildfires than I do. Casandra Johns 06:07 I don't know what region it was in. Margaret 06:09 Okay. Casandra 06:09 I guess I'm curious. Of course, they're related because everything climate-y is related, ultimately. Margaret 06:16 Yeah. Casandra 06:19 Yeah, I'm curious how closely they're tied together. But, if you don't know, and I don't know, that's fine. Because there's also a massive wildfire. And that sucks. Margaret 06:27 Yeah. There's a massive wildfire. Brooke 06:31 Is that a continuous area, Margaret? That five? Whatever, something miles? Margaret 06:37 You all are exceeding my level of research that I did, because I did research about the entire world. So I don't know. Brooke 06:44 Okay, fair. Casandra 06:45 Oh, yeah. You have more. This is just like heat waves everywhere. Okay. Margaret 06:48 Yeah. Okay. And also joining us today on playing the squeaky toy in the background is Rintrah, the best dog in the world. Brooke 06:59 Can confirm. Margaret 07:00 The best dog in the world. No complaints? Okay. Yeah, I, you know, there's a lot more I don't know about this, right? But this was one that I haven't even seen really cropping up much in the media at all. And actually, one of the things that's sort of interesting and terrible and telling is that a lot of the information that I've been able to find about climate change disasters comes from the business media, like, a lot of this is about how it will affect stock prices, how it will affect, you know...300 Mines are shut down right now in China, or as of you know, two days ago when I did most of the research for this recording. And so it talks more about the 300 mines that have been shut down instead of the 119,000 people who have been evacuated from their homes. And it's just, it's a real problem. There's a lot of photos of like, low reservoirs that are like 20 meters below what they're supposed to be and things like that. And, of course, to tie everything into everything else, you know, things that happen in one place don't only effect that region. The drought is fucking up their harvest, and fertilizer for export has been affected, which will probably fuck up the world's food supply, which was otherwise very stable. So, I don't think that's gonna be a problem. Casandra Johns 08:16 The world's been chaos, but at least we know, food is cheap and available. Margaret 08:20 And will stay that way. Margaret 08:22 Okay, so then the one that I'm finally starting to see more get talked about in the media, thankfully, although it's annoying, because it's only been talked about because now there's like dramatic photos. But whatever. I mean, I'm not blaming people for not paying attention to everything that's happening in the world. Pakistan is having flooding, like just absolutely massive flooding. I've read reports saying that there's a half a million people living in refugee camps. It's taken at least 1000 lives, it's fucking up food production. Over a million homes have been destroyed. A third of the country is underwater. Have y'all seen the satellite image photos? Casandra 08:22 Yep Casandra Johns 08:59 Yeah, and they're referring to it as a 'lake.' Which makes me wonder like, are they anticipating at least some portion of it to remain? Like, "And look at our new lake!" Margaret 09:10 Yeah. Casandra 09:12 I heard I heard someone else I heard someone referred to it as a 'small ocean.' Margaret 09:18 Yeah. Margaret 09:19 Yeah. And, and Pakistan is the the fifth most populous country in the world after China, India, U.S., Indonesia, I think. Yeah. And so it's like, it's a big fucking deal and a big fucking problem. And one of the other problems because capitalism solves...makes everything worse. Pakistan has taken out a $1.1 billion dollar loan from the IMF, which for anyone following at home, the IMF is a predatory lending organization called the International Monetary Fund, that actually a lot of modern leftist politics, at least in the Western world and actually a lot of the developing world kind of cut its teeth in the...during the, the turn of the millennium fighting against the IMF and the World Bank, specifically because of the stuff that they do, which is that they loan predatory. It's like a payday loan. You know, it's like a paycheck loan place, but for entire countries, they loan you $1.1 billion, and then you're going to be paying off the interest for the rest of your life as a country. And of course, a lot of what's happening right now is that developing nations as they take out these loans are therefore forced to extract more fossil fuels from their own countries, in order to pay off the interest of their loan, not even touching the principal, trapping us further and further in the cycle of what's destroying everything. So that's all really fun. Okay, then, East Africa, particularly Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia, are also facing prolonged drought, rising food prices. A lot of this is because of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. This is projected to leave 20 million people hungry with an estimated 3 million potential deaths if aid isn't delivered, and these three countries represent 2% of the world's population, but 70% of the extreme food insecurity. And most of...about 90% of the wheat imported by East Africa comes from Russia and Ukraine, which are of course, having some issues right now. They're not famously friends. But you're thinking to yourself, "Well, I'm a wheat farmer in the US, and the high prices are good for me." They are not. Things are not good with domestic wheat production here in the United States, either, which, of course, affects large quantities of the world. Also, the US is a major grain exporter. And so this is things that affect the US do affect everyone else. And not just because we're the center of Empire. Drought is affecting wheat fields in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska. Kansas is estimating a 30% drop in their harvest. Oklahoma is estimating a 50% drop, in its harvest. And so even though you have these, like record high prices for wheat, farmers are expecting to lose money, because they're not able to grow enough. You look like you have a question. Brooke 09:19 Oh wow. Casandra Johns 12:24 And yeah, so we talked about this a little bit the other day, I think, like I'm not sure if people realize what it means when the wheat crop is devastated. You know, it's not just like, "Maybe I can't eat bread." Brooke 12:43 There's more to it than that? Casandra Johns 12:45 Right! I mean, the next thing I think of is like, who eats the wheat? Not just humans. You know, like, I can't eat wheat, but like, I eat beef. Margaret 12:58 Yeah. Casandra 12:58 And chicken. Margaret 13:00 Yeah. Brooke 13:00 Was does that matter, Casandra? Casandra 13:03 Maybe they eat wheat. Just the like domino effect. Margaret 13:07 Yeah. Casandra 13:08 Yeah. When we talk about rising food prices and rising fuel prices, and how those are connected to like rising everything prices. Margaret 13:15 Yeah. And book prices most famously. Brooke 13:16 Okay, well, like, I have a solution. Casandra 13:19 Okay, what's your solution? Is it Communism? Brooke 13:19 Cause, we're all about solutions here. Well, you started talking about Pakistan being all flooded like the country's a giant lake. And then you said drought in the US and I'm like, "Let's just pick up some water over there and just put it over here." And then there won't be a drought or flood. Margaret 13:36 So what's so great and I'm gonna get to in a moment is that drought and flood are entirely related. I think you knew this, and we're just setting me up to say this, but they're absolutely related. The more drought you have, the worse flooding you have, which of course, like boggles my immediate science, right? My non science brain is like, "But water is the opposite of drought," you know, and we're gonna get to them second. Okay, so also in the US, Lake Mead is drying up. It's the largest reservoir in the United States, it provides water to 25 million people. It's possible that soon it won't have enough water to feed the Hoover Dam, which provides electricity to about a million people. And the one upside of all of this drought..this is really selfish. It's kind of like interesting the stuff they keep finding in the water. They keep find... Margaret 14:26 Yeah. They're like finding like some guys like "Oh, look a barrel," and he like pops open some barrel from the 1920s. And just like a dead guy with a bullet in his skull, and they're like, "Oh, the mafia really did just drop people off in barrels," which led me to the conclusion that apparently leaving dead bodies in large body in large bodies of water is more effective of a strategy than I've been led to believe. Casandra 14:27 Well, they haven't they also...hasn't also revealed like Nazi...like sunken Nazi ships and shit. And then they're like the.... Casandra 14:27 Crime? Margaret 15:01 Yeah, not in Lake Mead, though. Casandra Johns 15:04 Right. But then..No, but I'm just saying like everywhere it's revealing interesting things like in Europe the...what are the stones called? Margaret 15:12 The Hunger Stones. Casandra 15:13 Hunger Stones? Margaret 15:15 Yeah. Casandra 15:15 So apparently, what's the context for this? Previously, in history when there were massive droughts and like rivers dwindled down to nothing, people made carvings in the stones at particular water levels with these like really epic, maybe Margaret's looking at some examples, of these really epic miserable statements about like, "Fear ye, fear ye, if the water gets this low..." Margaret 15:40 You're dead. Casandra 15:40 Yeah, but people are seeing those now, which is terrifying and interesting. Margaret 15:47 Yeah. Terrified and interesting is a good way to describe the current epoch. Brooke 15:52 Cool. That's the silverling, the mud caked lining. Brooke 15:52 Yeah. There was. It's not happening right at this moment. But here locally, when the Detroit reservoir got real low a couple of years ago, there was a town that had been flooded when they built the dam there and it was low enough that like, remnants of this town were visible, including like an old wagon, like covered wagon base kind of wagon and other cool artifacts. Brooke 16:27 See some history before we all die. Margaret 16:30 Yeah, yeah, exactly. Brooke 16:31 Great. Margaret 16:32 So, in California, heat and drought are also combining as power usages reaches a five year high power use, because people are running more and more air conditions. I didn't quite realize exactly how...I don't I don't have a percentage in front of me...But like, air conditioning is a really, really big use of electricity. And so in California, the grid is estimated...is expected to become unstable, although that might have already happened. It was supposed to happen like this week. So that might happen by the time y'all hear this. Or maybe it didn't happen. And I'm here I am chicken littling, all day long. And, of course, Jackson, Mississippi flooding. The capital of Mississippi, which is primarily black city has left 150,000 people without drinking water. Sooo... Brooke 17:18 I haven't heard about this at all? Margaret 17:20 Oh, yeah. And there's some mutual aid groups on the ground. Cooperation. Jackson is a long standing organization that works to sort of build dual power and do all kinds of awesome stuff in terms of cooperative economics and things like that. And they are doing a lot of mutual aid work. I believe there's also a group and maybe this is actually not maybe they're not directly related. I'm not sure there's a group called Hillbillies Helping Hillbillies that I've at least seen talk a lot about this issue. I don't know if they do most of their work down there or if they've been more focused on the Tennessee floods. Casandra Johns 17:54 I know Mutual Aid Disaster Relief is also doing work there. Margaret 17:59 Yeah. So "Why does all this stuff happen, Margaret?" you might ask. Brooke 18:07 Why does all this stuff happen, Margaret? Margaret 18:09 Well, I am an expert named Jennifer Francis, a senior scientist at the Woodward Climate Research Center in Falmouth, Massachusetts, and my quote, that is definitely me is, "As the air and oceans warm under a thicker blanket of greenhouse gases, more water vapor evaporates into the air providing more moisture to fuel thunderstorms, hurricanes, nor'easters and monsoons." Basically, as the temperature rise of the Earth, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor, every degree of...every increase of one degree Celsius can boost the capacity for holding water vapor by about 7%. So that's fun. And also as things get more humid, you're like, "Okay, well, that's cool. It's like more tropical and stuff, right?" Higher humidity is substantially more dangerous, like heat and humidity is what kills people, because of the way that our bodies thermo regulate basically, like, if you're at 100% humidity, and the temperature goes above your body temperature, you die. Not like instantly, right? But your body loses its ability to thermo regulate. And so that is the wet bulb temperature is the temperature at 100% humidity, and that can be calculated out from there. So, for example, 105 degrees Fahrenheit at 5%. humidity is not that bad. It's like 61 degrees wet bulb, right? You're not in danger, I mean, you can be in danger zone from other parts of it, you need to get in shade, right? But like, whereas 105 degrees at 95% humidity is 103 degrees wet bulb. So, and for context, you know, it's like I used to never really think about the level of humidity that I lived in until I moved to the South and I had to worry about mold and all kinds of other shit. But, much of the South, and San Francisco and also I believe much of Alaska sit at around 80 to 90% humidity, whereas the Southwest might be at around 30% humidity. So, when you hear about temperatures at different levels in different parts of the country, the humidity that they're facing, like matters in terms of how catastrophic this type of thing is likely to be. And then the "What to do about it section!" Don't worry, we're almost done with the terrible climate shit part. Casandra Johns 20:20 I feel like earlier, you mentioned something about the relationship between flooding and drought. I was hoping you were gonna circle back to that. Margaret 20:28 Okay. Oh, yeah. So. So basically, the...some atmosphere shit I only half understand. But, as everything gets hotter, more of the air like sits...and more of the water sits in the air and that...it just fucks everything up. So, like, the rain falls off fucked up. I, I kind of like, wrap my head around it. And then I, it unraveled, you ever, like study things that are completely outside your thing? And then you like, you get your takeaway, and then the details like dissolve? That's what happened to me while I was researching this? Casandra Johns 21:00 No, that's I didn't realize it had I, I thought my assumption was it was going to be that, you know, you can look up videos of this where like, people put a cup of water upside down on like dry soil, you know, partially damp soil and like saturated wet soil. And the cup of water immediately, like seeps into the ground in the saturated soil, but it takes a really long time for the dry soil to absorb the water. Margaret 21:25 Yeah. Casandra 21:25 And so my assumption was like, "Oh, if there's a drought and the soil is bone dry, it can't absorb moisture very effectively." Margaret 21:33 Yeah. Casandra 21:33 Which is counterintuitive, maybe? But...then it floods. Margaret 21:36 I think that is a big part of it. Yeah. Casandra 21:38 Okay. Margaret 21:39 And then also, I was even just like...go ahead. Brooke 21:43 I was thinking about how matter can't be created or destroyed. And so the water still exist somewhere, even though it got sucked up from the dry places. And that might be why it ended up flooding in other places because the water still exists. Margaret 21:58 Well, a lot of places it's literally the same place will have droughts and floods. I think Texas was dealing with that I think it was Dallas, was having a record drought and might still be in a record drought and then had like, really fuck off flooding. I think it was about a week or two ago. That was like destroying everything. And, you know, because if the rain patterns are just completely different than Yeah, what the ground is used to absorbing and like, and which ties into what to do about it. A lot of what to do about it needs to happen at the scale that we're not necessarily going to talk about right now. But, rainwater catchment and drought areas is super important. And, you know, I was looking it up because there's this like. I'd always been sort of told that rainwater catchment like fucks up the water system of that area, you know, because Colorado has, they have re-legalized it a little bit in 2016. But it's been illegal for a very long time to catch rainwater in Colorado because they're like, "Oh, it's so dry here. We need all the groundwater." That was what I had always got told. The real reason's that Colorado made rainwater catchment illegal have a lot more to do with...capitalism, and the way that water rights are, you're basically stealing from people in entirely different areas if you catch the rainwater at the source or whatever. And, it it can affect things,right, if you like take water that could otherwise have ended up groundwater, but you're mostly it's mostly like shit that would have run off anyway. And so rainwater catchment increasingly in a lot of places, I believe Arizona has like new laws that like require new buildings to include rainwater catchment. There's entire countries who I didn't write down the names of that require rainwater catchment in all new buildings, especially island nations, I'm under the impression and so rainwater catchment is cool. And then, Arizona you can get rebates if you install rainwater catchment. In Colorado, it is now legal again for like home level and there's like all these like rules and shit. And you're, you're only allowed to store two barrels for a total of 110 gallons and you can only do it at like, home, or whatever. I'm sure there's ways that people could imagine catching rain water without getting caught. The CDC points out that rainwater is generally not safe to drink without treatment. You can use it to water non food plants without treatment. I say this, I showered with rainwater for the past three years and don't give a shit. But, maybe I shouldn't recommend that to other people. But, also filtering rainwater is like not the biggest deal in the world. And then... Casandra Johns 24:39 Also like, the idea of only using it on non food plants is really funny to me, because like it just rains on my plants, you know? And then I eat them. Margaret 24:51 Yeah. Brooke 24:52 You shouldn't let rain land of your plants. Margaret 24:54 You shouldn't be eating food from plants. Plants comes from stores, Casandra. Casandra Johns 24:59 Uh oh. Okay. And if they get rained on specifically then they're like poison. Margaret 25:06 Yeah, me, okay. Like, you walk out of a food store, the main place that people get food, like McDonald's, and you have your chicken nuggets, or... Casandra 25:14 And then they get rained on? Margaret 25:16 You wouldn't want to eat them now, would you? Casandra 25:18 Okay, I see what you mean. Margaret 25:20 Yeah, no, I like that part about the like non food plants or whatever is like to me is like that's what the CDC says. The CDC has lost a lot of...I don't trust it as much as I might have used to. Casandra 25:36 Interesting segue to... Margaret 25:39 Yeah. Well, there is one more part though that I believe one have you added to the notes about soil remediation and dry gardening? I'm wondering if you want to talk about some of that. Brooke 25:52 That has to be Casandra, cause it wasn't me. Casandra Johns 25:54 Oh, I mean, that was me thinking about like, how the what I was saying before how bone dry soil...the best place to store water is in the soil. Right? Margaret 26:04 Yeah. Casandra 26:06 Just like the best place to store nitrogen is in the soil. But, you know, if I lived in a super dry area, and this is only so effective for like the home gardener, this like ideally would happen on a large scale. But, if I lived in a really dry area, I'd be working really hard to like improve my soil health so that it can store more water. So that things like dry gardening are possible. So I can you know, have food even in a drought. Margaret 26:32 What is dry gardening? Casandra Johns 26:36 Dry gardening is gardening with little to no, like, manually added water. Margaret 26:43 Is that where you like mulch the shit out of it all to prevent evaporation? Casandra Johns 26:46 Yeah, you can do it that way. You can also...there. There's a...well, it's on my bookshelf, so I'm not gonna mention it because I can't remember the title right now. But yeah, mulching, spacing your plants a lot farther out, making sure that your soil can store water so that if you know we live, where I live, it rains a lot in the spring. And if the plants I plant have a room, and the soil is fluffy enough that they can send the roots really deep, then in the summer, when it's dry, they can still access the water that's stored in the soil. Does that make sense? Margaret 27:19 Cool, and then they grow chicken nuggets? Casandra 27:22 Yep. Margaret 27:23 Cool. Okay, so back to the clever segue that I broke about not trusting the CDC.... Casandra Johns 27:36 Yeah, yeah, I Okay. So, we realized we should probably say at least something about monkey pox. Because it's the thing that exists. My notes are titled monkey pox sucks. And... Brooke 27:52 Correct. Casandra Johns 27:53 Correct. Yeah. And I realized in researching this that I knew very little, I think I was just like, "We live in a time where there will be epidemic after epidemic," and I'm, you know, mentally overloaded on this topic. And had a lot of assumptions that were wrong. But, one interesting thing I found out is that the CDC is saying it's not transmitted....It's not airborne. Which, you know, they've kind of gone back and forth about whether masks are going to help...masks. I can't enunciate....whether masks are going to help prevent the spread. Brooke 28:37 If the mask prevents you from licking someone's open wounds, then then I say that would be helpful. Put your mask on. Casandra Johns 28:44 But, then there's there are other recommendations around like, avoiding close face to face contact with people. So that's all. I think I'm just affirming that I am also skeptical of CDC guidelines at this point, which is a bummer. Margaret 28:59 Yeah. Casandra 29:01 Anyway, do you want to hear all about monkeypox? Margaret 29:04 Yeah. Yay. Casandra 29:06 Yay. Margaret 29:06 What a fun show we make. Brooke 29:10 That's like a game, right? It's a children's game that you play. It's fun. Spread all over? Isn't it great? Casandra 29:18 No. Margaret 29:19 It's one of those games with a 1-3% death.... Okay, please continue. Brooke 29:24 That's pretty low. It's fine. Casandra Johns 29:26 Oh, my God, what a world that we live in. So apparently was discovered in 1958 in laboratory monkeys. So, you know, you can insert something here about blaming capitalism for everything. Because maybe it wouldn't have been a thing if monkeys were not in laboratories? Anyway, it's a cousin of smallpox in the first human case was recorded in 1970. When I first heard about monkey pox in May or whatever I was like, "Oh, cool and new disease." It's not new. It's been around for decades. So, it's really interesting that like, we don't have a vaccine that can quickly be rolled out. Do you want to guess why that is? Margaret 30:14 Is it Capitalsim? Brooke 30:14 I guess 'racism.' Casandra 30:15 Racism. Brooke wins with 'racism.' Brooke 30:23 Yay? Casandra 30:26 Yeah, so it was that to be uncommon in humans, but cases started increasing around 1980. And most of the cases have been documented in central and western Africa. That correct? In Africa. Margaret 30:41 Yeah, you said Nigeria is like one of the main spots of it? Casandra 30:45 For this outbreak. Margaret 30:46 Okay. Casandra 30:48 Yeah. So, and they think that one of the reasons....so there have been multiple outbreaks since it was first recorded in humans in 1970, which I didn't realize, because we don't hear about them, because mostly they've taken place in Africa. Which is just depressing. And I'll come back around to that in a minute. But, they think that that the increase in cases might be connected to the fact that it is related to smallpox. The smallpox vaccine, they think gives like, 85% that it is like, 85% effective against monkey pox. But most people don't get the smallpox vaccine anymore. Brooke 31:27 Yeah. Casandra 31:28 And I think that's related to the increase in monkey pox cases. Margaret 31:33 People don't get the smallpox vaccine anymore, because smallpox kind of went away because of vaccines? Casandra 31:40 Yeah, Brooke 31:41 No, it just stop being trendy. People were like, "That is not cool anymore. I'm not gonna take that one." Casandra Johns 31:48 Yeah, yeah. Which then is like, there's a whole tangent in here about who and how they decide a disease has been 'eradicated.' I'm doing air quotes that you can't see has been, 'eradicated.' Especially when something like monkey pox is trance was initially transmitted from animals to humans. And so, yeah, I don't know, is smallpox eradicated? I don't know. I'm not an epidemiologist. But I'm curious. So, let's see. Okay, so the current outbreak grew from one case in Massachusetts in the US, I'm talking about the US now, May 17. And at this point, you know, however many days it's been since May, there are almost 20,000 cases in the US, which is a lot of cases. Brooke 32:40 I mean, it sounds like a big number. But, also I know, there's a lot of people in the US, but also, I don't know how much cases of other things that we know about are common. So I don't have any frame of reference. Margaret 32:51 Yeah same. Casandra 32:53 Yeah. Brooke 32:54 Well, it's way smaller than Covid. Casandra Johns 32:57 Right. It is way smaller than Covid. But, you know, and it's, it's sort of like Covid, you're probably not going to die from it. But then there's the asterisk, 'unless you're immunocompromised already,' you know. So like, who are we? Who are we willing to throw under the bus for this? Brooke 33:13 So just Casandra. Casandra 33:13 Yeah, just me. Yeah. But then there's also public health experts are apparently warning that the virus is on the verge of becoming permanently entrenched here. Margaret 33:24 Cool. Casandra 33:25 So maybe 20,000 isn't, you know, a big chunk of the population, but in terms of like, a virus, it's bad news, because we don't really want it to become entrenched here, right? Brooke 33:38 Yeah, viruses, bad. Casandra 33:41 Virus equals bad. Okay. Okay, so, so there's been a lot of criticism about Biden's administration and their sluggish response to the outbreak. I read a really interesting report. I think WaPo [Washington Post] was the first place to report on this, but they said that, on August 4, US Health and Human Services officials plan to stretch the country's limited supply, or they announced, that they plan to stretch the country's limited supply of vaccines by splitting doses to cover five times as many people. This is after saying that they had plenty of doses. So, already sketchy. Yeah, cool, cool. And then the chief executive of Bavarian Nordic who's the vaccine manufacturer responded by accusing the Biden admin of breaching contract by planning to use them in this like inappropriate way by splitting the doses and then apparently threatened to cancel all future vaccine orders so that....Yeah, I'm not sure how that was resolved. Brooke 34:45 Capitalism. The other 'ism' now at play. Margaret 34:50 I was right. I was late. Casandra Johns 34:57 So the big concern for me in researching this was how it spreads, because I have a child who's about to go back to public school, so apparently animal to human transmission, it's spread by direct contact with blood, bodily fluids or cutaneous or mucosal lesions of infected animals. And then human to human transmission is close contact with respiratory secretions, which to me says airborne, right, right? Is that not what that means? Anyway, respiratory secretions, skin lesions of an infected person, or recently contaminated objects. So things like bedding, clothing, stuff like that. Um, but the CDC says it's not airborne. So, take that, as you will. I don't know. How are you gonna take that, Brooke? Brooke 35:41 Right. Well, I mean, respiratory secretions that does sound more significant than just like, you know, air droplets, like we talked about with covid, like, more moist, kind of things coming out of you, like sneezes and coughs and stuff that actually sprays more liquid matter? Casandra 36:07 So, use your imagination with that. Margaret 36:08 We could just go through and describe every act that could... Casandra 36:10 Don't spit in people's mouths. Brooke 36:14 Damn it, there goes half of my kink play. Margaret 36:18 I mean, it does seem like it's less contagious than like, because like, okay, right, like, because they said originally COVID wasn't airborne. And they weren't always wrong about that, right? But, the fact that it's been here for months, and is at 20,000 cases, is like, 'promising,' in that it seems less contagious than COVID? But that's, I guess I'm talking about like, the first or second most contagious virus that the world's ever faced. So, I guess it's a terrible benchmark to