Podcasts about roadmaps

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  • 278PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about roadmaps

Latest podcast episodes about roadmaps

Culture Factor 2.0
Will Pemble: Backyard Rollercoasters and Digital NFT Simulator Experiences

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 56:23


Will Pemble is a Web1 Pioneer, a Web2 Leader, and a Web3 Futurist. He built and sold Web.com, one of the first and largest domain name registrars on earth. As a Top 50 Domain Name Millionaire, technology futurist, and serial entrepreneur, Will has been building and growing tech companies since before the days of Web1.Will's latest adventure is CoasterPunks.com, an NFT Collection on a mission to build the world's first carbon neutral roller coaster thrill ride, a 200,000 watt solar farm, and an 8 episode educational TV series executive produced by Mythbuster Kari Byron and EXPLR Media.Will has built five backyard roller coasters and been featured on Good Morning America, Discovery Channel, Netflix, Facebook Watch, and dozens of television shows worldwide.New adventurers in Web 3 seem to think that it is separate and built independently of Web2, being a pioneer of Web1 and a leader in Web2, what do you think?Digging into CoasterPunks, your NFT collection, is a digital and phigital experience on a roller coaster? and is the digital footprint carbon neutral bc it minted on a blockchain that is by design low gas?If phitigal experience, is this at Disney? or any other amusement parks?Left-field questions:Your solar farm will support how many acres? And can people buy an NFT to have a stake in the generated power and/or the dollars created? OR a stake in the farm it supports? Like a shared agriculture model?What is the TV series you are creating and will it be on the blockchain?CoasterPunks websiteWill Pemble, TwitterWill Pemble, YouTubeWill Pemble, InstagramHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, TwitterWatch an episode with a former Playboy Playmate #build #rollercoaster #roadmap #mardigras #adventure #community #solarfarm #web.com #futurism #domain #entrepreneur #coasterpunks #coasterpunksnft #mythbusters #karibyron #exploremedia #hackaday #guykawasaki #gusmachado #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #bitcoin #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #community #decentralizedeconomy

Culture Factor 2.0
Ridhima Ahuja Kahn: Dapper Labs make the Top Shots using Flow Blockchain and serve up Brand Partnerships like Cryptokitties

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 29:43


Ridhima Ahuja Kahn is the VP of Business Development at Dapper Labs. Her focus is helping build meaningful partnerships with the world's top IPs, creators, and social media platforms as they look to build blockchain-based experiences.Prior to Dapper Labs, she was a Partner at Andreessen Horowitz (a16z) where she focused on sports, social, media & entertainment, collectibles (both in digital & physical), hospitality/travel and food.She has also spent time on the investment teams at the Hewlett Foundation & Grovenor Capital Management.- Tell me about how you shifted into this role at Dapper Labs and was the inspiration behind TopShot birthed at Dapper or was your sports background the impetus to this idea?- What does fandom look like in metaverse ? What does TopShot and Cryptokitties experiences look like there? And do you think experiences are the magic of an NFT and your utility? What do experiences look like in the Metaverse?- Flow blockchain technology is unique to Dapper, reducing the friction of Web 2 native users and Web 3 adventurers, do you think this shift in creating your own blockchain has been part of the the secret sauce for Dapper Labs?- Digital Fashion will likely see a ton of growth due to the concept of wearables and shopping in the Metaverse: Luxury brands will soar to the top fast bc of virtue signaling and the marketing machine they are built on. Can Dapper help creators or smaller brands with NFTs for this use case?- Because we are also an education platform on Culture Factor, can you define DAO  and is Dapper getting involved in the DAO space?- And what would a brainstorming session at Dapper look like in terms of iterating on best use cases, verticals or simply coming up with experiences?Ridhima Ahuja Kahn of Dapper LabsHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, Clubhousehttps://youtu.be/PKCND4FqGLc#dapper, #metaverse, #blockchain, #creators, #digital, #flow, #create, #labs, #web3, #community, #physical, fashion, #technology, #experience, #nft, #brands 

The Procuretech Podcast: Digital Procurement, Unwrapped
Procuretech Pub: S2P Tips with Joël Collin-Demers from Pure Procurement

The Procuretech Podcast: Digital Procurement, Unwrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 46:20


This week on the Procuretech podcast, I'm joined by Source-to-Pay (S2P) and implementation specialist Joël Collin-Demers, all the way from Montreal. Source-to-Pay today – Market trends, Roadmaps, and Best-of-Breed vs. Full Suite Today we'll be talking about the dynamics of the source-to-pay application market, how to craft a transformation roadmap in that space, and where we see this market going in the future. But before that, I ask Joël to introduce himself. Once he's given us some fascinating insights into his favourite vegetable (it's eggplant, if you were curious), Joël goes on to speak about his twelve years of experience in the procurement space. He started off his career working for IBM, working on implementing procurement modules. He then progressed to implementing for direct and indirect materials, and looking specifically at source-to-pay applications that sit on top of ERP. For the last three years he's been running his own independent consultancy, addressing exactly the kind of issues we'll be talking about today. "Sauce"-to-Pay Joël mentions the classic ‘pasta sauce' metaphor for consumer choice: There was a time when there were only two or three kinds of pasta sauce on the shelf, and no-one felt bad about their decisions. Nowadays, breadth of choice creates option paralysis - it's almost impossible to know if what you're buying is really the best deal out there. I point out that twelve years ago (2010) would've been around the time that Ariba, Coupa, Jaggaer - all the big suites - were just starting to mature and come onto the market. I ask Joël to talk about what it was like at this time, when all-in-one suites were hugely in vogue. He mentions SAP purchasing Ariba in 2012. For a while they didn't do anything with it, but over time they integrated. Adoption in the market for these big suites really didn't begin until a little later, maybe 2015 - at least from what Joël saw in the Canadian market. Many providers in this time were trying to buy up smaller solutions so that they could offer full suites covering the full procurement process. Developing bespoke applications in-house. Is it worth it? I bring up contract management and SRM, along with newer concepts like KYS. Going back to Joël's “pasta sauce” analogy. I put it to him that I actually make my own pasta sauce - which, jokes aside, leads me on to asking if there's any sense to companies building their own SAP tool. Cearly this isn't viable for mid market businesses, but at the enterprise level, does it pay off to build things from scratch. What are the pros and cons here? Joël says that sometimes you need to make your own pasta sauce - on the shelf solutions might not fit your exact needs. Despite this, he's never quite seen anyone build out their own application, in his twelve years of experience. But what he does see, is large amounts of customisation, or enterprises building out their own little bits of functionality that a core suite may be lacking. He compares it to a pyramid. ERP is at the base, this connects to other functions, then you add applications for specific use cases to build on top of that, then you may go and get specific applications for one specific vertical. If you can't find something cost-effective on the market, this is when it pays to build things yourself. I ask if this is still a viable strategy now. Looking at Ariba and Coupa, and their app stores full of best-of-breeds that can be easily integrated, does this diminish the case for building an in-house app? Joël thinks so. He expects to see a funnelling down of use-cases where building your own app will be a viable strategy. Niche spaces are being increasingly served. But then again, there are always gaps to fill. Niche apps are still being developed, and not every niche has been colonised just yet. ERP, Data, and Single Source of Truth I ask Joël if we still need all-in-one suites to provide a single source of truth. Is he seeing a...

MacVoices Audio
MacVoices #22119: MacVoices Live! - An Apology to DuckDuckGo, Stream Deck & Touch Bar, Ads in Apple Music, WWDC Expectations

MacVoices Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 99:10


This MacVoices Live! discussion starts of with Chuck's apology to DuckDuckGo relating to a widely reported user tracking issue, then turns a wide variety of topics that include the Touch Bar vs. the Stream Deck, ads intruding on ad-free Apple Music playlists, and Twitter being fined. Next up, Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Brittany Smith, Frank Petrie, Jeff Gamet, Jim Rea, Mark Fuccio, Andrew Orr, and Kelly Guimont covered iOS evolution, the importance of hardware and software roadmaps to developers and users, as well as why specific timelines aren't realistic. This edition of MacVoices is brought to you by the MacVoices Dispatch, our weekly newsletter that keeps you up-to-date on any and all MacVoices-related information. Subscribe today and don't miss a thing. Show Notes: Links: Reddit post by DuckDuckGo CEO & Founder re: Alleged Microsoft Trackers Elgato Stream Deck - Live Content Creation Controller with 15 Customizable LCD Keys, Adjustable Stand Three hardware features Apple needs to trash forever by Dan Moren on Macworld A year with the Elgato Stream Deck by Jason Snell on Six Colors Better Touch Tool Apple should not be injecting ads in its Apple Music playlists on AppleInsider Twitter to pay $150 million penalty for allegedly breaking its privacy promises – again - Federal Trade Commission website How iOS customization has evolved over time by Andrew Orr on Apple Insider When is it Time for a New Smartphone? on The Tech Photo Guy (Kelly's appearance)  Guests: Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Kelly Guimont is a podcaster and friend of the Rebel Alliance. She hosts the Daily Observations Podcast at MacObserver.com, and appears on The Incomparable network as well as hosts I Want My M(CU) TV. You can also hear her on The Aftershow with Mike Rose, and she still has more to say which she saves for Twitter. Andrew Orr is a freelance writer and amateur photographer and Contributing Editor at AppleInsider. He loves Apple products and enjoys writing and sharing all things tech. When he's not writing about Apple, you can often find him snapping photos with his iPhone. Follow him on Twitter or sample his musical tastes on Apple Music…if you dare. Frank Petrie is an author and contributor to ScreenCastsOnline Magazine. Follow him on Twitter and check out his web site, ympnow.com. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Brittany Smith is a trained cognitive neuroscientist who provides ADD/ADHD, technology, and productivity coaching through her business, Devise and Conquer, along with companion video courses for folks with ADHD. She's also the cofounder of The ADHD Guild, a community for nerdy folks with ADHD. She, herself, is a self-designated “well-rounded geek”. She can be found on Twitter as @addliberator and on YouTube with tech tips.   Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss  

