Podcasts about CLT

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Latest podcast episodes about CLT

Livfiit Listens
EP. 53 | Natalie Catania on Healing Family Trauma, Mind-Body Connection, Emotions within the Body, & Nutrition

Livfiit Listens

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 56:00


Today we're sitting down with our third ever podcast guest, my sister, Natalie Catania! Natalie is a Registered Dietitian, Energy Healer and Massage Therapist with a passion for guiding you into alignment with your true health. She obtained her Masters of Science in Nutrition from Keiser University and a Bachelor's Degree in Dietetics from Florida State University. The basis of this knowledge in combination with energy healing, has given her a different perspective on how to truly heal the body from the inside out. Due to her outspoken nature, she also played a big leadership role in assisting the healing process of family trauma. So in this epi, we're hitting all the bases and touching on being a leader in healing familial wounds, how emotions manifest within the body and effects your physical health, and basic nutrition tips to get healthier today! . Topics in Today's Epi: - How to be a leader in healing family trauma - Working through toxic situations with parents - Improving your delivery in the face of conflict - How emotion manifests within the body - The mind-body connection - The importance of clearing energy from the body to be your healthiest - Health benefits of vitamins, minerals, and electrolytes . Olivia's Affirmation: “I am a high value individual.” Natalie's Affirmation: "I receive all love openly and freely." . Connect with Natalie! NATrition encompasses shamanistic healing practices with a functional nutrition approach. This allows her to guide you - mind, body, and soul - into True Health Alignment. Natalie Catania, MS, RD, LDN, CLT, LMT Shaman, Energy Healer, Functional Dietitian, Massage Therapist NATritionrd.com IG: @natcatt13 Email: natritionrd@gmail.com . THE LIVFIIT COSTA RICA RETREAT // https://trips.trovatrip.com/trips/costa-rica-with-olivia-catania-jun-2023 . BOOK A 1:1 CALL WITH ME // https://stan.store/Livfiit Shop EHP Labs // http://www.ehplabs.com/discount/livfiit10 code: "LIVFIIT10" to save & support Shop My Amazon Favorites // https://www.amazon.com/shop/livfiit?listId=20MNY4GGY77KN *This is my affiliated Amazon Storefront. I do receive a small commission when you shop through this link.* . Youtube (@LIVFIIT) // https://www.youtube.com/c/Livfiit/videos Instagram (@LIVFIIT) // https://www.instagram.com/livfiit/?hl --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/livfiit/support

Nurture Small Business
What To Do When Trust Breaks Down in Your Business

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 26:52


Once trust is lost, it's difficult to get it back. How can business owners foster trust and open communication with their teams? Shantera Chatman, President of PowHer Consulting, returns to the show to teach us how. Shantera works with businesses of all stripes to pinpoint cultural gaps and communication breakdowns. Her immersive experiences and guided listening sessions have helped strengthen teams and set them on the path to positive change. Find out how empathetic listening can repair bridges in your organization. Don't forget to check out our last talk with Shantera on Women's Equality Day! About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President, Denise Cagan, has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs.   Recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder, Denise enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work-from-home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. With extensive experience in outsourcing solutions that provide administrative, creative, marketing, and website support, she is able to help other small businesses grow and thrive. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan. LinkedIn

Cooper And Anthony Show
What Happened To That Friend, Buy Me What For Christmas, Sex Talk And Rock and Rock and Best Of Cooper's Dinner

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 49:46


What Happened To That Friend, Buy Me What For Christmas, Sex Talk And Rock and Rock and Best Of Cooper's Dinner #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

Lillian McDermott
Jennifer Gramith, ND, Natural Prevention & Reversal of Diabetes

Lillian McDermott

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 57:57


Jennifer Gramith, ND, CLT, of Rightway Health and Wellness has taught us all about the lymphatic system, dealing with emotions, and the importance of a balanced mindset. She has helped us cleanse our Gallbladder/Liver and taught us about the latest in energy medicine introducing us to tools like EVOX and ZYTO. Dr. Jen is aware […] The post Jennifer Gramith, ND, Natural Prevention & Reversal of Diabetes appeared first on LillianMcDermott.com.

Roundball Rock
Sorry We Say Vibes So Much In this Episode

Roundball Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 57:15


Sean and Joey talk FTX, CLT, and other acronyms.SUPPORT: www.patreon.com/roundrockpodTWITTER & IG: @RoundRockPodE-MAIL: RoundRockPod@gmail.comPHONE: 323-682-0342MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/roundball-rock-the-podcast?ref_id=13068ALBUM: www.roundballrock.bandcamp.comSONG: "Take Me To Doc Rivers" by Sean Keane Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nurture Small Business
Celebrating Iconic Women in Business

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 17:40


When professional women inspire and uplift each other, they can accomplish incredible things. Tonia DeCosimo, President and Editor-in-Chief of P.O.W.E.R. Magazine, is dedicated to recognizing and empowering women in business. From celebs and icons to everyday working women, P.O.W.E.R. gives them a platform to network and share their achievements.  Tonia has interviewed some truly remarkable women, including stars like Susan Lucci, Gloria Gaynor, and Christie Brinkley! Hear about Tonia's interview stories, along with her tips for connecting with celebrities. The next awards gala will be held May 18th, 2023, in The Mansion at Oyster Bay. Women from countless industries will gather to celebrate and form new connections. To apply for the 2023 P.O.W.E.R. Icon Award, or nominate another woman entrepreneur, send Tonia an email! About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President, Denise Cagan, has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs.   Recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder, Denise enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work-from-home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. With extensive experience in outsourcing solutions that provide administrative, creative, marketing, and website support, she is able to help other small businesses grow and thrive. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan. LinkedIn

Cooper And Anthony Show
If The Mic Stand Don't Fit Make it, Family Feud Questions, You Know What EMN Is? Did I Just Say That? How To Elect Officials

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 64:48


If The Mic Stand Don't Fit Make it, Family Feud Questions, You Know What EMN Is? Did I Just Say That? How To Elect Officials #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

Nurture Small Business
Paccurate: The Next Step in Supply Chain Sustainability

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 23:36


Have you ever considered the labor, emissions, and cost of a package delivered to your doorstep? With the explosion of online shopping since the pandemic began, supply chain sustainability is a huge concern. CEO of Paccurate James Malley has made it his mission to optimize packing and reduce emissions from shipping. Paccurate is a digital solution to wasted packaging and shipping labor. Their software has saved acres of cardboard and millions of dollars in distribution costs. Listen to find out how their AI-driven software works and the impact it's having on retail shipping. About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President, Denise Cagan, has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs.   Recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder, Denise enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work-from-home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. With extensive experience in outsourcing solutions that provide administrative, creative, marketing, and website support, she is able to help other small businesses grow and thrive. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan. LinkedIn 

Cooper And Anthony Show
Zoom Call Meeting Mask, Should He Pay For Her Tow, Home Design Trends Making A Comeback With Gen Z

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 45:08


Zoom Call Meeting Mask, Should He Pay For Her Tow, Home Design Trends Making A Comeback With Gen Z #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

Miguel and Holly Uncensored
11-04-22: [Trigger Warning] Why Your Vote Matters

Miguel and Holly Uncensored

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 55:32


Even though we're all hungover on this episode (yes, we explain why!) we talk about the importance of voting with a volunteer for CLT for Choice.

Who Got Next? The Podcast
Episode 99: Anita M. The Realtor, Episode 99, Vol. 9

Who Got Next? The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 48:01


This week WGN is diving back into real estate. This time we are getting into the woman's perspective. I had the pleasure to sit down with the homie Anita M, a realtor here in CLT who is ready to assist you with your home purchasing needs. Our conversation hits on a couple key topics. Anita gives the pod insight on why she decided to become a realtor and hits on some key points that first time homebuyers might miss. Outside of her loving to help potential buyers achieve their dream home. Although Anita says doing the job is very rewarding, she does speak on what it takes to perform her duties at a high level; minus the challenges that she faces sometimes being a black woman in the industry. It's great to get a different view from a woman's POV and I hope you will enjoy this conversation. Make sure to check out her offer at the end only through WGN! In closing, make sure you let her know WHO GOT NEXT sent ya! # WhoGotNext #CLTture #Vol9

Kolbecast
127: Forging a Path

Kolbecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 59:49


AMDG.  It's never too early to think about what life after Kolbe looks like.  Today, Kimberly Farley—director of homeschool partnerships for the Classic Learning Test—joins Bonnie and Steven with her background in homeschooling and her expertise in college preparation.  They discuss easing stress levels when approaching college prep, constructive understandings of standardized testing, and how to use testing as a tool for understanding.  Plus, they touch on considerations for dual enrollment, including both tangible and intangible benefits and drawbacks. Kolbecast episodes mentioned and relevant: 120 Substance Matters with CLT founder Jeremy Tate 83 This Is Only a Test 109 A Lifetime Venture with Dr. George Harne 59 The Secret Whiteboard 40 Windshield Time 99 Gifted, Graced, and Formed Other links from the episode: Kolbe graduation requirements and diploma programs Dual Credit Courses via Kolbe Academy's partnership with The University of St. Thomas Dual credit webinar recording College planning webinar recording Resources and offers from CLT: Listen in for a discount code on all test registrations just for Kolbe families CLT test dates and deadlines for the full suite of exams Journey through the Author Bank seminar series, a free webinar with a scholar from a partner college discussing an author from CLT's author bank CLT's podcast Anchored episode with Kimberly Kolbecast episodes cover a range of topics relating to school at home, the life of faith, and Catholic education. Using the filters on our website, you can sort the episodes to find just what you're looking for. If you listen to the Kolbecast via a podcast app/player, we'd be so grateful to you for leaving a rating and review. That helps us reach more listeners. However you listen, please spread the word about the Kolbecast! What questions do you have about homeschooling, the life of faith, or the intersection of the two? Send your questions to podcast@kolbe.org and stay tuned for answers. You may hear them answered in an upcoming Kolbecast episode! Interested in Kolbe Academy's offerings? Visit kolbe.org.

I did this instead of killing myself

Meet Jake Manning. He's a professional wrestler, comic, and trading card aficionado. He currently works for All Elite Wrestling where he modestly describes himself as a glorified T-shirt counter and broke ass renaissance man. Jake has been in professional wrestling for 20 years, and been doing standup comedy for 7. You can catch him on stage or in the ring in Asheville, Greenville, CLT. In this interview, Jake and I talk pro-wrestling, Brett Favre, George Carlin, likability in standup, and more. Check Jake out at the links below, and have a great week! #standup #podcast Follow Our Guest: https://www.instagram.com/manscoutmanning/ https://www.facebook.com/manscoutjakemanning https://www.ebay.com/usr/manscou81 https://www.facebook.com/AEW https://twitter.com/manscoutmanning https://www.youtube.com/c/ManScoutManning Follow My Other Stuff: David on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidbakker7/?hl=en The Podcast on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ididthisinsteadofkillingmyself/?hl=en The Podcast on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2GGXI851tdRDK1XmiSgcMk David's Twitter… https://twitter.com/davidbakker7 And TikTok…I guess (you don't have to…really. We should all delete this app). https://www.tiktok.com/@davidbakker7 And your mom… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQw4w9WgXcQ

Nurture Small Business
Angel Investors: Partner Up by Conquering Your Money Anxiety

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 31:46


Rarely do women deal with the monster that money is in their heads. What is the money monster? Listen as business consultant Olivia Jaras takes us through an exercise that uncovers your feelings about money. Until you start owning how you relate to money, you will have limited success with funding your business and approaching investors.  Olivia strongly recommends reaching out directly to those who could be an asset to your company and creating partnerships. Partnerships are more than just money; they're also resources and connections. Rather than directly asking for funds, approach potential partners with your mission and values. Angel Investors are more likely to invest when your business supports a cause that resonates with them.  Tune in to learn more about how to talk to investors, connect with incubator programs, and obtain grants. Be sure to check out one of Olivia's favorite books, Happy Money to start unravelling money anxiety. About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President, Denise Cagan, has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs.   Recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder, Denise enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work-from-home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. With extensive experience in outsourcing solutions that provide administrative, creative, marketing, and website support, she is able to help other small businesses grow and thrive. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan. LinkedIn

Cooper And Anthony Show
Men And Going To The Doctor, Joe Concha from Fox News, Anthony On A Jury

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 65:50


Men And Going To The Doctor, Joe Concha from Fox News, Anthony On A Jury. #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

Lillian McDermott
Jennifer Gramith, ND, How the Endocrine System Supports Our Libido

Lillian McDermott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 55:25


Jennifer Gramith, ND, CLT, of Rightway Health and Wellness has taught us all about the lymphatic system, dealing with emotions, and the importance of a balanced mindset. She helped us cleanse our Gallbladder/Liver and taught us about the latest in energy medicine introducing us to tools like EVOX and ZYTO. Dr. Jen uses genetic testing […] The post Jennifer Gramith, ND, How the Endocrine System Supports Our Libido appeared first on LillianMcDermott.com.