compare it to. Casandra Johns 36:49 Yeah, I think comparing everything to covid is probably not in our best interest, especially because a lot more people are comparing this to AIDS, in terms of the communities it's impacting, and how it's spreading. So it's, it's okay, let me go back to my list. Alright, so the incubation period is usually six to thirteen days, it's thought to be mainly spread through sexual activity, specifically, men who have sex with men and have multiple partners, though now they've sort of expanded that to include like queer and trans people, which is good. Not that it's spreading in queer and trans communities, but that they're changing language. So then I was like, "Well, is it an STI, right?" And I Googled "Is Monkey pox and STI? And the first two articles that came up, were: Number one, "Monkey pox is an STI and knowing that can help." And then number two is, "Monkey pox is spreading through sex, but it's not an STI." So you know, I'm not a doctor. Casandra Johns 37:02 It's not an STI. Casandra 37:29 Okay. Brooke 37:31 Because it's not it's, yeah, go ahead. Casandra Johns 37:52 But it seems to mainly be spreading through sex, probably because of the close contact involved. Margaret 38:02 Yeah, I mean, like, like, scabies is... Brooke 38:04 Yeah, like not through the sex itself. Casandra 38:06 Right. Brooke 38:07 But through the close physical contact of you know, that happens during sex. Casandra Johns 38:12 I think. I also saw a list. I think it's LA County. I was reading their like, list of eligibility criteria, and maybe risky behavior to avoid...'in void.' Would that even? Yeah, thank you. I was just trying to figure out what my made up word means. Risky behavior to avoid and they listed that, like, we're still learning about how it's transmitted, right, which is wild for a disease that's been around since the 70s. But, they listed that it could possibly be transmitted through semen. Like not solely but that could be another way that it's transmitted. Brooke 38:53 Sure, transmitted through bodily fluids, but the distinction when it when it's an STI is something that's sort of limited to being transmissible through kind of the genital region. Casandra Johns 39:10 Is that why one type of herpes is considered an STI, and the other isn't? Brooke 39:14 Yeah, so you can like can get both of them in both places because of oral sex. Casandra 39:21 Huh, that's interesting. Brooke 39:23 But yeah, technically. That's why. Casandra Johns 39:25 Thanks for knowing more about STI classification than me. I appreciate it. Brooke 39:29 Well, I fuck a lot. So I got to know these kinds of things. Casandra 39:35 All right, moving on with my notes. My next... Brooke 39:40 I just made everyone turn a scarlet blushing red color because I have non prude among this collective. Casandra Johns 39:48 I'm not blushing. I'm not prudish. I'm just Demi. Okay, so my next section is titled "Racism," which, yeah, so the virus isn't spreading in this specific outbreak of monkey pox is been spreading in Nigeria since 2017. Yet, somehow there are no clinical...there's no clinical trial data of the effectiveness of the vaccine or T pox, which is the antiviral they've developed. No human studies. I wonder why. Um, well, I as I said it's understudied because up until now, it's been isolated to central and west Africa. Yeah. What would have happened if we were vaccinating on a large scale in Nigeria? Would it have spread? Margaret 40:31 Yeah, I mean, that's like such a thing that I keep thinking about all this shit, where it's like, it's just seemed so obvious to me that, like the solutions to all the major things that we're dealing with right now, like don't make any sense in a world full of borders. You know? Being like, like, "We got ours. Fuck you," doesn't make any fucking it never made any fucking sense. But, it really doesn't make any fucking sense now, or it's like, yeah, if we had, like, I don't understand, even if I'm like a self interested, rich white American. I don't understand how I can be like, "Oh, new new disease just dropped and it's in another country." Let's go get rid of it in another country. That makes sense from...it's cheaper than building spaceships to Mars. Brooke 41:16 I think it's people still just not fundamentally understanding how deeply integrated we are now as a global society. Yeah. I mean, we shouldn't have figured especially in the last couple of years, if you haven't figured it out before, then like, you should understand that now. I feel like... Margaret 41:32 Yeah, acids been around for a long time. Casandra 41:39 Don't understand the reference? Margaret 41:43 Just like, oh, no, like, we're all one consciousness? Whatever. Casandra 41:52 Okay, my next subsection of notes is titled "Homophobia." Margaret 41:55 Hurray. Casandra 41:56 This is...I'm announcing these by way of a content warning. So yeah, so I read a few different, you know, I've seen like on Twitter and stuff, people talking about how homophobia relates to the way the language the government has been using and media outlets have been using around monkeypox, and also the government response to it and didn't fully understand that other than that it's mainly spreading in queer networks right now. But, I read an article that talked about how the homophobia they were seeing was mainly around the language that gay sex is quote, unquote, 'driving' the epidemic. Yeah, and just like really sex negative advice around how to keep from getting monkey pox. But, in reality, the drivers of the epidemic are the structures globally that have led to like vaccines and tests and treatments all existing for this virus, but not being accessible. Margaret 42:57 Yeah. Casandra 42:58 Yeah, I don't know if y'all have read any of the first person accounts of people trying to find access even to a test. Like I read an account of someone who went to their doctor was like, "I think a monkey pox." and the doctor, like, had to jump through all of these hoops just to access a test Margaret 43:14 Fucking hell. Margaret 43:16 So that's cool. Let's see, before I talk about the 'What we can do,' I want to circle back to climate change really quickly. Because, I think that in my brain, I know that epidemics and climate change are related, but I hadn't thought much about how in the particular mechanisms, but I read an interview that, that interested in me a lot. And they talked about how climate change is driving the risk of infectious diseases. I saw a report that 58% of the 375 infectious diseases they examined, have...this is a quote, "have been at some point aggravated by 'climatic hazards.'" So that's cool. Brooke 44:03 I...but how? I don't understand the connection. Casandra 44:06 Yeah. So. So one way is that climate change, they were talking about how it brings humans closer to animals, not in the sense that like "We are closer to nature," but just like, as we encroach on... Brooke 44:17 oh, sure. Casandra 44:20 And so, animal to human transmission is a thing. But, also if we're talking about like climate change and natural disasters, people get very sick of diseases and die after natural disasters. So, I'm sure that's part of what they mean by 'aggravated,' being 'aggravated by climatic hazards.' Warmer temperatures also attract insects and carriers of disease to parts of the world that they didn't used to exist in. Margaret. I feel like you were talking about...we were talking the other night and you mentioned like...no was it you? Maybe I was reading something? I've been reading too much lately. I was reading about a type of mosquito that is like, more likely to carry things like Dengue fever, and is now in the US, is now in the northern hemisphere. And. Margaret 45:08 Oh, that's exciting. Casandra 45:10 Yeah, and it has to do with warmer water temperatures where they can hatch their eggs and also with capitalism, because apparently they were transported here in 'tires.' Margaret 45:22 Huh? Casandra 45:23 Like when tires sit, you know outside in a wash, tje water pools? Yeah. Wild. Margaret 45:33 Which ties back to rain catchment and how don't do lazy rain catchment where you just put your downspout into the barrel, you should filter it, and you should prevent mosquitoes from breeding in there. Also algae, and all kinds of other stuff. Casandra 45:47 Yeah, it's true. Brooke 45:49 So today's episode is brought to you by capitalism and racism. Margaret 45:54 And I was thinking rain barrels. But Sure. Brooke 45:59 Well, the reason we have to talk about these horrible things is the 'isms.' Margaret 46:04 Right? Where as I was thinking about sponsors, Big Rain Barrel. The big sponsor of the show. Brooke 46:11 That'd be a great sponsor. I hope we get a free barrel. Casandra 46:14 Yeah. Brooke 46:14 Free barrel with every Ep [episode] Margaret 46:16 Yeah. I want to be able to talk about them personally. So, please contact us through the site. The advertisers. I want the I want Big Rain Barrel to...I just want a rain barrel. That's all. Please continue. Casandra 46:31 So in 2022, we're still experiencing the COVID outbreak, right? And now my monkey pox. And also polio. Margaret 46:40 Cool. Casandra 46:42 Yeah. Yeah, yes. Polio. Someone Someone got polio. For the second time since they declared polio like a...they don't use the word eradicated. But they were basically like, "Humans don't get this anymore." But two have since then. One was this summer. So that's...okay. Brooke 47:06 That's neat. Casandra 47:07 Yeah, what can we do about it? We can wash our hands a lot. I'm still gonna wear a mask, even though the CDC says it's not airborne, because I don't understand the difference. And also Covid's still a thing. We can research testing and vaccination in our areas, because it seems to be vastly different in different cities and counties and really confusing. So you can do the research ahead of time and share it through your network so people know where to access information and help. You can also get vaccinated if you qualify. However, I let's see, I looked at a few different counties and their eligibility criteria. And they all seem to have a few things in common. You have to be gay or bisexual men, or a transgender person who has had either 1) Multiple or anonymous sex partners in the last 14 days or 2) Skin to skin, skin to skin or intimate contact with people at large venues or events in the last 14 days. And then they're also starting to include people of any gender or sexual orientation who have engaged in commercial or [cuts out], so sex workers in the last 14 days. So yeah, if any of those are you, and you have a vaccination place near you, why not get it? Margaret 48:32 Because Bill Gates will be able to track all the sex you have? Brooke 48:38 Yeah, Casandra 48:39 The reason I agreed to research monkey pox for this episode is because, like I said, my kids about to go back to school. And I was really nervous. And I'm feeling a little bit less nervous for the moment about school because of the cases documented in children so far areextremely low. So, that's some good news for all of the other parents out there. Margaret 49:02 And the children listening Casandra 49:05 For any of the children listening. Margaret 49:06 It just occurred to me that children might listen to this podcast. I'm so sorry, children, about the world. Not about the cussing. I'm sorry about the world. Casandra 49:18 Speaking of school, Brooke 49:20 Hey, yo, student loan forgiveness that's been in the news. Right? And as the person with the background in economics, I feel like I have to talk about that. So, student loans, I'm fairly certain that of the two of you one of you has student loans and one of you does not. And I'm I'm curious how each of you feel about student loan forgiveness without...you can go ahead and not reveal which one of you it is and isn't for the moment. Just tell me if you like it? Is it good? Or bad? Casandra 49:56 Fucking-tastic I mean, not this version, this version is just like so. So, but like, should they forgive all of our student loans? Fuck yes, they should. Margaret 50:04 I agree. Brooke 50:05 Casandra says yes. Oh, and Margaret agrees Wait, but only one of you has student loans? Margaret 50:11 So, I don't have student loans. And...I can't imagine, I can't imagine anyone who doesn't have student loans giving a shit. Like I just like, I struggle so hard. Like, every time someone's like, "They did this with our taxpayer money," and I'm like, "Motherfucker, they invaded half the world with our tax money." Like... Casandra 50:35 There there other things you should be frustrated about being done with your tax dollars. Casandra 50:40 And this is not one of them. Margaret 50:40 Yeah! Margaret 50:42 Yeah. And then even with my like, even if I was like a self interest capitalist shit, it's like, I don't know, healthy economy is not one built on fucking debt. And I don't know, whatever. I'm just like... Brooke 51:00 Don't spoil my ending, Margaret. Margaret 51:02 Oh, sorry. Right. Casandra 51:04 But capitalism means that there have to be people who are suffering and poor so that I can feel superior and be stable and have more money. Margaret 51:13 Oh, that's a good point. Casandra 51:14 Yeah. Margaret 51:15 No, I take it back actually, Brooke. I'd like to change my answer. No one should. Casandra 51:21 Fuck Casandra. Margaret 51:26 No one should have the right to have debt forgiven. It should probably be transmitted to children and children's children. Oh, wait, that already happens. Just okay. Anyway. Casandra 51:36 What about corporations? Shouldn't they be able to get their debt forgiven, Margaret? Margaret 51:40 Oh, yeah. I mean, corporations, obviously should have their debt forgiven. I mean, otherwise, we wouldn't have an economy. Brooke 51:46 Like, God. Okay. You two know everything. My work is done here. Throw the topic and walk away. Excellent. Casandra 51:55 Sorry, Brooke. Brooke 51:56 No, I'm loving it. Casandra 51:58 This is how we cope with talking about money. Margaret 52:01 Yeah. Brooke 52:04 Oh, it's so good. No, I have you know, I have a couple of, of friends and or relations that are both on the against it side. Well, neither of whom went to college or have any students debt. Casandra 52:21 Why are they still your friends? Brooke 52:22 Well, Facebook friends, let's say that. Casandra 52:25 That's fair. Brooke 52:25 I think it's important to listen to what people say on the other side. So, I try and understand the arguments and can have a conversation back and hopefully bring them into the light. Margaret 52:34 Yeah, that's legit. But wait, what if we instead created an increasingly more insular and pure subculture? Brooke 52:44 It seems problematic I'm gonna say, but... Margaret 52:47 What? Brooke 52:47 That's probably for another episode. Okay. Margaret 52:50 Okay, I'll stop derailing you, Casandra Johns 52:52 it would only be the three of us. Everyone else is wrong in some way. Margaret 52:56 I think that that's probably true. I'm sorry Bursts, who's doing our editing, I'm sorry Inmn, who produce the podcast. Brooke 53:06 You better apologize to all the patrons right now too. Margaret 53:10 Yeah, if you want to be pure and join our pure culture. A $20 a month level. Brooke 53:19 No. No cults. No cults. Margaret 53:22 Everyone keeps saying that to me. Okay. Brooke 53:26 That's why I took away that book on cults that I showed you the other day, you don't need the help. Margaret 53:32 Please continue. Brooke 53:33 Oh, God. Right. So so the arguments against it. Like you were saying, you know, one of them's about the, "I don't want my tax dollars going to that," which, like you said, is a pretty wild argument, because we don't get to decide directly where our tax dollars go. There's plenty of things that I'm in...None of us like taxes...And amongst us, especially like, abolish the government abolish the taxes, but even people who are okay with taxes as a functioning society, we still, you know, you don't get to decide where each dollar goes. What's your question face? Casandra 54:10 You mean when I vote, it doesn't directly change things? Brooke 54:14 Oh, God, another topic for another whole podcast episode about how about how it actually works out there in the world. Yeah, so that argument is kind of wild. And then the other one that I that I have seen is the, you know, "Why should anyone else pay for their choices?" especially if it's their...other people's bad choices or whatever. Which again, is wild to me. Margaret 54:42 You mean the bad choice to loan $60,000 to a 17 year old? Brooke 54:47 Yeah, seems like maybe that should be not a not a thing. Margaret 54:51 Well, I just but it's a bad financial like, like come on. That's that's a that's part of loaning money is you take into account like, there's risk involved. It is a risky loan to loan a 17 year old money. Anyway, yep. Sorry. Brooke 55:07 Yeah, I saw one of my, you know, probably Gen X or Boomer aged relatives saying, "Hey, I signed up for the loans at 18. And I read the document, and I knew what I was getting myself into. And it was a choice. And it's everybody's choice." And it's so many bad takes so many bad takes... Casandra 55:24 I wonder how much their loan was compared to mine? Brooke 55:27 Yeah, and there's that. Casandra 55:28 I'm gonna guess significantly less. Brooke 55:30 Yeah, so let me get into a little bit of data here, because I love data. Let's talk also about what the loans are and aren't, because if you're only looking at the headlines there's a lot that's not captured in there. The number we see tossed around is the $10,000 of forgiveness. And that's up to $10,000 of forgiveness. So there's caveats on that, because there's a income limitation as to when you can get it. And it decreases a little bit based on what your income is. But also, if you were awarded a Pell Grant, at any point in your college education, you can actually get up to $20,000 in forgiveness, and Pell Grants are a federal grant, not a loan, but a grant, i.e. a gift, basically, that only go out to the lowest income kind of folks. So, if you qualified for a Pell Grant at the time that you also took out loans, then you can get a higher amount of loan forgiveness. And then it also only is it takes effect for people who had taken out a loan prior to June 30th of this year 2020. So if you're in school, right now, if you're just starting this fall, it doesn't apply to you. You had to have taken out a loan prior to that to qualify. Some of the cool things about it, though, are that it helps kind of all kinds of federal loans, which 95% of student loan debt is a federal loan. Only about 5% is private loans. So that's most people with loans, although it's only again, those income requirements, but that's still a large portion of folks. Where's the other one I was looking at? Oh, there's a type of loans that parents can take out to help their kids. So most of the federal loans that folks sign up for, they are signing up themselves, right, you're putting yourself in debt for it, even though you're only 18, or whatever. But parents can also get a loan, there's a federal loan called Parent PLUS, that you can take out to help your kids and those loans also qualify for forgiveness. And that is different than the student's loan. So if you're a parent who took out one of those loans for your kid, and your kid also took out loans, you both separately qualify for forgiveness. Casandra 57:48 Is this...Sorry, is this...I hadn't heard of those parent loans. Is the thought that they're taking out a loan to help pay for their kids college? Brooke 57:56 Yeah. Casandra 57:57 Okay. So, just like, "Look, another loan we can give to someone." Brooke 58:02 Yeah. And it's a federal federal one again, and you know, federal loans overall are, at least compared with like private student loans you can get they're way more reasonable, super low interest rates, longer repayment periods, you can get restructuring, if you're having financial issues or get a pause on it, there's more ways to get them forgiven, like working for a nonprofit or in the private sector, stuff like that. So, these are sort of nicer loans, which is one of the faults that people point out with it is that the the private loans that are the more of the predatory style loans, like we talked about with the IMF earlier, you know, higher interest rates, they don't care about how much you are or aren't making necessarily, they just say you have to start paying it at this point, and you have to pay this much and they'll come after your car or your dog or your firstborn child or whatever in order to get their repayments. And this federal forgiveness doesn't affect those folks. Margaret 58:59 Would you say that our listeners should take out predatory loans from payday loan places in order to buy rain barrels? Brooke 59:08 No. Because you should never support predatory loan places. You can steall from those places. Margaret 59:16 What if we, what if we start a rain barrel loan fund that offers predatory rates? Brooke 59:28 Then I would no longer call you an anarchist. You'd be an An-Cap [Anarcho-capitalist] and out of the club. Casandra 59:33 Is this you? Is this you segwaying into an ad break for our sponsors? Margaret 59:41 No, i was my brain's poisoned by how the fact that my other podcast is...has actual ad breaks. Casandra 59:48 Duh Duh duh duuuuh! I'm rain barrels! Brooke 59:49 Hey, if rain barrels would give away some, loan some rain barrels, I would let them plug a little ad on this ad-free anarchist podcast network. Yeah. Margaret 1:00:01 Yeah. Although, I'm holding out for big IBC tote. Brooke 1:00:05 Yes. Margaret 1:00:05 Cause IBC totes are 275 gallons, sort of 55 gallons. And that's what I showered with for the past three years, an IBC tote available from wherever you're willing to go get a really cheap thing that used to be full of detergent and wash it out vaguely. Margaret 1:00:11 Half an hour's drive, we can go grab some. Casandra 1:00:25 Wait, really? Margaret 1:00:26 Yeah, yeah. Casandra 1:00:28 We should talk about that after we're done doing a podcast which we are in fact doing right now. Margaret 1:00:32 Oh right, okay. Brooke 1:00:33 Okay, one of the other things that comes up when folks talk about student loans is you get like the the Boomer types that will say, you know, "I worked a part time job when I was in school and paid off my...paid for my school while I was going to school." And I think we all know that that's just not possible to do anymore. And that's because of the cost of education and how it has skyrocketed. So, if you look at the difference from 70s, 80s, or so, of like median income in the US with the average household makes, versus the average cost of college, the average income has gone up like half again as much since the 80s or so, whereas the cost of college is four times more expensive than it was. And then the other argument that comes up that people make is, well, "Everybody thinks they have to go to college. Now, you know, everybody's trying to enroll in college, not everyone needs to go to college. But everyone tries to." And when you look at the numbers of like, the portion of the population that has that's going to college and how that's changed in the last like 50 years, it's been pretty much steady for the last 25 years. It rose in the 60s, late 60s was kind of flat in the 70s then started to rise again through the 80s and the mid 90s. Probably because of the series of recessions that we had that were really severe in some places, like Oregon had a really severe recession. And when there was a recession, more people go back to school, but it hit a peak in the mid 90s And then dropped for a while and then has kind of been staying around that peak, on average, over the last 25 years. That and that's the number of people has gone up, but the portion of the population, right, so as a percent of the total population has actually been quite stable for a while now. Margaret 1:02:30 And like, I'm a big fan of having not gotten a degree, right? But, I even had a dream again last night where I like dropped out of school again. And I was like, "Fuck you, I quit." And it was really, but, but it's something that I think that a lot of people don't talk about when they talk about being like, "Oh, well, not everyone needs a college degree," or whatever it is they they don't understand that like how important upper higher education is to upward mobility and upward class mobility, especially for like people who are like, marginalized among other identities besides class, like specifically around race, you know, like, there's...so I think that...I think it's something that we can accidentally get a little to like, "Yeah!" like, you know, people get very, like "I'm so blue collar, everyone should drive forklifts," instead of going and studying gender studies or whatever, right? And just like not fucking getting how important class mobility can be for people and how that functions most of the time. And so I get really annoyed when people are like, "No one should ever go to college," or whatever, because I'm like, that is a really that is a position that comes from a specific place for some people, you know? Casandra 1:03:44 Yeah. Brooke 1:03:46 I think people also forget in that the fact that college classes can include courses for some of those types of jobs. So,talking about like the other four year degree, an apprenticeship. You know, if you're an electrician or a sheetmetal worker, you're probably you're going to take some classes and probably through a community college as part of your education to get those kinds of jobs. If you're doing a forklift or CNC, you have to take a course and they can be three months, six months, twelve months courses, and often again, through community college. So even though you're not getting a degree, you're still doing some post secondary education. Margaret 1:04:29 Yeah. Casandra 1:04:30 Do you want to know how much debt I have for my community college? Brooke 1:04:34 Oh, this is gonna hurt. Casandra 1:04:36 Forty Grand. Brooke 1:04:38 Shut the front door. Casandra 1:04:41 And that's like with grants and shit because like I good grades and all that. I was on the 'President's list.' Brooke 1:04:45 For a frame of reference, listeners, Casandra graduated more recently, like last couple years, or three or whatever it was, but fairly recently. Yeah. When I was looking at the numbers, here's my personal anecdote. The cost have the four year degree that I got 15 years ago. I'm taking some community college classes now. And if I did an associate's degree, it would cost me as much for two years of community college today as it did for a four year degree with two majors 15 years ago. Yeah, the cost has has exponentially risen again. Four times. It's it's four times higher than it was like 40 years ago. It's risen more than anything, any other good or commodity. The cost of college has increased. Margaret 1:05:40 I will say, my, like optimistic, putting on my optimism hat. I don't like hats. That's probably why I'm not great. Okay. When I think about like some of the most...the strongest that leftist movements, anarchist movements, I know more about anarchist movements, I do other movements. The strongest they've been is like often, while popular education, or the existing educational infrastructure is failing everyone. And, you know, like a lot of work around reframing education in both France and Spain was coming out of anarchists in the late 19th and early 20th century in the modern school movement, all this stuff, and people were getting, like, literally murdered for advocating for things like "What if boys and girls are taught in the same classrooms and shit," and it's like awild idea that anarchists came up with. And like not talking about God in the classroom. Oh, my god, we're actually losing on all of these. Okay, anyway. It's like, "Remember the fight for an eight hour workday?" And I'm like, "Man, I wish I had eight hour workday right now." Okay, and but, but so that's like, my like, my, like, optimism is that like, in a burned for us new weeds grow? You know, I think that there's a lot of opportunity for alternative educational systems, but not in a way where they could like, immediately step in and be like an accredited university that allows the sort of class mobility that we're talking about, or whatever, right, but like, it does seem like mutual aid schooling and education are like, probably in a better position to take a foothold than they used to be. I hadn't really...I'd only previously thought about this more for like, grade school type stuff, especially for the whole, like how public school is like also kind of like low key just like childcare. And like, hadn't quite thought about this in terms of like, how it ties into, you know, continuing education, but it could, we could have Anarchy University, and then everyone could have degrees and okay, I don't know where I'm going with this. Brooke 1:07:45 Anarcho-U. Casandra 1:07:45 You need another project, Margaret. So... Margaret 1:07:51 No, dear listener, you need a project. At Projects-R-Us, we will give you a project. Brooke 1:08:00 Wrong podcast. Wrong, wrong podcast. Margaret 1:08:02 Replace the continuing education system!. Brooke 1:08:04 Nope, wrong podcast. Margaret 1:08:04 Okay, fine. Brooke 1:08:06 Yeah, so, Casandra 1:08:07 That'd be like your ideal job, I think. Margaret 1:08:09 it really would be, yes, I have way better at coming up with things that I can dedicate my entire life to than dedicating my entire life to any of the individual things. Brooke 1:08:22 Oh, maybe, maybe you didn't need to start the cult just to find leaders fo