Keeping Current CME
Roadmaps for Reducing High Blood Pressure

Keeping Current CME

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 28:08


Let our experts steer you in the right direction on how to get blood pressure under control. Credit available for this activity expires: 5/31/2023 Earn Credit / Learning Objectives & Disclosures: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/974793?src=mkm_podcast_addon_974793

Knew Amsterdam Radio w/ Flobo Boyce
Bonus Episode: Road Maps with Walter Ward

Knew Amsterdam Radio w/ Flobo Boyce

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 38:29


Author of the memoir, "Road man to Life," Walter Ward joins the show on this bonus edition of Knew Amsterdam Radio. Mr. Ward chats his upbringing, discipline in the classroom and what it means for his experiences as an author. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/knewamsterdam/support

Investor Connect Podcast
Startup Funding Espresso -- Startup Valuation Roadmaps

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 1:49


Startup Valuation Roadmaps Hello, this is Hall T. Martin with the Startup Funding Espresso -- your daily shot of startup funding and investing. Investors setting a valuation should review the cap table to understand how future rounds will cause dilution. A cap table tracks each shareholder and the amount of equity they own including the pre and post-money valuations. Key factors to consider are the following: Option pools -- what has been set up or will be set up. Liquidation preferences -- does any other investor have a right to a liquidation preference that gives them a portion of the proceeds before other investors? Future rounds of funding -- how many more rounds of funding will be required? Most startups will need additional funding so some dilution is to be expected. Map out the proposed follow-on rounds of funding to see the effects of dilution on the investors' equity position. Consider the impact of venture capital on the cap table which can have a major impact on earlier investors. It's often the case the startup must raise additional capital beyond the plan, due to unforeseen circumstances so any proposal shows the best-case scenario. By mapping the cap table from the current investment to the exit, the investor can understand their position at an exit and what return to expect. Thank you for joining us for the Startup Funding Espresso where we help startups and investors connect for funding.Let's go startup something today. ____________________________________ For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:   Check out our other podcasts here:   For Investors check out:   For Startups check out:   For eGuides check out:   For upcoming Events, check out    For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group    Please , share, and leave a review. Music courtesy of .

AllVoices, Reimagining Company Culture
Olivia Nuamah, National Inclusion, Diversity, and Belonging Leader at PwC Canada - Equity Dialogue and Trust Roadmaps

AllVoices, Reimagining Company Culture

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 29:38


Welcome to Reimagining Company Culture, a series discussing emerging trends and priorities shaping the future of workplace culture and employee wellbeing. We highlight thought leaders who are constantly evolving their strategy and can provide insight to folks about how to address new business challenges.  AllVoices is on a mission to create safe, happy, and healthy workplaces for all, and we're excited to learn from experts who share our mission. In this episode of Reimagining Company Culture, we're chatting with Olivia Nuamah, National Inclusion, Diversity, and Belonging Leader at PwC Canada.  With a long record of accomplishment in the inclusion and diversity space and experience leading organizations like Pride Toronto and the Atkinson Foundation, Olivia believes strongly in the power of community building to advance justice and equity.Tune in to learn Olivia's thoughts on measuring inclusion and belonging, creating a more equitable world, celebrating AAPI Heritage Month, and more!About AllVoices In today's workforce, people often don't feel empowered to speak up and voice their opinions about workplace issues, including harassment, bias, and other culture issues. This prevents company leadership from making necessary changes, and prevents people from feeling fulfilled, recognized, and included at work. At AllVoices, we want to change that by providing a completely safe, anonymous way for people to report issues directly to company leaders. This allows company leadership real transparency into what's happening in their companies—and the motivation to address issues quickly. Our goal is to help create safer, more inclusive companies.

Innovation Talks
The road-mapping process

Innovation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 20:43


Roadmaps are what we use as a reference to tailor our projects and various investments in the business. It's essentially our guide—a compass to where we want to be with all the details of getting there. However, many are confused by road mapping, especially regarding how it starts and who should be spearheading it.   [...] The post The road-mapping process appeared first on Sopheon.

Culture Factor 2.0
Vladislav Ginzburg: P2: Alpha on Creator to Fan to Creator, what Utility do you Want?

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 39:23


Vladislav Ginzburg is the Chief Executive Officer at Blockparty.Ginzburg leads Blockparty and the mission to build a blockchain-agnostic platform for collectible NFTs at the intersection of art, music and culture. Blockparty launched their MVP In August 2020 with a number of mainstream oriented drops, including first digital artworks by 3lau Slime Sunday, Adventure Club, Dave Krugman and others.Earlier, Ginzburg was Chief Business Development officer at Blockparty Tickets where he introduced blockchain as an NFT powered ticketing system to music festivals and professional sports teams, including a partnership with the Sacramento Kings of the NBA.Before entering the Blockchain and entertainment spaces, Ginzburg managed a fine art fund where he transacted more than $150 million in blue chip artworks. Ginzburg studied at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio as well as The New School in New York.Let's dig into your art background first, I believe it lays the groundwork for your interest in NFT related art and event?In the art world,  Vladislav Ginzburg has managed several high-value growth funds in the fine art industry where he has executed transactions for iconic canvas works by Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Jean-Michele Basquiat, Salvador Dali, Pierre Auguste Renoir, and hundreds of others for clients., including placing works into museum exhibitions globallyWhat is your relationship with Warner Music and how will it compliment Blockparty goals for the artist?Opensea is the amazon for NFTs; it's the most common and most costly to mint because there's so many people on it. Rarible and a few others are less expensive. By having their own storefront on Blockparty (part Website, Etsy and Shopify?, Is this a solution to the two ends of the spectrum of Opensea and Rarible?Wants to dive into the live event aspect because of Lively partnership. Does Blockparty expect to be more of an event platform in the end? Or are they primarily a storefront/tools provider? What's the endgame?Ginzburg is the co-founder for Moonwalk. No code: there is code that sits behind the NFT. Moonwalk, being a no code platform, allows people who don't have developers in their back pocket to mint NFTs and play in the same arena as people who do have their own developers. Is Moonwalk going to eventually live on Blockparty?Are Ginzburg's platforms working toward democratizing crypto/NFTs for any and all?We are speaking on NFT.NYC in June!!Data to market yourself, your wallet, online habits, or curated social media look?Creators pushing for Blockparty to push further with them, innovating togetherEasy vs. creating smart contracts that work for the artists on the platformDali and Warhol experimented with digital art, NFT artists that were painters, sculptors and photographers using AR and image recognitionToken, receive it into your wallet, send it out of your wallet or stake it.look forward alpha: music NFTs will thrive with UGC (user generated content) selling viral content from fans taking and creating NFTs and sending to the viral TikTok artist.Vladislav Ginsburg on Twitter Holly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, Clubhousehttps://youtu.be/PKCND4FqGLc#utility #creator #warner #brands #art #creativetechnologist #music #musician #spinnin'records #integrity #intention #purpose #impact #lockeddiscord #accesskeys #rightsownership #Fortnight #wearables #legacy #warnermusic #indieartist #fans #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #bitcoin #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #community #decentralizedeconomy

Kevin McCullough Radio
20220513 - Commissioner Mark Morgan On How These New Road Maps Can Protect & Save Our Borders

Kevin McCullough Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 10:30


20220513 - Commissioner Mark Morgan On How These New Road Maps Can Protect & Save Our Borders by Kevin McCullough Radio

Culture Factor 2.0
Vladislav Ginzburg: P1: Warhol's Digital Art to NFTS & Blockparty's Creators in Web 3

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 46:41


Vladislav Ginzburg is the Chief Executive Officer at Blockparty.Ginzburg leads Blockparty and the mission to build a blockchain-agnostic platform for collectible NFTs at the intersection of art, music and culture. Blockparty launched their MVP In August 2020 with a number of mainstream oriented drops, including first digital artworks by 3lau Slime Sunday, Adventure Club, Dave Krugman and others.Earlier, Ginzburg was Chief Business Development officer at Blockparty Tickets where he introduced blockchain as an NFT powered ticketing system to music festivals and professional sports teams, including a partnership with the Sacramento Kings of the NBA.Before entering the Blockchain and entertainment spaces, Ginzburg managed a fine art fund where he transacted more than $150 million in blue chip artworks. Ginzburg studied at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio as well as The New School in New York.Let's dig into your art background first, I believe it lays the groundwork for your interest in NFT related art and event?In the art world,  Vladislav Ginzburg has managed several high-value growth funds in the fine art industry where he has executed transactions for iconic canvas works by Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Jean-Michele Basquiat, Salvador Dali, Pierre Auguste Renoir, and hundreds of others for clients., including placing works into museum exhibitions globallyWhat is your relationship with Warner Music and how will it compliment Blockparty goals for the artist?Opensea is the amazon for NFTs; it's the most common and most costly to mint because there's so many people on it. Rarible and a few others are less expensive. By having their own storefront on Blockparty (part Website, Etsy and Shopify?, Is this a solution to the two ends of the spectrum of Opensea and Rarible?Wants to dive into the live event aspect because of Lively partnership. Does Blockparty expect to be more of an event platform in the end? Or are they primarily a storefront/tools provider? What's the endgame?Ginzburg is the co-founder for Moonwalk. No code: there is code that sits behind the NFT. Moonwalk, being a no code platform, allows people who don't have developers in their back pocket to mint NFTs and play in the same arena as people who do have their own developers. Is Moonwalk going to eventually live on Blockparty?Are Ginzburg's platforms working toward democratizing crypto/NFTs for any and all?We are speaking on NFT.NYC in June!!Data to market yourself, your wallet, online habits, or curated social media look?Creators pushing for Blockparty to push further with them, innovating togetherEasy vs. creating smart contracts that work for the artists on the platformDali and Warhol experimented with digital art, NFT artists that were painters, sculptors and photographers using AR and image recognitionToken, receive it into your wallet, send it out of your wallet or stake it.look forward alpha: music NFTs will thrive with UGC (user generated content) selling viral content from fans taking and creating NFTs and sending to the viral TikTok artist.Vladislav Ginsburg on Twitter Holly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, Clubhousehttps://youtu.be/PKCND4FqGLc#blockparty #blue-chip #authenticity #prognosticator #wallstreet #artnet #database #creatorcollector #web2.5 #web2fatigue #nocode #massadoption #digitallynative #imagerecognition #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #bitcoin #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #community #decentralizedeconomy