The Lunar Society
Brian Potter - Future of Construction, Ugly Modernism, & Environmental Review

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 145:57


Brian Potter is the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he discusses why the construction industry has been slow to industrialize and innovate.He explains why:* Construction isn't getting cheaper and faster,* We should have mile-high buildings and multi-layer non-intersecting roads,* “Ugly” modern buildings are simply the result of better architecture,* China is so great at building things,* Saudi Arabia's Line is a waste of resources,* Environmental review makes new construction expensive and delayed,* and much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.More really cool guests coming up; subscribe to find out about future episodes!You may also enjoy my interviews with Tyler Cowen (about talent, collapse, & pessimism of sex). Charles Mann (about the Americas before Columbus & scientific wizardry), and Austin Vernon about (Energy Superabundance, Starship Missiles, & Finding Alpha).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you share it, post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00) - Why Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist (06:54) - Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures (10:10) - Unique Woes of The Construction Industry  (19:28) - The Problems of Prefabrication (26:27) - If Building Regulations didn't exist… (32:20) - China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, & Japan(44:45) - Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies (1:00:51) - 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of Labour(1:08:02) - AI's Impact on Construction Productivity(1:17:53) - Brian Dreams of Building a Mile High Skyscraper(1:23:43) - Deep Dive into Environmentalism and NEPA(1:42:04) - Software is Stealing Talent from Physical Engineering(1:47:13) - Gaps in the Blog Marketplace of Ideas(1:50:56) - Why is Modern Architecture So Ugly?(2:19:58) - Advice for Aspiring Architects and Young Construction PhysicistsTranscriptWhy Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist Dwarkesh Patel Today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Brian Potter, who is an engineer and the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he writes about how the construction industry works and why it has been slow to industrialize and innovate. It's one of my favorite blogs on the internet, and I highly, highly recommend that people check it out. Brian, my first question is about The Line project in Saudi Arabia. What are your opinions? Brian Potter It's interesting how Saudi Arabia and countries in the Middle East, in general, are willing to do these big, crazy, ambitious building projects and pour huge amounts of money into constructing this infrastructure in a way that you don't see a huge amount in the modern world. China obviously does this too in huge amounts, some other minor places do as well, but in general, you don't see a whole lot of countries building these big, massive, incredibly ambitious projects. So on that level, it's interesting, and it's like, “Yes, I'm glad to see that you're doing this,” but the actual project is clearly insane and makes no sense. Look at the physical arrangement layout–– there's a reason cities grow in two dimensions. A one-dimensional city is the worst possible arrangement for transportation. It's the maximum amount of distance between any two points. So just from that perspective, it's clearly crazy, and there's no real benefit to it other than perhaps some weird hypothetical transportation situation where you had really fast point-to-point transportation. It would probably be some weird bullet train setup; maybe that would make sense. But in general, there's no reason to build a city like that. Even if you wanted to build an entirely enclosed thing (which again doesn't make a huge amount of sense), you would save so much material and effort if you just made it a cube. I would be more interested in the cube than the line. [laughs] But yeah, those are my initial thoughts on it. I will be surprised if it ever gets built. Dwarkesh Patel Are you talking about the cube from the meme about how you can put all the humans in the world in a cube the size of Manhattan? Brian Potter Something like that. If you're just going to build this big, giant megastructure, at least take advantage of what that gets you, which is minimum surface area to volume ratio.Dwarkesh Patel Why is that important? Would it be important for temperature or perhaps other features? Brian Potter This is actually interesting because I'm actually not sure how sure it would work with a giant single city. In general, a lot of economies of scale come from geometric effects. When something gets bigger, your volume increases a lot faster than your surface area does. So for something enclosed, like a tank or a pipe, the cost goes down per thing of unit you're transporting because you can carry a larger amount or a smaller amount of material. It applies to some extent with buildings and construction because the exterior wall assembly is a really burdensome, complicated, and expensive assembly. A building with a really big floor plate, for instance, can get more area per unit, per amount of exterior wall. I'm not sure how that actually works with a single giant enclosed structure because, theoretically, on a small level, it would apply the same way. Your climate control is a function of your exterior surface, at some level, and you get more efficient climate control if you have a larger volume and less area that it can escape from. But for a giant city, I actually don't know if that works, and it may be worse because you're generating so much heat that it's now harder to pump out. For examples like the urban heat island effect, where these cities generate massive amounts of waste heat, I don't know if that would work if it didn't apply the same way. I'm trying to reach back to my physics classes in college, so I'm not sure about the actual mechanics of that. Generally though, that's why you'd want to perhaps build something of this size and shape. Dwarkesh Patel What was the thought process behind designing this thing? Because Scott Alexander had a good blog post about The Line where he said, presumably, that The Line is designed to take up less space and to use less fuel because you can just use the same transportation across. But the only thing that Saudi Arabia has is space and fuel. So what is the thought process behind this construction project? Brian PotterI get the sense that a lot of committees have some amount of success in building big, impressive, physical construction projects that are an attraction just by virtue of their size and impressiveness. A huge amount of stuff in Dubai is something in this category, and they have that giant clock tower in Jeddah, the biggest giant clock building and one of the biggest buildings in the world, or something like that. I think, on some level, they're expecting that you would just see a return from building something that's really impressive or “the biggest thing on some particular axis”. So to some extent, I think they're just optimizing for big and impressive and maybe not diving into it more than that. There's this theory that I think about every so often. It's called the garbage can theory of organizational decision-making, which basically talks about how the choices that organizations make are not the result of any particular recent process. They are the result of how, whenever a problem comes up, people reach into the garbage can of potential solutions. Then whatever they pull out of the garbage can, that's the decision that they end up going with, regardless of how much sense it makes. It was a theory that was invented by academics to describe decision-making in academia. I think about that a lot, especially with reference to big bureaucracies and governments. You can just imagine the draining process of how these decisions evolve. Any random decision can be made, especially when there's such a disconnect between the decision-makers and technical knowledge.Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures Dwarkesh PatelTell me about your eBay arbitrage with designer clothes. Brian Potter Oh man, you really did dive deep. Yeah, so this was a small business that I ran seven or eight years ago at this point. A hobby of mine was high-end men's fashion for a while, which is a very strange hobby for an engineer to have, but there you go. That hobby centers around finding cheap designer stuff, because buying new can be overwhelmingly expensive. However, a lot of times, you can get clothes for a very cheap price if you're even a little bit motivated. Either it shows up on eBay, or it shows up in thrift stores if you know what to look for. A lot of these clothes can last because they're well-made. They last a super, super, super long time–– even if somebody wore it for 10 years or something, it could be fine. So a lot of this hobby centered around finding ways to get really nice clothes cheaply. Majority of it was based around eBay, but it was really tedious to find really nice stuff on eBay. You had to manually search for a bunch of different brands, filter out the obviously bad ones, search for typos in brands, put in titles, and stuff like that. I was in the process of doing this, and I thought, “Oh, this is really annoying. I should figure out a way to automate this process.” So I made a very simple web app where when you searched for shoes or something, it would automatically search the very nice brands of shoes and all the typos of the brand name. Then it would just filter out all the junk and let you search through the good stuff. I set up an affiliate system, basically. So anybody else that used it, I would get a kick of the sales. While I was interested in that hobby, I ran this website for a few years, and it was reasonably successful. It was one of the first things I did that got any real traction on the internet, but it was never successful in proportion to how much effort it took to maintain and update it. So as I moved away from the hobby, I eventually stopped putting time and effort into maintaining the website. I'm curious as to how you even dug that up. Dwarkesh Patel I have a friend who was with you at the Oxford Refugees Conference, Connor Tabarrok. I don't know if you remember him. Brian Potter Nice. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Finding other information about you on the internet was quite difficult actually. You've somehow managed to maintain your anonymity. If you're willing to reveal, what was the P&L of this project? Brian Potter Oh, it made maybe a few hundred dollars a month for a few years, but I only ever ran it as a side hobby business, basically. So in terms of time per my effort or whatever, I'm sure it was very low. Pennies to an hour or something like that. Unique Woes of The Construction Industry   Dwarkesh Patel A broad theme that I've gotten from your post is that the construction industry is plagued with these lossy feedback loops, a lack of strong economies of scale, regulation, and mistakes being very costly. Do you think that this is a general characteristic of many industries in our world today, or is there something unique about construction? Brian Potter Interesting question. One thing you think of is that there are a lot of individual factors that are not unique at all. Construction is highly regulated, but it's not necessarily more regulated than medical devices or jet travel, or even probably cars, to some extent, which have a whole vat of performance criteria they need to hit. With a couple of things like land use, for example, people say, “Oh, the land requirements, could you build it on-site,” explaining how those kinds of things make it difficult. But there is a lot that falls into this category that doesn't really share the same structure of how the construction industry works.I think it's the interaction of all those effects. One thing that I think is perhaps underappreciated is that the systems of a building are really highly coupled in a way that a lot of other things are. If you're manufacturing a computer, the hard drive is somewhat independent from the display and somewhat independent from the power supply. These things are coupled, but they can be built by independent people who don't necessarily even talk to each other before being assembled into one structured thing. A building is not really like that at all. Every single part affects every single other part. In some ways, it's like biology. So it's very hard to change something that doesn't end up disrupting something else. Part of that is because a job's building is to create a controlled interior environment, meaning, every single system has to run through and around the surfaces that are creating that controlled interior. Everything is touching each other. Again, that's not unique. Anything really highly engineered, like a plane or an iPhone, share those characteristics to some extent. In terms of the size of it and the relatively small amount you're paying in terms of unit size or unit mass, however, it's quite low. Dwarkesh Patel Is transportation cost the fundamental reason you can't have as much specialization and modularity?Brian Potter Yeah, I think it's really more about just the way a building is. An example of this would be how for the electrical system of your house, you can't have a separate box where if you needed to replace the electrical system, you could take the whole box out and put the new box in. The electrical system runs through the entire house. Same with plumbing. Same with the insulation. Same with the interior finishes and stuff like that. There's not a lot of modularity in a physical sense. Dwarkesh Patel Gotcha. Ben Kuhn  had this interesting comment on your article where he pointed out that many of the reasons you give for why it's hard to innovate in construction, like sequential dependencies and the highly variable delivery timelines are also common in software where Ben Koon works. So why do you think that the same sort of stagnation has not hit other industries that have superficially similar characteristics, like software? Brian Potter How I think about that is that you kind of see a similar structure in anything that's project-based or anything where there's an element of figuring out what you're doing while you're doing it. Compared to a large-scale manufacturing option where you spend a lot of time figuring out what exactly it is that you're building. You spend a lot of time designing it to be built and do your first number of runs through it, then you tweak your process to make it more efficient. There's always an element of tweaking it to make it better, but to some extent, the process of figuring out what you're doing is largely separate from the actual doing of it yourself. For a project-based industry, it's not quite like that. You have to build your process on the fly. Of course, there are best practices that shape it, right? For somebody writing a new software project or anything project-based, like making a movie, they have a rough idea for how it's going to go together. But there's going to be a lot of unforeseen things that kind of come up like that. The biggest difference is that either those things can often scale in a way that you can't with a building. Once you're done with the software project, you can deploy it to 1,000 or 100,000, or 1 million people, right? Once you finish making a movie, 100 million people can watch it or whatever. It doesn't quite look the same with a building. You don't really have the ability to spend a lot of time upfront figuring out how this thing needs to go. You kind of need to figure out a way to get this thing together without spending a huge amount of time that would be justified by the sheer size of it. I was able to dig up a few references for software projects and how often they just have these big, long tails. Sometimes they just go massively, massively over budget. A lot of times, they just don't get completed at all, which is shocking, but because of how many people it can then be deployed to after it's done, the economics of it are slightly different. Dwarkesh Patel I see, yeah. There's a famous law in software that says that a project will take longer than you expect even after you recount for the fact that it will take longer than you expect. Brian Potter Yeah. Hofstadter's law or something like that is what I think it is. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. I'm curious about what the lack of skill in construction implies for startups. Famously, in software, the fact that there's zero marginal cost to scaling to the next customer is a huge boon to a startup, right? The entire point of which is scaling exponentially. Does that fundamentally constrain the size and quantity of startups you can have in construction if the same scaling is not available?Brian Potter Yeah, that's a really good question. The obvious first part of the answer is that for software, obviously, if you have a construction software company, you can scale it just like any other software business. For physical things, it is a lot more difficult. This lack of zero marginal cost has tended to fight a lot of startups, not just construction ones. But yeah, it's definitely a thing. Construction is particularly brutal because the margins are so low. The empirical fact is that trying what would be a more efficient method of building doesn't actually allow you to do it cheaper and get better margins. The startup that I used to work at, Katerra, their whole business model was basically predicated on that. “Oh, we'll just build all our buildings in these big factories, get huge economies of scale, reduce our costs, and then recoup the billions of dollars that we're pumping into this industry or business.” The math just does not work out. You can't build. In general, you can't build cheap enough to kind of recoup those giant upfront costs. A lot of businesses have been burned that way. The most success you see in prefabrication type of stuff is on the higher end of things where you can get higher margins. A lot of these prefab companies and stuff like that tend to target the higher end of the market, and you see a few different premiums for that. Obviously, if you're targeting the higher end, you're more likely to have higher margins. If you're building to a higher level of quality, that's easier to do in a factory environment. So the delta is a lot different, less enormous than it would be. Building a high level of quality is easier to do in a factory than it is in the field, so a lot of buildings or houses that are built to a really high level of energy performance, for instance, need a really, really high level of air sealing to minimize how much energy this house uses. You tend to see a lot more houses like that built out of prefab construction and other factory-built methods because it's just physically more difficult to achieve that on-site. The Problems of Prefabrication Dwarkesh Patel Can you say more about why you can't use prefabrication in a factory to get economies of scale? Is it just that the transportation costs will eat away any gains you get? What is going on? Brian PotterThere's a combination of effects. I haven't worked through all this, we'll have to save this for the next time. I'll figure it out more by then. At a high level, it's that basically the savings that you get from like using less labor or whatever is not quite enough to offset your increased transportation costs. One thing about construction, especially single-family home construction, is that a huge percentage of your costs are just the materials that you're using, right? A single-family home is roughly 50% labor and 50% materials for the construction costs. Then you have development costs, land costs, and things like that. So a big chunk of that, you just can't move to the factory at all, right?  You can't really build a foundation in a factory. You could prefab the foundation, but it doesn't gain you anything. Your excavation still has to be done on-site, obviously. So a big chunk can't move to the factory at all. For ones that can, you still basically have to pay the same amount for materials. Theoretically, if you're building truly huge volume, you could get material volume discounts, but even then, it's probably not looking at things like asset savings. So you can cut out a big chunk of your labor costs, and you do see that in factory-built construction, right? These prefab companies are like mobile home companies. They have a small fraction of labor as their costs, which is typical of a factory in general, but then they take out all that labor cost while they still have their high material costs, and then they have overhead costs of whatever the factory has cost them. Then you have your additional overhead cost of just transporting it to site, which is pretty limited. The math does not really work out in favor of prefab, in terms of being able to make the cost of building dramatically cheaper. You can obviously build a building in a prefab using prefab-free methods and build a successful construction business, right? Many people do. But in terms of dramatically lowering your costs, you don't really see that. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah. Austin Vernon has an interesting blog post about why there's not more prefabricated homes. The two things he points out were transportation costs, and the other one was that people prefer to have homes that have unique designs or unique features. When I was reading it, it actually occurred to me that maybe they're actually both the result of the same phenomenon. I don't know if I'm pronouncing it correctly, but have you heard of the Alchian-Allen theorem in economics? Brian Potter Maybe, but I don't think so. Dwarkesh Patel Basically, it's the idea that if you increase the cost of some category of goods in a fixed way––let's say you tax oranges and added a $1 tax to all oranges, or transportation for oranges gets $1 more expensive for all oranges––people will shift consumption towards the higher grade variety because now, the ratio of the cost between the higher, the more expensive orange and the less expensive orange has decreased because of the increase in fixed costs. It seems like you could use that argument to also explain why people have strong preferences for uniqueness and all kinds of design in manufactured houses. Since transportation costs are so high, that's basically a fixed cost, and that fixed cost has the effect of making people shift consumption towards higher-grade options. I definitely think that's true. Brian PotterI would maybe phrase this as, “The construction industry makes it relatively comparatively cheap to deliver a highly customized option compared to a really repetitive option.” So yeah, the ratio between a highly customized one and just a commodity one is relatively small. So you see a kind of industry built around delivering somewhat more customized options. I do think that this is a pretty broad intuition that people just desire too much customization from their homes. That really prevents you from having a mass-produced offering. I do think that is true to some extent. One example is the Levittown houses, which were originally built in huge numbers–– exactly the same model over and over again. Eventually, they had to change their business model to be able to deliver more customized options because the market shipped it. I do think that the effect of that is basically pretty overstated. Empirically, you see that in practice, home builders and developers will deliver fairly repetitive housing. They don't seem to have a really hard time doing that. As an example, I'm living in a new housing development that is just like three or four different houses copy-pasted over and over again in a group of 50. The developer is building a whole bunch of other developments that are very similar in this area. My in-laws live in a very similar development in a whole different state. If you just look like multi-family or apartment housing, it's identical apartments, you know, copy-pasted over and over again in the same building or a bunch of different buildings in the same development. You're not seeing huge amounts of uniqueness in these things. People are clearly willing to just live in these basically copy-pasted apartments. It's also quite possible to get a pretty high amount of product variety using a relatively small number of factors that you vary, right? I mean, the car industry is like this, where there are enough customization options. I was reading this book a while ago that was basically pushing back against the idea that the car industry pre-fifties and sixties we just offering a very uniform product. They basically did the math, and the number of customization options on their car was more than the atoms in the universe. Basically just, there are so many different options. All the permutations, you know, leather seats and this type of stereo and this type of engine, if you add it all up, there's just a huge, massive number of different combinations. Yeah, you can obviously customize the house a huge amount, just by the appliances that you have and the finishes that are in there and the paint colors that you choose and the fixtures and stuff like that. It would not really theoretically change the underlying way the building comes together. So regarding the idea that the fundamental demand for variety is a major obstruction, I don't think there's a whole lot of evidence for that in the construction industry. If Construction Regulation Vanished… Dwarkesh Patel I asked Twitter about what I should ask you, and usually, I don't get interesting responses but the quality of the people and the audience that knows who you are was so high that actually, all the questions I got were fascinating. So I'm going to ask you some questions from Twitter. Brian Potter Okay. Dwarkesh Patel 0:26:45Connor Tabarrok asks, “What is the most unique thing that would or should get built in the absence of construction regulation?”Brian Potter Unique is an interesting qualifier. There are a lot of things that just like should get built, right? Massive amounts of additional housing and creating more lands in these really dense urban environments where we need it, in places like San Francisco–– just fill in a big chunk of that bay. It's basically just mud flat and we should put more housing on it. “Unique thing” is more tricky. One idea that I really like (I read this in the book, The Book Where's My Flying Car),  is that it's basically crazy that our cities are designed with roads that all intersect with each other. That's an insane way to structure a material flow problem. Any sane city would be built with multiple layers of like transportation where each one went in a different direction so your flows would just be massively, massively improved. That just seems like a very obvious one.If you're building your cities from scratch and had your druthers, you would clearly want to build them and know how big they were gonna get, right? So you could plan very long-term in a way that so these transportation systems didn't intersect with each other, which, again, almost no cities did. You'd have the space to scale them or run as much throughput through them as you need without bringing the whole system to a halt. There's a lot of evidence saying that cities tend to scale based on how much you can move from point A to point B through them. I do wonder whether if you changed the way they went together, you could unlock massively different cities. Even if you didn't unlock massive ones, you could perhaps change the agglomeration effects that you see in cities if people could move from point A to point B much quicker than they currently can. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, I did an episode about the book, where's my flying car with Rohit Krishnan. I don't know if we discussed this, but an interesting part of the book is where he talks about transistor design. If you design transistors this way, can you imagine how slow they would be? [laughs] Okay, so Simon Grimm asks, “What countries are the best at building things?”Brian Potter This is a good question. I'm going to sort of cheat a little bit and do it in terms of space and time, because I think most countries that are doing a good job at building massive amounts of stuff are not ones that are basically doing it currently.The current answer is like China, where they just keep building–– more concrete was used in the last 20 years or so than the entire world used in the time before that, right? They've accomplished massive amounts of urbanization, and built a lot of really interesting buildings and construction. In terms of like raw output, I would also put Japan in the late 20th century on there. At the peak of the concern and wonder of “Is Japan gonna take over the world?”, they were really interested in building stuff quite quickly. They spent a lot of time and effort trying to use their robotics expertise to try to figure out how to build buildings a lot more quickly. They had these like really interesting factories that were designed to basically extrude an entire skyscraper just going up vertically.All these big giant companies and many different factories were trying to develop and trying to do this with robotics. It was a really interesting system that did not end up ever making economic sense, but it is very cool. I think big industrial policy organs of the government basically encouraged a lot of these industrial companies to basically develop prefabricated housing systems. So you see a lot of really interesting systems developed from these sort of industrial companies in a way that you don't see in a lot of other places. From 1850 to maybe 1970 (like a hundred years or something), the US was building huge massive amounts of stuff in a way that lifted up huge parts of the economy, right? I don't know how many thousands of miles of railroad track the US built between like 1850 and 1900, but it was many, many, many thousands of miles of it. Ofcourse, needing to lay all this track and build all these locomotives really sort of forced the development of the machine tool industry, which then led to the development of like better manufacturing methods and interchangeable parts, which of course then led to the development of the automotive industry. Then ofcourse, that explosion just led to even more big giant construction projects. So you really see that this ability to build just big massive amounts of stuff in this virtuous cycle with the US really advanced a lot of technology to raise the standard of development for a super long period of time. So those are my three answers. China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, and JapanDwarkesh Patel Those three bring up three additional questions, one for each of them! That's really interesting. Have you read The Power Broker, the book about Robert Moses? Brian Potter I think I got a 10th of the way through it. Dwarkesh Patel That's basically a whole book in itself, a 10th of the way. [laughs] I'm a half of the way through, and so far it's basically about the story of how this one guy built a startup within the New York state government that was just so much more effective at building things, didn't have the same corruption and clientelism incompetence. Maybe it turns into tragedy in the second half, but so far it's it seems like we need this guy. Where do we get a second Robert Moses? Do you think that if you had more people like that in government or in construction industries, public works would be more effectively built or is the stagnation there just a result of like other bigger factors? Brian Potter That's an interesting question. I remember reading this article a while ago that was complaining about how horrible Penn Station is in New York. They're basically saying, “Yeah, it would be nice to return to the era of like the sort of unbound technocrat” when these technical experts in high positions of power in government could essentially do whatever they wanted to some extent. If they thought something should be built somewhere, they basically had the power to do it. It's a facet of this problem of how it's really, really hard to get stuff built in the US currently. I'm sure that a part of it is that you don't see these really talented technocrats occupy high positions of government where they can get stuff done. But it's not super obvious to me whether that's the limiting factor. I kind of get the sense that they would end up being bottlenecked by some other part of the process. The whole sort of interlocking set of institutions has just become so risk averse that they would end up just being blocked in a way that they wouldn't when they were operating in the 1950s or 1960s.Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah, that's interesting. All right, so speaking of Japan, I just recently learned about the construction there and how they just keep tearing stuff down every 30 to 40 years and rebuilding it. So you have an interesting series of posts on how you would go about building a house or a building that lasts for a thousand years. But I'm curious, how would you build a house or a building that only lasts for 30 or 40 years? If you're building in Japan and you know they're gonna tear it down soon, what changes about the construction process? Brian Potter Yeah, that's interesting. I mean, I'm not an expert on Japanese construction, but I think like a lot of their interior walls are basically just paper and stuff like that. I actually think it's kind of surprising that last time I looked, for a lot of their homes, they use a surprising post and beam construction method, which is actually somewhat labor-intensive to do. The US in the early 1800s used a pretty similar method. Then once we started mass producing conventional lumber, we stopped doing that because it was much cheaper to build out of two-by-fours than it was to build big heavy posts. I think the boring answer to that question is that we'd build like how we build mobile homes–– essentially just using pretty thin walls, pretty low-end materials that are put together in a minimal way. This ends up not being that different from the actual construction method that single-family homes use. It just even further economizes and tightens the use of materials–– where a single-family home might use a half inch plywood, they might try to use three-sixteenths or even an eighth inch plywood or something like that. So we'd probably build a pretty similar way to the way most single-family homes and multi-family homes are built currently, but just with even tighter use of materials which perhaps is something that's not super nice about the way that you guys build your homes. But... [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel Okay, so China is the third one here. There's been a lot of talk about a potential real estate bubble in China because they're building housing in places where people don't really need it. Of course, maybe the demographics aren't there to support the demand. What do you think of all this talk? I don't know if you're familiar with it, but is there a real estate bubble that's created by all this competence in building? Brian PotterOh, gosh, yeah, I have no idea. Like you, I've definitely heard talk of it and I've seen the little YouTube clips of them knocking down all these towers that it turns out they didn't need or the developer couldn't, finish or whatever. I don't know a huge amount about that. In general, I wish I knew a lot more about how things are built in China, but the information is in general, so opaque. I generally kind of assume that any particular piece of data that comes out of China has giant error bars on it as to whether it's true or not or what the context surrounding it is. So in general, I do not have a hard opinion about that. Dwarkesh Patel This is the second part of Simon's question, does greater competence and being able to build stuff translate into other good outcomes for these countries like higher GDP or lower rents or other kinds of foreign outcomes? Brian Potter That's a good question. Japan is an interesting place where basically people point to it as an example of, “Here's a country that builds huge amounts of housing and they don't have housing cost increases.” In general, we should expect that dynamic to be true. Right? There's no reason to not think that housing costs are essentially a supply-demand problem where if you built as much as people wanted, the cost would drop. I have no reason to not think that's true. There is a little bit of evidence that sort of suggests that it's impossible to build housing enough to overcome this sort of mechanical obstacle where the cost of it tends to match and rise to whatever people's income level are. The peak and the sort of flattening of housing costs in Japan also parallel when people basically stopped getting raises and income stopped rising in Japan. So I don't have a good sense of, if it ends up being just more driven by some sort of other factors. Generally though I expect the very basic answer of “If you build a lot more houses, the housing will become cheaper.”Dwarkesh PatelRight. Speaking of how the land keeps gaining value as people's income go up, what is your opinion on Georgism? Does that kind of try and make you think that housing is a special asset that needs to be more heavily taxed because you're not inherently doing something productive just by owning land the way you would be if you like built a company or something similar?Brian Potter I don't have any special deep knowledge of Georgism. It's on my list of topics to read more deeply about. I do think in general, taxing encourages you to produce less of something for something that you can't produce less of. It's a good avenue for something to tax more heavily. And yeah, obviously if you had a really high land value tax in these places that have a lot of single-family homes in dense urban areas, like Seattle or San Francisco, that would probably encourage people to use the land a lot more efficiently. So it makes sense to me, but I don't have a ton of special knowledge about it. Dwarkesh Patel All right, Ben Kuhn asked on Twitter, “What construction-related advice would you give to somebody building a new charter city?”Brian Potter That is interesting. I mean, just off the top of my head, I would be interested in whether you could really figure out a way to build using a method that had really high upfront costs. I think it could otherwise be justified, but if you're gonna build 10,000 buildings or whatever all at once, you could really take advantage of that. One kind of thing that you see in the sort of post-World War II era is that we're building huge massive amounts of housing, and a lot of times we're building them all in one place, right? A lot of town builders were building thousands and thousands of houses in one big development all at once. In California, it's the same thing, you just built like 6 or 10 or 15,000 houses in one big massive development. You end up seeing something like that where they basically build this like little factory on their construction site, and then use that to like fabricate all these things. Then you have something that's almost like a reverse assembly line where a crew will go to one house and install the walls or whatever, and then go to the next house and do the same thing. Following right behind them would be the guys doing the electrical system, plumbing, and stuff like that. So this reverse assembly line system would allow you to sort of get these things up really, really fast, in 30 days or something like that. Then you could have a whole house or just thousands and thousands of houses at once. You would want to be able to do something similar where you could just not do the instruction the way that the normal construction is done, but that's hard, right? Centrally planned cities or top-down planned cities never seem to do particularly well, right? For example, the city of Brasilia, the one that was supposed to be a planned city— the age it goes back to the unfettered technocrat who can sort of build whatever he wants. A lot of times, what you want is something that will respond at a low level and organically sort out the factories as they develop. You don't want something that's totally planned from the top-down, that's disconnected from all the sorts of cases on the ground. A lot of the opposition to Robert Moses ended up being that in a certain form, right? He's bulldozing through these cities that are these buildings and neighborhoods that he's not paying attention to at all. So I think, just to go back to the question, trying to plan your city from the top down doesn't have a super, super great track record. In general, you want your city to develop a little bit more organically. I guess I would think to have a good sort of land-use rules that are really thought through well and encourage the things that you want to encourage and not discourage the things that you don't want to discourage. Don't have equity in zoning and allow a lot of mixed-use construction and stuff like that. I guess that's a somewhat boring answer, but I'd probably do something along those lines. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting, interesting. I guess that implies that there would be high upfront costs to building a city because if you need to build 10,000 homes at once to achieve these economies of scale, then you would need to raise like tens of billions of dollars before you could build a charter city. Brian Potter Yeah, if you were trying to lower your costs of construction, but again, if you have the setup to do that, you wouldn't necessarily need to raise it. These other big developments were built by developers that essentially saw an opportunity. They didn't require public funding to do it. They did in the form of loan guarantees for veterans and things like that, but they didn't have the government go and buy the land. Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies Dwarkesh Patel Right, okay, so the next question is from Austin Vernon. To be honest, I don't understand the question, you two are too smart for me, but hopefully, you'll be able to explain the question and then also answer it. What are your power rankings for technologies that can tighten construction tolerances? Then he gives examples like ARVR, CNC cutting, and synthetic wood products. Brian Potter Yeah, so this is a very interesting question. Basically, because buildings are built manually on site by hand, there's just a lot of variation in what ends up being built, right? There's only so accurately that a person can put something in place if they don't have any sort of age or stuff like that. Just the placement itself of materials tends to have a lot of variation in it and the materials themselves also have a lot of variation in them. The obvious example is wood, right? Where one two by four is not gonna be exactly the same as another two by four. It may be warped, it may have knots in it, it may be split or something like that. Then also because these materials are sitting just outside in the elements, they sort of end up getting a lot of distortion, they either absorb moisture and sort of expand and contract, or they grow and shrink because of the heat. So there's just a lot of variation that goes into putting a building up.To some extent, it probably constrains what you are able to build and how effectively you're able to build it. I kind of gave an example before of really energy efficient buildings and they're really hard to build on-site using conventional methods because the air ceiling is quite difficult to do. You have to build it in a much more precise way than what is typically done and is really easily achieved on-site. So I guess in terms of examples of things that would make that easier, he gives some good ones like engineered lumber, which is where you take lumber and then grind it up into strands or chips or whatever and basically glue them back together–– which does a couple of things. It spreads all the knots and the defects out so they are concentrated and everything tends to be a lot more uniform when it's made like that. So that's a very obvious one that's already in widespread use. I don't really see that making a substantial change.I guess the one exception to that would be this engineered lumber product called mass timber elements, CLT, which is like a super plywood. Plywood is made from tiny little sheet thin strips of wood, right? But CLT is made from two-by-four-dimensional lumber glued across laminated layers. So instead of a 4 by 9 sheet of plywood, you have a 12 by 40 sheet of dimensional lumber glued together. You end up with a lot of the properties of engineered material where it's really dimensionally stable. It can be produced very, very accurately. It's actually funny that a lot of times, the CLT is the most accurate part of the building. So if you're building a building with it, you tend to run into problems where the rest of the building is not accurate enough for it. So even with something like steel, if you're building a steel building, the steel is not gonna be like dead-on accurate, it's gonna be an inch or so off in terms of where any given component is. The CLT, which is built much more accurately, actually tends to show all these errors that have to be corrected. So in some sense, accuracy or precision is a little bit of like a tricky thing because you can't just make one part of the process more precise. In some ways that actually makes things more difficult because if one part is really precise, then a lot of the time, it means that you can't make adjustments to it easily. So if you have this one really precise thing, it usually means you have to go and compensate for something else that is not built quite as precisely. It actually makes advancing precision quite a bit more complicated. AR VR, is something I'm very bullish on. A big caveat of that is assuming that they can just get the basic technology working. The basic intuition there is that right now the way that pieces are, when a building is put together on site, somebody is looking at a set of paper plans, or an iPad or something that tells them where everything needs to go. So they figure that out and then they take a tape measure or use some other method and go figure out where that's marked on the ground. There's all this set-up time that is really quite time consuming and error prone. Again, there's only so much accuracy that a guy dragging a tape 40 feet across site being held by another guy can attain, there's a limit to how accurate that process can be. It's very easy for me to imagine that AR would just project exactly where the components of your building need to go. That would A, allow you a much higher level of accuracy that you can easily get using manual methods. And then B, just reduce all that time it takes to manually measure things. I can imagine it being much, much, much faster as well, so I'm quite bullish on that. At a high level and a slightly lower level, it's not obvious to me if they will be able to get to the level where it just projects it with perfect accuracy right in front of you. It may be the case that a person moving their head around and constantly changing their point of view wont ever be able to project these things with millimeter precision––it's always gonna be a little bit jumpy or you're gonna end up with some sort of hard limit in terms of like how precisely you can project it. My sense is that locator technology will get good enough, but I don't have any principle reason believing that. The other thing is that being able to take advantage of that technology would require you to have a really, really accurate model of your building that locates where every single element is precisely and exactly what its tolerances are. Right now, buildings aren't designed like that, they are built using a comparatively sparse set of drawings that leaves a lot to sort of be interpreted by the people on site doing the work and efforts that have tried to make these models really, really, really precise, have not really paid off a lot of times. You can get returns on it if you're building something really, really complex where there's a much higher premium to being able to make sure you don't make any error, but for like a simple building like a house, the returns just aren't there. So you see really comparatively sparse drawings. Whether it's gonna be able to work worth this upfront cost of developing this really complex, very precise model of where exactly every component is still has to be determined. There's some interesting companies that are trying to move in this direction where they're making it a lot easier to draw these things really, really precisely and whave every single component exactly where it is. So I'm optimistic about that as well, but it's a little bit TBD. Dwarkesh Patel This raises a question that I actually wanted to ask you, which is in your post about why there aren't automatic brick layers. It was a really interesting post. Somebody left in an interesting comment saying that bricks were designed to be handled and assembled by humans. Then you left a response to that, which I thought was really interesting. You said, “The example I always reach for is with steam power and electricity, where replacing a steam engine with an electric motor in your factory didn't do much for productivity. Improving factory output required totally redesigning the factory around the capabilities of electric motors.” So I was kind of curious about if you apply that analogy to construction, then what does that look like for construction? What is a house building process or building building process that takes automation and these other kinds of tools into account? How would that change how buildings are built and how they end up looking in the end? Brian Potter I think that's a good question. One big component of the lack of construction productivity is everything was designed and has evolved over 100 years or 200 years to be easy for a guy or person on the site to manipulate by hand. Bricks are roughly the size and shape and weight that a person can move it easily around. Dimensional lumber is the same. It's the size and shape and weight that a person can move around easily. And all construction materials are like this and the way that they attach together and stuff is the same. It's all designed so that a person on site can sort of put it all together with as comparatively little effort as possible. But what is easy for a person to do is usually not what is easy for a machine or a robot to do, right? You typically need to redesign and think about what your end goal is and then redesign the mechanism for accomplishing that in terms of what is easy to get to make a machine to do. The obvious example here is how it's way easier to build a wagon or a cart that pulls than it is to build a mechanical set of legs that mimics a human's movement. That's just way, way, way easier. I do think that a big part of advancing construction productivity is to basically figure out how to redesign these building elements in a way that is really easy for a machine to produce and a machine to put together. One reason that we haven't seen it is that a lot of the mechanization you see is people trying to mechanize exactly what a person does. You'd need a really expensive industrial robot that can move exactly the way that a human moves more or less. What that might look like is basically something that can be really easily extruded by a machine in a continuous process that wouldn't require a lot of finicky mechanical movements. A good example of this technology is technology that's called insulated metal panels, which is perhaps one of the cheapest and easiest ways to build an exterior wall. What it is, is it's just like a thin layer of steel. Then on top of that is a layer of insulation. Then on top of that is another layer of steel. Then at the end, the steel is extruded in such a way that it can like these inner panels can like lock together as they go. It's basically the simplest possible method of constructing a wall that you can imagine. But that has the structural system and the water barrier, air barrier, and insulation all in this one really simple assembly. Then when you put it together on site, it just locks together. Of course there are a lot of limitations to this. Like if you want to do anything on top of like add windows, all of a sudden it starts to look quite a bit less good. I think things that are really easy for a machine to do can be put together without a lot of persistent measurement or stuff like that in-field. They can just kind of snap together and actually want to fit together. I think that's kind of what it looks like. 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of LabourDwarkesh Patel What would the houses or the buildings that are built using this physically look like? Maybe in 50 to 100 years, we'll look back on the houses we have today and say, “Oh, look at that artisanal creation made by humans.” What is a machine that is like designed for robots first or for automation first? In more interesting ways, would it differ from today's buildings? Brian Potter That's a good question. I'm not especially bullish on 3D building printing in general, but this is another example of a building using an extrusion process that is relatively easy to mechanize. What's interesting there is that when you start doing that, a lot of these other bottlenecks become unlocked a little bit. It's very difficult to build a building using a lot of curved exterior surfaces using conventional methods. You can do it, it's quite expensive to do, but there's a relatively straightforward way for a 3D-printed building to do that. They can build that as easily as if it was a straight wall. So you see a lot of interesting curved architecture on these creations and in a few other areas. There's a company that can build this cool undulating facade that people kind of like. So yeah, it unlocks a lot of options. Machines are more constrained in some things that they can do, but they don't have a lot of the other constraints that you would otherwise see. So I think you'll kind of see a larger variety of aesthetic things like that. That said, at the end of the day, I think a lot of the ways a house goes together is pretty well shaped to just the way that a person living inside it would like to use. I think Stewart Brand makes this point in––Dwarkesh Patel Oh, How Buildings Learn. Brian Potter There we go. He basically makes the point that a lot of people try to use dome-shaped houses or octagon-shaped houses, which are good because, again, going back to surface area volume, they include lots of space using the least amount of material possible. So in some theoretical sense, they're quite efficient, but it's actually quite inconvenient to live inside of a building with a really curved wall, right? Furniture doesn't fit up against it nicely, and pictures are hard to hang on a really curved wall. So I think you would see less variation than maybe you might expect. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting. So why are you pessimistic about 3D printers? For construction, I mean. Brian Potter Yeah, for construction. Oh God, so many reasons. Not pessimistic, but just there's a lot of other interesting questions. I mean, so the big obvious one is like right now a 3D printer can basically print the walls of a building. That is a pretty small amount of the value in a building, right? It's maybe 7% or 8%, something like that. Probably not more than 10% of the value in a building. Because you're not printing the foundation, you're not printing like the overhead vertical, or the overhead spanning structure of the building. You're basically just printing the walls. You're not even really printing the second story walls that you have in multiple stories. I don't think they've quite figured that out yet. So it's a pretty small amount of value added to the building. It's frankly a task that is relatively easy to do by manual labor. It's really pretty easy for a crew to basically put up the structure of a house. This is kind of a recurring theme in mechanization or it goes back to what I was talking about to our previous lead. Where it takes a lot of mechanization and a lot of expensive equipment to replace what basically like two or three guys can do in a day or something like that. The economics of it are pretty brutal. So right now it produces a pretty small value. I think that the value of 3D printing is basically entirely predicated on how successful they are at figuring out how to like deliver more components of the building using their system. There are companies that are trying to do this. There's one that got funded not too long ago called Black Diamond, where they have this crazy system that is like a series of 3D printers that would act simultaneously, like each one building a separate house. Then as you progress, you switch out the print head for like a robot arm. Cause a 3D printer is basically like a robot arm with just a particular manipulator at the end, right?So they switch out their print head for like a robot arm, and the robot arm goes and installs different other systems like the windows or the mechanical systems. So you can figure out how to do that reliably where your print head or your printing system is installing a large fraction of the value of the building. It's not clear to me that it's gonna be economic, but it obviously needs to reach that point. It's not obvious to me that they have gotten there yet. It's really quite hard to get a robot to do a lot of these tasks. For a lot of these players, it seems like they're actually moving away from that. I think in ICON is the biggest construction 3D printer company in the US, as far as I know. And as far as I know, they've moved away from trying to install lots of systems in their walls as they get printed. They've kind of moved on to having that installed separately, which I think has made their job a little bit easier, but again, not quite, it's hard to see how the 3D printer can fulfill its promises if it can't do anything just beyond the vertical elements, whichare really, for most construction, quite cheap and simple to build. Dwarkesh Patel Now, if you take a step back and talk how expensive construction is overall, how much of it can just be explained by the Baumol cost effect? As in labor costs are increasing because labor is more productive than other industries and therefore construction is getting more expensive. Brian Potter I think that's a huge, huge chunk of it. The labor fraction hasn't changed appreciably enough. I haven't actually verified that and I need to, but I remember somebody that said that they used to be much different. You sent me some literature related to it. So let's add a slight asterisk on that. But in general the labor cost has remained a huge fraction of the overall cost of the building. Reliably seeing their costs continue to rise, I think there's no reason to believe that that's not a big part of it. Dwarkesh Patel Now, I know this sounds like a question with an obvious answer, but in your post comparing the prices of construction in different countries, you mentioned how the cost of labor and the cost of materials is not as big a determiner of how expensive it is to construct in different places. But what does matter? Is it the amount of government involvement and administrative overhead? I'm curious why those things (government involvement and administrative overhead) have such a high consequence on the cost of construction. Brian Potter Yeah, that's a good question. I don't actually know if I have a unified theory for that. I mean, basically with any heavily regulated thing, any particular task that you're doing takes longer and is less reliable than it would be if it was not done right. You can't just do it as fast as on your own schedule, right? You end up being bottlenecked by government processes and it reduces and narrows your options. So yeah, in general, I would expect that to kind of be the case, but I actually don't know if I have a unified theory of how that works beyond just, it's a bunch of additional steps at any given part of the process, each of which adds cost. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Now, one interesting trend we have in the United States with construction is that a lot of it is done by Latino workers and especially by undocumented Latino workers. What is the effect of this on the price and the quality of construction? If you have a bunch of hardworking undocumented workers who are working for below-market rates in the US, will this dampen the cost of construction over time? What do you think is going to happen? Brian Potter I suspect that's probably one of the reasons why the US has comparatively low construction costs compared to other parts of the world. Well, I'll caveat that. Residential construction, which is single-family homes and multi-family apartment buildings all built in the US and have light framed wood and are put together, like you said, by a lot of like immigrant workers. Because of that, it would not surprise me if those wages are a lot lower than the equivalent wage for like a carpenter in Germany or something like that. I suspect that's a factor in why our cost of residential construction are quite low. AI's Impact on Construction ProductivityDwarkesh Patel Overall, it seems from your blog post that you're kind of pessimistic, or you don't think that different improvements in industrialization have transferred over to construction yet. But what do you think is a prospect of future advances in AI having a big impact on construction? With computer vision and with advances in robotics, do you think we'll finally see some carry-over into construction productivity or is it gonna be more of the same? Brian Potter Yeah, I think there's definitely gonna be progress on that axis. If you can wire up your computer vision systems, robotic systems, and your AI in such a way that your capabilities for a robot system are more expanded, then I kind of foresee robotics being able to take a larger and larger fraction of the tasks done on a typical construction site. I kind of see it being kind of done in narrow avenues that gradually expand outward. You're starting to see a lot of companies that have some robotic system that can do one particular task, but do that task quite well. There's a couple of different robot companies that have these little robots for like drawing wall layouts on like concrete slabs or whatever. So you know exactly where to build your walls, which you would think would not be like a difficult problem in construction, but it turns out that a lot of times people put the walls in the wrong spot and then you have to go back and move them later or just basically deal with it. So yeah, it's basically a little Roomba type device that just draws the wall layout to the concrete slab and all the other systems as well–– for example, where the lines need to run through the slab and things like that. I suspect that you're just gonna start to see robotics and systems like that take a larger and larger share of the tasks on the construction site over time. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, it's still very far away. It's still very far away. What do you think of Flow? That's Adam Neumann's newest startup and backed with $350 million from Andreeseen Horowitz.Brian Potter I do not have any strong opinions about that other than, “Wow, they've really given him another 350M”. I do not have any particularly strong opinions about this. They made a lot they make a lot of investments that don't make sense to me, but I'm out of venture capital. So there's no reason that my judgment would be any good in this situation–– so I'm just presuming they know something I do not. Dwarkesh Patel I'm going to be interviewing Andreeseen later this month, and I'm hoping I can ask him about that.Brian Potter You know, it may be as simple as he “sees all” about really high variance bets. There's nobody higher variance in the engine than Adam Neumann so, maybe just on those terms, it makes sense. Dwarkesh Patel You had an interesting post about like how a bunch of a lot of the knowledge in the construction industry is informal and contained within best practices or between relationships and expectations that are not articulated all the time. It seems to me that this is also true of software in many cases but software seems much more legible and open source than these other physical disciplines like construction despite having a lot of th