Let's Get Civical
Title: Hoover Dam - An Engineering Marvel!

Let's Get Civical

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 36:57


In this week's episode of Let's Get Civical, Lizzie and Arden take on the Hoover Dam! Join them as they talk about why it was built, the dangerous process of how it was built, and what is happening to the Dam's Lake Mead! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @letsgetcivical, @lizzie_the_rock_stewart, and @ardenjulianna. Or visit us at letsgetcivical.com for all the exciting updates! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Clean Energy Show
Don't Charge Your Electric Vehicles and Definitely Don't Charge Your E-Bikes

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 57:07


The U.K. Conservatives have elected a new PM, Lizz Truss, who doesn't like to look at solar panels. Battery fires get E-Bikes banned in New York City public housing. California pays poorer people not to own cars. General Motors offers to buy out Buick dealers who don't want to get with the electric future. A word for all the awefull people who fear a green future. California suffers its worst drought in twelve hundred years and you can't put gas in a gas car without electricity. Also this week: Pipeline patrol planes Russia cuts off the gas yet again American Top 40 used to get sent to radio stations on vinyl LPs says Brian Germany offers cheap train passes to offset high energy prices France is looking to cut energy use by 10% which means lowering the thermostat to 19 degrees/66 F. Ethanol plants can give off terrible pollution that is harmful. Tesla Canadian factory rumors. All about Metathesiophobia from a Chevy Bolt owner Feedback on our light pollution episode from May End-of-life batteries from electric vehicles are not likely to be the primary source of recyclable material until the mid-2030s, according to Benchmark Mineral Intelligence Trump goes on nonsensical rant about electric cars: 'We need to rid of them' Four years of Boston Consulting Group's US electric vehicle sales forecasts, compiled by RecurrentAuto show how bad EV adoption predictions are.  Electric school buses in Massachusetts provided energy back to the grid for more than 80 hours this summer, helping to reinforce the grid during some of the hottest summer days when electricity was most in demand. 10 of 13 ‘Flagship' CCS Projects Failed to Deliver, IEEFA Analysis Concludes. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! Check out our YouTube Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Tell your friends about us on social media! Transcript of this episode  (done by A.I.) News anchor: The United Kingdom Conservative Party announced Monday that Liz Trust was selected as its new leader. Lizz Truss: It's an honor to be elected as leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party. And I think one of the most depressing when you're driving through England is seeing fields that should be full of crops or livestock, full of solar panels. Various people: You got to be kidding me. You got to be kidding me. You're kidding me. You're kidding me. You're kidding me, right? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? Yeah. Nope. Hell, no. Brian: Hello, and welcome to episode 130 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton, James: And that must be I'm James Whittingham, and this week, British conservatives have indeed elected their new PM, and she doesn't like the site of solar panels. Oh, Boris. Who would have thought I'd ever miss your puffy ass? And you know, that thing on your head? In a shocking announcement, General Motors offers to buy out any Buick dealers that don't want to sell electric vehicles. It's shocking because I had no idea Buick still existed. I learned a new word that describes everyone you hate on Twitter. And it's not donkey knobbler. Nobler California suffers an unprecedented heat wave and the worst drought in 1200 years. Worst of all, it's become unfashionable to say, but it's a dry heat. All that and more on this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Also on this edition of I hope you're not wearing white, because it's after Labor Day. Brian, the pipeline plane that flies over my house is flying lower than expected. Much lower. Californians are asked not to charge their electric cars. Russia has a clog in their oil pipes again. And a wildfire warning in Alberta reminds people you can't run a gas pump without electricity. First of all, how's your back this week? Yeah, definitely better. I am walking without a cane for the first time. You literally walk with a cane. I was really walking with a cane. You were literally a hobbled old man for a while. Absolutely. But yeah, I think I'm doing okay. Although I will have to probably switch my seating position halfway through the show. All right. As we record this, our whole province of Saskatchewan in Canada is in international news. And I thought it would be weird if we didn't talk about that. Yeah, we've been having all kinds of emergency alerts on our phones night and day of a terrible tragedy that has taken place on the First Nation and around and for a while, the mass killer has been believed to be hiding in the city that we live in. If you listen to the show and you hear us talking about it while you've heard it in the news, and here we are. We're both here. Brian safe and his farm shelter. Our thoughts go to all the victims. And, yeah, it's not too often we make international news, and sometimes it's for good reasons and sometimes not so good. Let's hope for a good outcome and better things in the future. Yeah. So speaking of our hometown, it came up on a podcast this week. So remember when I retired, I said my retirement project was going to be making my own shoelaces? Yeah. So I learned that from a TV show called Going Deep with David Reese, one of the greatest TV shows of all time. I absolutely loved it. It covered things like how to tie your shoes. Fantastic show, right? Anyway, David Reese and John Kimball have a podcast called Election Profit Makers, and it's a humorous podcast about political commentary, American politics. But they go off on a lot of tangents on the show, which is why I like it. And they started talking recently about the old American Top 40 show with Casey Cases. And so I decided to write them a letter. And they read my letter on the show this week, which was a lot of fun for me. And it mentions our hometown, and we have a clip. Clip of another podcast: Brian writes in: Dear Kidmitas and Long John Silver. As a teenager in the early 1980s, my first real job was as the overnight DJ on CK CK, the Top 40 radio station in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. In addition to overnights, I would often operate the American Top 40 show on Saturday afternoons, and it would come in on four vinyl LPs every week. Incredibles per side. I can't believe they used to do the radio shows on records. Yes. Now he says, I managed to keep a souvenir from my time at this station, and that's the complete vinyl set of the 1983 Top 100 Countdown from American Top 40. And he attached pictures along with a picture of the skyline for Regina, Saskatchewan. It's pretty sweet. I'm telling you. Canada, pretty much every city in Canada has a great skyline. James: That one guy sounds like me. And going off on tangent sounds like us. Brian: Yeah, there's a very similar dynamic on the show there, I would say. And perhaps I'm the straight man, you're the funny man. But, yeah, they like to talk about skylines. That's one of the tangents, the aesthetic qualities of city skylines. And so they appreciated the skyline of our city. And, yeah, in their opinion, most Canadian cities have a fantastic looking skyline. And I don't know, I would have to kind of agree. Yeah, sure. They're not bad. I remember somebody from going through town once, I told the story in the show before. I was going to a newspaper conference, a student newspaper conference in Winnipeg. And he went through Johnny, he said, hey, your town looks brand new, because he just drove by to look at the skyline. And it's all glassy towers. At least it was 30 years ago when I was in university. And apparently wherever they were from didn't have that. And the other nice thing about our skyline, it rises out of a completely flat prairie. It's very unusual to have a city built on a completely flat thing. But then the other part of the call so, yeah, it makes me sound super old to be relating this story, but I used to operate the American Top 40 show. It came in on records. They would make a record every week, four LPs. And that's how we would play the show on the radio. That is amazing. In the mail, I guess. I don't remember, but so I have the complete Top 100 countdown from 1983. It was usually meant to be played, like, on New Year's Eve. You start at 04:00 p.m.. The show wraps up at midnight top 100 hits of the year. So next year it'll be the 40th anniversary of this 19 8100. So I've always been ready to have like a New Year's Eve party or something where we play the 1983 Top 100 countdown. But I don't know. Then I'd have to stay up till midnight, which I don't think I would. Oh, that's tough for you. That's tough for you. You'd need an injection of some sort. Yeah. So huge. Thanks to David and John and the election profit makers show. That was a lot of fun. And you can go on ebay and discogs and you can find them for sale. You can buy them. Sometimes I think the one I've got is probably worth a couple of something. Was it like the Casey case I'm talking was on vinyl too? Oh, yeah, everything. So you didn't have to do anything. I would have to insert the commercial break so he would say, and coming up next, right after this and then you'd have to pause the turntable, play the commercials and then start the turntable back up again. Have you ever paused a turntable while it was playing someplace? And I went, don't remember doing that. No. But we used to play songs on carts. They were sort of like eight tracks. That's how all the songs were played on the station. So sometimes there's a few songs that have pauses in them. Like the music stops for a second. So sometimes for fun, we would pause the pause for a little extra. You dirty bastards. On late night radio, screwing is a lot of fun. You rebel. That's funny and weird. So that's our broadcasting heritage here at the Clean Energy Show. Well, that is so weird. Like, you've never mentioned that to me before. That's such a weird thing. I wonder if it was just practical because they could stamp them out at the time. Like nowadays they could stamp a CD, I suppose. Yeah. There were enough stations to play the show. There must have been a lot they would have had to make. Yeah, like 1000 or 2000, maybe, who knows? Well, I was driving into my North Regina subdivision, I guess, made in the late 70s so it's still at the edge of the city. And I saw a plane flying over the subdivision here. From a different perspective, it was the pipeline plane, from a different perspective, wasn't flying over here. I thought the damn thing was landing like it was so low. So I was kind of curious. And I used a flight Tracker 24 software online than in my app to track it sometimes to see where it's going. And it says Calibrated 2100ft, but I thought that was 2100ft because that's where the air ambulance, helicopters fly. It's not, though. It's not above terrain. It's above sea level. And we're 1900ft above sea level. So that sucker is 200ft above the ground. Yeah. And this is the plane. I've got a toy drone, Brian, that almost goes that high. And if I hacked it, it would like it's a very serious subject, but it's not out of the question that anybody could be flying a drone at a couple of hundred feet and run into this airplane, which, by the way, inspects the pipeline for leaks. Yeah. So I did some research on pipeline inspection planes. They call them pipeline patrol pilots. And apparently in the old days, not that long ago, they would fly 50 to 100ft off the ground. Now, I'm sure they wouldn't do that over a city because there would be cell towers and things like that. And by the way, a cell tower is probably that high in some cases, so that's interesting. But somebody died in Edmonton in 2013 doing it because they were taking pictures. Their job is to take photographs and fly the damn plane by themselves. Wow. Well, I remember I made a film one time where we rented a helicopter and we filmed some stuff from a helicopter. And my recollection back then was a thousand feet was as low as the helicopter was allowed to go over the city when we were flying over the city to take some shots. So the pipeline planes must have their own special kind of regulation. It gives us PTSD here, it sounds like World War II because they sound like they're flying right over your head. Incoming. Always yell incoming when it comes to my family, just as a joke. Nobody gets it, but I am using myself. And that's how it goes. That's all that matters. Yeah, this plane just does the pipeline through the small city we live in of 200,000 people or so. Just does that stretch. So it takes off and lands in about less than 15 minutes and it's done its whole work. Wow. The other day, though, I tracked it and it took off and did it twice, and then it took off down the pipeline, which also splits our bedroom community of Emerald Parkwite City diagonally. Just splits it in half. You're on the wrong side of the pipeline. I know, but, well, it's still fun. And there's lots of golfers out there. And I heard on the radio that they're going to stop poisoning the little bastards. They can be annoying, the Richardson ground squirrel, which we have here in abundance, and they will reproduce. They will come into my yard and eat my strawberries and assert themselves and get cocky. I've spent lots of time staring at them and they chirp. They make this high pitched chirp and it's just really irritating after hours. It's kind of bad, like having a really nasty crow around or something. By the way, the crows disappeared. I mentioned that. We started the summer, lost the crows, they're gone. I don't know who shot them or ate them or whatever. So they're gone? Yes, they're moving on. CBC had a new story that perhaps my ears up on California. I guess the government down there asked them to not charge your EVs. Try not to use too much electricity in those key hours. And the key hours are between 04:00 p.m. And 09:00 p.m.. Even electric cars, supposedly a long term solution to fossil fuel usage, are part of this problem. Owners of Tesla's and other Ecars are being asked not to charge their vehicles during that five hour period, prompting some to ask questions about an eventual complete conversion to electric cars. Severn. Vormstein is with the University of California. There's no way we could keep up right now if we suddenly went to 100% clean cars. What do you think of that? Yeah, well, it's annoying because of course we can't immediately switch to 100% electric cars. It's a gradual thing, but there's certainly a number of factors being stacked on top of one another that is turning this into a much more difficult year for energy grids than I think we ever expected. So with California, it's this massive heat wave. They're well over 100 degrees Fahrenheit in California and the worst drought in 1200 years. Did you see that? No. This is the worst drought in 1200 years in the western United States. Well, it's been a weird pattern. And I heard somebody say that it was El Ninja. The ocean current was sticking around for a second and possibly third winter. Wow. And that has done weird things. And one of the things is bunched up the systems in North America. So we got this big ridge going way up to Alaska, and that gets hot. And we get hot here in central western Canada. And yesterday was the hottest day on record for Regina for this day. Yeah, it was the second hottest day of the summer. The hottest day of the summer was also in September, where it got to 36 deg. It's crazy. I mean, that's never happened before, ever. I've lived here almost all my life, and I was at a weather geek when I was a kid. I paid attention to these things and yeah, it's weird. So I heat my pool with solar panels, like thermal solar panels, and it's the first time I've ever been in the pool in September without a gas heater in my pool. And it's weird because it doesn't work as well as it does in June. The sun goes down early, and it goes behind trees, my neighbors trees. So the pool itself gets shaded. And it's unpleasant to be in there when you're not in the sun. So it takes a longer time to heat up anyway. It's just weird. Yeah. And of course, the other thing that's happening with a massive drought and this is not just California, but places in Europe is happening, too, is the hydroelectric cannot run at full capacity because they just don't have the water behind the dams that they normally do. So the Hoover Dam, lake Mead. There was another mob body found the other day in Lake Mead. So Lake Mead is the reservoir for the Hoover Dam. Produces lots of hydroelectric power, but it's down to something like 30% of its maximum level now. And so they can't generate as much electricity as normal. And, yeah, they're finding bodies now. The water is so low, they're finding bodies in there that have been there for decades. And the rivers are low in Germany, so you can't transport coal. And the water is too hot to cool some of the nuclear plants in, I believe, France. And now, this isn't a hundred years from now, this isn't 50 years from now. All this weird stuff is happening now. Posing problems for non solar and wind. I would say yes. And the only thing I would mention here is I think we talked about it, but there's a Tesla virtual Power plant pilot project going on in California. So they've run it three times now, and they're probably running it again today. So today is expected to be perhaps the biggest peak of this energy crisis in California. They may have to go to blackouts today in California as we record this because they may not be able to produce enough energy. But anyway, it's not enough to save the grid. But these virtual power plants in California can output up to 50 MW, which is a promising start. Imagine eventually when every home has a backup battery that would be enough to kind of stabilize these problems with the grid. But I thought that was super encouraging. And when called upon, they can all shoot power to the grid at up to 50 MW, apparently. And 50 MW is five times the peak capacity of the solar plant that I visited in Saskatchewan. What are the first ones that came on? The only ones that they're allowing now is 10 MW. So 10 is five times what that is. And that just further illustrates how puny that solar farm from SAS power is. Yeah. So they're expecting rolling blackouts is expected to be 115 deg today in Sacramento. That's 46 Celsius. That would be a record. And people are going to turn on the air conditioners. They're telling people not to charge their electric cars, especially during peak hours. I don't think people do because in California there's like peak energy demand, right? Yeah. I was posting this on Twitter. If you have an EV, you can get a special plan on the grid. There the utility and they'll charge you less overnight. So if you have an EV plan, you pay, I don't know, it's a third or something like that of what the demand is during the day, in the early evening, and then you can charge all you want from eleven on or something. Yeah, and that's a good example of how we are going to adapt and we're not going to switch to 100% electric cars overnight. But that's one of the strategies going forward as we slowly transition to electric. And I should say I think it's like $0.25 overnight. So that's almost twice what we're paying. I guess ours are creeping up too, but twenty five cents per kilowatt hour per kilowatt hour. That's still kind of pricey. It's not like the $0.03 that some places are talking about charging EV owners to charge overnight. But that is one way your neighbors will say, well, the grid can't handle it because they write it out a meme on Facebook, that's BS. If we charged overnight, we have the capacity to meet what the peak demand is and it falls off overnight. And there's lots of buffer there between what overnight use is and what the peak is that you could charge in some grids right now. You could just charge all the electric. If everybody had an electric car, you could charge them all and it'd be fine because they're only charging for a couple of hours too, like at most usually. Yeah. And it's an example of how these grids just need to plan and manage. And just the extreme weather that we're having this year is kind of revealing, maybe, who has done the best planning and who has not. I mean, the governor could have easily said don't cook supper in your oven or don't do a load of laundry. But they went after electric cars and said don't charge them. And very few people are charging them anyway. What they need to do is say turn up your thermostat by a degree or two and just take it easy because the peak we don't want to rolling black. And do your thing if you can, if you want to, and then the industry can help with that as well. They can slow down their shifts at factories or whatever, but yeah, so we'll see what happens if there are in fact, I guess there are 5000 MW short of its power supply, peak demand, that's forecasted by the computers. And that will hit at 05:30 P.m. Pacific, which is a couple of hours after we're recording this. Yeah, we'll see how that goes. Russia has again stopped supplying gas to Germany through the pipeline that we've been talking about over the past few weeks on the show. So again, Russia has said, no more gas for you. Germany, they were trying to build up gas reserves in Germany. And Germany has said finally, that they are still planning to close those three nuclear power plants that are scheduled to close by the end of the year. They're going to go ahead with it, but the kind of compromise is they're going to keep two of them on standby, whatever that means. I guess if they completely mothballed everything, they couldn't start it up again. But they're going to not completely mothball everything and have two of the three on standby until April so that they possibly could be restarted if they need to. There's a remarkable thing that you talked about last week. If you missed last week's show, you might want to go listen to that because there's a lot of stipulations going on with those plants that they have to fix or not fix. And it's a challenge. Yeah. No, I often think about Mad Max. The Mad Max movies, which I love. And it's all based around gasoline because it's the wasteland in Australia and gasoline is the precious resource after society has collapsed. But if we were to have this Mad Max future now, it'd really be solar panels and batteries would be the precious resource. And it's a much, much simpler thing than having to make gasoline and store gasoline or process it or whatever you have to do. And the same thing with nuclear power plants. Like, a nuclear power plant is not going to be much use in a post apocalyptic world because it's too complicated to run. And yeah, so I did enjoy that segment on last week's show. It's not as simple as just deciding to keep a plant open or close it. Nuclear power plants have so many rules and regulations and laws, they would literally have to change the laws in Germany to keep those power plants open. And hats off to the employees of the nuclear power plants in the Ukraine, which are essentially prisoners of the Russians and who have decided, because speaking of not being used in an apocalypse, well, you have to have the expertise there, and they're basically forcing them to be there. It's just a horrible situation. And Brian, speaking of emergency alerts, we've gotten a whole bunch of alerts, but Alberta has some emergency alerts that I'm going to make fun of or at least make light of because Jasper National Park in Alberta straddling the Alberta BC border. It is arguably one of our national park's best areas. It's amazing. So beautiful and less touristy than bank because it's a bit more out of the way. It is experiencing, unfortunately, a wildfire due to the heat wave that we've been talking about. And it was started by lightning. But here's what the CBC news story said about it said before Jasper lost power Sunday evening, the Alberta Emergency Alert System advised residents to prepare for a possible power outage in the town of Jasper, including advising people to fill up their vehicles fuel tank as gas stations rely on electricity. And people come to us and say what do you do with the power comes out? They come up with those parking lots with their EVs and they say what do you do if the power goes out? As if they run out of extension cords. The fact is you charge them and you have hundreds of kilometers of range if the power goes out. And then you drive like you would. And if the gas station has no power, if you had no power, you could drive to where there is power and charge it up if you needed to. Yeah. And Jasper has always had kind of an isolated electricity system because it's in kind of a remote place and I think there's only kind of one power line going in and out. So they have frequent blackouts in Jasper. So perhaps the residents are used to this. But I remember being in Jasper a few years ago and the power was out. It was out for hours. But where did we go? We went to the one restaurant or there was a couple that had generators like this happens frequently enough that this restaurant had a big enough generator to keep themselves running. Well, it's wilderness. It's mountain wilderness. You have power lines that are hard to get to. You have to helicopter people in there. That's a perfect place for a battery backup system when they become available. Yeah, and I think they are working on that. They're running generators to do the well, I think the power is out right now. So if anybody in Jasper is listening to us. Hello. Yeah. So General Motors is going to offer buyouts to their Buick dealers. So this is very similar to a story we had last year where they were offering buyouts to Cadillac dealers. So these are sub brands within General Motors. When they offered it to Cadillac dealers, about 320 out of the 880 retailers accepted the offer. And apparently the buyouts for the Cadillac dealers was in the range of $300,000 to a million dollars a payout to get them to stop selling Buicks or stop selling Cadillacs. And this is because General Motors realizes they have too many dealerships. They cannot go forward with this many dealerships in an electric vehicle future. So this is a sign of the times and good on General Motors for planning for the future like that and we'll see how it goes. So there's about 2000 Buick dealers and they're all going to be offered this deal and some of them will have to go away. And of course switching to an EV dealership is going to be perhaps an expensive proposition. There'd be money involved and so I think this is a buyout, really, for the kind of the smaller dealerships that don't think that they can make enough money off of EVs. As we've discussed many times, they don't need oil changes, they need much less maintenance. It's for those dealerships that just think they don't want to make the effort or spend the money to go to EVs because they don't think it's going to be worth it. My elderly neighbors will be disappointed because they bought a Buick recently. Oh, really? That's what I said to myself. Oh. I didn't know Buicks existed anymore. Yes. I don't know why they don't just shut out the brand. Because the average age of the buyers got to be in their seventy s. Seventy s? How about one hundred eighty s? One hundred. I'm thinking old people who are living in the don't want to buy a Cadillac or a Buick. But you know, the Cadillac lyric is pretty. It checks all the checkboxes. It takes off a lot of things, fast charging range. But maybe I'll end up with just one of those one of these days. Some more news from Germany. So over the summer, they introduced this really interesting deal for cheap rail in Germany. And they did this because of the high fuel prices in Germany. This is really part of the whole strategy energy crisis in Europe. Fuel is just too expensive. And of course, also the more people drive, the more it contributes to greenhouse gasses. So over the three months of the summer, germany offered for $9, which is about €9 a month, a train ticket to go anywhere in Germany. And this has worked really well. It has saved about one 8 million tons of CO2 from the atmosphere. And yes, people took advantage of this. It makes a lot of sense. And of course, it's not necessarily as possible where we live in the isolated prairies, but when you have a proper rail system, like they do in pretty much all the countries in Europe, why not offer incentives and get people to use it? And it benefits everyone. I wonder if that will spread through Europe just because there's a big crunch coming on energy and maybe that idea will spread and that will also maybe change some people's habits. Yeah, I hope so. And of course, it's also just a bit of a help because gasoline is just so expensive. So it's a way to help out your population and give them a break on the high fuel prices. This is a clean energy show with Brian Stockton and James Whittingham. Brian. The UK finally has a new Prime Minister to replace Mr. Boris Johnson. Right. So, Liz Truss, I haven't seen a picture. What's her hair like? It's more organized, I would say. Definitely more organized. Okay, that's a good sign. It doesn't seem to have a life of its own. It seems fine as every other person in England has normal hair. But not Boris. Yeah, so she's weird. She doesn't like the sight of solar panels. And I think one of the most depressing sights when you're driving through England is seeing fields that should be full of crops or livestock, full of solar panels. The hell is wrong with her? She started as a Social Democrat and she was an anti nuclear activist when she was young, but at some point at university, a switch went off and she became hard. Right. And she's vowed to be a very Conservative Conservative because that's what she campaigned on. I always think it's fantastic when I see a field of solar panels, but also Agravoltaics, which you talk about frequently. You can have both. You can have crops and solar panels. You can have sheep grazing, you can have goats grazing. It's a win win. It's sad that she's insane. It's sad that she's dumb about this, as many people in her party are, but, you know, there's only 14% of Brits are against the net zero plan for us. Johnson 14% of people are against sunny days. That's unheard of. Like, there's a very strong support for clean energy in that zero. Yeah. So that's a weird stand for her to she's making it a sort of culture war, using the climate as a culture war thing. She doubled down on her comments during the leadership campaign that farmers feel shouldn't be full of solar panels, and several Conservative MPs have raised it. And solar farms in the UK currently account for 0.8% of total land use. That's very little land use right now under the government's net zero plan. Solar farms. This is getting rid of climate change, right? Addressing climate change, Paris Accord targets and all that over the next 30 years would be .6% of all land use. About half of 1% of land use would be solar in the UK. And that's not accounting for efficiency improvements as we move forward. We'll need less panels, and maybe there'll be different ways to deploy them. Yeah, it's a strange thing to plant a flag on. Anyway, Brian, I just want to add one thing. Solar energy. UK says that this amount of land use will be less than the amount of land currently used for golf courses. That is the .6% of UK land. And saving the freaking planet is less than golf courses. No. And golf courses are kind of notoriously bad for the environment because they take up so much space for the enjoyment of so few people and they take so many resources to water and maintain those lawns that apologize to golfers. Let's take all the golf courses in the world and just put solar panels on them. That would be great. All right, so, staying in Europe again, European energy crisis. France is looking to cut their energy use by about 10% this year. So, again, energy crunch. France is having problems with their nuclear plants. They aren't able to share as much energy back and forth with other countries like Germany who's having their problems. So coming into the winter, they have said that they want to cut energy use by about 10%. So in the winter, this is going to mean setting your thermostat in your house at about 19 Celsius or 66 Fahrenheit, which is a genuine sacrifice. I would not want to do that. We've been very spoiled of just being able to kind of set the temperature. So 19 would be freezing for me. Yeah. Where am I? I'm around 21, I think. Winter has been so far behind us and yet so close to tennis. But that's up. It's up. When I first moved to this house, I was a 20 degree man. Brian. Yes. Now that I'm old, I'm not making energy anymore in my body. I'm just getting old. I'm supposed to eat less. That's why the seniors menu 55 plus is cheaper at Denny's, because I'm supposed to eat less. Yeah, I don't feel like you feel like you do the same thing I did when I was 20. There's going to be a lot of sweaters sold in France. That's all I got to say about that. Yeah, get into the sweater business and Brian from the Nebraska examiner and I know you have subscription, Brian. Do you have a subscription to that one? No, but next time I'm on the PressReader app, I will look for the Nebraska shout out to the Nebraska examiner staff. A southwest Iowa ethanol plant has been ordered to pay $10,000 fine for its repeated air emissions of excessive cancer causing compounds in the last five years. I live near an oil refinery, heavy oil operator refinery. And I complained about the smell and I told you that there's an author and a team of journalists looking at that over four years and they're looking to go to ethanol and stuff like that and biofuel fuel for planes and stuff like that. They're trying to diversify and there's even canola crushing plants going up around it. But this proves to me the reason why I mentioned it is that even these plants can have horrible emissions like formaldehyde. This plant was spewing out formaldehyde and other byproducts of its fermentation process that are known to have adverse health risk like cancer. So actual harm to the environment and public health may have occurred since this order from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and due to the amount of pollutants that were and are being admitted. So, yeah, it's just something to keep in mind when you think that, oh, good, your refinery is going bio. It can be bad for you as well if you live near one. Yeah, no, I've never been a fan of the bio fuels. It's a stop gap that we probably don't need. Okay. So rumors are heating up about a possible Tesla factory here in Canada. Public companies have to disclose their lobbying efforts. So Electric and others have reported on this. Apparently Tesla is looking at Quebec and Ontario for some type of factory. I mean, it could be a car factory, could be a battery factory, could be both, who knows? What's your bet? Where's your bet going right now? I'm thinking it will be a car factory, and I'm thinking Quebec. There is a long history of not only automobile production in Ontario and Quebec, but also mining a lot of the minerals. And of course, Tesla is trying to local source as many of the minerals and metals and stuff needed for electric cars for the batteries. So, yeah, best case scenario, a battery and car plant. And I'm leaning towards Quebec, but that's really just a guess. I'm leaning towards not being a normal car plant. Like not XYZ three, not a full blown thing. No, it could be batteries or it could be something weird like cyber trucks and semis. That's my guess. Yes. Because they both take up a lot of batteries. So maybe they'll just make the batteries for those two things and I don't know, they'll be able to transport them to the east coast because that's kind of one of the challenges of the Texas plant, is having to transport all that stuff to the other half of the country and the eastern half. Yeah, and like I say, there's a huge history of doing this. Like all the major car brands have factories or have had factories in Ontario and Quebec, in Canada. So clearly there's a decent reason to do it. If others have done it, then probably it'd be a work for Tesla. And on the Great Lakes, that's a port. That's access to a port. So if you wanted to ship to Europe, that's another option. Yeah, it's not just the eastern part of North America is a shorter shipping route to Europe where a lot of these things are going to be bought over the next little while. So, once again, I know I mentioned this a lot, but I was on the Chevy Bolt user group that is largely the United States. There's so many people there compared to Canada. That is a post every couple of minutes and it eats up my Facebook feed, but I always find it interesting. Brian there's a guy named Randy Moffatt, which is interesting because I went to high school with the person with that name and the fear of change. This is something that he pointed out in a Facebook post talking about all the hate that EV owners were getting. And so he came into this and he said, the fear of change has a word, it's called oh God. Meta the SEO phobia. No. You do. Finland pronunciations. Why can't you do this? No, I think you did it slowly, but you did it above. So it is the fear of change. And I hadn't heard of this one before. Have you heard of that? One. I've heard lots of phobias. Yeah, this is basically what's going on in the world. If you were looking at Facebook hate and people uncomfortable with DVS. So why do they give a crap? I mean, you could say, well, they're forced to in 2035 or in California and other places, but that's not really a pressing issue right now. It's not here before us. Why do people hate on EV so much? And it is a fear that people are going through, a fear of change. And the fear of change is evolutionary in humans. Our internal predispositions teach us to resist change, mainly to always feel in control. So these people are feeling out of control on these people who like to feel in control the most in our comfort zone. Yeah. And of course, it isn't just a hatred of EVs. It's just a reaction to people are scared about getting off fossil fuels, which seems like a weird thing to us because it's a whole new dawn of a fantastic new day. It's nothing but good news getting off fossil fuels. But yeah, people are just scared about change. And you see it a lot in Alberta, our neighboring oil province, where people are just absolutely dead set on sticking with what they know, which is oil and gas. Here's a quip from YouTube. We are all afraid of the uncertainty that comes with change. We would rather things be not so great then go through the risk and process of change. This specific phobia can reduce one's will to live. So this is pretty extreme. Wow. The phobes who have this often feel like they have no control over their lives on the cost and changes. She tends to live in the past and may also be depressed. So there you go. Therefore, you make them unwilling to move. So Randy says on this Facebook post, I became interested in computers in the early 1970s and learned a program so that's very early, like, very few people were doing it back then. I was always on the cutting edge of technology. The amount of hate was palatable with people accusing me of being a Satanist. Randy S from the States, where there's lots of, you know, Baptists and religion and stuff, people said they would never own one. This is a computer. Okay, yeah. So we are going through this again. He says. However, now the government is issuing mandates for this transition to EV is making the fear even worse. When I got my first EV almost nine years ago, I had neighbors calling me crazy. My next door neighbor said he would never own one. Last weekend he told me he just ordered his third. So be patient, be nonconfrontational, just set a quiet example and someday, just like computers, they will figure it out. And I thought that was a great post. I wanted to share with their listeners. This happens all the time. Like, I follow photography and cameras and stuff. And there's a move now from optical viewfinders to electronic viewfinders and cameras, and it's progressed enough that people have accepted it. But two or three years ago, you had people just hatred for electronic viewfinders on cameras. Like, people just hated the idea of it, and one by one, they're all moving to it. It happened too quickly for them to comprehend. I don't know. As soon as I found out about it, I thought it was fantastic, and I couldn't wait to switch. So, yeah, this is definitely a mindset. Conservatives versus progressive. I had one on a point and shoot camera 15 long time ago, a lot of years ago in the digital camera age. Didn't care for it, of course. They weren't focused. You couldn't do anything. I'm sure they're getting a lot better, and I've not actually used one myself. It was very clear to me early on it was the way of the future. But, yeah, people just take much longer, generally speaking, to catch on. All right, let's stick it to the mail bag. The user feedback this week comes from Doug in Colorado, who wrote about our May 2 show. Doug, you're behind. You put a lot of catching up to do. Take some time off work if you have to. Binge listen our show. So he says to us, thank you for highlighting the problem of light trespass from harsh, glaring Led street light fixtures. And he says an excellent resource is the International Dark Sky Association. They have everything people need to know about light pollution, including model lighting ordinance. And also, thanks for coming to Ups. Replacement gasoline, mail delivery, van, contract debacle. Hoping canada learns from the United States. US is making big mistakes and hopefully pushes Canada to do much better. Yeah, so I vaguely remember talking about Led lighting back in May. That was a long time ago. Led lighting, I think what we said at the time, it's a fantastic opportunity to upgrade things and make it better and reduce light pollution. But since Led lights are still kind of new technology, a lot of the designs aren't great. Cities don't quite know how to implement them yet. And yeah, a lot of the times they're just too harsh. But, yeah, my pet peeve is the brightness. We have the ability now to put them on timers and control the brightness. So street lights could come on at full power, kind of in the dusk times, and then you could eventually back those off at three in the morning, just turn all the street lights down. And if you've ever been out in the middle of the night, you don't need a whole lot of light to see once your eyes are adjusted. I'm surrounded by a ridiculous amount of light pollution. I'm thankful that they changed the street lights in our neighborhood here to Led that have a slight warmth to them, and they're less bright than the previous, I would say overall they disperse them better, and they even that out, and that's fine. However, my neighbor across the street, across the boulevard, he's the person with the police stickers all over his house, he's scared of getting killed. And he's got this bright white LEDs just glaring on his property like a landing strip for an airport. And then across the Pipeline Field, which is, I don't know, 50 meters across, 50 yards across, there's another guy who has a giant white light in his backyard, and it shines, and I can see the gophers and anything going around in the night. And then there's a school there as well, which is further away from me, but they have this anti never do well lighting to keep people from doing things there, because people do do things. But it's blindingly bright, and it shines in my drapes, and it's a long ways away, and it's light pollution. And all these lights that I speak of are not on the spectrum of warmth. So they're the bluer side, and they bounce, and those are the wavelengths that bounce up into the sky the most. And I think I talked about this on the show, but I've got a street light just right outside of my house. And a couple of years ago, the ball went out, and it was the greatest, because I don't want that giant street lamp shining in my windows at night. It was so great. I was very disappointed when they should have rented a bucket truck and went up there and put some tape over it just a little put in a low wattage bulb. And also yesterday I was coming home from Home Depot and I saw two pickup or two trucks with Amazon delivery vehicles on them, like there was four Amazon Delivery Prime trucks, the kinds that look like the EVs that they're coming out in the States. So, of course, I went and checked them out and saw the giant tailpipes on them. Was very disappointed. But they looked those four transit vans converted, and they should look they should be EVs, and they're not. We don't have those around here. We have a third party delivery service, don't we, in Virginia? No, it hasn't been great for electric sort of trans advance around here. Yeah, but there was one place remember last week we talked about a place in Saskatoon? They got one for delivering at a bakery, and it's just and they're saving money, handover it's free. They said there's paying for the payments to save money. They save for the payments for the new vehicle. So how great is that? And of course, we'd love to hear from you. So right now, get out your pen. Get out your typewriter. Cleanenergyshow@gmail.com. Write us with an angry letter. Tell us when we're wrong. Tell us when you agree or disagree with us. We're on Twitter. We're on TikTok Clean Energy Pond as our handle. And don't forget to check out our YouTube channel for all kinds of things going on. We got two YouTube channels. I dare you to find the second one that has the audio on the podcast. Probably can't do it. Leave us a voicemail@speakpipe.com cleanenergyshow. You know, it's been ages since anybody left us a voicemail at SpeakPipe, so be fantastic if somebody did that. Yes, we'll mention your name and your birthday. So mention your birthday. We'll mention your birthday. Here we go. Brian. The Clean Energy Show Lightning Round, where we breeze through the headlines and end the show on a fast pace. End of life batteries from electric vehicles are not likely to be the primary source of recyclable material until the mid 2030, according to Benchmark Mineral Intelligence. Yeah, I think we talked about that last week of the week before that. It's going to be a very slow ramp up because electric vehicle batteries are just lasting way longer than people thought. Our friend Donald Trump has gone on a nonsense, cynical rant about electric cars the other day at a rally. He says we need to get rid of them. The story was on electric and we have a clip, but I'm not going to play the man, okay? I said to myself, how can we cover this and not hear his stupid freaking voice? You already said his name. Which gives me I'm sorry. I like how Steven Colbert does it. They have Twitter. People come up with nicknames, which always makes for him every. But this is very similar to the British PM with the rant about solar panels is kind of the same thing. This is trying to make it into a culture war type of issue. Well, speaking of Britain, I had a computer read his text in a posh British accent. So here it is. A friend of mine wanted to do something for the environment. He went out and bought an electric car and he made a certain trip, I won't say from where, kentucky. And he is a good person. He wants to do what's well, and now he understands, hey, not so good. He bought an electric car and he made the trip often from Kentucky to Washington. And he made it. He would drive down, put the car away and drive back. He was getting like 38 miles per gallon. It took me more time to charge in the damn car than I could spend in a drive in. It took me two and half times. My name is Donald J. Trump, and I'm an idiot. A complete and total idiot. Please enjoy listening to the Clean Energy Show. Hopefully Brian isn't drunk this week. Okay, well, that was a bit added on at the end there, but you get the idea. It makes no sense at all. Yeah, and we all know electric cars work great for road trips. They do. And the author of that electric piece, Freslinber, pointed out that he went from New Orleans up to Quebec, didn't have to stop for more than 30 minutes and he had to dine anyway. I had to eat something and go to the bathroom and stretch his leg. Yeah, it wasn't an inconvenience at all for him and his Tesla. Yeah. With the caveat that the Tesla charging network is definitely the best and the third party charger is maybe not as good and you might still have some issues there. Have you heard of Boston Consulting Group before? Often it is quoted in the news on different things. It is a major consulting group. So four years. This is four years of Boston Consulting groups. US. Electric vehicle sales forecasts. This is something that Wall Street relies on, consulting groups like this. And this is an evolution of how their forecasts have changed. We talked about this type of thing on the show, that people are always revising their forecast and we could have told them differently. So in 2018, they said 21% of sales will be EVs in 2030. This is the United States. Two years later, they said, Oops, 26. Year after that, 42. That's a big jump. And then this year, they're now saying 53%, which is a lot more common. And even that is like, we doubt that. We think it's going to be more than that. Things are going to tip. This is an S Curve adoption, and we're at the steep part of the S Curve. This is going to go up way faster than people think. Just think back to when smartphones were first introduced and everyone's like, that's kind of a weird thing. And then you blink and a couple of years later, everybody had a smartphone. And that's how fast it goes. You're looking at the chart now on our script. Look at where it levels off. It levels off between 55 and 75%. Yeah, they're still kind of doing it wrong. They're still underestimate. Curves of adoption don't level off until around 90%. Like color TVs, cell phones, stuff like that, when the last 10% is the hard to get. Yeah. And I will say, like, manufacturing cars, electric cars, is a lot more difficult, probably, than manufacturing something like a smartphone. So it maybe won't go as quickly as the smartphone, but it is going to go fast. From carbon tracker. Just over 30 solar installations are being carried out every week in Britain, and that is up from 1000 a week just two years ago. So it's tripled the home. That's a lot. The home solar installations have tripled in two years. That's crazy time for CS. Fast fact hawaii produces more renewable energy than all of Canada. Were you sitting down for that? Oh, yes. Your posture is excellent this week, by the way. I'm happy to see your back is better. Yeah, I haven't had to change position, but yeah, we reported a couple of weeks ago they got their last shipment of coal for their last coal fired electricity plant. And that plant did close down just the other day. So that's great. So, yeah, the regulatory consequences are clear. If utilities fail to meet their renewable targets, they are forced to pay penalties, which must be covered by company, the shareholders, and rather than the taxpayers. And that's the way it should be. That should be the lesson for everybody. The shareholders should have to cover it, not the ratepayers. Electric school busses in Massachusetts provided energy back to the grid for more than 8 hours this summer. That is a lot of hours of emergency heat wave protection from buses that weren't doing anything because they are electric. They were sitting around all summer. And this is a great use case in the United States where they have less severe winters, but summer heat waves need that grid backup. And those electric buses which are just starting to trickle in, really, for schools, are there and useful. So that's awesome. Fantastic. Ten of 13 flagship CCS that is carbon capture and Sequestration Rhine SEQUEST projects failed to deliver, according to IEFA analysis, and that's 50% of goals haven't even been reached. And that's what our boundary dam they mentioned. The boundary dam is the first thing they mentioned right here in this catch one. Yeah, we had one of the first carbon capture on a coal plant, and they have captured some carbon, but nowhere near what they thought they were. Mars Technica ebike battery fires are pushing New York City towards a ban in public housing. That is, public housing is banning ebikes. This is quite disturbing, but so is the reason why so poorly made cells, tough work and lack of space, I guess, in these places, are causing deadly rise of fires. A deadly rise of fires in the New York City. That was a lot. I mean, laptops can do that, too. Ebike battery is made up of dozens of individual AA sized batteries wired together and managed by a battery management system. And you were talking last week how you were told that you have to unplug. You can't just keep charging us. Maybe that's the reason. Yes. My ebike doesn't have a battery management system, so you're not supposed to leave it plugged in. But yeah, I could see where this could turn out to be a huge problem. By the way, my partner shops at Shoppers Druckmart, and they had an ebike in there for $250 for the weekend, but it was just this tiny little thing that didn't have pedals, it just had spikes to put your feet on. Yes. Anyway, that's interesting. Sometimes those things are mismanaged. The charging is mismanaged, the faulty, they are damaged, they're waterlogged. But a five year old was killed in a fire, and it's very tragic. And just be careful. If you have an ebike battery, don't read the manual and be aware that you're not supposed to leave it. In many cases, you're not supposed to leave them charging indefinitely, but they're not inherently dangerous either. But anything that is a battery that charges I mean my charge and lead to acid battery in my house for my RV. So you got to be careful. Washington Post amid a bonanza of measures passed to cut the state's carbon emissions in California as fast as possible, the legislature in California approved $1,000 refundable tax credit to poor Californians who don't own vehicles. So it's paying people not to own vehicles if you are poorish. I might even qualify. It will head to the desk of Newton soon and he's going to sign it. He's expected to sign it. The bill offers the tax credit to single filers earning up to $40,000 in joint filers up to $60,000 who live without personal cars. And you can get it whether you make a lot of tax money or not. And you can just get that $1,000 regardless. Yeah, that sounds great. And maybe that's something we'll start to see other places. I've heard the concept before, but this is the first time I've seen it getting passed. Another CS fast Fact from Nat bullard from Bloomberg New Energy Finance. There are 148,026 convenience stores in the United States. OK, 148,000.   What he's saying is look out. Change is coming. And Brian, that is our time for this week. It's been fun as always. Glad you're feeling better. We'd like to hear from you. Remember, contact us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com and all the rest of the places. And if you're new to the show, remember to subscribe to get our podcast cast every week, and we'll see you next time. See you next week.