Overpriced JPEGs
The FULL Aku Story with Founder, Micah Johnson | Overpriced JPEGs #31

Overpriced JPEGs

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 71:05


✨ SUBSCRIBE TO THE OVERPRICED JPEGS CHANNEL ✨ https://bankless.cc/jpegs  AkuDreams recently made headlines for their $34M smart contract mistake. But long before that, Aku founder and artist, Micah Johnson, was making headlines for his groundbreaking project. Aku became one of the first NFT projects to be optioned by a major Hollywood studio and is currently working with former Lucas film executives to develop a feature-length film using Aku IP. In his first press appearance since the Akutar auction, Micah Johnson, the former MLB player turned artist, joins Carly to discuss how to create lasting IP, what it was like transitioning from being a professional athlete to a professional artist to a CEO, why Unreal Engine is so important to the metaverse, and, of course, that notorious smart contract error. This is a project built to last a bear market, so don't miss it! ------

Culture Factor 2.0
Daniel Botha: HashLips YouTuber for NFT Artists plus Roadmaps & Community

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 65:58


NFTs are rapidly evolving - and so is this space. HashLips is driving transformation and bridging gaps through accessibility, education, and empowerment. The name is an alias for his YouTube channel, and for his NFT Art Engine as well as an NFT collection. It is also an art movement. Dig a bit deeper, and you realize that HashLips is an advocate for blockchain technology advancement, too. Most especially, it is a community of like-minded adventurers.HashLips was born on YouTube in 2021. The channel already has over 2 million total video views. However, HashLips isn't merely a library of ‘how-to' videos. It's far more important. HashLips is known by the NFT community for making things accessible that simply weren't before, thus leading to the alias HashLips being spoken by people who have been enabled by the open-source nature of what Daniel does. HashLips now being an Idea and a concept for people to learn from, a community was formed.Art Engine.“It was written to facilitate the creation of NFTs and generate artworks,” said Daniel. “I wrote the program to be user-friendly. The audience loves to learn about NFTS, create NFTs, and learn how to code. So, this was a way for anyone to learn and generate their own NFT collections. The HashLips Art Engine is a way to generate a lot of images quickly and easily. It was created and made open-source.The Art Engine has now enabled the creation of more than 6,000 NFT collections to date – all from within the HashLips community.One of the most captivating aspects of the NFT space is that it's still evolving and highly fluid. What's HashLips' future? Advocating accessibility and inclusivity.As Daniel would say:“Just because you don't understand how this technology works, doesn't mean that you should be left behind.”What I learned about Daniel that isn't in his bio:He's been following his true north as an artist since childhood.He took inspiration from his father who was a classically trained jewelry artist.Daniel was surrounded by materials that were transformed into beauty and he witnessed the creative process as metal morphed into a ring.While looking for gallery representation, he received a mentor, and opportunity to travel to China.As a rite of passage, he left home and found himself in a job where he was introduced to java script. And he a big believer in vision boards and the power of positive thinking.All this said, Daniel, can you share your foray into crypto, token and NFTS at this point?Mentorship and studying in China, was this the impetus of teaching on YouTube?Can you describe The HashLips Art Engine?Are you teaching about blockchain technology and walking people through the process of creating an NFT?Why open-source?Roadmaps and utilities, let's talk about the guilt or need for these pieces of the process.New NFT collectionDoes math appear as art to you?Vision boards and mindsetHashlips websiteHashlips YouTubeHashlips on Twitter Holly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, Clubhousehttps://youtu.be/PKCND4FqGLc#HashLips #accessibility #education #empowerment #development #nocode #onboarding #novice #opensource #artengine #SketchyApeBookClub #SABC #Sketchy Lab #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #bitcoin #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #community #decentralizedeconomy

CX TUNING HACKS
Wie Customer-Experience-Roadmaps mithilfe Design-Thinking besser umgesetzt werden

CX TUNING HACKS

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 32:12


Die Kundenerfahrung (CX) ist einer der Dreh- und Angelpunkte des modernen Marketings. Innovative Design-Thinking_Methoden bei dem Tuning Prozess von kudnenerlebnissen nacht vieles einfacher. Heute zu Gast ist Claudia Richardt, Expertin für agiles Arbeiten und genau die Methdoen, die jeden im Team in den Veränderungsprozess integrieren. Viele wertvolle Insights, Stay tuned for your Customer, Deine Peggy Deine Teilnahme am Webinar am 30.Mai 2022 Hier anmelden: →https://www.amelung-partners.com/kontakt (https://www.amelung-partners.com/kontakt) Conatct : Claudia Richardt →https://www.real-lab.de/claudia_richardt (https://www.real-lab.de/claudia_richardt) → Melde Dich an für ein kostenloses CX Beratungsgespräch: https://calendly.com/amelungandpartners/30min?month=2022-01 (https://calendly.com/amelungandpartners/30min?month=2022-01) → Melde dich hier für den CX Newsletter ( DEUTSCH) an: https://en.amelung-partners.com/kontakt (https://en.amelung-partners.com/kontakt) → Melde dich hier für den CX Newsletter (ENGLISCH) an:https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/welcome-cx-tuning-hacks-2022-peggy-amelung-laurenzana/ ( https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/welcome-cx-tuning-hacks-2022-peggy-amelung-laurenzana/) →Folge mir auf Instagram https://www.instagram.com/amelungandpartners/ (https://www.instagram.com/amelungandpartners/) →Folge mir auf Twitter https://twitter.com/amelungpartners (https://twitter.com/amelungpartners) →Schick deine Fragen und Themen, die dich rund um CX bewegen mir bitte gern an:

Ventures
Evaluating NFT clubs: Incentives, promises, and roadmaps :: with Jesse Bryan (BAYC #1361)

Ventures

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 45:00


In this episode of Ventures, my guest Jesse Bryan (https://twitter.com/JesseBryan) and I continue our conversation from episode 89 to discuss multiple aspects of NFTs and NFT clubs. We talk about the history of NFTs, the differences between Moonbirds, Crypto Punks and Bored Ape Yacht Club, the important nuances of intellectual property ownership and licensing, airdrops, community, “staking” of NFTs, cybersecurity, and thoroughly evaluating a team and their roadmap before deciding where to spend your time and money. Visit https://satchel.works/@wclittle/ventures-episode-94 for detailed notes and links to resources (videos, articles, etc…) mentioned. You can watch this episode via video here.   1:54 - Tee up for the episode, recap of Part 1 (Ep 89), storytelling in organizations, introduction to the world of NFTs.2:40 - Quick background on Jesse and his introduction take on NFTs // He believes the next billion dollar brands are going to come out of the NFT space.3:45 - Background on Ethereum, ICOs originally, but NFTs started in 2017…Punks, Kitties, and then Apes didn't launch until April 2021. 5:19 - History of NFTs from Jesse's brand-building perspective9:53 - What the Bored Apes did that the Crypto Punks didn't (e.g. IP ownership)12:00 - Tweet, minting a bored ape 1 year ago turned into the best investment of all time. https://twitter.com/JulianKlymochko/status/1516920342400450562 13:56 - NFTs are investing in a brand. You can essentially buy a brand name, like buying Radio Shack. “The most valuable real estate is the corner of someone's mind” (John Hegarty quote)16:30 - Status games / signaling w/ NFTs18:22 - Summarizing the facets and layers of NFTs for entrepreneurs to be aware of. Networking benefits, status benefits, financial benefits, claims to airdrops, IP ownership, cooperation with other brands, and deal flow. None of this is new.20:45 - Moonbirds. What are they? What just happened?23:49 - NFT mint analogy to kickstarter; better when you already have an audience.25:14 - Subgroups within NFT clubs, and subgroups of subgroups25:35 - Jesse believes Quirkies is the strongest community in the NFT space. Examples of people helping each other out.27:00 - Importance of understanding basic cybersecurity when diving into the NFT space.27:10 - Recap of Moonbirds, why it seemed like a good investment (analysis from a VC perspective). Nesting. Problem of diluting the term “staking” https://cobie.substack.com/p/apecoin-and-the-death-of-staking 29:20 - How to teach entrepreneurs to use NFT clubs to help humans flourish32:53 - Two pieces of advice that Will got early in his startup investing career: 36:20 - Typical investment model, comparing NFTs to traditional investments…e.g. is the team “known”?  Is there real traction or just “fake” traction? What's the roadmap?39:20 - 5 Part Matrix when evaluating an investment. Team, Product, Market, Traction, Financial Model, https://satchel.works/@wclittle/ventures-episode-62 40:10 - Don't silo your understanding in Web3. The multidisciplinary nature of DAOs, DeFi, Metaverses, NFTs, etc… 41:35 - APE Coin43:14 - Where can people get a hold of Jesse to continue the conversation? https://twitter.com/JesseBryan 