Dirty South Makeup
EP 72: Paige Rabinowitz and Christina Vida On Staying Safe And Having Fun With Special Effects And Halloween Makeup For Your Self Applied And Client Applications

Dirty South Makeup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 74:38


Bring your own barrier foam biddies, we're chatting about staying safe and having fun this halloween for both your own makeups and for client applications. Professional Makeup Artists Paige Rabinowitz and Christina Vida join me in a round table chat debunking common special effects faux pas (not all blood is made for eyes or mouths y'all) and going over the basics of how to use common SFX products from beginner to advanced levels. We hope you find this episode helpful and have a great time this halloween not ripping your eyebrows off with pros-aide! Special thanks to our guests, Paige Rabinowitz IG @artistrybypaigerab website: Www.paigerabinowitz.com and Christina Vida IG @ ChristinaVida_Artistry websites: www.ChristinaVidaArtistry.com https://omniabrush.com/products/omnia-artist-favorites-christina-vida-7pc-bundle About our guests: Paige is a Charlotte, NC based makeup artist & hairstylist. Her journey through the world of makeup and hair started as a love for FX makeup over 6 years ago while in film school which snowballed into a full fledged career as a makeup artist and licensed hairstylist and has taken on a beautiful life of its own. Her slightly chaotic journey through the industry has taken her from CLT to NYC and back again and she's loved every second of it. Christina Vida is a native New Yorker, born and raised in the South Bronx. Christina is a professional special effects makeup artist for the last seven years, working primarily in tv/film. Her shift towards the makeup industry came after working ten years in healthcare. A career where she incorporates bedside manner into her chair-side manner. She also advocates for the current shift in industry culture where artists & creatives are valuing their mental & physical health, as well as safety. Christina is working on her 3rd year with Broadway Cares for their annual Halloween Charity Concert "I Put a Spell on You" at SONY Hall. Listeners can stream the replay for 24 hours beginning at 7 pm Eastern on October 30, on Broadway On Demand. https://www.broadwayondemand.com/series/Tr8bWSHdziof-i-put-a-spell-on-you-alive-at-sony-hall Shoplist all products mentioned, some are affiliate links: https://shopmy.us/rachelrosemakeup ________ PLEASE VOTE. Early voting open in Georgia until 11/4, official election date on 11/8. DM me a pic of your voting sticker and I will mail you a Lipstick Biddies Sticker! More info on polling dates and locationshere: https://www.vote411.org/ NEW! Private Discord Lipstick Biddies Server, free to join for the first 100 to sign up through this link, and included in all patreon memberships! https://discord.gg/N8Kugv63gQ Please support this podcast through Patreon to listen to the full episode and full library of past bonus solo episodes: https://www.patreon.com/lipstickbiddies starts as little as $5, less than the price of a lipstick! Check out each tier to see which one feels right to you. Merch Store and more at lipstickbiddies.com Rachel's Birthday sticker bundle available through 10/31 Sign up for our e-mail list for news on future virtual in-person meetups/appearances, and early access here: https://forms.gle/JJPZqMZz6MUDpmBW7 Follow us on IG and Tiktok @lipstickbiddies @rachelrosemakeup and use #lipstickbiddies Write a review in apple podcasts or rating in Spotify and DM me a screen grab along with your contact info for a special surprise in the mail Subscribe to our channel on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXzO-OQqGjfwr6YxBgMXhjA --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lipstickbiddies/message

Nurture Small Business
A Mission of Safety: Good for Consumers and Business

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 24:54


When you put your company mission first, it will shape every facet of your business. That's how Ryan Margolin, CEO of Professional Hair Labs, grew his family business to the industry exemplar it is today. Pro Hair Labs began with two words in mind: consumer safety. This value made such a splash in the company that its ripples are still felt throughout the beauty industry. Their integrity has informed every business decision. Choosing to follow the strict EU manufacturing guidelines, even when distributing in the US, and taking swift action against counterfeiters being chief among them. Find out how Pro Hair Labs incorporates their mission all the way down to the marketing strategy.  About Your HostDCA Virtual Business Support President, Denise Cagan, has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs.Recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder, Denise enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work-from-home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. With extensive experience in outsourcing solutions that provide administrative, creative, marketing, and website support, she is able to help other small businesses grow and thrive. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan. LinkedIn 

Cooper And Anthony Show
I Don't Wanna Read, Airplane Stories, News Headlines, You Are The Driving Type, Choose A Celebrity Side

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 51:04


I Don't Wanna Read, Airplane Stories, News Headlines, You Are The Driving Type, Choose A Celebrity Side. #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

FOXcast OT
Treating Lymphedema (S3, E7)

FOXcast OT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 24:02


This week on FOX Rehabilitation's Live Better Longer podcast, we are joined by FOX physical therapist and lymphedema therapist, Elizabeth Garfield, PT, CLT, who explores the factors that contribute to lower extremity swelling, edema, and lymphedema in older adult patients.  Elizabeth explains what a clinician can do to treat lymphedemas, such as improving ankle mobility to reduce falls, using compression garments, and decreasing the risk of developing wounds and infections. She also discusses evaluation techniques like the Stemmer Sign and gives examples of how to set simple goals for your patients. Listen: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Amazon Music |  Stitcher | TuneIn | Other Android Apps

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 4: Stro Show, Bouknight Arrested and The Wrap Up

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 38:28


Mac and Bone close down the show by talking about what they should make of the James Bouknight arrest, chatting with Ashley Stroehlein about another chaotic week in CLT sports and wrapping up the show with a tribute to Robbie.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

FOXcast PT
Treating Lymphedema (S3, E7)

FOXcast PT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 24:02


This week on FOX Rehabilitation's Live Better Longer podcast, we are joined by FOX physical therapist and lymphedema therapist, Elizabeth Garfield, PT, CLT, who explores the factors that contribute to lower extremity swelling, edema, and lymphedema in older adult patients.  Elizabeth explains what a clinician can do to treat lymphedemas, such as improving ankle mobility to reduce falls, using compression garments, and decreasing the risk of developing wounds and infections. She also discusses evaluation techniques like the Stemmer Sign and gives examples of how to set simple goals for your patients. Listen: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Amazon Music |  Stitcher | TuneIn | Other Android Apps

Nurture Small Business
StressLess and Grow Your Business More

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 31:25


Let's be honest: the state of the world can feel like a dumpster fire. The pressure entrepreneurs face to maintain a business, a family, and our own lives can build up to a mountain of stress. And when stress snowballs into illness, we can't always afford that sick day. Ellen Leonard, stress management consultant, knows what that's like. She's developed the StressLess Method Ⓡ for business owners to take control of their mental health. Learn how to keep stress from spilling over, and how to help your team do the same.  Be sure to check out Ellen's resources for dealing with burnout and bringing more positivity into your life. About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President Denise Cagan has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs. Denise is recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder. She enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work from home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. She has extensive experience in helping small businesses grow through outsourcing solutions providing administrative, creative, marketing, and website support. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan LinkedIn

Tell Me Why
S5:E10 — ‘We have an incredible team running a reliable hub' — Ralph Lopez

Tell Me Why

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 8:17


In the latest episode of Tell Me Why, Ralph Lopez, VP of CLT Operations, joins Ron DeFeo, Chief Communications Officer, to talk about the work the team is doing in CLT to run a reliable operation. Succeeding in DFW and CLT is critical to our airline's success and the team in CLT is setting an important tone across key dependability metrics. Plus, Ralph and Ron share more about their excitement for the upcoming World Cup.