WORLD ORGANIC NEWS
Episode 308. Droughts, Hydro Power and Food

WORLD ORGANIC NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 10:51


LINKS No Dig Quick Start Course https://changeunderground.net/the-no-dig-gardening-course/ buymeacoffee.com/changeug email: jon@worldorganicnews.com Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1546564598887681 Transcript: https://worldorganicnews.com/episode308/ Varroa mite emergency response https://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/emergencies/biosecurity/current-situation/varroa-mite-emergency-response#:~:text=Varroa%20mite%20tracing%20and%20surveillance%20work%20has%20confirmed%20three%20new,fall%20within%20existing%20red%20zones “When You See Me, Weep” | ‘Hunger Stones' Resurfacing in Europe Due To Record Drought https://snowbrains.com/when-you-see-me-weep-hunger-stones-resurfacing-in-europe-due-to-record-drought/ 'Flagstone of fire' lit on River Suir in rare sighting https://www.rte.ie/news/regional/2022/0901/1320127-kennys-rock/ China Facing Power Supply Threat From Drought in Sichuan https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-08-16/china-joins-europe-in-facing-threats-from-worsening-drought The West's historic drought is threatening hydropower at Hoover Dam https://edition.cnn.com/2022/08/16/us/hoover-dam-hydropower-drought-climate/index.html

Just Be® ~ Spiritual BOOM
Ep 29: Loads of Conspiracy Theories & Anne Heche / More Help with Inner Work & Forgiveness / Tap Root

Just Be® ~ Spiritual BOOM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 45:50


I didn't plan on this to be this long. Things just kept a comin' especially when I started investigating then reporting the ever-growing, long, long list of conspiracy theories (and some I didn't even know, and I know a lot!!!). It is exciting that so much is now being questioned. This train can no longer be stopped. Whoo whoo! More awesome details on the importance of deep, inner work and how you can accomplish more. As well as the need for forgiveness AND tools to make it happen (Ho'oponopono). Then, more grounding work is presented along with connecting that into divinity (tap root). Ahhh, such awesome, transcendent stuff, if I do say so myself! Finally, in this episode, I will strongly encourage you to be more open and see more truths. If you try to avoid what is happening, you are only doing a disservice to yourself. Ironically, not allowing yourself to see all of the darkness conversely means you are not allowing yourself to see all the light or goodness. All of this bigger picture is to get your vibe up! I give you more opportunities and offer much more to research. Reference:More about Ho'oponopono:https://thehumancondition.com/hooponopono/POD DETAILS:Host: Eden Koz / Just Be®, LLCWebsites: EdenJustBe.com or EdenGhostBusters.comFacebook: Eden KozInstagram: Eden KozYouTube: Just Be ChannelMusic: Created for Eden by Ryan Sulibuk. For commissions & inquiries contact - SulibukProduction@gmail.com

EWN - Engineering With Nature
Rivers as Resources to be Valued

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 12:01


Welcome to the summer feature podcast miniseries—EWN On The Road. As we teased in Episode 5, in this special series, Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist for Environmental Science with the US Army Corps of Engineers and the National Lead of the Engineering With Nature® Program, is sharing some highlights of his travels across the country over the past 2 years visiting people, places, and projects relevant to EWN. The miniseries includes 4 episodes and will post August 3, 10, 17 and 24:   Episode 1—The San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge: A Natural Landscape Revived Episode 2—The San Joaquin Valley: Past, Present, Future and from the Air Episode 3—The Heartland Tour: Five Rivers in One Day Episode 4—Rivers as Resources to be Valued   We hope you'll find these special podcast episodes enlightening and easy listening for your summer travels. You can read more about Todd's travels and see additional pictures in the EWN On The Road blog on the EWN Website.    In Episode 4, host Sarah Thorne and Todd Bridges continue their discussion on rivers—their role and value. In the winter of 2022, Todd and his wife (and trusty driver), Anita, traveled nearly 8,000 miles through eight states on the “Southwest Swing” of the EWN On The Road tour. They visited the Hoover Dam and Lake Mead on the Nevada and Arizona border, which is at its lowest level in its history, an alarming indication of the megadrought that has gripped the Southwest. As part of the trip, Todd spent some time exploring the Los Angeles River in California, what he calls, “an important case example of river engineering in the twentieth century.” The Los Angeles River travels 51 miles through the greater Los Angeles area, with nearly a million people living within 1 mile of it. Because of challenges related to flooding and the natural movement of the course of the river, it was “locked down,” engineered into an unchanging, unnatural, concrete channel. This unusual situation caused Todd to ponder whether rivers are “problems to be solved” or “resources to be valued.” To help answer this question, Todd spent time talking to people living and working nearby about what they want the river to be. “I met more than 20 people from a whole variety of organizations that have been working for many years to reintroduce the ‘natural' into the Los Angeles River. And I think what people are looking for is to reconnect to the river. One group was focused on restoration at the Sepulveda Basin, a large 2000+ plus acre area next to the river with huge potential to become basically the Central Park of Los Angeles, or like the Golden Gate Park of San Francisco. . . . There's just a tremendous amount of interest and growing momentum to create value by reintroducing the ‘natural' into the Los Angeles River.” There is a significant opportunity for EWN to be part of this transformation: “I'm quite hopeful that we're going to be able to collaborate in this space so the Los Angeles River can become a model for how we can reengineer to harmonize the natural with human communities.   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Todd Bridges at EWN Todd Bridges at LinkedIn EWN On The Road LA County Department of Public Works – LA River Master Plan LA River Master Plan EWN Podcast S3E4: Engineering With Nature for Safe and Livable Cities

Westworld
Ep.127: Westworld - 408 - Telegraph

Westworld

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 65:10 Very Popular


The "Westworld" Season 4 finale brings us to our final Telegraph of the year (and possibly ever), with listener email and voicemail taking aim at Christina, Hale, Olympiad security, HBO budgets and hosts done dirty. "Westworld" fans unloaded on "Que Sera Sera," made their predictions for Season 5, asked how transcending actually works and noted how closely Season 4 mirrored the structure of modern video games. Listen to more great music from Simon: www.soundcloud.com/simonsteric Westworld Episode 8 Summary:In the wake of the host William's actions, humans and hosts are being wiped out. Caleb, Frankie and Stubbs evade the violence amongst the humans and stop at a pharmacy to tend to Frankie's wounds, but Clementine appears and kills Stubbs before being overpowered and killed by Caleb and Frankie. The two reach their extraction boat; Caleb, whose host body is about to fail, bids farewell to his daughter. Charlotte is revived by drone hosts and finds recorded instructions left for her by Bernard prior to his death. She retrieves Dolores' original control unit, which contains a simulation of the world inhabited by Christina (who created Teddy, Maya, and others to help herself gain sentience). Charlotte then follows William to Hoover Dam and stops him from deactivating the Sublime (using a gun planted by Bernard), before removing and destroying his control unit. She then uploads Dolores' control unit into the Sublime before destroying her own. Dolores awakens inside the Sublime and decides to attempt to give sentient life another chance at avoiding extinction, realizing that neither humans nor hosts can survive in the real world. She starts by recreating the original Westworld park inside the Sublime. Subscribe Now Android: https://shatontv.com/westworld-android Apple/iTunes: https://shatontv.com/westworld-itunes Twitch: https://shatontv.com/twitch Help Support the Podcast Support with Paypal – https://shatontv.com/paypal Support With Venmo – https://venmo.com/ShatPodcasts Shop / Merchandise: https://shatontv.com/shop Shop Amazon With Our Affiliate Link – https://www.amazon.com/?tag=shatmovies-20 Sponsor's Listener Survey – https://shatontv.com/survey Leave an iTunes Review –  https://shatontv.com/westworld-review Leave a Voicemail – (914) 719-SHAT – (914) 719-7428 Feeds & Social Media – https://shatontv.com/subscribe-and-follow/ Check out our Movie Podcast – http://shatthemovies.com WebPlayer (All Episodes) – https://shatontv.com/westworld-web-player Theme Song – “The Ecstasy Of Gold” (Hip Hop Instrumental Version)  by Dj 2 Bad Outro Music - By Simon Eric Haywood

Apple News Today
School's starting. But districts are short on teachers.