Gram this
The road maps in dream interpretation

Gram this

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 17:37


The Art of Living Ageless --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/elaine-vigne/support

ThePrint
ThePrintPod: India, UK must look beyond roadmaps, deal announcements. Boris Johnson's visit an opportunity

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 6:16


India and UK will need a cottage industry of experts, supporters, and various networks to seize this moment of change.----more----Read the full article here: https://theprint.in/opinion/india-uk-must-look-beyond-roadmaps-deal-announcements-boris-johnsons-visit-an-opportunity/922422/

Sustainable Xagility™ - board & executive c-suite agility for the organization's direction of travel
Bruce McCarthy on his career, product vs project management, and getting roadmaps right

Sustainable Xagility™ - board & executive c-suite agility for the organization's direction of travel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 35:54


This week, the Xagility podcast has the pleasure of welcoming the amazing Bruce McCarthy. Bruce has authored Product Manager versus Project Manager and co-authored Product Roadmaps Reloaded: how to set direction while embracing uncertainty along with C Todd Lombardo, Evan Ryan, and Michael Connors. In this episode, Bruce and John discuss the definition of product, product vs project management, probabilistic forecasting, and the importance of using roadmaps right. Bruce McCarthy's linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brucemccarthy/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/xagility/message

Sustainable Xagility™ - board & executive c-suite agility for the organization's direction of travel
VIDEO: Bruce McCarthy on his career, product vs project management, and getting roadmaps right

Sustainable Xagility™ - board & executive c-suite agility for the organization's direction of travel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 35:54


This week, the Xagility podcast has the pleasure of welcoming the amazing Bruce McCarthy. Bruce has authored Product Manager versus Project Manager and co-authored Product Roadmaps Reloaded: how to set direction while embracing uncertainty along with C Todd Lombardo, Evan Ryan, and Michael Connors. In this episode, Bruce and John discuss the definition of product, product vs project management, probabilistic forecasting, and the importance of using roadmaps right. Bruce McCarthy's linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brucemccarthy/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/xagility/message

The Agile World with Greg Kihlstrom
#233: Voice of the Customer and Product Roadmaps with Matt Young, User Voice

The Agile World with Greg Kihlstrom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 22:58


Today we're going to talk about the role of the voice of the customer in driving product roadmaps. To help me discuss this topic, I'd like to welcome Matt Young, CEO of User Voice.

Habitology - Success Habits Made Easy
E#186 Three Proven Marketing Roadmaps for Coaches

Habitology - Success Habits Made Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 29:59


If you've finished your coaching qualification and are ready to launch a business, it can be daunting to realize that you have no idea of how or where to find clients, and to create a consistent income. Forget the Facebook ads or webinar skills training courses - in this episode, I'll discuss three marketing roadmaps for coaches that play to your natural communication strengths and help you start promoting with authenticity, integrity and confidence. These are the most effective marketing strategies because you get the chance to connect more personally and emotively with potential clients or referrers. If you need help to develop your proven marketing roadmap, book a good fit call to see if I can help you. Or, enquire about my June Passion to Profit program if you need help to build the foundations of your business.

The tastytrade network
Crypto Never Closes - March 31, 2022 - NFT Roadmaps & Utility

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 14:42


Some of the most valuable NFTs now days, such as bored ape yacht club have been praised for the introduction of the roadmap and utility concept. NFTs with utility bring value back to the buyer instead of just the artwork alone. Kay and E discuss how some companies are using NFT technology to bring value back to their customers.

The tastytrade network
Crypto Never Closes - March 31, 2022 - NFT Roadmaps & Utility

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 15:33


Some of the most valuable NFTs now days, such as bored ape yacht club have been praised for the introduction of the roadmap and utility concept. NFTs with utility bring value back to the buyer instead of just the artwork alone. Kay and E discuss how some companies are using NFT technology to bring value back to their customers.

Overpriced JPEGs
The Past & Future of NFTs with Carlini8 | Overpriced JPEGs #21

Overpriced JPEGs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 103:35


In this episode, we welcome NFT OG—Carlini8— founder of the NFT project Purrnelope's Country Club, and former co-founder of Pranksy's NFTBoxes.  You'll come away from this conversation knowing more about ENS subdomains, all things Dutch auctions, whether roadmaps are good or bad, what BAYC got wrong about their ApeCoin drop, and more.  Carlini8 speaks from deep experience and his work on Purrnelope's and elsewhere should be a case study in how to operate in web3!    ------ SUBSCRIBE TO OVERPRICED JPEGs YOUTUBE:

#DoorGrowShow - Property Management Growth
DGS 161: Jason's Daughter Madi Provides an Inside Look Into DoorGrow & Jason

#DoorGrowShow - Property Management Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 48:51