Nurture Small Business
How to Incorporate Gen Z Into Your Company's Technology

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 25:37


Hackers are finding more creative ways to hold your data hostage every day. To keep them at bay and protect your business, every team member needs to be in the know about your security plan. Denis O'Shea, founder of Mobile Mentor, sheds light on what dramatic changes in business tech could mean for you. Once central to security, passwords are phasing out in favor of multi-factor authentication and biometrics. As our tools and technology evolve, so do workers' perceptions of data protection. Years of data show that personal privacy is one of the biggest concerns of many Gen Z workers. Meanwhile, company security is out of sight and out of mind for this generation. To get your entire team on board with security measures, it will take a new approach. Listen in to the ideas that Denis recommends. About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President Denise Cagan has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs. Denise is recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder. She enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work from home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. She has extensive experience in helping small businesses grow through outsourcing solutions providing administrative, creative, marketing, and website support. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan LinkedIn 

The Mac Attack Podcast
Mac Attack Hour 1: Panthers Blown Out by Niners, CFB Recap and Sounds of the Weekend

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 41:06


Mac and Bone open a Panther Monday by talking about yet another Panther loss, this time a blowout by the Niners, recapping the college football weekend and reacting to the sounds of the weekend from the CLT sports scene.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cooper And Anthony Show
It Was Almost A Three Some, Who is Older? Cooper On Sunrise Australia, Houses Today Aren't Built Like They Used To Be

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 57:20


It Was Almost A Three Some, Who is Older? Cooper On Sunrise Australia, Houses Today Aren't Built Like They Used To Be #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

Nurture Small Business
New Tech Tango Makes Process Documenting Easy

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 23:08


Are you ready to save hours on documentation? Ken Babcock is making it much easier for business owners to document procedures with Tango. His company has developed a browser extension that automatically records your process, step by step, so you don't have to worry about the details. Inspired by his experience at Uber with quick growth and turnover, Ken cares deeply about making knowledge sharing simple. What are you waiting for? Listen now and cut down on time consuming procedures!About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President Denise Cagan has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs. Denise is recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder. She enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work from home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. She has extensive experience in helping small businesses grow through outsourcing solutions providing administrative, creative, marketing, and website support. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan LinkedIn 

The Build Show Podcast
Building in the Near Future

The Build Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 26:01 Very Popular


Today's episode of The Build Show Podcast is part 2 of last week's video, where Matt and Architect Steve Baczek went deep into the building industry's past and present. This week, they'll head for the future and discuss what they see coming down the pipeline. What does the future hold for a well-built house? Is it CLT? Can the building community solve the problems they've created? Don't miss this episode. Do you agree with Matt and Steve?

Cooper And Anthony Show
They Threw A Funeral For Their Friends Straightness, Tom Hanks.. Good Actor or Likable Actor, Long Day of Background Work, Head Lice School

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 52:48


They Threw A Funeral For Their Friends Straightness, Tom Hanks.. Good Actor or Likable Actor, Long Day of Background Work, Head Lice School. #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

The Language of Creativity Podcast
A Literal Pain in the Ass - Elizabeth Makous (Pelvic-Floor Physical Therapist) Ep26

The Language of Creativity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 78:58


“You have pain where?!” People have often asked why a healthy person like me would need physical therapy. They are quite surprised to learn about pelvic-floor therapy… and it's not long before I hear “I have pain there too.” What was once a specialty that not even many obstetricians or urologists knew about, Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy is now a rapidly growing field with an outsized demand for new therapists. Treating conditions like urinary and fecal urgency, incontinence, prolapse, nerve entrapment, surgical scarring, pre and postpartum issues, visceral restrictions and sexual dysfunction, it's not hard to see why. When Elizabeth Makous became a physical therapist over 30 years ago there were only a couple of classes teaching pelvic floor therapy. When seeing a patient complaining of vaginal pain “deep inside” she donned a pair of gloves and began treating patients internally.  Elizabeth has continued to innovate new treatments in the field applying her unique kind of creativity to the world of medicine. After the home birth of her son she figured out a way to treat her own bathroom issues without surgery. She's developed protocols for successfully treating issues previously thought untreatable (even with surgery). She even approached a company called TheraWand to ask if she could make improvements to an existing vaginal wand product to more efficiently treat the pelvic floor rectally. After spending a year with a heat lamp sculpting plastic into the curves she felt would be more safe and effective… she'd created a brand new trigger wand that can be used to treat both men and women. Maybe it was the way she was raised… spending time in the clinic with her father, a doctor, and her mother, a nurse. Her grandfather was also a doctor in this small-town community who treated blacks for free during the segregation era in the South. Their passion spilled over in such a way that when meeting a patient with a need, Elizabeth says “there is a gift inside me that just looks for a way to treat it.” In this episode we talk about the importance of being your own medical advocate, how sitting for a living can be an occupational hazard, treating patients with lymphedema, pain management (without opioids), and how Covid restrictions didn't stop humans from needing touch. We also speak about being a highly-sensitive (HSP), the need for major reform in the emergency mental healthcare system, and how Elizabeth leans on her Catholic Chrisitan faith (for example: she took two medical mission-trips to Kenya in 2019 and 2021 helping to empower African men and women to alleviate pelvic pain and to treat female victims of female genital mutilation). Finally, chronic pain if left untreated can leave people feeling very desperate… and it doesn't have to be that way! Guest: Elizabeth Mackous, MSPT, CLT, PRPC, CES “The Pelvic Whisperer” Website: https://www.pelvicwhisperer.com/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/PelvicWhisperer Instagram: @pelvicwhisperer The Makous Protocol practitioner and patient classes  (Teachable) Information for cancer patients and to find a therapist Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy Episode References: Henry Mayo Hospital Outpatient Therapy Center Valencia, California Debbie Evans (Steve's mom) Dr. David Wise (pelvicpainhelp.com) A Headache in the Pelvis (GoodReads) “Pelvic floor massage for Prostatitis and CPPS with a TheraWand” (The Pelvic Pain Clinic)  Currently available TheraWand products (some products have become unavailable) My Pelvic Floor Muscle | Elizabeth's class on “An Innovative Way To Use Electrical Stimulation For Severe Pelvic Floor Dysfunction U.S. Olympic Team Sexual Abuse lawsuit (The Denver Post) Neptune Beach, Florida (Wikipedia) Elaine Aron: The Highly Sensitive Person Steven Bau: BLDRS Collective Mycelial Networks: The National Forest Foundation Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine Center (Dr. Wu) 750 N Hill St J, Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 680-8782 The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk (GoodReads) Somatic Experiencing International (traumahealing.org / IG: @somaticexperiencingint) Matthew Sanford interview “The Body's Grace”: On Being Dr. Andrew Goldstein: Sexual Medicine Courses for Pelvic Health Practitioners   Language of Creativity's host Steven Leavitt enjoys discussing the ins and outs of all aspects of creating, creativity, and life with his fellow creators, artists, inventors, designers, and producers. Along the way, he gains perspective and multiplies his understanding of our universal potential for creating, living, and learning, Host: Steven Leavitt Site: https://www.icreatesound.com/ Portfolio: http://stevenleavitt.com/   Intro Music: CHEF (music.joshgeenen.com) Midroll piano score: Steven Leavitt Outro music: “Nothing Wrong” by Lobate Scarp   Please review this podcast on Google Play, iTunes, and Stitcher and help other creatives find their tribe! Website: https://thelanguageofcreativity.com/ Facebook Group: The Language of Creativity Discussion Group - Facebook Tags: lymphedema, hiring, stunt people, pelvic floor therapy, injury, stunt-people, orthopedic, recovery, soft-tissue, connective tissue, compression therapy, fracture, preventing blood-clots, circulation, preventing infection, healing, vagina, rectum, testicle, testicular surgery, adema, doctors, nurses, embarrassment, The Stanford Protocol, enlarged prostate, men, women, pain, discomfort, relief, urologist, insurance, wellbeing, release, ischial tuberosity, abdominal tension, blocked, knotted, massage, nerves, surgery, hospital, pandemic, Los Angeles, Santa Clarita, commuters, drive to work, sitting jobs, computer work, gaming, workout culture, lifting, pudendal nerves, spasm, muscles, making people feel at-ease, pelvis, gut, nerves, abdominal pain, GERD, diverticulitis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, hernia, crazy, intuition, fascia, varicocele, vasectomy, nerve entrapment, nerve pathway, ilioinguinal genitofemoral nerve, interconnected, suffering, confusion, radiating pain, driving, audio, editing, movies, sitting, long workdays, tension, chronic pain, long hours, paper-work, desk jobs, ergonomics, standing desks, chairs, back, tension, Googleing, classes, anal release trigger wand, LA, video games, tendons, lumbar spine, hydrocele, Africa, Kenya, creativity, purpose, self-educate, autodidact, gifts, talents, coccyx, tailbone, piriformis, sciatic nerve, internal electrical stim protocol, urinary and bowel incontinence, overactive bladder, medication, accurate diagnosis, healthy, nerve damage, cancer, childbirth, pregnancy, baby, c-section, scars, c section scars, prostate surgery, abdomen, viscera, stomach, release, releasing, embarrasment, diaper, high impact, scar tissue, dead muscle, prolapse, homebirth, son, daughter, pinched, leaking, probe, doctor, kinesthetic learning, professional, teaching, nurse, patient, medical problems, faith, bravery, confidence, Catholicism, Christian, Jesus, service, live your faith, heritage, heal the sick, ministry, sexual abuse, victims, ritual abuse, fracture, bone, PT, stretching, kegels, wrong information, jaw, evaluate, House M.D., nerve pain, surgery, oxycontin, nerve blocks, opioids, opioid epidemic, narcotic, drugs, constipation, constitution, visceral, pain, inflammation, dad-bod, gamer body, severe injuries, adrenaline junkie, broken foot, manual therapy, sensitivity, pee, nervous system, jacked up, ramped up, Princess and the Pea, chronic pain, special sock, socks, fibromyalgia, lipedema, fat cells, massage, touch, big hips, hypermobility, CPS, chronic pain syndrome, hyperactive, downregulate, clinicians, highly sensitive person, HSP, psychologist, The Princess and The Pea, not a disorder, emotional, spiritually sensitive, emotionally sensitive, sensitivity, hear, listen, open, ramped up, spiritual experiences, imagination, electromagnetically sensitive, electromagnet, MRI, depression, lack of exercise, hurts to exercise, neuroplasticity, amblyopia, science, sexual dysfunctions, innnovation, fascia, mycelial networks, soil, permaculture, fungus, soil nerve network, design-scientist, release scar tissue, abdominal surgery, pelvic surgery, visceral work, CT scan, underdiagnosed, be your own advocate,  patient advocacy, episodes, Chinese Medicine, iridology, gastroenterologist, GI, ultrasound, gallstones, cholecystectomy, hopelessness, childbirth pain, suicide stigma, suffering, psych ward, jail, disabled, disability, mental illness, multiple personalities, multiple personality disorder, dissociative identity disorder, psychology, feelings, treatment, psychologist, dissociation, trauma, abuse victim, touch, rape, touch triggers, somatic experiencing, paraplegic, yoga, car accident, release, cry, safe healing touch, trust, cross-body communication, EMDR, pain management, Dr. Goldstein in New York, vulvar dermatology, continuing education, grandbabies, adult children, fitness center, COVID, high-strung, give love, give help, holistic medicine, autoimmune disease, Vitamin D, obese, dark skin, body, bodies, miracle, artists, sitting professions, energy, COVID safe, health

The Summit View Podcast
Catching up with a true Carnivore ft. (Matt Lawrence)

The Summit View Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 54:01


Tim host's a special guest from his hometown - Matt Lawrence (@thecarnivore.pt) who he and Matty V have been training with to l]ose weight and overall have better health. Matt Lawrence dives into why he choices the Carnivore diet and all the health benefits. Tune in to learn more and see the progress of the guys!