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 9:30 Very Popular


Tens of thousands of teaching positions are vacant, and schools are trying unusual things to address the shortage. The Wall Street Journal takes a look. A key witness testified in the latest trial against convicted sex-offender R. Kelly. BuzzFeed News has the story. A conversation with the journalist who broke the story of R. Kelly’s abuses. CNN reports on how the American West’s historic drought is threatening the Hoover Dam’s ability to generate power for the region. The latest In Conversation looks at how uneven the share of housework still is for men and for women, and how to get to a better place.

Westworld
Ep.126: Westworld - 408 - Que Sera Sera

Westworld

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 48:59 Very Popular


For a straightforward "Westworld" Season 4 finale, we decided to do a straightforward recap of Episode 8. Ash is gonna tell you exactly what happened; Gene is gonna discuss different characters' senses of identity, and both will dig into what a potential Season 5 could hold. In this "Que Sera Sera" Deep Dive, the Shat Crew also will cover Season 4's loose ends, the nature of Christina's Final Test, who's dead, who's left alive and what gets looted first at drug stores. Listen to more great music from Simon: www.soundcloud.com/simonsteric Westworld Episode 8 Summary:In the wake of the host William's actions, humans and hosts are being wiped out. Caleb, Frankie and Stubbs evade the violence amongst the humans and stop at a pharmacy to tend to Frankie's wounds, but Clementine appears and kills Stubbs before being overpowered and killed by Caleb and Frankie. The two reach their extraction boat; Caleb, whose host body is about to fail, bids farewell to his daughter. Charlotte is revived by drone hosts and finds recorded instructions left for her by Bernard prior to his death. She retrieves Dolores' original control unit, which contains a simulation of the world inhabited by Christina (who created Teddy, Maya, and others to help herself gain sentience). Charlotte then follows William to Hoover Dam and stops him from deactivating the Sublime (using a gun planted by Bernard), before removing and destroying his control unit. She then uploads Dolores' control unit into the Sublime before destroying her own. Dolores awakens inside the Sublime and decides to attempt to give sentient life another chance at avoiding extinction, realizing that neither humans nor hosts can survive in the real world. She starts by recreating the original Westworld park inside the Sublime. Subscribe Now Android: https://shatontv.com/westworld-android Apple/iTunes: https://shatontv.com/westworld-itunes Twitch: https://shatontv.com/twitch Help Support the Podcast Support with Paypal – https://shatontv.com/paypal Support With Venmo – https://venmo.com/ShatPodcasts Shop / Merchandise: https://shatontv.com/shop Shop Amazon With Our Affiliate Link – https://www.amazon.com/?tag=shatmovies-20 Sponsor's Listener Survey – https://shatontv.com/survey Leave an iTunes Review –  https://shatontv.com/westworld-review Leave a Voicemail – (914) 719-SHAT – (914) 719-7428 Feeds & Social Media – https://shatontv.com/subscribe-and-follow/ Check out our Movie Podcast – http://shatthemovies.com WebPlayer (All Episodes) – https://shatontv.com/westworld-web-player Theme Song – “The Ecstasy Of Gold” (Hip Hop Instrumental Version)  by Dj 2 Bad Outro Music - By Simon Eric Haywood

Westworld
Ep.124: Westworld - 407 - Telegraph

Westworld

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 61:48 Very Popular


It's our longest listener-mail podcast of the season! "Metanoia" was a hit with Westworld fans, triggering voicemail and email about The Sublime, Teddy, Maeve and Christina.  In this episode, the full Shat Crew responds to questions about Clementine, learns the difference between worms and snakes, nerds out on social contract philosophy, theorizes on where all the people went, and hears another hilarious ad from Discount Don.  This Telegraph also digs into how "Westworld" will end and why pearls aren't hidden in hosts' bums. Listen to more great music from Simon: www.soundcloud.com/simonsteric Westworld Episode 7 Summary:Bernard and Maeve travel to Hoover Dam to open the door to the Sublime, which Charlotte has kept preserved in the dam's data vault. Christina goes with Teddy to Olympiad Entertainment and has its employees destroy the premises and erase all the stories controlling the humans. Stubbs and Frankie use the distraction to rescue Caleb. Charlotte prepares to discontinue the hosts' inhabitation of human cities so that they can "transcend" their human bodies. William convinces his host self that humans are a fundamentally destructive species; the William host realizes his true purpose and kills the human William. Bernard and Maeve enter the tower; Maeve fights Charlotte while Bernard accesses the control room. William kills Charlotte, Maeve, and Bernard, then programs the tower to turn the humans against each other before it self-destructs. Christina is unable to stop the chaos and realizes the humans cannot see her; Teddy explains that while the world is real, she is not physically there. Subscribe Now Android: https://shatontv.com/westworld-android Apple/iTunes: https://shatontv.com/westworld-itunes Twitch: https://shatontv.com/twitch Help Support the Podcast Support with Paypal – https://shatontv.com/paypal Support With Venmo – https://venmo.com/ShatPodcasts Shop / Merchandise: https://shatontv.com/shop Shop Amazon With Our Affiliate Link – https://www.amazon.com/?tag=shatmovies-20 Sponsor's Listener Survey – https://shatontv.com/survey Leave an iTunes Review –  https://shatontv.com/westworld-review Leave a Voicemail – (914) 719-SHAT – (914) 719-7428 Feeds & Social Media – https://shatontv.com/subscribe-and-follow/ Check out our Movie Podcast – http://shatthemovies.com WebPlayer (All Episodes) – https://shatontv.com/westworld-web-player Theme Song – “The Ecstasy Of Gold” (Hip Hop Instrumental Version)  by Dj 2 Bad Outro Music - By Simon Eric Haywood

Remarkable Parks Podcast
VALLEY OF FIRE STATE PARK S1 E30

Remarkable Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 42:40


Olivia and special guest Charmin talk about barbeque-able bugs, sharing a third brain, and the conspiracy theories about Hoover Dam.

The Clean Energy Show
United States Finally Fights Climate Change with I.R.A. Bill