Have you ever wondered what it would be like to have your own kid work with you in your business? Here at DoorGrow, one of our team members is the founder/CEO's daughter!  Property management growth expert Jason Hull interviews his own daughter AND team member, Madi Sleight. Madi gives a unique perspective on Jason, DoorGrow, social media, and more. If you ever wondered what Jason is really like personally, this episode is for you. You'll Learn… [01:15] Meet today's guest: Madilyn Sleight with DoorGrow [05:16] What does Jason even do? Madi's perspective as a kid and as Jason's daughter. [07:45] Joining the team at DoorGrow and Madi's role on the team. [05:16] What does Jason even do? Madi's perspective as a kid and as Jason's daughter. [17:45] The program is not a miracle cure… then who is the program for? [22:15] Jason's personality according to his daughter and how Jason's “out there” beliefs benefit the DoorGrow and Scale Mastermind [27:40] What's next for Madi? [32:01] More about Madi and her relationship with her dad [38:25] Madi learned to mimic Jason's voice on socials + how she does social media Tweetables “I love those clients. I love the ones that just show up to everything and they do everything that we say and they just get the best results.” “For me, it's super rewarding to see clients winning and succeeding. Like it's worth more than money and getting paid to do what I do.” “It's crazy that I get paid to just help people win, which is really awesome.”  “I think the first thing that people who are skeptical or unsure need to realize is you're not selling a magical cure.” Resources DoorGrow and Scale Mastermind DoorGrow Academy DoorGrow on YouTube DoorGrowClub DoorGrowLive TalkRoute Referral Link Transcript [00:00:00] Madi Sleight: You know, you've always kind of been out there in your beliefs or like what you're interested in. Like, And I mean this in the best way possible, you're kind of like a nutjob. [00:00:11] Jason Hull: All right, welcome DoorGrow Hackers to the #DoorGrowShow! If you are a property management entrepreneur that wants to add doors, make a difference, increase revenue, help others impact lives, and you're interested in growing your business and life, and you're open to doing things a bit differently, then you are a DoorGrow Hacker. DoorGrow Hackers love the opportunities, daily variety, unique challenges and freedom that property management brings. Many in real estate. Think you're crazy for doing it. You think they're crazy for not because you realize that property management is the ultimate high trust gateway to real estate deals, relationships and residual income. [00:00:50] At DoorGrow, we are on a mission to transform property management business owners and their businesses. We want to transform the industry, eliminate the BS, build awareness, change perception, expand the market and help the best property management entrepreneurs win. I'm your host property management growth expert, Jason Hull, the founder and CEO of DoorGrow. Now let's get into the show. [00:01:15] All right, everybody, so today's interview guest that I have with me is Madilyn Marie Hull, my daughter who goes by Madi. [00:01:28] Madi Sleight: It's also Sleight now.  [00:01:31] Jason Hull: Oh, oh, that's right. She's married now. So it's Madilyn Marie Sleight. So... no? Madi Sleight?  [00:01:40] Madi Sleight: You didn't have to put in the middle name in there, come on.  [00:01:43] Jason Hull: I know, but like I named you, and I gave you that name, so. Cool. So yeah, gosh, that's a old habit. Yeah, Madi Sleight. I got to get used to that last name. I'm still not used to it. So Madi Sleight... I wanted to have her on the show. I want to have my daughter-- she's my oldest-- and I wanted to have her on the show partially because her birthday is tomorrow. We're recording this here on February 1st and she was born February 2nd. And it's her birthday tomorrow.  [00:02:10] But Madi also has been working with me. How long have you been working with me?  [00:02:17] Madi Sleight: It'll be two years in I think July-- June or July.  [00:02:22] Jason Hull: Yeah. So she's been going to school, going to college, and doing work with DoorGrow. And so, she's become a critical part of the team. And so, I wanted to have her on the show because I think it would be really cool for those that listened to the podcast. Those that wonder who Jason Hull is and what's he really like, you know? I'm also a father, and I am a boss and Madi's gotten to experience both sides of those things the good and the bad. And I thought it'd be cool to have you on the show just to help people understand maybe a little bit more about me and that sort of thing.  [00:02:59] So Madi, why don't you introduce yourself? Tell people with the right name, since I screwed that up already and tell everybody what it is that you do at DoorGrow. [00:03:10] Madi Sleight: Okay. Well, my name is Madi Sleight. Nobody calls me Madilyn, except for you apparently. But, I am our social media manager here at DoorGrow, and I also just do a couple other little things like I video edit and I create case studies/ testimonials of our clients, showcase their wins, post those to YouTube, and I hand those over to Kyle as well, our kind of marketing guy. And he makes those into these awesome Facebook ads that are our lead gen source right now.  [00:03:40] I sit in on all the weekly calls, the weekly coaching calls with our clients and I take notes and I capture their wins, so I kind of get to know all of our clients on maybe more of a surface level, but it's still really cool. I get to know their names and faces and backgrounds of their businesses. How many doors they add each call. And it's very insightful. I've tried a lot of different things in the last year and a half of being at DoorGrow. I tried sales followup for a little bit, tried a little bit of client success here and there. I've gotten to learn a lot of things, and I am an advertising major at the university of Idaho. [00:04:17] And so it's kind of been cool learning, you know, things in lecture about advertising, SEO, sales, marketing, stuff like that. Being able to use that knowledge at DoorGrow. But then also learning things at DoorGrow and being able to put that towards my degree and use that in my classes.  [00:04:38] Jason Hull: Yeah. And I think it's really cool. [00:04:40] So, I think the most important thing that I want that you do is more testimonial videos because it's proof, it's evidence that we're getting results and you get to see this stuff firsthand. You're not just behind the paywall and seeing what goes on, but you get to see the inner workings of the business. And so, maybe you could share with people what you thought I did in the business and what you thought I did before you became a team member of the business, what your perspective was and then maybe how that shifted, because I'm sure that was quite a bit different once you got in. [00:05:16] Madi Sleight: I don't even know what I thought you did cause for a while, when I was a little kid, you were the website guy. And I thought, "oh, how cool," you know, "my dad made a website for Mr. Gas in my hometown." And I was like, "wow!" You know. [00:05:30] Jason Hull: Wow, that's a long time ago.  [00:05:32] Madi Sleight: I know! And I remember that. And so, when you started making that transition into coaching, you know-- and it was kind of a subtle, smooth transition. You started in with your brother. You've got family members who are into this kind of stuff, but it wasn't something that you necessarily shared with me and my siblings all the time. You kind of just would disappear and turn on your busy sign, your neon, sign outside your door of your office. And we were like, "Yeah, he's working," you know, "he's doing what he's doing." [00:06:02] And it was only until I think two summers before I started working at DoorGrow, when you came to me and were like, "Hey, you should try out making a couple social media posts for us." And I did 'cause I was into design stuff. Only then I was like, what is DoorGrow? What is-- what does that even mean? [00:06:22] That is such a weird term doors and growing? Is it like a plant business? I got really into it. Like I was really curious and I actually like begged him for the remainder of those two years. Like, "dude, I'll do your social media. It's a travesty. I will fix it for you" [00:06:40] Jason Hull: "Let me do it, dad." [00:06:42] Madi Sleight: Seriously! I was like begging him. And even like my sister-- I would be texting my sister and I'd be like, "man, you know, he still hasn't gotten back to me on this." And she's like, "oh, I'll go talk to him. Hailey did. Hailey and I would text behind your back and be like, man. [00:06:58] And that was one of the first things when I, was graduating high school and going off to college, your social media was still-- it was still not great. it was very inconsistent. You guys were probably posting... you posted mostly about the podcast episodes, which I still do. But other than that, you were posting maybe once a month or less, not consistently. [00:07:19] And the branding, the designs and branding were kind of off and it almost made you look sketchy from a social media standpoint, and I honestly, when I was applying to work for DoorGrow, I still wasn't completely sure what you did. I knew that you've coached businesses to like become better businesses. And that's kinda what I told people like, "yeah, he's a business guy who makes other business guys do better."  [00:07:45] But it wasn't until I actually-- I was just desperate for a job at that point, but I applied to DoorGrow and you made me jump through all these hoops, personality tests. I was like, "this is so my dad." Cause you had made me take these personality tests before. You had, you know, human design stuff. This was stuff that he would make my siblings and I do, but I took them again and I was like, "he makes his applicants do this?" [00:08:10] I was like, that is such a thing that my dad would do, but I'm going through. I do all the things. And as I was going, I just started getting more and more excited. I was like, "man, this a lot of hoops to jump through." I feel like if I get past all of this, I must be a really cool person. [00:08:27] Like it started making me more excited to work for you guys, because it was like qualifying me as someone you were hiring. And then I made the little introduction video, and I tried to have fun with it and get like my personality involved. And I remember being so nervous. I was like, "Why am I so nervous? It's my dad. I'm trying to work with my dad." But I was so nervous all of a sudden. I was so excited. And I remember-- we had different team members at the time like Jon Ray-- and you were sending me messages that you had gotten from the team. Like, "Man, I love her video!" And I got so excited, and going through the trainings that you sent me-- you sent me like the company mission statement and the core values-- I went through those and I read it and I got to learn like what you do and what you stand for. And not only was it cool' cause I got to know you a little bit better on the business side. That was something me and my siblings never really got to experience when we were little, but I also got to know the business. [00:09:25] And first of all, I learned you were not a scam because I wasn't sure. It's an expensive program. You know? Like are people getting value out of it? But people were, and the more like I dove into the client testimonials and I watched, I remember some of my family members at the time being like, "what are you doing?" [00:09:44] And they're like, "come take a break and hang out with us." I'm like, "no, I'm watching all these videos." I was like watching them in the background while doing other things. I was watching them and I really got to know the business. And then I got even more excited and I was like, "you know, this company doesn't really need me for social media right now. I mean, you did, you needed some social media help, but also you guys were doing just fine. The value was there and people noticed that even without flashy visuals or a really well set up socials page. Although, and I can get into this later, but I do think the social media is helping from what I've seen now. I can get into that later if you want, but...  [00:10:23] Jason Hull: I don't, I don't have to mess with it now, which is really nice. It just gets done. So, yeah. And I don't really have to spend time on Facebook. I don't have to spend time on Instagram. So that really did add value. My favorite thing that you do though, is get testimonial videos. I love those and you do a really great job on editing those. So you had mentioned just seeing me work from, you know, I was working from home. Right? And most people, if they have a dad that works, which I guess most people probably do, their dad usually takes off, like leaves and comes back. Like they just disappear, but I was always there and working from home. What do you think that was like for you? Is that different than you think other people's experience? Was it weird?.  [00:11:05] Madi Sleight: Yeah, it was weird. I mean, when we were really little, and I mean like second grade, eight years old, you had an office for OpenPotion downtown, you know, and even then when you would go to work sometimes-- [00:11:19] Jason Hull: I forgot about that. [00:11:21] Madi Sleight: Sometimes even then when you would go to work, you'd take me and my sister along with you. And we would like to play around-- [00:11:27] Jason Hull: Yeah, I did for a little while. In the beginning, I did have an office, yeah. [00:11:30] Madi Sleight: And we would play around in the back with your workout equipment while you were working. Even when you had an office. It wasn't like, like a day job, like a cubicle. We were around. We would play in the shop windows, you know.  [00:11:44] Jason Hull: You have such a good memory. It's really wild. [00:11:49] Madi Sleight: I really do. Well, I wasn't that young. I was like eight years old. That was when I was missing my two front teeth, you know? Yeah, no, I remember. You had the Roomba going around the office. We would tape stuff to it. Anyway, I'm getting off track. [00:12:04] Jason Hull: I had a robot cleaning for me. So coming in from the outside and then seeing-- cause you get to see-- you're on pretty much every coaching call, I think every coaching call, right? And you take show notes and then you give those to the group in the Mastermind and everybody else. How would you describe what we do now? And like, what's your perspective seeing what goes on in the business? [00:12:30] Madi Sleight: Even in just the last year and a half, and I know like we've really sped up the process of getting things organized with Sarah coming on, but even in just the last year and a half, like from when I started versus now-- The program has been polished and cleaned up the value and the coaching, modules themselves were always there, but now we're really like getting to polish and refine them and you get to work on making all the fine adjustments and tunings that you want to. [00:13:00] And it's really cool seeing that happen because as we're growing and adding more clients, I also see our clients getting more excited. When we made changes to certain documents a couple of weeks ago clients went crazy for it. They were like excited with us over this nerdy formatting change or like changing the order of the program around. The clients get excited, and I've gotten messages from clients being like, "Hey, can you send me the link to this document? I'm excited to restart it or like to do it over again. I want the newest updated version." And so, it's not just something that benefits us on like a organization level... [00:13:37] Jason Hull: You're talking about the Roadmaps roadmaps or the new scripts, or? [00:13:39] Madi Sleight: I didn't know if I was supposed to like, go into details on the podcast. [00:13:43] I don't know what I'm supposed reveal to the public.  [00:13:44] Jason Hull: Like it's a proprietary secret? Nah.  [00:13:48] Madi Sleight: It's a secret. It's for clients only. I don't know. But no, the clients love the updated grow roadmap. They really did. They found a lot more clarity. And I remember when I was reaching out, you know, "Hey, you're in this program, we updated this." [00:14:03] They're like, "man, can you send me the notes for that call? I missed it." Or I get notes all the time because I've turned into like the weekly coaching call and note taker. People will message me like, "oh man, I'm so upset. I missed today's call." You know, they'll be on every other call like, "man, what did I miss? Can you send me the summary directly so I can like study it and take notes? I'm like, wow. Some of our clients get really invested and find a lot of value in just the weekly coaching calls. And some of our clients-- like we've got a group of them that show up to every single one. [00:14:36] Jason Hull: Oh, I love those clients. I love the ones that they just, they show up to everything and they do everything that we say and they just get, they get the best results. They're like... they're the best. Like if I could just have all those kinds of clients, I would just have those and everybody would be rich. We would make tons of money. They would make tons of money. But yeah, I love clients that just do what I say.  [00:15:03] Madi Sleight: No, it's true. And it's nice to watch them, especially like from beginning to end. Sometimes they come in a little bit skeptical, like Jon Schmitt. I remember in the beginning he seemed a little stubborn. I dunno, he was intimidatingat first. But when I got on that interview with him last-- or a couple of weeks ago, he was the most excited and he was just going on and on about how much value he got out of the program and how he just decided to do what you said. And so he got the results and he's now like one of our biggest cheerleaders, he and Sonia and Alex come on the call and Alex as well, his son, Alex is always mentioning how much he's learning. He takes notes and he's learning and he wants to quit his day job and start taking over the property management business. [00:15:47] And that's really cool to watch because I've been on and I've been able to watch a lot of the clients' journeys from beginning to now. [00:15:58] Jason Hull: Yeah, you have, and you have a perspective or a lens through which you get to see the business that nobody else has because you're watching these videos over and over again, probably while you're editing them and piecing together, and you're like keeping track of different clips where they share wins on different calls, and then you're taking these together. So you get to see their entire journey in collapsed time. And so that's interesting.  [00:16:24] Madi Sleight: Well, I almost get like emotionally attached to these people that I've never met. You know, I've seen through a Zoom screen every week and I'm just quietly sitting there not talking back and I'm just recording them. Sometimes when I'm watching them and piecing together, putting music to their story and cutting out some "ums" or "and yeah"s or "and so"s and like putting together this really impactful video, sometimes I get emotional. I'm like, "wow, I'm so proud of them." You know, they came so far and it's so cool because I almost feel like I get to know these people on a personal level. [00:17:00] Jason Hull: Yeah, I mean for me, it's super rewarding to see clients winning and succeeding. Like it's worth more than money and getting paid to do what I do and to be just even a guide and seeing all the success in their journeys. It's like really, I mean, it's really amazing. I think it's really amazing that I get to have this job. It's crazy that I get paid to just help people win, which is really awesome. So we like any coach or any business, I've had haters. There's people that just don't believe like we're real or think we just, maybe could be snake oil salesman or something like that. Maybe you could share with people what are you noticing clients are doing? [00:17:44] Madi Sleight: I think the first thing that people who are skeptical or unsure need to realize is you're not selling a magical cure. You know, they're not going to go through the program and immediately they're going to have knocks on their door being like, "Here, take my properties." That's not how it works. And you know, at first I thought when I first joined the business, I was like, "How can you make that guarantee? How does this work? You know, are you helping them with SEO, helping them get referrals, but really the program benefits those who put in the work. [00:18:15] It's not for people who are just going to watch the videos and then not do anything about it. In fact, most of the program is doing the work. The videos are almost just helpful content to get you going. The program is not the videos, but I feel like some clients come in and that's what they think, but our most successful clients, our most excited, our most-- I don't know-- just our best clients, the ones that get the best wins and successes. They just come in, they dive right into the content, they keep their three commitments. They put in as many hours of prospecting they can a week. They get right into it. They just do what you say. They attend the weekly coaching calls. They ask lots of questions. That is something that I've noticed is our best, most rewarded clients. They ask a lot of questions. They come on and ask where they're stuck. They ask really good, insightful questions. [00:19:07] And sometimes they'll take up half the coaching call some of these questions, like 30 whole minutes or 40 minutes. We've been going over time a lot lately because we've been getting really good questions. And then they take what they learned from those calls and they just go implement it.  [00:19:26] Jason Hull: Yeah, it's true. Yeah, we spend a lot of time on those calls sometimes. And I love them asking questions. If they're doing the work, they always have questions. And I see my goal as mentor or as coach to just help them collapse time, point them in the right direction, give them enough information to get them moving forward in the right direction and then kind of get out of their way. So the training material in DoorGrow Academy helps them collapse time, especially because it helps them avoid doing the wrong things. Most people are just doing the wrong things or they're spending-- every business owner is spending tons of time in their business, but they're just focused on the wrong things. And so I think one of the greatest things I think that I provide is just clarity and helping them collapse time. So they don't waste so much time doing the stuff that isn't working. [00:20:15] So they actually spend less time on the phones and less time talking to people overall. In relation to the amount of doors they're acquiring than they would, if they were focused on SEO or pay-per-click or content marketing or social media marketing, or pay per lead services. This is all the stuff that people try to do. And then they come to us and we say, don't spend any money on any of that stuff. In fact, you don't even need to spend money, and we'll get you growing faster, but it takes work. All of those channels take work. They all take time.  [00:20:48] But none of them could help somebody like John Babiarz add, you know, how many doors has he added in what period?  [00:20:58] Madi Sleight: Right now, our most updated testimonial, which is already out of date because you just had a call with him. He had hit around 200 in under a year of being in the program.  [00:21:10] Jason Hull: 10 months, I think you put on the video?  [00:21:11] Madi Sleight: 10 or 11 months.  [00:21:13] Jason Hull: Yeah, that would be impossible with focusing on lead gen, typical internet based lead generation, like SEO, pay-per-click, content marketing. How many doors did he start at? I can't remember. [00:21:25] Madi Sleight: He said he started at 60 or 70. And so about six months into the program. I think he had doubled his portfolio.  [00:21:35] Jason Hull: Yeah. [00:21:36] Madi Sleight: Don't quote me on that. Those dates could be wrong.  [00:21:38] Jason Hull: I think I remember our first video used to run ads was 60. He added 60 doors in 11 weeks is what it said. And we just got lucky that he would mention how many he had added so far in the program, which inspired us to actually start tracking with clients, like keep them conscious of that. Like how many doors total, since during the program, have you added? So that we can monitor that and speed it up. [00:22:01] But yeah. So that's interesting. What else do you think people should know about. That don't know me from a perspective maybe as my kid or as boss, but how would you describe me to other people?  [00:22:15] Madi Sleight: I don't know. it's really interesting. You know, you've always kind of been out there in your beliefs or like what you're interested in. [00:22:25] Like, you tend to-- and I mean this in the best way possible, you're kind of like a nutjob. Like you go out, you love to read books and learn. You're constantly on this like self-improvement grind. You're always like learning new things and that's something that you always, you've always been that way. You've always wanted to learn and try new things to figure out like, what's the best way to do this? What's the best diet to eat? What's the best workouts? You've always kind of got that like innovative mindset in a way. You're willing to try like out there experimental things if it's working. [00:23:00] And I think that also translates into business. Like I wouldn't say that what we're doing is crazy here at DoorGrow. I think what we're doing is just something that helps businesses in general to thrive and to grow. But I don't think anyone else is really doing it like DoorGrow is. I don't think so. [00:23:19] Maybe you would know better. [00:23:20] Jason Hull: Probably not.  [00:23:20] I don't think anybody's doing anything the way that we do it. Not, not exactly. That's why all my trainings and with "secrets." We've got special, unique ways that I've come up with of doing things they're similar to what other people might do, but those little differences are where all the magic happens, I think. [00:23:38] Madi Sleight: And I think in a way, you know, those kind of out there techniques in your personal life and in business, that's something that benefits DoorGrow and is kind of what this whole thing is riding on is your unique perspective and take on these processes that help property managers add doors and scale their businesses. [00:23:59] It all kind of comes back to you being just a little bit crazy, just a little bit. [00:24:03] Jason Hull: A learning nut job. So yeah, I think one of the most common things I heard you and the kids say to me growing up is, "you're weird" to me.  [00:24:17] Madi Sleight: You are! And you were, you really were.  [00:24:21] Jason Hull: So, what else would you describe about my personality? And then we'll probably talk a little bit about you.  [00:24:26] Madi Sleight: Well, another thing that I think kind of lends itself to the program and to DoorGrow, but it's totally your personality is you're very logical in thinking. You're very like process oriented. And so you take that crazy and you mix it with this nerd. And then you get this person who can not only come up with these crazy ideas, but can implement them. Like you spend hours in AirTable, creating spreadsheets and processes and crazy like interconnected, intricate spreadsheets and databases. And I don't know. I don't know if I could do that, but you're willing to figure that out. You think it's fun and it's 'cause you've kinda got that like nerdy side as well, but you're very logical oriented and I think that helps our clients as well. [00:25:15] It's got pros and cons. You tend to think less emotionally and more logically. You don't bullshit or beat around the bush. You tell our clients what needs to get done. You push them to succeed and you're okay telling them the uncomfortable truth, even if they don't want to hear it. [00:25:33] Jason Hull: Yeah. That's true. Do you think I'm too harsh?  [00:25:36] Madi Sleight: Um, you know, there are times where it's appropriate and times where it's not. In your personal life, sometimes I'd be like, man, you're just a robot.  [00:25:45] Jason Hull: Personally, I'm probably too harsh sometimes.. [00:25:48] Madi Sleight: Sometimes you're a little too logical. Me and my siblings come to you like, "oh my gosh, I've got this emotional problem." and you're like, "it's okay. Just read a book. Here, take this book on self-improvement. And we're like, "I just needed you to listen!" But I think your clients need to hear it, so.  [00:26:09] Jason Hull: Yeah, I think I've gotten better with that over time that, I mean, I used to be really, really analytical and logical and truth was all that mattered, you know, so. But yeah, I think the challenge of that is you're constantly bombarded by emotional challenges if you're too logical. So I had to learn how to feel things and empathize more and more over the years. So I'm up there in years now, you know.  [00:26:39] Madi Sleight: How old? [00:26:39] Jason Hull: I think I turn 45 this year, so. [00:26:42] Madi Sleight: You think? You don't know? [00:26:43] Jason Hull: Yeah, no, I do. I turn 45 this year, so. All right, so that's enough about me. So let's just talk a little bit about you. So how old are you turning tomorrow?  [00:26:58] Madi Sleight: I'm turning 20.  [00:27:00] Jason Hull: 20? And your birthday's on 2/2/02. And you're turning 20 on 2/2/22.  [00:27:11] Madi Sleight: Yeah, it's also Groundhog's day.  [00:27:15] Jason Hull: Oh, okay. So what what's with the twos, Madi? [00:27:19] Madi Sleight: I don't know. It's my lucky number. I was also married and I graduated in 2020, so.  [00:27:25] Jason Hull: Yeah, a lot of people did not like that year.  [00:27:28] Madi Sleight: You know what? It was okay I guess. I also did not like that year all the time, but hey, still the twos. Two is my lucky number.  [00:27:40] Jason Hull: Yeah. So what's next for you? Like you're going to school now. You're doing a little part-time with DoorGrow. What gets you excited about the future?  [00:27:49] Madi Sleight: I don't know. I've always been very future oriented, you know, even since I was a freshman in high school, I was getting 4.0 not because I want it to, or because anyone expected me to, but because I wanted to get scholarships for college and I accidentally became valedictorian by doing that. I was willing to give it to the other girl that was salutatorian. I literally said, she's student body president. She can have it. They said it doesn't work that way. I was like, okay. But I just wanted the scholarships. I was always very future oriented. [00:28:23] And so I took a bunch of credits in high school, college credits. And so now I've kind of fast-tracked through college. It's only my second year, but I've got junior standing. And so I don't have a whole lot of college classes left to take, I don't have very many semesters left and at this point in my college career, I'm not taking any gen ed courses anymore. I'm taking all the fun, you know, journalism and mass media courses, taking a lot of graphic design, a lot of media ethics. And right now, I actually applied and I made it onto the school's national advertising competition team. So I'm working with a team of like nine or 10 other people right now, and we're working on a creative brief sent to us by Meta for the Meta Quest 2 VR headset. [00:29:13] Jason Hull: Formerly known as Facebook?.  [00:29:14] Madi Sleight: Yeah, Facebook. You know, all that good stuff. And so I get to actually come up with a whole advertising campaign with this team and I was given the producer role, which basically means I get to boss everybody around, which is something I'm good at. I have been told.  [00:29:29] Jason Hull: You are. You're good at that. You used to boss around your siblings. [00:29:32] Madi Sleight: I know, I know. And it's a little bit of a control freak. But I think this role suits me really well and I'm able to help our two presidents and I work very closely with them and they've already decided that I talk so much that I'm going to be the one presenting in person. [00:29:51] I guess I volunteered by talking a lot in our meetings. But no, I'm excited and this is something that I feel like will benefit my future, my resume. And I was very excited to be working for DoorGrow and getting relevant experience toward the field I'm going into, the digital design space or the desktop publishing, advertising sphere. [00:30:14] So I don't know. For a while, I feel like after I graduate, you know, Preston, my husband's still going to be in school, and so he'll still be going to school. So I'll just be sticking around and working with DoorGrow full-time and will stay.  [00:30:29] Jason Hull: Ooh, that'll be cool.  [00:30:30] Madi Sleight: I know you're excited. He keeps trying to get me to drop out by offering me a salary.  [00:30:39] Jason Hull: Yeah. 'Cause I'm obviously a huge fan of college. I went to college, but I feel like nowadays it's not really as useful as I don't really even look at applicants' college degrees. I really don't. I just look at experience and skills. Some people do, but yeah, I would love to have more Madi in the business because it's a good thing. [00:31:03] Madi Sleight: After I graduate, I'm just going to be sticking around here, saving up money for whatever's next. We've got a good area. We're close to Washington advertising agencies and stuff like that. There's lots of internships and possibilities. So I don't know. I'm happy, you know, with what I do at DoorGrow right now, I wouldn't mind branching out and trying new things when I go full time. But for now, I'm just excited to stay within this industry of, marketing, advertising, graphic design area and I like working from home. [00:31:34] And so that's something I've kind of gotten used to, but that's kind of what's next for me, I'm excited to keep taking classes at the university. It's a small college the journalism and mass media college, we're small. A lot of my classmates are the same in every class. A lot of my professors are the same, but they're very experienced. [00:31:52] A lot of them are experienced journalists and advertisers, marketers, PR people, know what they're talking about, at least I think so.  [00:32:01] Jason Hull: All right. So everybody's like he's throwing her some like easy, slow balls. What do you feel like is my biggest challenges or my biggest deficiencies or whatnot?  [00:32:14] Madi Sleight: In the business or in general? [00:32:17] Jason Hull: Oh, well either one. [00:32:21] Madi Sleight: Well, I mean, like I said, it's something that you've been working on and something that you've improved upon, but the emotional aspect was something that I personally had an issue with growing up, especially being the oldest, being very hard-headed and stubborn and also very emotional. All of your kids are very emotional. [00:32:39] So that's something that you're going to have... [00:32:43] Jason Hull: Yeah, I think of all of them, you're the least emotional out of all of them. [00:32:49] Madi Sleight: Which is funny because I've actually gotten more in tune with my emotions as I've gotten older, but I'm also just better at regulating, I think, than some of my siblings. [00:32:59] Jason Hull: Yeah, perhaps yeah. I mean, you are the oldest. I'm also an oldest. Right. And I think there's a sort of a personality type attributed to the oldest child. But yeah, I know that the things that I've always seen in you, the gifts that I see in you is that you have a really great memory. Like you remember like history from even when you're really young, like you bring up stories and it sparks, like it helps me remember and I'm like, oh my gosh. I can't believe she remembers that. Even when you're a really young, it's really quite weird. You remember a lot of details. I think also you would always take control. If there were a group of kids playing-- we would go, I would take you to the community swimming pool, for example. And you would immediately just start meeting people and you would organize everyone into doing a game or doing something like you would immediately, you were taking charge.  [00:33:50] And it wasn't like something you were ever pushed to do, you just did it. You're just driven to do that. You're like, this is what I want. I want to have fun. And I want to be in charge and get everybody doing things and you would just do it. And every kid would then be playing and like doing what you wanted them to do. Even with your, you know, your sister right under you Hailey, you would tell her like-- You would play games, which would be like some sort of role-play like pretending to do stuff. [00:34:15] And you would tell her what to say. You'd be like, "I will have a blah, blah, blah. And then you say blah blah blah blah..." and then she would be like, "blah blah blah blah." and she would just like, say it. Eventually, I think that wore thin. [00:34:28] Madi Sleight: Yeah, she got sick of it real quick. [00:34:31] Jason Hull: Eventually that wore thin. And she no longer tolerated that, but yeah, you would always like take charge. You were always really outgoing, like naturally, like talking to people and whatnot. And you were just, you were such a fun kid. You were just so fun. What was interesting about you growing up is you would just break out into song. You would make up songs while like, while we were driving or while we were doing things, you just sing about what you were seeing and what was going on. And it was really, really stinking cute. [00:35:04] Madi Sleight: You want to know what's funny? You want to know what's really funny? So I remember that when I first came on at DoorGrow, you pulled up my DISC assessment. And you were like, "man, this is really interesting." It's something about like your natural or your taught personalities, you know?  [00:35:19] Jason Hull: Yeah. your natural score versus your-- [00:35:22] Madi Sleight: like adapted. [00:35:24] Jason Hull: Yeah your adapted score.  [00:35:25] Madi Sleight: And you brought up something that was kind of unknown to me at the time that I was an adapted people pleaser, like my people pleasing score it was really, really high. I had been taught or expected to do that, but it was naturally pretty low. And that's, been in the back of my mind for like the last year and a half. And that's something that I've been working on. And as I've been like more myself and less worried about what people think... my poor husband. We have this inside joke. And I mentioned this when I was in Austin. The, "oh, is that your song? Is that your song?" Because I will be doing laundry or I'll be cooking and I'll be like, "it's time to do the laundry. I'm doing the laundry going to fold some socks." And like, I'll just start-- I'll just start like singing and dancing and he'll look at me and he'll go, "is that your song?" [00:36:12] I'm like, "that's my song."  [00:36:13] Jason Hull: "That's my song."  [00:36:15] Madi Sleight: So now that I'm like getting more into like my natural personality, I'm like reverting back to how I was, singing and dancing and coming up with stupid little jingles when I was a kid, So it's really funny.  [00:36:30] Jason Hull: It's kinda like that inner child work. Like you're just, you're becoming more comfortable being that authentic version of yourself. It's funny. Cause like I wrote songs, and I would make up songs all the time, like about things. Like sometimes the kids will still, like, if they're making chicken nuggets, will sing "chicken nuggets." [00:36:49] Madi Sleight: I do that! I do "the chicken nuggets."  [00:36:52] Jason Hull: "I want eat chicken nuggets, I like to eat chicken nuggets."  [00:36:57] Madi Sleight: I do that every time. I can't believe you remember that..  [00:36:59] Jason Hull: Yeah. I mean, as a parent, you've learned ways to get your kids inspired to do things because this is something that I learned a long time ago, but whenever we fail to inspire, we always control. And so it's hard to control people. if it were easy, everybody would do it. I'm going to control everybody and make the world around me, do what I want. But there's a lot less friction when you can inspire people to do it and song is sometimes a way to get kids to do things. [00:37:24] So well. All right, cool. Is there anything else people should know? About you? About me? About DoorGrow?  [00:37:33] Madi Sleight: I don't know. I'm happy where I'm at. And I think as we're growing our team, you know, we just hired Ashlee and she seems like a really good fit. And I get along with everyone on the team super well. We've got a good, fun dynamic, even Adam, you know, Adam's a little more shy than Kyle. [00:37:50] Kyle's a little rambunctious. Yeah. No, everyone like fits really well. And I get along with everybody and I like the company culture. I thought originally, you know, I kind of had this like inner fear that working with my own dad would be a nightmare. [00:38:06] Jason Hull: Yeah.  [00:38:06] Madi Sleight: Yeah. That was something that I was worried about. But honestly, I think it's been good because I don't know how often we would get to communicate otherwise, but now we talk to each other on a daily basis. Sometimes I get sick of you. Sometimes I do. sometimes I'll be in the huddle at 7:30 in the morning and I'll be like, "I'm too tired for this," but I think it's helped us like grow together personally. [00:38:28] And I also just learn a lot from you and from the business. And I think it's a really good opportunity for me.  [00:38:35] Jason Hull: Yeah. I love having you in the business because, you know, a lot of times parents-- I feel like I have a lot of stuff that I know that I would like to get into my kids, but there's not really a vehicle to do that, but getting your kid in business with you and in doing things because I want everyone on the team to grow, but of course I want my daughter to grow as well. [00:38:56] And so, you know, it's being able to see you develop and grow. Is even more rewarding, you know, for me. And it's really rewarding to be able to share some of that stuff that's in me that I would love all my kids to have, which are heavily connected to values and the things that I care about. [00:39:19] And. You know, interacting and dealing with people and what's effective and contribution and all the things that you've heard. Here's what's really genius about you that I should point out. So when you started doing social media posts, you had listened to some of my podcast and you'd listen to things. You've learned my voice, which is really weird. Like there's AI software out there now, which we now can play with a little bit that actually can learn our voice and it can speak. And it can make the sounds that sound like me, right? There's like an AI version of Joe Rogan out there. For example, it sounds exactly like them. It's like a deep fake, like, it's crazy. You can sound just like him and it's AI, people can type in words and it can spit out someone else's voice. Right.  [00:40:03] You learned to pretty much do that by just watching the videos, but in text, right. So when you're creating posts and content, every now and then I'll read something I'm like, well, that's kind of a little different than how I say it, but what's really weird is most of the time I would see posts or things that you would post and I would look at it and then I would feel like I needed to like it because I was like, that's great stuff. I love that. I mean, it's silly that I love like things you've gotten from what I say, but I didn't write it and I'm reading it going, "yeah. I resonate with this" obviously. And so it's really funny.  [00:40:40] And then I'm like, oh, that's silly. I shouldn't be liking my own stuff. That's weird, but I didn't post it, you know? So it's really awesome to see that you were able to encapsulate the voice. How are you able to do that when other people haven't? [00:40:52] Madi Sleight: Well, the weird thing is I started out making this, like this kind of like a reservoir, like a doc of all these different quotes on all these different topics. [00:41:00] So if I needed a caption for something about a topic, I'd look and I'd go, oh, and I'll just copy and paste it. So I really did just--  [00:41:08] Jason Hull: So you have a Jason's quotes database?  [00:41:11] Madi Sleight: I do, and I keep adding to it, but now I started off doing direct quotes and then I started like, "Hmm, I don't like the way he said that. I feel like that's inproper grammar" So I like tweak it a little bit. Yeah, no, "I feel that's not the right word. I think he meant to say this." And so I like put in little things that start tweaking it. And now what I do is I actually, like, I've gotten way more efficient and like more quick at getting social media posts out there. [00:41:37] 'Cause I'll go into this reservoir. and I have pages and I know exactly where everything is and I'll be like, "oh, this is a good line. I'll throw that in there. This is also a good line. I'll throw that in there." you know, make something up as well to go along with it. It's almost bad because we'll be in the coaching calls and you'll be talking about something and I'll be like, "I could regurgitate this quote on this topic because you'll be trying to say it and I'll be like, "I know exactly what he's trying to say." because you've said it before. One thing that's helpful is your views on a certain topic, like let's say SEO, or referral partners or this or that, you say mostly the same things about the same topic in most of our calls. And so I kind of picked up on that. [00:42:23] And so even if I don't have something in my beautiful reservoir, I just know what you would say. Like, I dunno.  [00:42:30] Jason Hull: You've heard me talk so much and heard me say so much, you know. I've worked with some coaches and mentors. I had one coach I worked with for like three years and it got to the point where on calls. I knew what he would say. Like, I could answer the question for people on his behalf. Yeah. So do you think you could coach clients? Do you think that's something that you could do? You'd be like, I know what Jason would say. This is like, what he would say.  [00:42:52] Madi Sleight: Well, it's funny because when I was doing like the client outreach for a little bit, you know, messaging all of our clients every week, sometimes I'd get a question and I would be able to confidently answer it. And other times, more rarely I would send them over to you but because I know your viewpoint on most of the things-- and that also helped when I was doing sales followup, because I started off and they'd ask me questions, like "how much does the program cost? What do you do?" And I couldn't confidently answer. [00:43:17] But now I can. And I don't think I'm to the point where I could take over the weekly coaching calls yet. I think I need to go through our program kind of like what Ashlee's doing right now. And like actually go through, take notes and become more familiar with the content of the program itself. But I don't think I'm too far behind that honestly because I listen to you for an hour, twice a week, plus meetings and huddles. And I post to your personal and to our business, social medias every single day. And I'm looking at your quotes every single day. Every time I'm creating social media content, I'm going through. "Hmm. You know, what's a good topic for this post."" [00:44:02] What's something we haven't, you know, put on social in a while." and I look at your podcast episodes and see what kind of content you put up there. And so there's a lot of information. If somebody wanted to impersonate you, I don't think it'd be that hard. There's enough information out there.  [00:44:20] Jason Hull: There's a lot out there.. [00:44:21] Madi Sleight: And the more that I consume just doing my daily tasks or weekly tasks, the better I get at, you know, mimicking your style, your voice on social media. [00:44:32] Jason Hull: Cool. Yeah, I think it's just really kind of weird to see when I see stuff that looks like I did it, but it's actually you, but it's like I did it, which is really strange. Cause I don't remember doing it, which is the weirdest thing I'm like, "I don't remember doing that, but that sounds exactly like something I would say." [00:44:52] Madi Sleight: Most of the time it is something you said.  [00:44:56] Jason Hull: That's why. Sometimes I don't even remember saying some things. You'll post something. I'm like, "that's really good! Did I actually say that?" Yeah. So, all right. Well, I think this has gone on long enough, and I appreciate you coming on and being willing to do this and kind of share your perspective on me. [00:45:16] And I think it's probably fun for everyone to hear a little bit about you.  [00:45:20] Madi Sleight: I think that the people listening to this podcast should go check out our socials. You know, we don't get a ton of engagement. We've been getting higher numbers. I've checked the percentages. They've gone up. We've gained more followers, but I think our social media content is pretty good. So if you could go check it out, that'd be really great. You're gonna find a lot of regurgitated quotes from my dad, but a lot of it's good information, especially for property managers. If you're like struggling to grow doors or feel like you're stuck at a roadblock or you can't scale your business, there's a lot of little tidbits of sneak peaks of what we kind of talk about in the program on our socials, lots of short paragraphs. [00:45:57] Little things, I take little gold nuggets from your podcast and put them on socials. So I think that's something that could be nice for someone to get into if they don't have a lot of time to listen to your podcast or to do a ton of research on DoorGrow,  [00:46:13] but also go check out our YouTube channel and our clients success videos. I'm going to be posting more this week as I get them refined to make some revisions and get them up there. We've got some really awesome client wins and people should expect a lot more client success videos in the coming year and in the next few months, especially because I've got a lot of content to get up there and to get out to people so we can show off how awesome our clients are. [00:46:42] Jason Hull: Yeah. I just got to get you to quit college and make videos full-time so I can get more of them out of you faster. [00:46:52] Madi Sleight: I'm too far in, at this point. I just gotta finish it. You don't have to wait that long. I promise I will work full time when I graduate.  [00:47:05] Jason Hull: Well, I'm looking forward to the time where you can go full time. Cause that'd be awesome and Madi, I love you. I adore you. A dad couldn't have had a better first kid and you were just, you've always been so fun. You always get my jokes and I really appreciate having you in the business. And thanks for coming on the podcast.  [00:47:26] Madi Sleight: Yeah. I don't know. I love working for DoorGrow and I like working with you, believe it or not.  [00:47:32] Jason Hull: I believe it. All right. And I think everybody else listening does too well, everybody else, I appreciate you hanging out with us. This is about an hour, this will be a long episode. And until next time to our mutual growth bye everyone. [00:47:47] Jason: You just listened to the #DoorGrowShow. We are building a community of the savviest property management entrepreneurs on the planet in the DoorGrowClub. Join your fellow DoorGrow Hackers at doorgrowclub.com. Listen, everyone is doing the same stuff. SEO, PPC pay per lead content, social direct mail, and they still struggle to grow!  [00:48:13] At DoorGrow, we solve your biggest challenge: getting deals and growing your business. Find out more at doorgrow.com. Find any show notes or links from today's episode on our blog doorgrow.com, and to get notified of future events and news subscribe to our newsletter at doorgrow.com/subscribe. [00:48:34] Until next time, take what you learn and start DoorGrow Hacking your business and your life.

Dr. John Barnett on SermonAudio
The End Of Days Roadmaps--God_S Prophetic Claim That Authenticates He Is Creator, Red

Dr. John Barnett on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 7:00


A new MP3 sermon from DTBM, International is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: The End Of Days Roadmaps--God_S Prophetic Claim That Authenticates He Is Creator, Red Subtitle: End Of The World, Armageddon & Speaker: Dr. John Barnett Broadcaster: DTBM, International Event: Sunday Service Date: 3/9/2022 Length: 7 min.