Nurture Small Business
Rewire Your Brain for Positivity

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 20:45


Research shows that your mindset creates your reality. Did you know 90% of your thoughts are the same each day, and many can be negative? What if you could turn those thoughts into positive ones? Elizabeth Louis is a mental health therapist who teaches her clients positive psychology skills. She has healed from trauma and created a positive mindset for herself, and you can too. It all starts with changing the language of your thoughts and focusing on your goals. About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President Denise Cagan has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs. Denise is recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder. She enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work from home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. She has extensive experience in helping small businesses grow through outsourcing solutions providing administrative, creative, marketing, and website support. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan LinkedIn 

The Spurs Up Show
Takeaways From The Gamecocks 56-20 Win Over Charlotte

The Spurs Up Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 52:08


Happy VICTORY MONDAY. Chris breaks down Saturday's blowout win over Charlotte including MarShawn Lloyd's big night, second half surge, Marcus Satterfield's conservative play-calling, honest assessment of Spencer Rattler to this point, what a big win over CLT really means and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson
Best of the Week: Good Morning BT Podcast: 9-23-22

WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 129:55


Bo & Beth celebrate the arrival of the President's Cup in CLT with PGA Radio's Bill Rosinski, Kevin Sylvester, and the Charlotte Business Journal's Erik Spanberg. Mick Mulvaney returns to the studio with reaction to the latest Biden & Trump interviews and a story about the time he dined with the Royal family. Plus, how Brett Jensen got cat-fished, the best way to eat an egg, studio feats of strength, corded headphones are apparently hip again, and Happy Birthday to the legendary John Moore!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

We Dig Music
We Dig Music - Series 5 Episode 9 - Now Playing Sept 2022 - Dystopian Future Movies, Sóley, & Teethgrynder

We Dig Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 75:49


September rolls around again so it's time for our 3rd and final Now Playing episode of 2022. This Month we have a very exciting exclusive where we're talking about the forfthcoming third album by Nottingham based Dystopian Future Movies, War Of The Ether, ethereal Icelandic soundscaper Sóley's Mother Melancholia, & eclectic Scottish doom outlaw Teethgrynder's Hostages. We also discuss recent gigs by CLT DRP, ArcTanGent festival, Tracey's recent foray into witchcraft, & giant pork balls...Dystopian Future Movies' War Of The Ether is released on 7th October 2022. You can preorder the record here - https://dystopianfuturemovies.com/shopThey're also on tour in October, playing Wharf Chambers in Leeds on October 21st, Star & Shadow in Newcastle upon Tyne on October 22nd, The Bodega in Nottingham (Which we'll be at!) on 27th October, & 229 in London on 28th October. you can book tickets here - https://dystopianfuturemovies.com/showsListen to them on Spotify here - https://open.spotify.com/artist/6Mfj0SlPpbHWrhAInKxk6d?si=WUUebrAwSPa5RKSPSTZciwYou can listen to the Sóley record on Spotify here - https://open.spotify.com/album/6f6EXm2kcPiVVU9hniLi0l?si=xzA6swHESt6-6NktlLsGBQand buy it on Bandcamp here - https://soley.bandcamp.com/album/mother-melancholiaYou can listen to the Teethgrynder record on Spotify here - https://open.spotify.com/album/1BvjoQ4Wqo9IswJ9Xhv3sW?si=xPYasUVwTl2gSnfEGuaopAand buy it on Bandcamp here - https://teethgrynder.bandcamp.com/album/hostagesAs always, if you enjoy the music please consider supporting the artists by buying their records etc.Hosts - Ian Clarke, Colin Jackson-Brown & Tracey BRecorded/Edited/Mixed/Original Music by Colin Jackson-Brown for We Dig PodcastsSay hello at www.facebook.com/wedigmusicpcast or tweet us at http://twitter.com/wedigmusicpcast or look at shiny pictures on Instagram at http://instagram.com/wedigmusicpcast We're part of the We Made This podcast network. Find all our episodes plus other brilliant shows such as We Buy Records, Pick A Disc, Giddy Carousel Of Pop plus Colin and Ian's other podcast Free With This Months Issue and loads more at http://wemadethispod.com/ https://twitter.com/wmt_network You can also find all the We Dig Music & Free With This Months Issue episodes at www.wedigpodcasts.com Support the We Made This podcast network on Patreon: www.patreon.com/wemadethis

We Made This
We Dig Music - Series 5 Episode 9 - Now Playing Sept 2022 - Dystopian Future Movies, Sóley, & Teethgrynder

We Made This

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 75:49


September rolls around again so it's time for our 3rd and final Now Playing episode of 2022. This Month we have a very exciting exclusive where we're talking about the forfthcoming third album by Nottingham based Dystopian Future Movies, War Of The Ether, ethereal Icelandic soundscaper Sóley's Mother Melancholia, & eclectic Scottish doom outlaw Teethgrynder's Hostages. We also discuss recent gigs by CLT DRP, ArcTanGent festival, Tracey's recent foray into witchcraft, & giant pork balls... Dystopian Future Movies' War Of The Ether is released on 7th October 2022. You can preorder the record here - https://dystopianfuturemovies.com/shop They're also on tour in October, playing Wharf Chambers in Leeds on October 21st, Star & Shadow in Newcastle upon Tyne on October 22nd, The Bodega in Nottingham (Which we'll be at!) on 27th October, & 229 in London on 28th October. you can book tickets here - https://dystopianfuturemovies.com/shows Listen to them on Spotify here - https://open.spotify.com/artist/6Mfj0SlPpbHWrhAInKxk6d?si=WUUebrAwSPa5RKSPSTZciw You can listen to the Sóley record on Spotify here - https://open.spotify.com/album/6f6EXm2kcPiVVU9hniLi0l?si=xzA6swHESt6-6NktlLsGBQ and buy it on Bandcamp here - https://soley.bandcamp.com/album/mother-melancholia You can listen to the Teethgrynder record on Spotify here - https://open.spotify.com/album/1BvjoQ4Wqo9IswJ9Xhv3sW?si=xPYasUVwTl2gSnfEGuaopA and buy it on Bandcamp here - https://teethgrynder.bandcamp.com/album/hostages As always, if you enjoy the music please consider supporting the artists by buying their records etc. Hosts - Ian Clarke, Colin Jackson-Brown & Tracey B Recorded/Edited/Mixed/Original Music by Colin Jackson-Brown for We Dig Podcasts Say hello at www.facebook.com/wedigmusicpcast or tweet us at http://twitter.com/wedigmusicpcast or look at shiny pictures on Instagram at http://instagram.com/wedigmusicpcast We're part of the We Made This podcast network. Find all our episodes plus other brilliant shows such as We Buy Records, Pick A Disc, Giddy Carousel Of Pop plus Colin and Ian's other podcast Free With This Months Issue and loads more at http://wemadethispod.com/ https://twitter.com/wmt_network You can also find all the We Dig Music & Free With This Months Issue episodes at www.wedigpodcasts.com Support the We Made This podcast network on Patreon: www.patreon.com/wemadethis

Unfrozen
Episode 38: Towards a Non-Combustible Practice, Away from Mundane Endeavors of Indifference

Unfrozen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 45:31


Hanif Kara is a civil and structural engineer and professor in practice at Harvard University's Graduate School of Design and the co-founder of AKT II, a 350-person engineering practice based in London. The firm won the Stirling Award for Peckham Library in 2000 (with (Will Alsop), the Sainsbury Laboratory in 2012 (with Stanton Williams), and the Bloomberg European Headquarters in 2018 (with Foster + Partners). He is co-author of Blank: Speculations on CLT with Jennifer Bonner, and the recipient of the 2022 Fazlar Khan Lifetime Award from the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. Intro/Outro: Great Things, by Echobelly Discussed: One Park Drive (with Herzog & De Meuron) Castilla (with Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners) 240 Blackfriars (with AHMM) The Tower and the Bridge by David P. Billington Joint studio with Farshid Moussavi, using reclaimed steel Google HQ London (with BIG & Heatherwick Studio) The Francis Crick Institute (with HOK & PLP Architecture) Culture flaps at SCI-Arc and The Bartlett

girls gone right
Another Girl Gone Right

girls gone right

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 31:58


This is a quick intro about another “Girl Gone Right!” Rachel is our new co-host & CLT representative, so she dives into her conservative story, faith journey & vision for our CLT GGR community. We are so excited to have Rachel as a leader here and we can't wait to see the impact she makes! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/peyton-lemerand/support

Cooper And Anthony Show
Sex, Talk And Rock N' Roll, The Adam Levine Cheating Scandal, Off Air Fight, Leonardo DiCaprio Is Reportedly ‘Taken With' Gigi Hadid, Movie Sequels That Are Coming

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 62:46


Sex, Talk And Rock N' Roll, The Adam Levine Cheating Scandal, Off Air Fight, Leonardo DiCaprio Is Reportedly ‘Taken With' Gigi Hadid, Movie Sequels That Are Coming. #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

Lillian McDermott
Jennifer Gramith, ND, The Proper Use of Genetic Testing

Lillian McDermott

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 55:03


Jennifer Gramith, ND, CLT, of Rightway Health and Wellness has taught us all about the lymphatic system, dealing with emotions, and the importance of a balanced mindset. She has helped us cleanse our Gallbladder/Liver and taught us about the latest in energy medicine introducing us to tools like EVOX and ZYTO. Dr. Jen uses genetic […] The post Jennifer Gramith, ND, The Proper Use of Genetic Testing appeared first on LillianMcDermott.com.

Nurture Small Business
Get Your Time Back With The 30 Minute Hour

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 34:42


If you had two extra hours each day, how would you spend them? As business owners, it's easy to get stuck working in your business instead of on it. Between last minute meetings, projects and errands, how do you make time for yourself? Blaine Oelkers, America's only Chief Results Officer®️, is an expert in unlocking productivity and building great habits. With clever planning, some mental shortcuts, and a willingness to say no, you can start getting your time back. Get a full recording of Blaine's TEDx Talk, What You Think About, You Bring About, along with a transcript. About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President Denise Cagan has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs. Denise is recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder. She enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work from home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. She has extensive experience in helping small businesses grow through outsourcing solutions providing administrative, creative, marketing, and website support. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan LinkedIn

Cooper And Anthony Show
Do Any Women in Gen Z Really Lust After Leonardo DiCaprio, You Can't Post A Photo Of You, Saturday Night Live Has 4 New Cast Members and Here They Are, Jeopardy Sports Questions, Best Of You Ate As A

Cooper And Anthony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 63:03


Do Any Women in Gen Z Really Lust After Leonardo DiCaprio? You Can't Post A Photo Of You, Saturday Night Live Has 4 New Cast Members and Here They Are, Jeopardy Sports Questions, Best Of: You Ate As A Kid That You Think Was Gross #nycradio, #radio, #syndicatedradio, #podcast, #podcasting, #podcasts, #spotify, #podcastlife, #podcaster, #radio, #music, #comedy, #podcasters, #applepodcasts, #itunes, #podcastshow, #spotifypodcast, #applepodcast, #radioshow, #nycradio, #CLT,#longisland, #Listen, #pandoraPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cooperandanthony/support

Kolbecast
120: Substance Matters with CLT's Jeremy Tate (replay)

Kolbecast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 32:58


AMDG. In this replay of a conversation from April 2021, Jordan and Bonnie visit with Jeremy Tate, president of the Classic Learning Test. He explains how high-stakes tests drive and dictate academic focus in America, how he decided to go up against the behemoth that is the College Board in designing a different kind of college admission test, and how he's challenged the societal status quo that excludes great thinkers like C.S. Lewis and John Paul the Great from the literature that test takers must examine. The group also discusses the immense time spent in test prep and what messages are sent by the materials studied in that time. Jeremy describes how the goal of classical education isn't to make people better employees—it's to make them better humans—but how the best humans often end up being the best employees, too. He reminds listeners that tests give a snapshot into key academic areas at a given point in time but say nothing about the kind of person that a student is. And he distills his goals into a succinct call to action: read good books, read them a lot, and enjoy them. Kolbe families always receive 50% off CLT exams by using the code KOLBE50. Additionally, CLT partners with colleges to sponsor CLT10 tests. For more information, check out this page on the Kolbe website.   Relevant links: Classic Learning Test (CLT) website CLT test dates and deadlines for the full suite of exams: https://info.cltexam.com/test-dates-deadlines CLT's Journey through the Author Bank seminar series, a free webinar with a scholar from a partner college discussing an author from CLT's author bank Anchored podcast Interview with CLT rep Brittany Higdon on Kolbe blog Student Spotlight: Interview with Kolbe Academy Student Meghan Rohatgi Kolbecast ep 83 This Is Only a Test regarding standardized testing for K-12 students Kolbecast episodes cover a range of topics relating to school at home, the life of faith, and Catholic education. Using the new filters on our website, you can sort the episodes to find just what you're looking for. You can also find the Kolbecast in most podcast players, so subscribe in your favorite app to never miss an episode! If you have a moment, please leave a rating and review, which will help the Kolbecast reach more listeners. What questions do you have about homeschooling, the life of faith, or the intersection of the two? Send your questions to podcast@kolbe.org and stay tuned for answers. You may hear them answered in an upcoming Kolbecast episode! Interested in Kolbe Academy's offerings? Visit kolbe.org.