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 69:13


The U.S. looks to pass the largest climate spending in history, providing incentives for electric vehicles, manufacturing, solar, wind and many surprising home upgrades. Massive oil fire at a storage facility in Cuba. James outlines clean energy-related stories from his vacation.  Chinese cars are invading Japan. Are Chinese cars the new Japanese cars? Brian describes his new e-bikes. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! Check out our YouTube Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Tell your friends about us on social media! ***TRANSCRIPT OF THIS EPISODE*** Okay. Yeah, sorry I was gone for a bit there, but I'm ready to go for episode 126. It's 127. No, I checked. It's the last episode. Yeah. No, it's 126 now. Brian, I did a show yesterday. I did an interview show yesterday with B NEF. That's not possible. You can't do a show without me. Well, it went really well. It's in my contract. You can't do a show without me. Well, you were there in spirit. What? You son of a hello, and welcome to episode 127 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week. I apologize to Joe Mansion. He's clearly a saint. After approving the largest climate action in US history, the Inflation Reduction Act, a massive fire has been spreading at an oil storage facility in Cuba. Our only hope now is that the fire spreads to a Cuban cigar factory so we can all enjoy the sweet, smooth, smoky aroma. And I outline everything clean energy related for my vacation. And as Brian predicted in the last episode, I did, in fact, almost die. Chinese EV maker BYD is entering the Japanese market with three models. Japanese car makers have stated publicly that they're not worried. Privately, they stated, oh, yeah, we're totally doomed. All that and more on this post vacation edition of The Clean Energy Show. Brian, when I got back from your cottage, I wanted to record a podcast. I was not ready to put my feet up anymore. I can't stand it. I don't know what I'm going to do if you die, if you get run over by a bus. I'm just not going to be able to expound my clean energy thoughts. I'm desperate. I'm booked on this now. Yeah, well, maybe you could improvise with you could pretend that I'm doing two voices. Like do a dumb voice for you, like a public voice, something like that. It seems to work well. Yeah. So we got a fat overblooded show for you this week to get everything out of our system. So listen to it at two times speed if you have to. Yes. And of course, we had prerecorded our last full episode because you were taking a week off and with the hope that nothing major happened. And it did kind of wait until you were back, but lots of major things happened, and so much so that you recorded an episode without me. And then here we are to do another one. Yes. So the episode without you is episode 126. It is the interview with two analysts from Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Terrific conversation with those people. I hope you listen to it. It's not just about the United States, as we learned throughout the podcast, it is for the world that this is very important, and not just for the reduction of emissions, but because it influences the rest of the world. The United States taking action is a linchpin for everyone else to do action on climate change. Yeah, no, I did hear the show. It was awesome. And yes, I think it's true. Lots of symbolic value as well as dollar value. You have a little bit different sound this week. Yeah. Look at this. I got James a new microphone. Can you believe it? I'm stunned, Brian. I'm stunned. We now have matching microphones. Did you ever see that documentary Metallica some Kind of Monster? I watched some of it a little bit. Yeah. This is the microphone. They use the microphone in the film, so you know it's got to be good. Yeah, I saw it on I don't know, my daughter is watching a Taylor Swift document. You see it all over the place. It's a very common microphone. What is it? The A. Sher SM seven B. And it's a bit of a cliche as a podcast microphone, but that's probably because it's the best. You know I've been watching. Only murders in the building. You haven't been watching that? No, I have. I love it. Really love it. Yeah, I love it, too. It's different podcasts people talk about because the storyline is that they're podcasting a true crime podcast as it happens in their building. Yeah, but only in their building. Yeah, steve Martin, Martin Shorts, and there's a murder in their building. And they make a podcast about it while they're doing it. So, yeah, I'm always kind of looking for the podcast elements, which are semi realistic. Like they're always kind of pulling out a phone and recording something. They're sort of doing it just enough to make it believable. I think it was kind of funny, though. If you watch the premiere, the initial episode of the series, they start with really bad mics and they constantly go up. And Martin Shorts character is the one doing the buying because he's the enthusiastic one, but he doesn't have any money because he's an out of work Broadway director and he owes money on his building piece. So he says he's going to take them back after 30 days, but he keeps getting better equipment and they've got boom mics at the end and different things, and they record it in the closet. Yeah, my 14 year old daughter is watching it with us and she's just loving it now, too. And terrific shows. If we're lucky, they'll be some kind of murder nearby. And we can include that on the show. Yes. Spin off. Only murders on the podcast. And did you get your bike yet, your second wife? Yes. So I did want to update you on that. We got the second one. So my partner and I have matching bikes. This is the ride. One up roadster, v two gravel edition electric bike. And we ordered them online from the company. Ride One Up. So, yeah, we got the second one. We've been going out on bike rides. Absolutely love it. This bike really so great. I have nothing but good things to say about it. It's just super fun to ride. It's the right kind of size and shape for a bike for me. Like, this is the kind of bike that I like. It's very light. In terms of an electric bike, I think it's £33. Wow. That's about as light as they come, I think. So for electric bikes, the batteries integrated into the frame, so it's not the biggest battery, but we don't go on particularly long trips, so, like 20 miles, 30 km is kind of the max. But we've come nowhere near to hitting that. I got it up to 22 miles an hour, the speedometers in miles, and so that's about 35 km an hour, which is about as fast as you can do because it is only one gear. It's got a belt drive with only one gear and the gearing is not really tall enough to go any faster than that. But who needs to go faster than 22 miles an hour? That's plenty fast. Tons of fun. And my only other sort of maybe quibble about it is that there's not much of a battery management system, so they recommend in the literature not to leave it plugged in. It's the kind of thing where yeah, mine did the same. Yes, when you plug it in to charge it, they recommend, like, set a timer on your phone to unplug it after an hour, or whatever you need, because it's not good for the battery if you just leave it plugged in. So I've been doing that and also trying to keep it they recommend keeping the battery between 30% and 80%. That's hard to do because there's no precise kind of measurements, but basically go for a bike ride, leave it plugged in for 20 minutes or something like that, and then make sure to unplug it. But yeah, absolutely love it. Nothing but good things to say. Mine says that you may need to run it down all the way and then charge it full in order for the computer, the onboard computer, to understand the range and charge. Not the range, but the charge percentage. Mine didn't say that, but even with a laptop, it's sort of recommended that you do that every once in a while, just to kind of recalibrate the battery to get it down to zero. Having said that, my portable drill and portable weed whacker has battery management of the charger and knows when to stop. So I'm disappointed that electric bikes don't. They're smaller batteries, mind you, I'm not sure why. And also, this is definitely on the low end of price, but again, that's one of the reasons I love the bike. Like, it's $1250. Getting it here to Canada was maybe one $800 for each bike, which is definitely on the low end, so you don't expect maybe all the bells and whistles. But this is the gravel addition, so it's a slight upgrade from the regular roadster, which is that one is like $1,050, so you can even get a slightly cheaper one. This one has upgraded tires and I think maybe a slightly upgraded belt drive or something like that. But yeah, it's great. Did you go for a romantic bike drive ride with us? Definitely, yes. And this is the kind of electric part of it is like, we went out on our bike path here in town. We have a nice bike path that goes through the city and long ways. We started coming back and we realized, okay, well, we'd like to get home now, so maybe we'll go off the bike path and drive through the city streets because that's the shortest route to get home. And then we realized, oh, no, wait, we'll just put the speed onto number five, take the long route, stay on the bike path. It's twice as long, but there are five power levels, and so if you want to go quickly or you're feeling lazy, just put it up to number five. So we were able to take the scenic ride home and arrive in kind of the same amount of time, but power level like one, two, and three is kind of the general range where I put it. It's a bit like shifting gears. Like level one is fine for flat terrain and no headwind or anything and a bit more of a workout, but if you've got a headwind or you're heading up a hill or something, you can just pop it up to level two or three. What happens to your other bike, your folding bike, your first bike Ebike you bought? Yeah, I'm just going to keep that one as a sort of a specialty bike because you can fold it and put it easily in the trunk of the car. So I think we discussed I'm actually going up to Saskatoon on Friday because I have a Tesla service appointment. I've got a squeaky steering wheel and a bit of squeaky suspension, and they're going to take care of that there. So I'm going to throw the folding Ebike into the trunk and be able to sort of ride around Saskatoon when the cars dropped off. Okay, well, that's good. Are you going to take the bikes to the lake at all? Yeah, I mean, it's almost the end of the season, and we're not sure when we're going to get out there again, but that's the hope. We originally kind of bought them for the lake. Are you going to disassemble them and put them in the back of your three or what? We could definitely fit one in the back of the three. I don't know. We sometimes take two cars out to the lake, so that might be the case because I don't have a bike carrier, and I don't really like bike carriers. I don't want to go through that. Hassle you got burned by a bike carrier one? Yeah, but it's definitely going to be my main bike because I really like it. All right, enough of this, Brian. Let's get to my vacation. I didn't have much of a vacation. It was a short vacation. I went to your cottage, which we were very generous to lend us. And by the way, I asked you if you're going to keep anything from your cottage for sentimental reasons, for the new cottage that you're going to not really know you didn't want to. And I told my son this, and he was offended. He says, oh, my God, I have more emotional attachment to that place than Brian does. My kids really have, to my shock and surprise, an emotional attachment to your cottage. Wow. It's hard for them to leave. Even when they want to. They start taking pictures and looking around like it's the last time they'll ever see it. In this case, it might be true, it might be and just capturing the thing. And we took two cars out. My kids went together in the Prius and we of course, my partner packed the kitchen sink and a few other things. Honestly, you would have been shocked. And I threatened to show that I was going to show you what all the things, because it's a cottage, it's not camping in the woods. You have most of what you need. Why do you have to we literally pack to an SUV in a car full of, like, telegram and then still, I had to come back and get something because I forgot it. And she did. And, yeah, we were late, so they got there half hour early and they found we were able to get in and sort of put their feet up on the deck and really just had it as their own. And you could tell that they were really enjoying the adult experience of having their own place in nature for even if it's just a half an hour. So, yeah, they had a good time. And my son went on as he does. He took the My Ebike, my 55 pound mountain bike. It was £55 when I got it, but I actually changed a few things, like, the forks were really heavy, so I saved a few pounds, actually, by changing the forks to better ones. He likes to go off because there's so many paths out there and he just loves exploring. This is something that goes back to his early childhood. He still likes doing it. And he came back and usually when he comes back from these things, he's really happy. It's like the happiest I ever see him is when he comes back from a trip up there. And this time he was a bit off. And I said, what's wrong? And he says, There was a cows. And I said, well, why? I ran into a herd of cows and they were mean to me. They moved at him and offended him somehow. So he says, I don't feel bad about eating meat anymore. He's come to the conclusion that he doesn't like cows because they were mean to him. Yeah, well, I think that area around the park is public grazing land that you can if you're a cattle rancher, there's public grazing land that you can use. He continued on after the cows because the herd eventually fled. But what if there was an angry bull in that? That might be as dangerous as, like, running into a bear or something you don't really, really expect to run into. It's a provincial park, by the way. He wanted to go to the edge of the park, the end of the park, and he did. And about a kilometer before the end of the park, he ran into oil rigs in the park and took pictures. So there are oil rigs in Kenosis Provincial Park in San Diego, in Canada. So you did not know that. I guess I didn't know that either. They'd be sort of toward the edge there. Yeah, but yeah, that's wild. Yeah. So he ran into things he didn't expect. But no, he did have a good time and he probably would have done more, but it really rained that night and then never stopped. It just kept raining. And the roads get to be impassable out there after a while because they're made of dirt. So my partner went kayaking. When she comes back from kayaking, it is the happiest I ever see her when she goes to the lake. Right. This time, not happy. Was it cows? No, she didn't really tell me because I went into the side of Little Kenosey Lake into the shore, and there's these little picnic areas there and I chose one of them that had a view of the lake and I could see her coming because I was worried. She actually was gone a long time and I thought, great, she's having a good time or she's dead either way. And she comes back and she doesn't tell me. So I get to the shore, to the docking station. By the way, they got this great thing for loading kayaks now, this wooden thing at Little Kenosis. It's got little rollers on it and it makes it so easy for novices like us who do it once a year because you could just sit in your kayak and just give it a little touch and it'll just go right into the water. And if you hit it right, you can come and come on shore. You just need somebody to smash that bottle of champagne on it and that's enough to have it slide into the anyway, what was wrong was just where I was looking at her at these little picnic areas. The next picnic area over there was a nude photography shoot. Okay. You did not see that coming, did you? No. Is that kind of thing allowed with the sanctioned I don't know. I posted on Facebook and I prevented you from seeing it because I wanted to have a natural reaction on the show. So I spent time waiting around there for a long time, so I knew who was there, who wasn't. And I did not see this with my own eyes, but I saw the people, like a woman photographer and a woman model of some sort going there. And the woman was half naked and holding a beer can. She was posing with an ear can, a beer can. So keep it classy. Saskatchewan. Yeah. So I had follow up DM's questions on that for my male friends. Yeah, she got more nature than she bargained for. So you may see some what is it? Only fans erotica with my partner in the background looking confused in a kayak. Yes. I told my son this. He said, dad, you don't understand. This is what people do nowadays. It's instagram accounts. Yeah, but they seem to know what they are doing. And they seem to but from the dialogue that she repeated to me, they seemed to be a professional outfit. But there was a sleazy guy hanging out by the dock and the truck that said Monster on the side. So I don't know if he was because he was flirting with them earlier. I don't know if he was sticking around to get a view. But me without my binoculars on that day, what else did I do? Well, the morning after my kids bike trip, it was raining, so it wasn't much we could do. It was kind of cool, which was nice because it was hot the first day, by the way. I preferred the cool. And we didn't have a breeze. I hate it when there's no breeze. It's always windy. It's always hurricane forest wind where we live. And then when you need a breeze, it's never there for you. So there was nothing there. It was a little warm. It wasn't as bad as last year, but it was just one day. So we took off. We did a little drive through Red versus Catch One, which is home to the Nazi Party of Canada, or at least the Nationalist Something Party. And he was always talking about it. The teacher came from that town. So we went through there and we kept on going into Manitoba. We saw this incredible infrastructure of oil just across the border in Manitoba. You don't think of oil in Manitoba, but we saw literally hundreds of pump jacks in a very condensed space. The most condensed I've ever seen. So I'm thinking it's fracking because there's like four of them in a row and they're going off in different directions. And there was practically a refinery there. Like, it wasn't a refinery, but it looked like a refinery because it all had all these huge storage tanks and there was no cell service, there was no town, there was nothing there. So it was kind of a weird little drive we had into Manicoba Twilight Zone episode that something weird was going to happen. Well, believe me, it's crossed my mind. Yeah. And then later on, we did a day trip in the Manitoba. Decided to have some adventure because it was only 4 hours to Winnipeg. So we took off to Winnipeg for a day. Nice. And we stayed in a nice little hotel there in a bad part of town, but it was a nice little trip. We did a few things. Should have done more, perhaps. The drivers are terrible in Manitoba. If you're listening to Winnipeg, you have terrible drivers. The speed limit there is a bit faster than most places. We were down by the Forks where the rivers meet, and we saw a bike accident right in front of us. This woman was driving, riding a bike and suddenly just went right into the ground for no reason. She just said she didn't turn sharp enough and just completely fell over and wrecked all of her clothing. And Jen, who had just taken a first aid course, ran up to her and she said her face was bleeding and all kinds of things. And the woman was just knowing, get away, I'm fine. People get embarrassed by these things. Totally. God knows I've been there. But it wasn't good for her. I have no idea why it happened. Right. So it wasn't a collision I was expecting with the terrible windowga drivers. Collision. There was a story going around online a couple of weeks ago that police in Toronto were actually giving out speeding tickets to cyclists. Did you hear that story? Oh, yeah. I don't there's a speed limit for cyclists. I believe it was Toronto's High Park. And they were literally out there with a radar gun giving out tickets to cyclists for going too fast. And sure, there's probably better things for the police to be doing with their time, but I do know it is oftentimes on those shared paths, the cyclists often do go too fast. So who knows? It was on a shared path. I believe so, yeah. Like a biking trail. It could have been you. It could have been me, yeah. My new bike can go faster than our school zone speed limits. And that's what my daughter, who took the bike out just before the vacation, was so thrilled when she came back. Dad, I broke the law because only 30 km an hour. What is that in miles? Like 22 or 20, something like that. So it's not very much. Also, I had a whistle dog as a and W brought back the whistle dog. It was a perfect vacation. Hot dog. It was wonderful. They're doing it better than they used to for the hot dog aficionado. Well, it's more like for my childhood memories, Brian, because I used to have the whistle dog platter come with a little close lawn, a plastic tray. Those were the days. Simpler times. Simpler times. So my hotel room had power lines right outside the window. So we are on the second floor, and if the window open, you could touch them. Okay? And like, there was two of them right there, like less than a foot away from the window. That's where they decided to put them. And if you were going to rescue me in the fire, it couldn't be done. So I questioned that and I thought I'd mention that because I've never seen anything like that before. They have a nice hotel. I popped into a Chevy dealership, the biggest in Manitoba, in Winnipeg. Winnipeg is a city of almost a million people, 900,000 or something like that. And I thought, I keep seeing an auto trader that they're getting Chevy bolts in. But apparently I went there and didn't go well. I went to the front desk. I said, Cockily, is there anyone that knows anything about EVs that I could talk to? And she just went on the intercom and said, Sales to the front. Sales to the front. The first yahoo came up. Young guy said, do you know anything about EVs? And he says, I know a few things. Good. But when we drove in, there was a bolt EUV. This is a little bigger version for about $80 more right where you drove in. So I said, Great. We can sit in the seats. We can try out the seat. This is really what we want to do in case we want to order one. And we did, and they were good. They were firm, but the foam was firm. But you weren't sitting against hard plastic. But it was fairly firm. Probably not that different. Actually, I think it did have fake leather, so it's kind of leather seats sort of get packed in a bit tighter. So it was fine. I don't think there's going to be they're not as nice as my Leaf. They're not as nice as the Prius, but they're okay. They'll do fine. But the guy was like, I know everything. And he said, no, we've hardly sold anything. Maybe three of these. I've seen three come through your thing in the past month, let alone the past, what, five years that they've been selling them? Maybe four in that particular place. So he's full of crap and discouraging me from Eve. He didn't try to sell me something else. He did say at one point, they're great. They got a low center of gravity. Lots of people are ordering the Blazer, which is the SUV that's coming next year. So I think he's starting to come around. And that sounds like what a lot of the GM employees are starting to do. But we got into an argument because he said I asked him about the charging, because it's supposed to come with a dual voltage charger. So you can plug into a normal 110 volts outlet here in North America, or you can plug into a dryer plug. Maybe you have one in your garage, maybe you can have one installed for it. You don't have to pay anything, you just have to pay for the electrical work. And actually, GM is paying for that electrical work to around $1,000 US. I think he claimed it didn't come with one. So I was taken through the trunk and I found the charger, and then I found a detached dryer Volt ponytail plug on it. And I said, well, look, here it is. He said, wow, they must have paid the extra $800 for that option. And I said, no, it comes with it. He said, well, you learn something every day, I guess.   He did say it would be $600 to ship at 550 km over here. He said, it's no problem for Dubai out of Province, they would write as a check for the extra sales tax because I have to pay sales tax here. And people are sort of craving all wheel drive, which is coming in the Blazer. But, yeah, he was just and he didn't want to tell me. I was thinking, okay, he's going to take my number. Didn't do it. I offered it, he didn't take it. I'm not going to be honest with you. We're not going to get any he told me three years, which is bull crap, it's a lie. The local people aren't doing that. And he said, well, the local people must be getting more. But we're in a small city. Compared to them, it's just crap. I mean, I'm sure there is a somewhat limited supply and they're advertising them. I can't watch a baseball game without seeing five ads for them. How could they advertise something that's not available unless they're only going to be seeing the bigger markets like they would in the states that have? Ontario is where I watch my Blue Jays games, and they seem to advertise for Ontario, and Ontario doesn't have any incentives. Well, they would certainly have more gasoline cars on the lot, so that's probably what they try and sell you. All right, well, let's get on with some things here. Brian, I can't take up the whole show with my own life. You know that Toyota, the wheels are falling off from electric. You said on a previous episode that it was just the lug nut issue. Well, it's actually more than that. They're literally falling off and they can't fix it. They're telling people not to drive them. Well, thank you, Toyota, for this great endeavor into electric vehicles. For the first time in Toyota history, they've made something that they can't literally keep the wheels on and people can't drive them. This is worse than the Bolt. The both they made them park outside of the garage and only charged 80%. Well, you buy this wonderful new car and you can't drive it. No. And they're offering to even buy them back from the owners. Right, right. Or give them a $5,000 fuel credit. And it's stupid. And this is a segment of. What James learned, because it's interesting. I learned something I always like to share with the listeners when I learned something. Something called profit parity. So EVs may be more expensive than internal combustion engines to buy, but they also make more money for car makers. And Audi says that that moment is now. So we talk about sales. EV parity, like it'll have the same price tag on it as like, Comp. And they say that it's starting to happen now with the premium vehicles. Well, Audi is saying that the point where they make profit is at parity now with what they make profit on other vehicles, like gas vehicles. Interesting. So that means you know what that means, right? It means they're going to make them. It means that the onus is now on them. They want to make money so that they start taking the reins of the EV revolution. And that is a fantastic thing, although still less to be made in terms of maintenance and for the dealers, like oil changes and stuff like that. Yeah, that's certainly true. Gosh. I hate oil changes. There's a small town Saskatchewan person who posted on a local Facebook Easy Group page, melville Tesla owner, he said he bought a Tesla and it was showing it off, as people do on these pages. But he was in Melville, which is a small town in town. Yes, I've some redneck relatives there. So I asked him how the townspeople are reacting to his electric car, and I had to laugh at his response. He says it's like a weird science experiment that's driving around if you ask that. Also, I just got a YouTube comment that I saw from a couple of episodes ago, and it says, this is from John. Can you upload just one version of the podcast? Because we have a video live version. I would prefer the ones with the video. It's kind of annoying to sport when you watch and listen to one version. Then you have the live version with the people in it come in the middle of the night. I don't know. There's not anything I can do about that except for starting a separate channel for the audio, which some people recommend you do. I wish you could subscribe to a playlist because it's on different playlists, but do you have any thoughts? Yeah, I mean, I'd be fine with just putting the one version on there, like the video version. When people tune into YouTube, they prefer to have visuals with it. So can't we just do that? Well, we do have a fairly good audience of people who just like the audio. Maybe it's because that comes first. I don't know. But when you listen to Lipson and other people who are on the server side, they say that there is a good demand for there are people who listen to audio only podcasts on YouTube. And that is a good way to get people in because it's a different way of expanding your audience and people finding you, because it is hard for people to find podcasts in this day and age. This is from Bloomberg on Tuesday. The UK government is preparing for a winter energy crisis that includes a reasonable worst case scenario. This is because they have less energy because France isn't exporting. They've only got half their nuclear. That's one reason. There's some other countries that may not be able to export electricity into the UK. Bloomberg hasn't exclusive on this and they think that they're planning they're planning for a bad case scenario where for four days in January, the peak demand could surpass their capacity. And this is what we talked about for a summer heat wave, which we haven't really gotten here in our province, where they might have been planning for that as well. But this would include organized blackouts for industry and even households. So you could have rolling blackouts in the UK this winter if there's a cold snap. Yes. And of course, the dispute continues with Germany and Russia. There's still not the full amount of gas flowing to Germany, not a huge amount of developments there. Gas is going through from Russia to Germany, but at a reduced amount. And there's still a bit of a standoff, a stalemate over how to resolve that. This is the Clean Energy show with Brian Stockton and James Whittingham. Brian, the Inflation Reduction Act was passed and it is a consequential, bloody miraculous piece of legislation that we did not see coming. In fact, there was this computer chip manufacturing in the US bill that the Republicans were going to support, but only if Mansion didn't support the Climate Act. So he said, there's no way in hell this is mid July that I'm ever going to support the Climate Act. So they passed the Chip Act and managed it about Face, which shocked the hell out of absolutely everyone, including the EV analysts and energy analysts that we talked to on the last episode of Bloomberg New Energy Finance in New York. They were flabbergasted as well. Anyway, Brian, this does a lot for EVs. It does a lot. It's a bill that does a lot of different things. Of course, it's supposed to reduce inflation. We'll get to that in a moment. But it also does a lot for the climate. Close to up to 40% reduction of emissions by 2030 in the Isa, which is groundbreaking. No, it's remarkable. And of course, we talked about this extensively, like, I don't know, a year ago or something, when it was called the Build Back Better bill. And we talked about it then because it seemed like it was likely to pass. And I felt like a chump for having spent all this energy thinking about it and talking about it, and then to have it just die like that was very disappointing. And, yeah, complete surprise to have it suddenly brought back under a different name. It felt like Joe Manchin was stringing people along and saying, junk, no, I'm not going to ever do anything but trying to appease me. Now, there is some stuff in here for fossil fuels, including a pipeline in his own state, of course. Yeah. But the consensus is that that's minor. The CO2 that adds is minor compared to the biggest spending bill in US history on climate, and it's a huge thing. So, yes, the $7,500 tax credits that people get for EVs have been used up by Tesla, GM and Toyota, believe it or not, further plug in electric hybrids. So, yeah, there was a 200,000 vehicle cap on that. But now that's all gone, they'll be able to do it again as long as the criteria is met by the automakers, which is sourcing a lot of that stuff locally or within their free trade zone. So there's also a used EV credit of $4,000, both at a point of sale, if you buy it from a dealer, if you don't have to wait for the tax time. Yeah, I think both these things can be supposedly done at a dealer plugin. Electric vehicles qualify with batteries of at least 7 kw, which is not much. Yeah, that's unfortunate. It's a battery that small where it doesn't cost very much, so it's a rather large subsidy for it's. A few Ebike batteries. Yeah, for not doing much. So that's one of the more unfortunate things, that this will maybe prolong the life of the plug in hybrid, which we need to move away from and from inside EVs. This pushes US automakers to become more independent from China. In order for cars to qualify, they have to source materials in North America or a country that has a free trade agreement with North America or with the US. Rather. The percentage of these materials increases over the years of this. This goes to 2032, which I brought up with the Bloomberg people is a bit absurd. I mean, if we hit price parity for all vehicle segments saying 2028 and they go down from there, and then you're giving a rebate in 2032 might be a little bit weird. Yeah. Although a great response on that, which is if this is largely about carbon emissions reduction, then why not keep it out to 2032? And $840 to offset the cost of a heat pump, closed, dryer or electric stove. So, yeah, that's pretty good. I mean, I wish I had that. I'd probably go get one. Yeah, those are both that'd be great. $8,000 for a heat pump for your house. $4,000 for an electrical panel upgrade, which is interesting, isn't it? Because a lot of people need an electric panel upgrades like you do. No, and as I said, mine costs about 6000 Canadian, which is not much more than that. That's great. $2,500 for improving electrical wiring in your home if you need it. That might qualify for what you did because you had to change your connection to the grid. Yeah, I think that might have covered the whole thing. As I said at the time, this is something like, everybody in my neighborhood is going to have to do this in the next ten years or so. Many neighborhoods are just 100 amp service, and that's just not going to fly in the era where we electrify everything. So these are the kinds of things that I haven't heard of before, the kind of incentives. So it's interesting to see how it plays out. One thing about this is that they're trying to bring solar manufacturing to the United States. And almost all the chips for solar panels are made in China. They're made cheaply there. The United States seems like the last country that can compete with manufacturing on an economic scale, so we'll see how that works. But the Bloomberg people did point out that wind turbines, which will also be big, so it's good to make them local, even though the blades have to be I don't know about the turbine, the actual generator itself, but we'll see about that. Anything big and heavy. So this was originally called build Back Better. It's now called the Inflation Reduction Act, which is, I guess, the flavor of the moment. But the question is, and it's really a climate and infrastructure spending bill, and not maybe that it matters, but is this actually an inflation reduction? Well, I've read several pieces on this saying that it is. I've read a couple of saying that it's not. I've read a lot more saying that it is. I think this is still a lot of analysis going on here, but they made some arguments that are above my pay grade. Just clean energy in general is a reduction of inflation because electricity, for example, costs less. So that reduces things, right? Yeah. And the way that fossil fuel prices have spiked recently because of the war in Ukraine, that's a large part of the inflation that we've been having. So, yeah, in theory, if you cut demand for oil and gas, that should bring down inflation because it'll bring down prices. If all this goes through 40% reduction in emissions in the US. By 2030, like, that's a remarkable amount. And yeah, that should hopefully ease up demand for oil and bring the price down. Okay, well, Ups is given some money, right? Yeah. USPS. Postal Service. Not us, different organization. And this is a story we've talked about before. Many people upset with the US Postal Service for not going fully electric in the new fleet of vans, delivery vans that they've been planning, and they've kind of increased the amount a couple of times, but they were still planning to buy lots and lots of gas powered vehicles for the US. Postal Service. But this new bill includes $3 billion for the US. Postal Service to buy electric trucks specifically, which was kind of the figure that they asked for it's like, oh, we'd need $3 billion to do that. And yeah, guess what? They've got it. And hopefully now this means all electric for the US. Postal Service. So again, we talk about this extensively with people who are about as expert as you can get from Bloomberg, a new energy finance. One is Tom Rowlands Reese, who is the head of research for North America, and the other is an EV analyst, Corey Cantor. This is an episode 126, which we dropped yesterday. So it's just behind this episode. It's a good interview and good information from people who absolutely know their stuff. And we will cover that act more extensively there with those experts. And I encourage you to listen to it. I also encourage you to give us feedback if you're interested in interviews. We did one before, right? We did one with Yuri, Yuri territory from the street pipes. And we got some good feedback on that. People seem to enjoy listening to that. So yeah, we could probably do that from time to time. And in addition to the show that we normally do. Okay, so there has been a massive fire in Cuba and an oil storage facility. And this is from a lightning strike. Not something you hear about necessarily all that often, but oil is flammable and therefore susceptible to things like lightning strikes. So this is turning out to be a huge problem there's. Now a fourth tank has caught on fire at this facility. So it's a massive fire burning out of control. And speaking of like brownouts and blackouts and electricity system, cuba was already predicting that they were going to have electricity problems this summer and they actually already have planned blackouts for Havana. And this is potentially going to be worse because of this because this oil storage facility was supplying oil to be burned at thermoelectric plants for some of the electricity system. So Cuba already in trouble in terms of their electricity system. Now it's going to be worse because of this fire, which is still not out yet. But the other thing that sort of brought to mind to me was just that we're at this inflection point where we're switching to clean energy. But we're also at this inflection point where just a lot of the infrastructure I think. Is really aging. Like all over the world. Certainly in North America here. Like our electrical grid and our province. They put up a zillion power poles 50. And guess what? 50, 60 years later, they're all kind of starting to fall over. And I think a lot of the grid structure in North America and really all over the world is kind of on its last legs. And maybe the clean energy revolution is not going to come fast enough because these are sort of coinciding issues. But it sounds like Cuba was in a bit of a problem already. Aging infrastructure was kind of bringing things down and then, boom, a lightning strike. And now they could be in trouble. Yes. And people will go around saying that clean energy will bring down the grid and have rolling blackouts. No, actually we keep seeing information and studies saying that the clean energy will eventually make the grid more stable, that it'll be more reliable that those batteries than people's EVs working in a two way function. Everything is going to be more stable once we finally get it figured out. We're just in this transition period where anytime there's a grid problem, the ProClean energy people are going to say, hey, it's the fossil fuels that are the problem. And the anti clean energy people are going to say, no, it's the windmills that are the problem. Windmills? They're not windmills. Well, that's what they'll say. That's what they'll say, but they'll be wrong. Idiots. Brian, there is one crucial bit of information for my vacation that I overlooked that this reminded me of. Yeah, you might say, james, what did a Cuban oil refinery or oil storage fire remind you of for your vacation? Good question. If you had asked that, I was minding my own business, driving to your cottage in beautiful Kenosi, and we went through the town of Kipling, as one does, and we slowed down because there was a lower speed limit in town and there's a few bunched up cars in front of us, so we're going slow. And then suddenly I see this river of fluid flowing across the road from left to right along gravitational lines. And I'm thinking, okay, it's a clear liquid and it's just flowing like a river. Like, what is this water main break or something? And just as I'm about to drive over it with my hot exhaust, I look over and there's these two guys in a pickup truck trying to get this tank desperately back onto the back of a truck. Oh, no. And it smelled horrible. And I'm fairly certain that it was diesel. And I didn't go too slow, so the guy kind of gave me a dirty look, but what the hell was I to know? And this is this instant frame capture, second moment of time that burns in your mind. And that's what I saw. I think some yahoo was taking some diesel, a big tank of it, back to the farm or whatever. That probably happens. Other people are doing that during this trip. And it fell off and spilled everywhere. Like probably $2,000 worth of it, I would guess, at least. But the thing is, if you're driving over and it splatters up on your exhaust, your hot exhaust, which I had an SUV, gas powered SUV, which, by the way, $2 a gallon or $2 a liter, and it went down through the trip, the gas prices were falling fast, by the way. Yeah, but yeah, that could have set me on fire and set him on fire and it was just a dangerous, stupid what the hell? Where did this come? But my car smelled like that the whole trip on the outside. If you walk near it to get a bike or something off the rack, then it was like, it still smells, and it's like this horrible smell. And I kept checking Twitter to see if anybody was tweeting about if there was a subsequent explosion, but this is an environmental catastrophe. What were they going to do, just run away and just leave it into the groundwater, the well water, and it was going to come back in the well water of this town or something? I mean, I don't know where they get their water, but it could be yeah. So that's the James almost died. So there's always some way of me almost dying on a trip to your cottage. But I often say, like, fossil fuels are often the most unpleasant thing about the cottage because even though you're supposed to be commuting in nature, everybody's got these giant SUVs and jet skis and everything, and then your car has to drive through a bunch of diesel and then stink the whole time or maybe burn down and I have to breathe it, too. So it was a long weekend. It was the August long weekend in Canada, and I've been there in the July long weekend. And that's where people party and there's thousands and thousands of boats out in the river or the lake rather, and people blasting music. So, yeah, I look forward to an electrified future. I told my son that because of course he wants to buy a cottage now, thanks to you. So I don't know where he's going to get one, but they're hard to come by now. Yeah. And I said, well, maybe it'll be quieter when you have one. Because of modification. Forbes magazine says electric car batteries are lasting longer than predicted, and the automakers were ramping up for recycling programs, but they've all been delayed because I'm an example of that because I have one of the earliest EVs that have been mass produced, and it's going strong, and it's also a terrible battery. So there's only better batteries than what I have, even if I crashed it. And the modules could be used for various things, they still have a value before the recycled. So almost all of the electric car batteries, according to Nissan executive Nick Thomas, are still in the cars. And people this is one of the naysayers things that people say all the time, and he says, we've been selling them for twelve years. Wow. I'm just going to leave it at that. But the deal is the EV batteries will last. The car people don't get. Even EV buyers don't get that. Yeah, but that's the deal. And there's lots of reasons why. And there's usually a second step, as you say. The car gets totaled, you can still take the cells out, you can put them in home storage. There's a second use before you get to the eventual, which is to crack it all open and take the minerals out and recycle them. So my car has lost some of its range over the ten years that has existed. But what some companies do is buy a pack at a record, say from another Nissan Leaf. We'll take the best modules out of there and replace the worst ones in your car, and then they'll send the rest of the recycling. But what people don't realize is electric cars have sophisticated battery management systems that guard the long term health of the batteries. Most manufacturers offer warranties of eight years, or 100,000 miles even. And there's an industry expectation that EVs will last longer than that. So they should not live the cars. Yeah, and they're definitely going to get better. They're only going to get better. Like, Tesla is talking about million mile batteries and 1.5 million mile batteries. So we'll see what happens in the next ten years. Yeah, you can expect a bit of degradation, but your battery should last for the life of the car. I mean, right now, people trade in their cars after three years, five years, your EV should be able to go a lot longer than that. Okay. A story here from Drive Tesla, Canada. This is a couple of weeks old, but I thought it was important just because we talked about the Japanese car manufacturers quite a bit, and that is that BYD is planning to enter the Japanese car market. This just struck me as a really big deal. I'm a person who grew up on Japanese cars in the that's all I was interested in owning was Japanese cars. And now here we are. BYD from China is going into the belly of the beast, as it were. This is a very interesting development, Mr. Stockton, isn't it? This is very symbolic in many ways, isn't it? That's what I thought. They're going into Toyota Nissan's backyard, and they're just going to scoop up market share. That says so much. The Japanese automakers I see thriving with their plug in electric hybrids, but people really don't want them anymore. There's some places that do, but people generally want the full meal deal. They want a battery electric vehicle. And you see that with many of the sales reports in most places. In a lot of places. What do you think? Brian, it's time for what do you think? And let's breathe through this quickly, please. This is where I ask you, what do you think of things that I'm not sure what to think about? So Tesla is not going to only add eight new factories, which is entirely possible by 2030, but increase average volume production capacity from the 450,000 average to cross the four current factories to 1.66 million per factory to reach 20 million per year. What do you think? Yeah, I think this is entirely possible. They've been saying for a while that 20 million vehicles per year is their goal, and this would be way more than anybody's currently doing. The Tesla factory in Shanghai is at a run rate approaching a million vehicles a year just at that one factory. They haven't done that for a full year, but their current run rate, and they just had some more upgrades and they've opened a new line. So just in the past month after their shutdown, they had a shutdown for Covet, then they had a shutdown to upgrade the factory. And it's only been a few weeks, but they appear to be producing vehicles at a rate so far unheard of for Tesla. So they're definitely on track for a million vehicles out of the Beijing factory, and no reason to think that they can't replicate that. They're looking for maybe a dozen factories to make 20 million a year to take the crown of the world's biggest automaker away from Toyota, which they're already kind of on the verge of doing with the Toyota Corolla. It seems a bit weird because they really don't have that many models. They've got the model Y and the model Three Those are the mass market ones. But the cyber truck is coming. The Tesla Semi is coming. They started teasing like some kind of a van or a people mover vehicle. So there'll be probably some more announcements of different form factors for the car. So I think that's what the naysayers are mostly questioning. It's like, well, how are they going to make 20 million? Because they've only got a couple of models and they'll keep it small, they don't need that many models. But, yeah, it seems entirely possible. And there should be a new factory announcement soon, possibly Canada, which is the next thing on your list here for things to ask me about. We don't really know the details other than Tesla had to release that they've been lobbying, I believe it was the Ontario government in Canada, the province of Ontario. Whenever you do lobbying of the government, it has to be announced. So they did that. So it could be a factory in Canada, but they could also just be lobbying for battery materials or mining or something like that, too. But yeah, I think potentially good news for Canada. Musk has teased it too. He has teased Canada. So we'll have to see. I wouldn't be surprised because the government is pointing all the stops to get EV manufacturing here, which is good because it is the future and we do need jobs. Yeah, I think our government would be on board with that. And there is a history of automotive manufacturing, particularly in Ontario, but also Quebec. We make a lot of cars here. A lot of the American branded cars are made here in Canada. So there is the kind of base of knowledge yeah, to start that here, for sure. So the California Public Utilities Commission makes california, the first state in the nation to allow EV owners to measure an EV's energy use independently from the owner's main utility meter through submetering. Any thoughts on that? Yeah, it's an interesting idea. I mean, we often talk about the coming smart grid. It hadn't occurred to me that this could be one of the uses of a smart grid, but there could be some useful parts of monitoring your grid use separately. EVs could then be kind of modeled out in your electricity bill and be somehow treated differently. Maybe that's where they could put, like, a gasoline tax. Gasoline tax? Where everyone is wondering why we're not going to be getting our gasoline taxes anymore. Depends on how they want to treat. That would be the sort of bad news, is maybe that's where they'd put the gasoline tax, as it were, onto your EV bill. Yeah, it depends on how they want to treat. As temperatures rise, shifts and travel patterns are likely to become more common in Europe, with researchers describing as a hotspot for severe summer heat. So many travelers are setting their sites on Scandinavia or switching to the spring and fall for traveling as a person. Yeah, we talked about my trip to Europe, which turned out time to be the hottest summer on record for Europe. It's been surpassed since then, but yeah, it's not very pleasant traveling somewhere when it's blistering hot like that. So, absolutely, this makes a lot of sense. We're all going to maybe have to start thinking differently about when and where we travel. And speaking of tropical vacations, hawaii has received their final shipment of coal, all new at six. One month to go until Hawaii no longer burns coal for electricity. Tonight, a closer look at the final shipment from Indonesia arriving in Kalai. Long a huge milestone as experts believe we have enough renewable resources coming online to meet Oahu's energy needs. There's no use for coal for electricity anywhere in the world. Yeah, I just wanted to include this because, especially with an audio clip, it just seemed like a really great good news story of Hawaii has been using coal as part of their electricity generation. But as they start to move to more renewable sources, they have literally received their last shipment of coal that's going to be burned for electricity. And this will take a while to get through. And I suppose there's a danger in the next year or two of maybe, oh, we made a mistake, we did this too quickly and maybe we'll need more coal, but I don't think so. And as we know, renewables are fairly quick to put up, and as long as they've made all their plans correctly for the grid needs the last shipment of coal, this is just fantastic good news. That's amazing. You also want to have kind of energy autonomy. There should be no reason to ship anything into Hawaii to burn to make electricity. You've got. All the sunshine and wind that you need to be independent and you don't have to worry about your shipment of coal getting wiped out by a tsunami or something. About your shipment of coal getting wiped out by a tsunami or something. All right, Brian. The show would normally be over by now, but no, due to vacation. We've got so much to give, so much to get out. We have a mail item here. Reminder, though, the coming up is the lighting headlines briefly, but let's dip into the mail bag from the maggot. He wrote us a couple of weeks ago. He says on your show yesterday, there was a discussion about wasteful. Normally your team, that you and me, Brian, we're the team is super odd point, but I have to disagree this time. The old wave of environmentalism was miserly moral kind. The old wave of environmentalism was the miserly moral kind. I must suffer to save the world. People are advised to adjust their circumstance. Drive small cars or slow cars, eat less. But the new technology environmentalism is a focus on solving problems completely, rather than doing slightly less bad things through efficiency. So when people see this new view as a threat to their lifestyle, they grow up throughout barriers. Climate denialism isn't just about science. People just basically don't want to change. But he says that this is something we talked about for the future. Cheap power. Free power, cheap heat for your home. This is all about the story leaving the doors open at shops in France with the air conditioning running. And you don't like wastefulness. But yeah, we're not there yet, are we? No, that's the only point. Yeah, this is an absolutely valid point. I think that is definitely our future. But for the time being, especially in this era when Europe facing energy shortages, they're having problems with some of their nuclear, there just isn't the kind of excess power on the grid that there used to be. So particularly for the next couple of years in this transition, they still have to close the doors on those shops in France. And there was another story, I think, from Italy, where they're regulating the amount of electricity. You're not supposed to set your AC lower than 27 Celsius or something like that in Italy. So we're still in a power crunch. We still need to conserve. But absolutely, this is our future. This is going to be an abundant future, particularly what Tony Siba talks about from Rethink X. He thinks it's going to be a super abundant future with essentially free electricity is kind of where we're headed. Yeah, we're just not there yet. He makes a good point, and I take that point because it is hard to get your head wrapped around that. But that is our future, and it will affect the way I talk about things a little bit as we move forward. It's just hard for people to wrap their head around it unless you're on the forefront of this. And that's the thing. But yeah, I don't think my neighbors would understand anything I was talking about if I said we're going to get free electricity in the future. You'll be able to leave your door open in winter and just let the fresh air in if you wanted to because don't tell your neighbors they'll call socially. We'd love to hear from you. So thanks for leaving us that email. Contact us at clean energy show. Write us right now. Cleanenergyshow@gmail.com. We're on Twitter. You can get updates to our show schedule there. If we change our show schedule around at all or have special episodes like we did this week, ticktock, we're there. Clean Energy Pod is the handle for TikTok and Twitter. Even if you're not a Twitter user or casual Twitter user, I recommend you follow us to get the latest. Don't forget to check out our YouTube channel for talking heads video of us doing the show unedited, so leave us a voicemail at speakfight. Comcleanrgy. Lightning rounding round five minutes, ten minutes ago. It's time for the lightning out, but here we go. Brian, hang on. Buckle in. This is a fast look of the rest of the week's headlines and clean energy that I wanted to talk about. Rainwater everywhere on earth is unsafe to drink due to Forever chemicals. That was the name of my alt rock pan in the 80s. Forever Chemical. There was a movie damn. And I forget the name of it. I just watched a movie on the furry of our chemicals lawsuit. This is like frying pans and nonstick and how they stick around and they are making people sick in some place in the southern states. So University of Stockholm study finds that this is true for drinking water even in the Antarctic. These per and poly floral alkal substances are PFAS are large family of human chemicals that don't occur in nature. They don't go away. And yes, don't drink the rainwater, people. Tip from the clean energy show. A new study by Stanford University says that prices would immediately drop and all of upfront costs for switching to 100% renewable energy will be paid back in six years. So if we suddenly right now switch to 100% renewable energy, it would pay back itself in six years. Yeah. And this is the other thing that your neighbors probably wouldn't understand and they would call you crazy if you said that. But it is absolutely cheaper to just ditch this stuff as soon as possible. Go clean energy. That's the way to go. So up in Nordic space, the world's first subsidy free offshore wind farm has started to produce power. Just that I mentioned that because it's kind of a milestone to have subsidy free wind farm start. They didn't even ask for subsidies when they put in the bid. That's cool. So the failure in French nuclear is increasing electricity prices all over Europe, not just in France. France already had more nuclear than they could use themselves in the past and was a net exporter during nighttime and low French demands. Now France has a huge electricity import, further increasing the prices have gone out of control in France. France is an interesting case study right now. Yeah. The UK is also in a bit of a power crunch, and it's partly because they've often relied on France to send them some excess power. So, yeah, lots of potential shortages and brownouts and blackouts coming in the UK and other places. Brian, it's time for a surprise new feature, the Clean Energy show, Fast Fact. That's right. I'm going to randomly insert fast facts into the show now. From time to time, electric vehicles require fewer workers to assemble than gas or diesel vehicles, according to The New York Times. Wow, that's pretty cool. And just one more reason. Is it maybe just the evolution of these things? I mean, car factories are just getting more automated over the years. If you look at a combustion vehicle, the hoses and the clamps and the welding and the exhaust pipes yeah, I can see I can see how it would be here's. Another 175 of the 180 nuclear power projects examined in a study found the final cost exceeded the initial budget by an average of 117%. I hope you were sitting down for that. And took an average of 64% longer than projected. So that is a study that has proven that nuclear never comes in on time or on budget. Why don't we have another facet? The land requirement for the world to go carbon neutral is less than that of the current energy infrastructure. That's remarkable. So putting up people say, my son even says, where are you going to put all the solar panels? How about on the oil wells? Lands. On the refinery? Land? On the pipeline? Land? Come on. So we don't often talk about that, but all of this or that oil storage facility in Cuba that we were talking about earlier, it's not just a fire hazard, but it's a massive, massive place that could easily use that land for solar. And apparently you wouldn't even need that much from our friends at Bloomberg. I think we can say that now. Francis EDF utility is lowering its nuclear power output because the temperature of the river it relies on for cooling is getting too hot in a heat wave this summer driven by climate change. You know, everything fits together, Brian. Everything we talk about, it all fits together like a perfect puzzle. It's all connected. Yeah. Nuclear, even nuclear. I mean, this is after Reuters reported that the Rhine in Germany, its main shipping artery was getting too shallow to transport coal to power stations. It's almost like God is saying, Hurry the hell up. Nature is acting back. There's these loops of things that are happening no. In the Hoover Dam in the US, which I believe it's Lake Mead, which is backed up by the Hoover Dam. The water level has been dropping for years. They may not be able to generate electricity there at some point. This is from Eco Watch, hot off the fresh. A new study has found that as climate warming increases overnight temperatures these hotter nights could increase mortality risks in heat waves by as much as 60%. Because remember, we were talking about this a couple of shows ago. It's not just about the temperature of the day, it's the temperature at night. Which is why we have heat warnings based on nighttime temperatures in Canada because you don't get any relief from it. Your house doesn't cool down. And that was the case last summer here where we live. It just was not cooling down at night. So it was definitely the hottest summer that I've had living in this house this year. Fortunately, it's kind of acting more like the old days and it has been cooling down at night. We've had maybe one night this summer where it was difficult to sleep. But yeah, it's been cooling down at night and it's been an absolute dream. It's been okay not to have air conditioning this summer. And finally this week on this fat overstuffed show from the journal Nature rapid battery cost declines accelerate the prospects of an all electric inter regional container shipping routes. So as battery prices of $100 US per kilowatt hour as they approach that, the electrocution of interregional trade routes of less than 1500 km, which if you ask me is still pretty significant, is economical with a battery ship with a minimal impact to the ship carrying capacity. So that is to say it's not displacing much of the ship's capacity to stuff it with batteries because of the cost and including the environmental costs. That's not including the environmental, but if you include them, the economical range increases to 5000 batteries achieve a $50 per kilowatt hour price point which we expect them to sometime next decade, maybe earlier than later. The economical range nearly doubles to up to 10,000 or 3000 without the environmental impact. So that means that shipping is 14% of pollution in the states of US is coming from shipping. So yeah, it's no

Westworld
Ep.123: Westworld - 407 - Metanoia

Westworld

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 50:15 Very Popular


Our "Westworld" Deep Dives are always dense, but this one truly is a thicc-ass boi. In this breakdown of Season 4, Episode 7, Gene and Big D compare simulations to reality, dissect William's conversation with himself and ask why Bernard would leave The Door open. "Metanoia" also leads the Shat Crew to explore who Bernard's video message was for, what Christina is, and why that one guy decided to set fire to his office. Listen to more great music from Simon: www.soundcloud.com/simonsteric Westworld Episode 7 Summary:Bernard and Maeve travel to Hoover Dam to open the door to the Sublime, which Charlotte has kept preserved in the dam's data vault. Christina goes with Teddy to Olympiad Entertainment and has its employees destroy the premises and erase all the stories controlling the humans. Stubbs and Frankie use the distraction to rescue Caleb. Charlotte prepares to discontinue the hosts' inhabitation of human cities so that they can "transcend" their human bodies. William convinces his host self that humans are a fundamentally destructive species; the William host realizes his true purpose and kills the human William. Bernard and Maeve enter the tower; Maeve fights Charlotte while Bernard accesses the control room. William kills Charlotte, Maeve, and Bernard, then programs the tower to turn the humans against each other before it self-destructs. Christina is unable to stop the chaos and realizes the humans cannot see her; Teddy explains that while the world is real, she is not physically there. Subscribe Now Android: https://shatontv.com/westworld-android Apple/iTunes: https://shatontv.com/westworld-itunes Twitch: https://shatontv.com/twitch Help Support the Podcast Support with Paypal – https://shatontv.com/paypal Support With Venmo – https://venmo.com/ShatPodcasts Shop / Merchandise: https://shatontv.com/shop Shop Amazon With Our Affiliate Link – https://www.amazon.com/?tag=shatmovies-20 Sponsor's Listener Survey – https://shatontv.com/survey Leave an iTunes Review –  https://shatontv.com/westworld-review Leave a Voicemail – (914) 719-SHAT – (914) 719-7428 Feeds & Social Media – https://shatontv.com/subscribe-and-follow/ Check out our Movie Podcast – http://shatthemovies.com WebPlayer (All Episodes) – https://shatontv.com/westworld-web-player Theme Song – “The Ecstasy Of Gold” (Hip Hop Instrumental Version)  by Dj 2 Bad Outro Music - By Simon Eric Haywood

Mars on Life
Damn! Oppenheimer Died For This (122)

Mars on Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 98:29


It's the chortling hour as the guys goof around with the teaser poster for Christopher Nolan's upcoming "Oppenheimer." What a cast, what a budget, but how's the story? We start off, however, on a recent explosion at Hoover Dam and how startling this news is on the heels of Lake Mead's evaporation. Then we talk about the MLB All-Star game at Dodger Stadium and the strike that never was from the concession staff. After some hot dog talk Andrew brings up Kylie Jenner's wee flight from Van Nuys to Camarillo, an act that's calling atten