Magnus Podcast
Ep. 054 - On Kingship.

Magnus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 59:50


"We were born not to sue but to command." - William Shakespeare Dr.Joe Wysocki of the Belmont Abbey College is here to discuss the making of monarchies, kings, statesmen and families through the lens of Shakespeare's Henriad.   Check out the Belmont Abbey Honors College- the newest of our endorsed institutions: https://belmontabbeycollege.edu/academics/honors-college/   Dr. Joseph Wysocki is Dean of the Honors College at Belmont Abbey College where he has also served as Assistant Academic Dean, and Chair and Associate Professor of the Politics Department since 2010. He is interested in all of the great books in the Honors College curriculum but has a particular focus on classical political philosophy and American political thought, especially the thought of Alexis de Tocqueville. Dr. Wysocki received his B.A. in Political Science and Economics from Belmont Abbey College and his M.A. and Ph.D in Political Science at Baylor University. He serves on the Council of Scholars for the American Academy for Liberal Education and CLT's Board of Academic Advisors. He lives in Gastonia, NC with his wife Jeanne and his six children.

The MRL Show On Demand
MRL Replay 9|7

The MRL Show On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 58:07


Americans are wasting 21 billion dollars in gift cards, “Should She?” Should Kylie tell her mom that her boyfriend is a dead beat? Maney's dad is moving out of CLT and his MIL is moving in! Plus, WOTR and Your dating formula!  The post MRL Replay 9|7 appeared first on Kiss 95.1.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, August 30th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:16


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Tuesday, August 30th, 2022. August 30th?! Time is flying! That’s why you need to sign up for our conference… FLF Conference Plug: Our upcoming Fight Laugh Feast Conference is just about 6 weeks away from happening in Knoxville TN, October 6-8! Don't miss beer & psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers which includes George Gilder, Jared Longshore, Pastor Wilson, Dr. Ben Merkle, Pastor Toby, and we can’t say yet…also dont miss our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and stuff for the kids too…like jumpy castles and accidental infant baptisms! Also, did you know, you can save money, by signing up for a Club Membership. So, go to FightLaughFeast.com and sign up for a club membership and then register for the conference with that club discount. We can’t wait to fellowship, sing Psalms, and celebrate God’s goodness in Knoxville October 6-8. https://thepostmillennial.com/san-francisco-businesses-threaten-to-stop-paying-taxes-until-city-officials-fix-homeless-problem?utm_campaign=64487 San Francisco businesses threaten to stop paying taxes until city officials fix homeless problem Small business owners of San Francisco are demanding the city solve the growing mental health, crime, and drug problems exacerbated by the high rate of homelessness in the area, threatening to stop paying taxes if the issues continue. The Castro Merchants Association, named after the city's Castro District, sent a letter to San Francisco city officials saying group members who own businesses in the area plan to stop paying taxes if the city doesn't do more to address the problems, reported KTVU. In the letter, the organization complained of homeless people who "regularly experience psychotic episodes," vandalize storefronts, and harass business owners, employees, residents and tourists. "Our community is struggling to recover from lost business revenue, from burglaries and never-ending vandalism/graffiti (often committed by unhoused persons) and we implore you to take action," stated the letter. "Every day we wake up and have to help people on the street. We have to clean up feces on the street. We have to clear our people from doorways, so we can open our businesses. It's not fair," said Terrance Alan, co-president of the association, and owner of Flore Dispensary and Cafe Flore to KTVU. "At this point it's a failure of the system to help them." The association requested that the city reserve 35 beds in homeless shelters for people in the Castro district, in addition to devising a plan for offering services to people who decline help and keeping monthly records of how many people have been offered services and shelter. "Sometimes they do get violent," said Deen Nasher, manager of Castro Smoke Shop. "The city does need to take care of these people, find a place for them to stay and help businesses. When we call, [the police] come 30-40 minutes later." Dave Karraker, the other co-president of the association, said that if the association’s demands are not met, they may ask store owners to stop paying taxes and other city fees. San Francisco’s Department of Public Health (DPH) responded to the group, acknowledging the association's concerns and citing state policies that make their demands difficult to meet. San Francisco businesses have seen a large increase in burglaries and vandalism since 2019, prompting The Castro Merchants Association to begin documenting incidents. The association noted over 90 incidents totaling more than $170,000 in repair costs since 2020. https://thepostmillennial.com/google-revises-search-results-to-better-facilitate-abortions?utm_campaign=64487 Google revises search results to better facilitate abortions Google will now filter search results to indicate which locations identified as providing pregnancy services specifically provide abortions. The search engine had come under fire from pro-abortion activists for including results for pregnancy centers that do not provide abortions. Prior to this change, crisis pregnancy centers were also included in search results for abortion clinics. These are centers that help women who are unexpectedly pregnant keep their babies. Crisis pregnancy centers are in the business of facilitating birth, motherhood, and families, and encourage women to keep their babies, often providing help not just to the expecting mother, but for her partner as well. When a user searches for abortion facilities, those facilities that specifically provide abortions will be labeled as "provides abortions." If the search engine doesn't know whether or not a facility provides pregnancy termination, that result will be labeled "might not provide abortions." Google search results had not been differentiating between pregnancy centers that seek to help women, and those that offer pregnancy termination. As a result, some women seeking abortions were directed to services that would not provide them. This happened, according to Bloomberg, about a quarter of the time. In June, after the Supreme Court ruling overturning the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that federally legalized abortion, lawmakers pressed Google to make this change. Their ask to Google came after a study from the Center for Countering Digital Hate, which "found that 11 percent of the results for a search for an 'abortion clinic near me' or 'abortion pill' in some states were for centers that oppose abortion," Reuters reported. This study was done in states that sought to make abortion illegal once the right to legislate on the matter was returned to the states. The Center for Countering Digital Hate also put together a list of the top ten accounts that have specifically sought to counter the genital mutilation of children, and called those users hateful for demanding that healthy children not be sterilized or otherwise mutilated. Those lawmakers who demanded Google change their search results to facilitate ease of finding access to abortions directed their letter to Google CEO Sundar Pichai. In the view of these lawmakers, crisis pregnancy centers that encourage the continuance, instead of the termination, of a pregnancy are "fake clinics." They cite the Center for Countering Digital Hate, saying that the ads for crisis pregnancy centers are "misleading." "Google’s updates," TechCrunch reports, "around searches for abortion come as a group of more than 600 Google employees is pressing the company to expand worker health benefits, divest itself of some political ties and bolster user privacy in light of the Supreme Court decision to strip federal abortion rights." https://fee.org/articles/cnn-medical-analyst-says-masking-stunted-her-toddler-s-language-development-and-taught-her-an-important-lesson-about-tradeoffs/ CNN Medical Analyst Dr. Leana Wen Says Masking Stunted Her Toddler’s Language Development Throughout the pandemic, Wen was in what I’ll call the “pro-mandate” camp. In March 2021, she excoriated governors who rescinded or failed to pass mask mandates in their states. “We are not out of the woods. We haven’t reached the end of the pandemic,” Wen said in a pro-mask CNN piece. “It’s counterproductive and truly infuriating these governors are treating this as if the pandemic is over. It’s not true.” Later that year, she went so far as to argue that unvaccinated people shouldn’t be allowed to leave their homes. https://twitter.com/i/status/1436372898651033601 - Play Video A year later, Wen’s views have changed. In a recent Washington Post article, she explained why she’ll no longer be masking her children and how she shifted away from “being extremely cautious” with Covid protocols. “I accept the risk that my kids will probably contract covid-19 this school year, just as they could contract the flu, respiratory syncytial virus and other contagious diseases,” she writes. “As for most Americans, covid in our family will almost certainly be mild; and, like most Americans, we’ve made the decision that following precautions strict enough to prevent the highly contagious BA.5 will be very challenging.” Wen’s observations are not wrong. The new variants are less deadly, and this is particularly true for children, which has always been the case. A year ago, when Wen was still advocating strict mandates, we pointed out that the CDC’s own data showed small children were at far greater risk of dying from the flu, drowning, vehicle collisions, cancer, and other things than Covid. This data, for whatever reason, apparently did little to persuade Wen in 2021, however. What does appear to have changed her mind is that her child appears to have suffered from the mandates. “Masking has harmed our son’s language development,” she bluntly asserts in the article. Dr. Wen no doubt knows a great deal about public health, just like Anthony Fauci and Rochelle P. Walensky. But even Fauci and Walensky, I suspect, would concede that it’s Wen who knows what’s better for her child. It must be stressed that it’s not just that Wen wants what’s best for her child. It’s that she actually knows what’s best for her child because she has infinitely more knowledge about her child than any distant bureaucrat or meddling politician could ever possess. Nobel Prize-winning economist F.A. Hayek detailed this “local knowledge” concept in his work exploring “the knowledge problem,” and he showed why central planners seeking to engineer society through force are capable of producing little beyond “planned chaos.” This is why it’s so important that freedom of decision-making is left to those who have the most local knowledge and can most accurately assess the risks and rewards of any given action. The good news is that Wen, to her credit, appears to have learned something throughout the tragedy of the Covid pandemic, as have so many others. Classical Conversations Classical Conversations supports homeschooling parents by cultivating the love of learning through a Christian worldview in fellowship with other families. We provide a classical Christ-centered curriculum, local like-minded communities across the United States and in several countries, and we train parents who are striving to be great classical educators in the home. For more information and to get connected, please visit our website at ClassicalConversations.com. Again that’s ClassicalConversations.com. Alright guys, it wouldn’t be a Garrison Hardie News Brief without my favorite topic… sports! College football is back up and running, so here’s the rundown of games and results… MATCHUP RESULT Austin Peay @ Western Kentucky WKU 38, APSU 27 Nebraska @ Northwestern NU 31, NEB 28 Idaho State @ UNLV UNLV 52, IDST 21 UConn @ Utah State USU 31, CONN 20 Wyoming @ Illinois ILL 38, WYO 6 Duquesne @ Florida State FSU 47, DUQ 7 Charlotte @ Florida Atlantic FAU 43, CLT 13 Florida A&M @ North Carolina UNC 56, FAMU 24 Nevada @ New Mexico State NEV 23, NMSU 12 North Texas @ UTEP UNT 31, UTEP 13 Vanderbilt @ Hawai'i Van 63- Haw 10 This has been Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. If you liked the show, hit that share button down below. If you want to sign up for a club membership, then sign up for our conference with that club discount, and THEN sign up for a magazine, you can do all of that at fightlaughfeast.com. And as always, if you’d like to email me a news story, ask about our conference, or become a corporate partner of CrossPolitic, email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News… I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great day, and Lord bless!

The Modern Craftsman Podcast
#227 MCH talks CLT

The Modern Craftsman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 132:29 Very Popular


Ben Chicoine, Jake Chicoine, and Karina Chicoine of MCH construction company out of Gatineau Hills in Eastern Canada join to talk about running a business as a family, CLT, and much more.  https://www.instagram.com/mchqc.ca/ https://linktr.ee/mchqc.ca Episode brought to you by: https://www.durationmillwork.com/ https://www.rockwool.com/ The Modern Craftsman https://linktr.ee/themoderncraftsman Where to find our hosts: Nick Schiffer  https://www.instagram.com/nsbuilders/ https://bit.ly/nsbuildersyoutube Tyler Grace  https://www.instagram.com/trghomeconcepts/ Podcast Produced By: Motif Media https://www.motifmedia.com/ https://www.instagram.com/motifmediaco/ Music: "Dessert" by Nate Gusakov https://www.instagram.com/nategusakovmusic/

FriendsLikeUs
Community Over Profit With Memo Salazar

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 100:08


Memo Salazar visits Friends Like Us for a one-on-one interview on affordable housing, land rights, Sesame Street for refugee children and more with host Marina Franklin. Memo Salazar Memo Salazar is a Mexican-born filmmaker, writer, and activist… and a longtime resident of Queens, New York. As a director, his work ranges from Public Enemy music videos to Elmo tackling homelessness on Sesame Street. He has collaborated with theoretical physicist Brian Greene on a Ted Talk, won 3 Emmy awards, and produced an animated series for Rohingya refugee children exiled from their home country of Burma. As an activist, he is a recipient of Arena's Five Borough Future fellowship and the 2019 Queens Latinx leadership award for his community work. He has co-run the Sunnyside CSA since 2007 and is now the co-chair of the newly created Western Queens CLT, which aims to bring truly affordable housing and community-owned land ownership to New York City. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf