Podcasts about physical medicine

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Latest podcast episodes about physical medicine

The Self Help Antidote
Grow Your Gift, Change Your Story

The Self Help Antidote

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 42:47


What are the attributes and unique abilities that define you?   You will never be as energized, or fulfilled as when you know your value.  Making a contribution to others by doing work you love may be one of the hallmarks of a successful life. But what if you don't know what your unique areas of value are? In this episode Dr. Winifred Bragg suggests that you can learn a lot about yourself by how you communicate with the most important people in your life.  What advice or area of expertise are you consistently sought after for?  What are the attributes and skills that people admire about you?  When you can identify your unique gift(s), believe in yourself, and know how to employ that gift in the service of others, you not only have the power to positively impact lives but change your life story in the process.  In this episode Dr. Bragg and I discuss:4 questions that will help you achieve your goalsBelief in yourselfWhat to do when you are afraidThe power of empathyThe real meaning behind "fake it until you make it"What makes up your identity, and what doesn't?How to grow your giftGratitudeWhat is the Bragg Factor?  Recognizing and capitalizing on opportunity And moreWINIFRED BRAGG MD is an expert in providing non-surgical treatment for injuries and pain resulting from spinal and orthopedic conditions. A nationally recognized speaker, Dr. Bragg has been featured on ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX. Dr. Bragg is board certified in both Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Pain Medicine. She is the Medical Director of the Spine and Orthopedic Pain Center in Norfolk, Virginia. Visit www.knockoutpain.comShe is the Creator of TheBraggFactor® a system that teaches professionals and students how to own and communicate their value. Using her signature program, she has given seminars and workshops to Fortune 500 companies. Visit TheBraggFactor.com

Nutritional Revolution Podcast
Episode 34 with Dr. Emily Kraus: Low Energy Availability, Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport, and Bone Health

Nutritional Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 49:12


In today's episode, we speak with Dr. Emily Kraus about correlations between low energy availability (LEA), the female athlete triad (FAT),  relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S), and overall bone health. Tune in to learn whether you may be at risk for LEA, what you can do to help restore energy balance, and how you can avoid this state of energy deficiency. Dr. Emily Kraus is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford Children's Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center. She specializes in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) sports medicine and takes a unique approach to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of sports injuries in athletes of all ages. She is involved in multiple Stanford IRB-approved research projects, including The Healthy Runner Project, a multicenter prospective interventional study focused on bone stress injury prevention in collegiate middle and long distance runners.Dr. Kraus also spends time performing gait analysis at the Stanford Run Safe Injury Prevention Program and serves as a medical advisors for the Adaptive Sports Injury Prevention Program at the Palo Alto VA. She has research and clinical interests in endurance sports medicine, injury prevention, running biomechanics, the prevention of bone stress injuries in collegiate athletes and the promotion of health and wellness at any age of life.She has completed nine marathons including Boston Marathon twice and one 50k ultramarathon. With running and staying physically active as one of her personal passions, she recognizes the importance of fitness for overall wellbeing and the prevention of chronic medical conditions.Please note that this podcast is created strictly for educational purposes and should never be used for medical diagnosis and treatment.See you in the next episode!***New customers save 10% off all products on our website with the code NEWNR10 here: https://nutritional-revolution.com/products/Find our 1 Week Real Food, Real Quick Meal Plan here: https://nutritional-revolution.com/product/1-week-real-food-real-quick-meal-plan/If you would like to work with our practitioners, click here: https://nutritional-revolution.com/work-with-us/If you're interested in sponsoring Nutritional Revolution Podcast, shoot us an email at nutritionalrev@gmail.com.***Mentioned:Dr. Emily KrausPersonal Instagram: @emilykrausmdScience Instagram: @emilykrausmd_sportscienceStanford FASTR ProgramInstagram: @stanfordfastrWebsite: https://fastr.su.domains/Resources: https://fastr.su.domains/resources/Educational Video Series: https://fastr.su.domains/blog/Research Western States Endurance Runner 

LiveWell Talk On...
223 - Hospital-based Therapy (Megan Annis, OTR/L)

LiveWell Talk On...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 14:33


This week is National Rehab Week, and on the podcast today is Megan Annis, OTR/L, occupational therapist with St. Luke's Physical Medicine and Rehab, to discuss rehab services offered at the hospital. She and Dr. Arnold talk about inpatient and outpatient rehab, the role of an occupational therapist and much more.For more info about Physical Medicine and Rehab Services in Cedar Rapids, call (319) 369-7331 or visit unitypoint.org/pmr-cr. This is the first of three podcasts celebrating National Rehab Week 2022. Check back on Wednesday for a podcast on Witwer Children's Therapy with Speech Pathologist Nicole Halvorson and on Friday for a podcast on Therapy Plus with Senior Physical Therapist Brock Yotty.Do you have a question about a trending medical topic? Ask Dr. Arnold! Anything from COVID-19 to the latest technologies and procedures to general questions about a service provided at UnityPoint Health - Cedar Rapids. Submit your question and it may be answered by Dr. Arnold on the podcast! Submit your questions at: https://www.unitypoint.org/cedarrapids/submit-a-question-for-the-mailbag.aspx 

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast
NFX #192: Recovery with Cannabis & Ketamine w/ Dr. Edward Pearson

Roscoe's Wetsuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 45:46


Dr. Edward Pearson is the medical director of KetaMD, an at-home ketamine Telehealth company, along with being the founder of the New Medicine Health & Wellness Center in Stuart, Florida.Displeased with what he saw in conventional medicine, after completing his internship and a short time in a Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation residency, Dr. Pearson set out on his own to find the education that would teach him how to truly heal people and prevent the epidemics of chronic illness plaguing humanity.Dr. Pearson has now become a worldwide expert in the field of truly integrated health care, he was certified by the American Board of Holistic Medicine in 2005 and 2011 and receives ongoing training from the best educators in the world, including the Institute of Functional Medicine and others.https://ketamd.comhttps://newmedicinefl.com

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine
Dr. Linda Carozza, Part 2

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 18:39


Dr. Linda Carozza is a clinical professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Health. She has written extensively on the broad topic of communication and aging with a focus on creative approaches to improving the quality of life. Her publications include the topic of counselling in chronic aphasia: integrating theory with professional roles in clinical practice and also on the topic of non-pharmacological approaches to dementia. She has a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. In 2021, she was selected a National Academy of Practice Speech Pathology Fellow. She has a doctorate in speech and hearing sciences from the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. Her baccalaureate and master's degree in speech and hearing are from the City College of New York.  Topics discussed in Part 2  included the following: common symptoms that will be experienced by an individual who is beginning to reveal signs of dementia or Alzheimer's disease; primary progressive aphasia (PPA); effective tools and resources used since 2019 when the World Health Organization published its first evidence-based guidelines on dementia risk reduction; roles played by informal and family caregivers and preparing them to do so; use of telehealth in treating patients; non-pharmacological approaches in assessment and treatment of dementia; and future research projects envisioned.      

The Preventive Medicine Podcast
Married, Moved, and More – The Podcast Returns!

The Preventive Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 33:39


The last episode released was on May 22nd, 2022 and a lot has happened since then! Since then I have gotten married, finished my intern year of residency, moved to a different state, and started training within my specialty of choice. In all this the podcast fell by the wayside but it is back!  In this episode, you'll be re-introduced to me, the podcast, hear about the major life events in the way of the podcast, my reflections on intern year, what my specialty - Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - is all about, and where the podcast is headed! I'm excited to bring the podcast back and if you want to help it grow make sure to rate and review the show!  Show Outline 1. Major life events and updates since the last episode released on May 22nd, 2022 2. My reflections after completing intern year 3. All about Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 4. Future plans for the podcast! Join our Mailing List HERE: Mailchimp

U2FP CureCast
Disdain for the Status Quo (Episode 66)

U2FP CureCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 82:04


Jason and Mathew talk with Andrew Park, a clinician-researcher at Craig Rehabilitation Hospital in Denver, Colorado. Jason met Andrew while in Denver for one of U2FP's Cure Advocacy Network stakeholder meetings last February. During that meeting, Andrew's passion for his work became evident. In this podcast, we talk about what's behind that passion, including: his path to becoming a researcher; his research interests and philosophy; a system-level path to functional recovery for the SCI community; and much more. Join us for this energetic and insightful discussion. Finally, we want to acknowledge that while Dr. Park works at Craig Hospital, our conversation was a reflection of Andrew's personal opinions and not the opinions of Craig Hospital. Bio: Andrew Park, MD, is a physician in spinal cord injury (SCI) medicine and an early investigator at Craig Hospital. In his role, he provides clinical care to individuals with SCI on both an inpatient and outpatient basis. He performs translational research at Craig Hospital and holds joint appointments at the University of Colorado Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Veterans Affairs Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders Center (VA SCI/D). He is performing research at both Craig Hospital and VA SCI/D with parallel research focused on inflammatory mediators of secondary complications after SCI. These studies laid the groundwork for his research interests at the intersection of clinical care and understanding of mechanisms related to immune dysfunction after SCI.

Kintinu'd Conversations
S2E3: What is a Spinal Cord Injury?

Kintinu'd Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 47:10


“Once you choose hope, anything is possible.” – Christopher ReeveBacked by decades of experience producing exceptional clinical outcomes, Kintinu Telerehab connects recovery to everyday life. In this podcast, we explore hot topics in rehabilitation, the keys to personal growth and recovery, and how to apply it all to the real-world.In this episode of Kintinu'd Conversations, Brad Dexter, Claire Thelen, and Tim Benak welcome Dr. David Gater to the podcast to discuss spinal cord injuries. We were grateful for our time with Dr. Gater, as we learned he suddenly passed away from a myocardial infarction only 3 weeks after our conversation. Dr. Gater was president of the Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals and was active in the American Spinal Injury Association, the Veterans Health Administration, VA System of Care, and the Paralyzed Veterans of America. He was also a member of the Association of Academic Physiatrists and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, along with other associations.Dr. Gater was also a research scientist at The Miami Project; chief of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service for UM Hospital and Clinics, Jackson Memorial Hospital, and the Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center; and Spinal Cord Injury Medicine Fellowship director. Nationally, he was co-director, National Institute on Disability Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) South Florida Spinal Cord Injury Model System, one of just 14 such centers in the country.Board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation, electrodiagnostic medicine, and spinal cord injury medicine, Dr. Gater was extensively published and made hundreds of local, departmental, and conference presentations. He was internationally known for his work in obesity and metabolic disease among people with spinal cord injury and disease, and was a staunch advocate for his patients.A world-renowned physician and researcher, Dr. Gater will be remembered as brilliant, innovative, kind, and compassionate. His influence will be carried forward by his colleagues, patients, and those he taught and mentored.We hope you can learn from and enjoy our conversation!Listen to the episode on Spotify, Amazon Music, Apple Podcasts, and Buzzsprout, or on your favorite podcast platform.Resources:Facing DisabilityChristopher and Dana Reeves FoundationThe Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

Mayo Clinic Talks
Plantar Fasciitis: Best Step Forward

Mayo Clinic Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 22:09


Host: Joshua D. Luciew, P.A.-C. Guest: Arthur J. De Luigi, D.O., M.H.A. (@DrDeLuigi, https://twitter.com/drdeluigi) Heel and foot pain can be a burdensome symptom for our patients, as discomfort can be experienced with each step they take, hindering locomotion. Many different patient populations are required to be on their feet for their job or for various wellness goals, which can exacerbate their painful heel and foot or deter them from exercise. In this episode, we will explore the most common cause of heel and foot pain: plantar fasciitis. Listeners will learn from a Mayo Clinic specialist in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation how plantar fasciitis develops, how it is properly diagnosed, and learn the best approaches for treatments of this condition to help patients resume their previous physical activities, pain-free. Connect with the Mayo Clinic's School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd. 

Visibly Fit with Wendie Pett
Episode 61: By Choice, Not by Chance. The Effects of Intentional Decisions and Thoughtful Habits on Our Faith, Health, Wellness and More with Dr. Evan Queler.

Visibly Fit with Wendie Pett

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 51:00


My great friend Dr. Evan Queler joins us on today's episode to discuss the power of fasting on our mind, body and spirit; the power of movement to reduce pain and inflammation; how strong faith affects our health for the better and much more! In this episode, you'll discover: -Clarity on the physical and spiritual practice of fasting...02:52 -Path of least resistance: Why we don't always do what we know to do...10:34 -A five-day fast that will set you on the path to being a more positive part of the world around you...20:15 -Move more to reduce chronic pain and inflammation, increase your quality of life...25:44 -Improving sleep patterns for those who sleep at irregular times...28:53 -The effects of love on the human physiology...32:03 -Dr. Queler's thoughts on the effects of faith on gene expression, DNA formation, etc...37:03 -Dr. Queler's exploits on the guitar explained...46:40 -And much more! Resources mentioned: doctorqlongevity.life/doctor-q-fast-kit Rebate Code: VISIBLYFIT Get $98 off the Doctor Q Fast Kit - normally $297 now ONLY $199 About the guest: Evan Queler is a medical doctor double boarded in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Lifestyle Medicine and is also fellowship trained in interventional spine & pain management. In 2017 Dr. Queler left his traditional interventional spine physiatry practice and is now practicing Lifestyle Medicine to help people feel better and live more by treating chronic disease through evidence based lifestyle change. He is also the co-creator of the Doctor Q Fast Kit - a science based customized metabolic diet that mimics a fast, and works in just 5 days. __________ To learn more and for free resources go to www.wendiepett.com. If you haven't listened to the Introduction and the first 5 episodes of the Visibly Fit Podcast make sure you do. You will be encouraged that becoming Visibly Fit is actually within REACH. You can download the worksheets at www.wendiepett.com/visiblyfitpodcast

Find Empathy - Mental Health Continuing Education
PSYPACT - Research, History, Interjurisdictional Practice, & Billing Considerations

Find Empathy - Mental Health Continuing Education

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 64:18


CONTINUING EDUCATION If you are a psychologist or social worker and want CE credits for listening this episode, click on this link. To find out more about all our CE courses click here. PODCAST SUMMARY As of July 2022, 34 States have enacted PSYPACT legislation with 31 fully effective participating states. After COVID-19, the participation of states and professionals in PSYPACT grew considerably and continues to expand across the country. The ability to use telepsychology to practice across state lines and expand practice has brought many benefits for patients and providers. However, there are distinct and vital competencies, ethics, and standards that must be addressed, implemented, and maintained. This is particularly true for telepsychology practices (including virtual neuropsychological assessments) with neurologic, medical, and disability populations. Although this technology can break down transportation and geographic barriers, some individuals may require additional assistance to properly utilize telepsychology services.The PSYPACT Bundle Course is a continuing education podcast series which will look at the various advantages and requirements of telepsychology for neurologic, medical, and disability patient groups. This course will cover: Available research and literature on telepsychology's application for neurologic, medical, and disability patient groups Telepsychology's use in outpatient care Use of technology to increase mental health access for inpatient rehabilitation units and the medical ICU. How family and care partner participation may be boosted with telepsychology Topics covered in this series will meet the criteria needed to satisfy PSYPACT requirements, and APA/ASPPB/APAIT telepsychology guidelines. Specifically, established research, clinical cases, and lessons learned will be presented to cover the following topics: Ensure Competence of the Psychologist to utilize and practice telepsychology and/or tele-neuropsychology Standards of Care in the Delivery of Telepsychology Services in Rehabilitation and Neurologic Populations Informed Consent of Patient, especially when considering patients with cognitive impairment or dysfunction Ensuring Confidentiality of Data and Information Security and Transmission of Data and Information Disposal of Data and Information and Technologies especially for psychologists working in a home office setting Testing and Assessment when Providing Teleneuropsychology Services Interjurisdictional Practice Our Experts: Mary Wells, PhD - Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System Anna Agranovich, PhD - Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine COST Listening, reading, or watching the course content is free. Pay only if you nee

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine
Dr. Linda Carozza, Part 1

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 20:55


Dr. Linda Carozza is a clinical professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Health. She has written extensively on the broad topic of communication and aging with a focus on creative approaches to improving the quality of life. Her publications include the topic of counselling in chronic aphasia: integrating theory with professional roles in clinical practice and also on the topic of non-pharmacological approaches to dementia. She has a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. In 2021, she was selected a National Academy of Practice Speech Pathology Fellow. She has a doctorate in speech and hearing sciences from the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. Her baccalaureate and master's degree in speech and hearing are from the City College of New York.  Part 1 included a discussion of the following: how she become interested in the area of adult neurogenic communication disorders; conditions encompassed by the term adult neurogenic communication disorders; professional qualifications for students or other individuals who wish to pursue this line of practice; some defining characteristics of dementia-communication changes and how they differ from stroke-treated communication changes; incidence and prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the US; whether the terms dementia and Alzheimer's disease basically are the same, and if not,  important distinctions between them; and some major causes of dementia.

Move It or Lose it - The Podcast
Episode 66 - Jacqueline Kaufman, PhD - Supporting Young Patients And Their Families

Move It or Lose it - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 48:46


Jacqueline Kaufman, PhD, is an Associate Professor within the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Michigan. Dr. Kaufman is the co-founder of the Michigan Adapted Cognitive Assessment Clinic (M-ACAC), the only known clinic of its kind, which conducts cognitive assessments for children and young adults with severe speech and motor impairment. Patients have traveled from as far as California and Arizona to receive care in this unique specialty clinic!Dr. Kaufman is doing amazing and important work for our auto-immune community, with a particular interest in caring for children who are undergoing neuropsychological assessment. In this conversation, we talk about how she works to provide personalized care for parents and children, how her experience volunteering while at school led to her "lightbulb moment", and the hopes she has for her work in the future.Links and resources:View Dr. Kaufman's profile on the University of Michigan websiteEmail Dr. Kaufman Find out more about my new DMAT Fitness Training programVisit Disrupt Fitness You can find Kathy Chester atdisruptfitnessgym@gmail.commoveitorloseit109@gmail.comInstagram - @msdisrupted Here are some additional products that help Kathy deal with beating the Heat and Migraines.  Take advantage of the coupon code.Koldtec - Cool Head WrapKOLD10To save $10 off every item in-store.2 items = $20 savings3 items = $30 savingshttps://www.koldtec.com/ Cold bean bag Releafpack. 15% discount use code Disrupt15https://www.releafpack.com 

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT
Spinal Cord Injury SIG: Interview with Dr. Edelle Field-Fote – Episode 14

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 25:28


Interview with Dr. Edelle Field-Fote about her group's paper “ Characterizing the Experience of Spasticity after Spinal Cord Injury: A National Survey Project of the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems Centers” published in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in 2022.   Join DiSCIS hosts Kristen Cezat, PT, DPT, NCS and Uzair Hammad, PT, DPT as we learn more about this new and exciting work! For the transcript of the podcast click here. The Spinal Cord Injury Special Interest Group is part of the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy – www.neuropt.org

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #89: Aphasia is a Complex Disorder: Mental Health, Language, and More – A Conversation with Dr. Sameer Ashaie

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 37:35


Thanks for listening in today. I'd like to welcome you to this episode of Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I'm Katie Strong, Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Director of the Strong Story Lab at Central Michigan University and serving as today's episode host. Today I'm talking with Dr. Sameer  Ashaie from the Shirley Ryan Ability Lab. Before we get into our conversation, Let me tell you a bit about our guest.        Dr. Ashaie is a Research Scientist in the Think and Speak Lab at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University.  He earned is PhD in Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences at the Graduate Centre, CUNY.  He is recipient of the 2022 Tavistock Trust for Aphasia Distinguished Scholar Award. Dr. Ashaie was also a recipient of NIDILRR's Switzer Merit Fellowship and NIDILIRR's Advanced Rehabilitation Research and Training post-doctoral fellowship. His lab the Shirley Ryan Affective and Emotion Rehabilitation Lab (SAfER) focuses on aphasia rehabilitation, particularly identifying post-stroke depression and related psychosocial disorders. He employs a variety of techniques in his research including eye-tracking and heart-rate variability.   In this episode you will:  Learn about the value of having researchers integrated into clinical care. Be empowered to think about depression on a continuum and why how we measure depression matters. Hear how network models can be a more useful way to examine complex disorders.    KS: Sameer welcome and thank you for joining me today. I'm really excited about this conversation with you, and having our listeners get to know you and your work .  SA: Thank you for having me here. You know I listen to the podcast, and I wasn't expecting to be here one day. So, it's a privilege being here. I KS: Congratulations on receiving the Tavistock Distinguished Scholar Award. Can you tell us a bit about the impact of receiving this recognition?  SA: It's a big honor. You know, oftentimes as an early career researcher in the field of physiology or I guess any field me especially I'm wondering like, if I'm doing whatever I'm doing, is it making sense? Is it making a difference? Are people noticing it? So getting this award especially and people that have gotten before me and the work they're doing? It really validates what I'm trying to do as an indication of where I'm trying to take my research program and I'm hoping that it has an impact on people with aphasia, and as well as the broader research community. KS: Absolutely! I'm excited to start talking about your research. But before we get to that, I'd love to hear a little bit about how you came into the field of speech language pathology, because it wasn't a direct line. Your story is in fact quite interesting. And I think you refer to it as a winding path. Could you tell us a little bit about how you came to be working in the area of aphasia? SA: I started my PhD in theoretical linguistics, looking at generative phonology. And then I ended up taking a class with Dr. Loraine Obler. It was a class on the historical debates on language localization. And that really got me interested in language. After two years in theoretical linguistics, I switched tracks to neuro linguistics, communication science disorders. Because I really got interested in just language, more than just a theoretical perspective that I had as a linguist. And then, of course, there are two people that really had an impact on my career and continue to have an impact on my career. One is that I did my PhD with Dr. Jamie Reilley at Temple. And that's how I got interested into sort of the semantic aspects of aphasia. And he was really supportive and was really great in how we think about science and how we do science.  And then I would say that the person who's had the most impact and continues to have the most impact, and really has made me think about this field is Dr. Leora Cherney. And I'm really indebted to her in terms of how I think about this field, how I think about our participants, how I think about how aphasia impacts their life in totality. And just seeing that kind of dedication and thinking about research that is support to impact people's life. And getting that inspiration from Leora. She has been really critical for me to really falling in love with this field, because you're keeping your participants at the center of the work you do. I mean, you might not see the impact, but you're trying to keep them that that is what your aim is. And I guess that's how I kind of came to this field, you know, some from sort of theoretical linguistics and interested in semantics and then getting a postdoc with Leora. And being inspired by her and the support she's given me to explore things. And carry a different line of research, but always keeping the participants in mind. KS: So, you're a research scientist who works in a rehabilitation hospital. I'm not sure if our listeners know exactly what you do all day long. Would you walk us through a ‘typical day' – if there is such a thing? What do you do in your lab? Would you talk us through that a bit?  SA: Yeah, I, myself did not know what a research scientist is what I was doing! It was all new to me as well. It's different than a traditional academic position, and especially in a place like, Shirley Ryan AbiityLab, which is a rehab hospital. Especially the model in our rehab hospital is that researchers are integrated into the clinical care. So, what I mean by that is that our labs are situated right where therapies are happening. So even though we're not involved in therapy that's happening with the patients getting the care at that time, we can see different types of therapies. That might be OT (occupational therapists) giving therapy, or speech-language pathologists, physical therapists. So that's that integration. You really get to see patients. You get to see sort of different issues that you might not think about, because we're so discipline focused, right? So, it opens up your mind to all sorts of possibilities, collaborations, issues you might not think about. For example, physical factors are really important for people, but seeing that live and that being worked on, it has a different impact on you. The second thing is that, as a research scientist, you're not teaching classes. Your primary work is centered around research, which, which has its perks, but also that you miss sometimes that interaction, you might have had students in a traditional setting. Not that we don't get students (at Shirley Ryan AbilityLab), we do. But the primary focus is really getting the research program started. And there are no things like semesters, you have the whole year. We work on the hospital schedule. And as an early career (professional), a lot of what you do is dependent on how you get funded and that's how you established your lab. So we so for example, as an early career person, you might not necessarily have a lot of students working for you because we're not in a Communication Sciences Disorders department. So that's sort of different. But the main thing is that it's an academic environment, but it's not a university.  KS: Yeah yeah you're right there in the thick of all of that rehab work. That's fabulous. I had the honor of doing a tour at Shirley Ryan at one of the Aphasia Days before COVID hit and it's just such a beautiful facility. It's just stunning. I love hearing about your path and a little bit about your work life and I've been interested in your research for a while now. I'm so excited to have this conversation. Your work in in mood and depression is something that really is an important area and I was hoping as we get started in this conversation if you could frame for us why this is such an important topic that extends to research and clinical work. SA: This is such an important question. And when I started my post-doc in the field of aphasiology, I was not interested in depression or mood. I was really interested in  semantics. But, you know, talking to the patients being embedded in a clinical environment and talking to family members, everybody talked about the importance of mood, and depression. And what I realized is that everybody's talking about its importance. Everybody gives it a nod. But we're not all assessing it in a systematic manner. But we all recognize its importance, and people need this support. So, I started digging in and seeing in the literature what's going on. I came across this meta-analysis that was published in 2017, I think by Mitchell et al., and they looked at I think around 108 studies of stroke and only five studies with people with aphasia have looked at depression. I was like, that does not sound good. And then, studies that are in the field of aphasiology that look at depression used measures hadn't been validated in our field. So, I was like, we all recognize that this is an important problem and people need the support, but before we can go anywhere, that we need to figure out a way, how we can identify depression in people with aphasia, systematically.  And of course, the big challenge I started thinking about that time is “how do you ask people that have language deficits about their inner feelings? Without sort of prompting them?” You know, we all use scales, those of us who do assess depression, we might modify them. But sometimes those questions are tricky to understand. And if you're modifying them, you might lead a person on to an answer. That's one thing. We can rely on caregiver reports for depression, and they're good. But we also know that those reports can underestimate and overestimate depression. And they're highly impacted by caregivers' mood itself. That was another thing. So, I wondered what can we do that assesses this systematically? And we can also include people with severe aphasia, who we often just exclude from these studies and who might have some of these most issues when it comes to mood or depression. There's some work in neurotypicals, that use a variety of techniques. For example, eye tracking. Research has shown that people who are depressed, tend to look longer at sad faces, or stimuli that denote sad valence. And their response is blunted away from positive stimuli. For example, if people are depressed they might look longer at a sad face and they might also look away from a happy face. There is also work looking at heart rate variability as well which uses certain metrics that you could derive from variability in between your heartbeats might tell us something about depression. This is also true with the dilation of our pupils, or EEG. And of course, none of these measures are perfect. Like we know with anything, we're not getting perfect measurements. But I started thinking that “yes, they might not be perfect, but can I come up with an algorithm or some kind of a composite that takes all these things into account, because if they all point to the same problem, then that problem must be there.” So that's one of the things I'm trying to do right now is combine pupillometry, heart rate variability, and eye tracking to see if we can come up with some kind of a metric that can identify depression. That way, we can move away from language in the sense that we're only using minimal language in terms of directions. We might just show people a happy face, or some emotion that some stimuli that denotes emotion.  The second sort of thing, which is really important is that not thinking of depression as something you either have it or you don't have it. It's on a continuum. It could fluctuate. One day, you could have some symptoms. Another day, you might not have any other symptoms. Or in the same day, it might fluctuate. So, how do we assess that? Related to that is not just relying on some scores. For example, we all just take, like, let's say we take a common scale, like the PHQ-9 (Patient Healthcare Questionnaire-9th Edition) and we might take the scores, and we sum them up and say, “hey, this person they're above a cut off”. But in that kind of approach, we're also missing what these individual symptoms are doing. The person might not endorse every single symptom in that scale. But they might endorse some symptoms. So are we just going to say, “no, they didn't meet a cut off, but they had three symptoms that they were on the scale. For example, ‘I was sad. I was fatigued, I had a loss of appetite.” But everything else wasn't there. Are we just going to negate those symptoms? So how do we take these symptoms into account as well, when we are thinking about depression. Within the broader field of psychopathology, there's a lot of movement thinking about individual symptoms as well. So, I'm just basically taking that and applying it to our field. It's nothing new that I'm coming up with, rather is just really seeing what people in the field of psychopathology are doing, confronting all these problems. And thinking about how this can applied to our field, because they might really have a direct impact on something we're doing when it comes to treatment, right? For example, if we start thinking about individual symptoms and that day a person is fatigued. Well that might directly impacted how they respond to treatment rather than just as a sum score. So that's another angle I'm taking when it comes to this work and depression. KS: That is so important. We all know what matters, but can you help us to know like, how big of an issue is mood depression in aphasia, you know, incidence prevalence or what, you know, do we know anything about that? SA: We do. And if you look at the literature, once again, they're so varied. Some papers might report 70%, some papers might report 30%. But I would say at least, it ranges anywhere from 30 to 70%. But I think a lot of that is also dependent on how we're assessing it. Going back to the scales that we are using and how reliable those scales are. There was a systematic review early on that indicated most of these skills might not even be valid. Are we use a caregiver reports? Are we supplementing that with something? In the general stroke population, we know at least 1/3 of stroke patients have depression. And with aphasia, it's between that 1/3 to 70%. It is most likely much more than that. But I think, to really get at it, we really have to start thinking about the tools we're using. But we know it's an issue because clinicians report it, patients report it, caregivers report it, whatever literature we have, which is not much, those studies report it. In our own study, we looked depression that might not meet the threshold for major depression. And we had around 20%, and those that meet (criteria) for minor depression, those were like, 18% or so. So, it's in that 30-40% range. It's a big issue.  But I think the bigger issue is that we are really missing how many people have it? How many people have the different symptoms? And what we also have is an incidence rate, a snapshot of the incidence rate, right? Like, you know, at six months, at one year, but we really need to start thinking about daily and how sort of depression changes over time. It will not be sort of weekly or yearly, we don't have that much longitudinal work, either. When I talk about daily, I talk about real world as well. I don't know if that answers your question… KS: It does. Yes, absolutely. Yeah, I love that, that it's we have some ranges, they are not probably as accurate as they could be, because we don't have the right tools to assess it, and that they're just a snapshot that we're not really looking at this over time or, as you said that day, that daily basis.  SA: One thing that I want to point out is that, and even with the lack of tools it's good that we are still assessing for depression. I don't want to make it seem like that there's nothing out there. But I think like for all of us, even the tools we're coming up with, we should always be thinking in our own, how can we improve upon whatever we have. And we all get attached to the methods we use. But I think at the back of our head, we should always be like, “can we improve these methods? Can we do something better?” Because ultimately, it's not about us. It's about people, our patients, our participants, family members that we're trying to do these things for. So it's really great that tools do exist, but we have to be candid, that we might not be getting everything out of them. They're a great steppingstone, but we have to constantly go back and build and just keep on taking new developments in the field of psychopathology in the field of measurement science and applied to them so that our field is moving along as well. KS: It's kind of the essence of evidence-based practice, right? We're using the best tools that we have at the moment, but that certainly we need to be on the lookout for what's coming in the newer literature or tools. Sameer, you have some really cool projects going on related to depression and mood. You talked a little bit about them earlier, but could you give us a little more detail on what you've got going on?  SA: So, one thing I could kind of hone in on that I mentioned earlier is on eye tracking. Right now we're trying to come up with some kind of an algorithm where we are relying minimally on language. So just the directions are language based. We're getting people in, and we're doing a combination of eye tracking changes in the pupil dilation and heart rate variability, as people are looking at different stimuli that denote different emotions. We have a paper out that looks at the feasibility of it. And what we're basically looking at trying to quantify that using some existing scales and caregiver reports. Can we then take these metrics and see whether people are looking at sad or happy faces, or any other stimuli that denote emotions, and is that related to these traditional scales. And then how can we then come up with a metric based on these three measures, pupillometry, heart rate, and some of the eye tracking indices that can point out depression in people with aphasia? We're using these tools, but the approach is out there. Anytime people are validating new tools, they have to rely on existing tools and go through these different iterations. So right now, we're in the first iteration trying to see what kind of metrics we can extract and what those metrics can give us that are easy to use. And one thing is that eye tracking or heart rate variability over the years, they have become really accessible, and the tools are not expensive themselves. So, with the aim that down the line, can this be used in the clinical setting? Of course, we're far away from that. But that's the end goal, we hope as a quick diagnostic check. KS: Okay, yeah, that's what I was going to ask you, because we've got a lot of listeners who are clinicians. And, you know, sometimes as clinicians, it's difficult to see the relevance of things like eye tracking and heart monitoring, when you're reading literature, when you're trying to figure out, “How can I help this person right in front of me?” So, I was hoping you could explain a little bit why those tools to track variables are so important. SA: I think this is a great question. And I think the big thing is that sometimes we just need to demystify these tools. I liked the way you framed it. We really have to think of them as tools. They're tools that were trying to use to assess a problem that might be difficult with the traditional language measure. That's really it. It's not they are better than behavioral measures. It's that because people aphasia have difficulties in language production and comprehension, can we use something else that relies minimally on language? That's really it. It's not some kind of fancy approach. Yes the tools themselves might sound fancy and stuff, but really the aim is it's just a tool that's addressing a certain problem. And with heartrate variability, we can already see because now it's so common, right? All our Fitbit or Apple Watches, they all have it. And even at a basic level, we're starting to think like, “Oh, this is what my activity level refers to.” So, I've started thinking about those kinds of things in a clinical setting. And the same thing with eye tracking. If these tools are sort of readily available, can we train people to use them in a quick way? Because of course, you could do fancy analyses, but you could also look at just quick measures that if the pipelines are in a place that people could just pull it out. Just like when clinicians give a battery of tests, if you ask me, I'm not a clinician, that's really complicated. You're working with a human being you have to change it on the fly. But people get trained on it all the time and can do it. It is the same thing with these tools but if we are successful in coming up with these metrics and these algorithms.. why not? Can clinicians be trained on using these tools in a clinical setting.  KS: It's exciting to be thinking about that identification of depression or mood disorder. We've got lots of work to do on what to do once it's identified, but just the identification is, as you said, that first step. I was curious if you might be able to recommend something to our listeners, you know, as I said, lots of us are clinicians, about what we should know or do right now about supporting mental health and people with aphasia. SA: I think all the clinicians I've talked to everybody recognizes the problem. That's the biggest step first of all. I think then it is really being aware of systematically assessing it. To be clear, I don't want to negate the support part. That's the end goal. But if we're not assessing depression routinely, then we're missing a big chunk. I want to keep stressing that point. I think the one thing clinicians can do is to start assessing people to the best of one's capability. If you're using a scale, then being systematic with that scale. If you're giving it in one iteration, you're giving it one way, on Day One. When you give it again, try to be as close in how you previously administered it so that we we know that you are assessing that same construct.  The second thing is what I've touched on earlier, is that thinking of depression as a continuum and that it fluctuates. It's not enough to just give a screening once, or to assess this person's mood, pretreatment and post treatment. But what about daily? Because if you start looking at daily variability, you might really start thinking, “Oh, no, we're all here. Like the patient he was feeling kind of down today. I don't know if you've put enough effort into it or something along those lines.” Well, low motivation and those kind of things are symptoms of depression. So I'd like to encourage clinicians to start thinking about assessing this daily.  And I think then, once we start sort of assessing it routinely, and making it a part of our work and not thinking of it as separate. That's the key. Not thinking about it like language is here, depression here. Like you know, the work you do, Katie, on narratives or stories, this is all interactive. They're all impacting each other in some sort of a loop.  And then lastly, once we're getting these, and we're routinely assessing people and getting them, then thinking about getting mental health support. And for that, we really have to start thinking about interdisciplinary work. And you could speak to that as well, because I know that you have those projects going on. We can do everything on our own, working with psychologists, referring people…once we can define these basic systems, and then, you know, down the line and training psychologists or psychiatrists and different techniques that they can work with people aphasia. Or clinicians who are up and coming getting some training. And that this is just part of routine care. It's not something we recognize the importance, but then we kind of put it on the back burner.  KS: Yes, right the back burner. Or say, “we don't have the tools, so we don't know what to do but we recognize it's a problem, but we don't do anything about it.” I agree. Sameer, since you brought up the interdisciplinary work and you have developed some relationships in psychology. I feel like you're kind of an exemplar interdisciplinary collaboration. Could you talk about how this collaboration has influenced your work and give our listeners any tips on how to develop such a rich collaboration? SA: All of the work I'm doing in depression and thinking about this is really influenced by people in the department of psychiatry and psychology. Much of my collaboration is with Dr. Stewart Shankman, who is the Chief Psychologist at Northwestern. And being a part of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) thinking about “how do we conceptualize depression?” and things like that. I just reached out to him, because I was interested in his work. I think we have to not be scared that people might not respond if we reach out. I just emailed him, and he was nice enough to respond. And I started attending his lab meetings and presenting our work to the lab and this problem, “how do you assess depression in people that have language deficits. How do we assess their inner feelings when they can't express themselves?” Being embedded in sort of in his work group, I was really exposed to this work. I don't think I would have been exposed to the work that people in that field are doing. For example, debates about how do we think about symptoms? Or how do we integrate these tools? How do we think about different emotions? And then applying it to our field of CSD. And thinking about metrics of depression. My work has really been influenced by how people in that field are grappling and using these issues. One can't do this work in a void. If there are people who are doing this work and that's their field, it only benefits us to form collaborations with them, learn from them, and bring our unique problems to them. So that we could come up with solutions that integrate the best of our knowledge domains. In other words, that team science approach is really the approach I'm taking towards this issue of depression. I think any work we do in the field of psychosocial disorders, mood, anxiety, fatigue, or whatever, I think it's really important that we start working with people who have focused their career on this issue. KS: I so appreciate you sharing that. And even just the simple tip of putting yourself out there to send an email and introduce yourself to someone who's from a different discipline to start that relationship is important. I envision through attending his lab meetings, you're there in his world, learning about things in a way that you wouldn't be, if you weren't a part of what he's got going on. And thinking deeply about how you can apply that to your interests in aphasia. I'm so excited. Our field just needs this innovation and it's exciting to hear about the work you're doing. SA: If I just did all on my own, I would have been just looking at what's in our field, what's in stroke, looking at papers…but you're not embedded in people who are doing this daily. They might not be doing it in our population, but this is what they're doing. And they're grappling with the conceptual issues as well. Tools, measurement, scales, everything. So that's a huge benefit to us because when we think about depression and stuff, yeah, the work has been done, but when you're embedded in that setting, you could take some of the newer things and start applying it as well. Seeing how we can move rapidly. And of course, then the flipside is like, also the collaborators have to be willing to collaborate with you. Dr. Shankman, he's been great. He's been willing and he's been great at mentoring me. I think most people, if you reach out, and you explain what you're trying to do people are willing and you also can contribute to their work, that I think that you know, these relationships will form. KS: Well, that is how cutting-edge work gets done. It's exciting to hear about it. You also have some additional interesting work, particularly in network analysis. Sameer, could you tell us what network analysis is, and why it's important to life with aphasia?   SA: In a nutshell, if we start talking about networks, networks are everywhere, right? Most of us are privy to the notion of social networks. That we're a bunch of friends, we're connected to each other. And a group of friends might cluster together, and then that cluster is connected to someone else. Anything, we take a look at it, if it's complex, it forms a network. Consider airports, highways, how they're interconnected. Certain things are central and more important than others. That's a network. People often give an example a flock of birds.  Birds might have different characteristics. But when they form a flock, it's made up of different parts, but they're all interacting together to form that flock. That's basically what network is. And it's derived from graph theory in mathematics. But at the end of the day, it's about looking at complexity. Anything that's complex, we could think of it as networks. So the work of network analysis, it's a collaboration between me and Dr. Nichol Castro at Buffalo. Both of us are interested in this approach and we decided to tackle this together. Right now we're building a network model of aphasia. One of the reasons, we decided to think about network approach is that going back, you know, we have these these two approaches, and people do integrate them. People do give nod to them, but impairment-based approach an LPAA (Life Participation Approach to Aphasia). And it's not to say that people that focus on impairment don't care about LPAA, or people that embrace LPAA, don't care about impairment. But generally, there is some kind of distinction being made, either implicitly or explicitly. And you might give nod that one thing is more important than other. But me and Nichol, we started thinking rather than thinking, “Okay, rather than thinking about what is important (language, or depression or anxiety) what about coming up, and thinking about all of them interacting in the network. And not assigning a priori importance to either one of them but rather looking at these interactions between multiple factors, and how they might impact each other, so that we're not missing anything, because aphasia is complex. It's not just about language. It's not just about depression. It's not just about supports (social support). It is about everything. So that's where a network model becomes useful. And then from there on building these initial models, then one could start thinking about treatment. That it is possible in a network, that one thing is more important than the other. And that is taking it one step further in an individual, Individual, A versus B, something might be more important in Individual A, like depression, and in Individual B it's communication confidence. We could start by building a big model first. And of course, all these things have steps and eventually come to that and thinking about how can we identify critical, important factors for a person that we could intervene on? But before we could do that, we wanted to build a bigger model at a group level, and start seeing what things are important in this network? And, and not thinking like, “Okay, I'm gonna just call aphasia…and we all are used to saying ‘aphasia is a disorder of language. Blah, blah, blah,' could be also impacted.' But aphasia is a complex disorder, let's see how these all these things interact.” You don't have to assign the importance to A or B. Or say like, “Okay, I'm going to look at attention, maybe that's about language.” Instead, let's see how all of them are impacting each other and are some things more important than others. I think with this kind of approach…all of us have this thinking. We're just trying to come up with a model that addresses this. And eventually, then this kind of model doesn't have to be just limited to outcomes. People could integrate brain, genetics, you could have different layers. And that goes back to your work about interdisciplinary collaboration. When you start thinking about things as a network, that can also extend to the network of people who are doing work in aphasia. That if it's a complex disorder, and people are looking at all these complexities, because not everybody can do everything that we can take the network of future researchers, and then why not integrate and use that network model for the vision and see all these things? That's what we kind of really are trying to get at. KS: The potential is powerful. Wow. Well, you've got a manuscript in the works that's about this complexity of participation poststroke. I really enjoyed reading about the project. But one thing that really struck me in the findings was how positive affect impacted participation. Could you tell us about this and the project?  SA: So this is all pre-existing data. We wanted to establish some sort of causal relationship at Time Point 1. For example at 3 months post discharge, can you predict something at 12 months post discharge? And one the reasons we were interested in positive affect is that we always think about depression, but positive affect is there too, right? And having positive affect could impact people in a positive way. We wanted to look at all these things, put them on the network and see how they're interacting to determine what might be causing or establishing some sort of causality. What was really interesting is that we thought that perhaps social support would predict participation. But it was really positive affect early on, that was predicting many of these things. When you really start thinking about it, it's not that surprising, because if you're feeling positive, and psychology, then you're going to seek out more help. And then you're going to seek out more help, you might participate more in the community. But having that affirmation is critical, because then once again, it goes back to a question mental health support. How can we focus on positive affect, as well, in our treatment? Maybe, if that's kind of integrated with intervention. If people are feeling better, or happier with that sort of, you know, give them some push towards seeking more help? And it's all cyclical, right? And that's what we are seeing, at least in this early work. KS: Oh, it's really interesting. I think clinically we know that in our gut, but is there something we can do to promote that or help support that down the road? This fabulous, fabulous! Well, Sameer, this time has gone by quickly. I've enjoyed the conversation. As we wrap up, do you have any final thoughts you'd like to share with our listeners? SA: Thank you for having me here. And it's a privilege being in this field, especially as somebody who was trained early on as a linguist, and now I'm doing complete something else. And I'm working with clinicians. It's an honor to participate. It's really a privilege. Thank you for having me here. KS: It's fabulous that you're here and doing this important collaborative work. Thanks for spending time with us today. You've given us lots of food for thought. Listeners, check out the show notes and I'll have links to all of the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab details there as well as Sameer's work and some of the other things that we talked about during today's conversation.  On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing library of materials go to www.aphasiaaccess.org If you have an idea for a future podcast topic email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.   Websites and Social Media Shirley Ryan Ability Lab  https://www.sralab.org/   Shirley Ryan Think + Speak Lab https://www.sralab.org/research/abilitylabs/think-speak-lab  Shirley Ryan Affective and Emotion Rehabilitation (SAfER) Lab https://www.saferlab.net/   Shirley Ryan Ability Lab on Twitter/Facebook @AbilityLab    Interested in Digging Deeper?  Ashaie, S., & Castro, N. (2021). Exploring the complexity of aphasia with network analysis. Journal of Speech-Language-Hearing Research, 64(10), 3928-3941. https://doi.org/10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00157  Ashaie, S. A.,  & Cherney, L. R., (2020). Eye tracking as a tool to identify mood in aphasia: A feasibility study. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 34(5), 463-471. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1545968320916160  Ashaie, S. A., Engel, S., & Cherney, L. R. (2022). Test-retest reliability of heart-rate variability metrics in individuals with aphasia. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 18, 1-25. https://doi.org/10.1080/09602011.2022.2037438  Ashaie, S. A., Hung, J., Funkhouser, C. J., Shankman, S. A., & Cherney, L. R. (2021). Depression over time in persons with stroke: A network analysis approach. Journal of Affective Disorders Reports. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadr.2021.100131  Mitchell, A. J., Sheth, B., Gill, J., Yadegarfar, M., Stubbs, B., Yadegarfar, M., & Meader, N. (2017). Prevalence and predictors of post-stroke mood disorders: A meta-analysis and meta-regression of depression, anxiety and adjustment disorder. General Hospital Psychiatry, 47, 48–60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2017.04.001 

Sandy K Nutrition - Health & Lifestyle Queen
Episode 125 - Arthritis - Is it Really Wear & Tear? Do You Need that Joint Replaced? With Expert Dr. Elizabeth Yurth - Reboot

Sandy K Nutrition - Health & Lifestyle Queen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 72:17


As part of my summer reboot series, I have brought back this incredible interview with cellular medicine physician, Dr. Elizabeth Yurth.  I can honestly say I have never met a more brilliant physician...Dr. Elizabeth Yurth is the Co-Founder and Medical Director of Boulder Longevity Institute, where she has been providing Tomorrow's Medicine Today to her clients since 2006. Dr. Yurth obtained her Medical Degree from the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and completed her residency at the University of California – Irvine. Along with her 25-plus years as a practicing orthopedist specializing in sports, spine, and regenerative medicine, Dr. Yurth is double-Board Certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Anti-Aging/Regenerative Medicine. She has a Stanford-affiliated Fellowship in Sports and Spine Medicine, and a dual-Fellowship in Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine (FAARM) and Anti-Aging, Regenerative and Functional Medicine (FAARFM) through the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M). She has also completed a Fellowship in Human Potential and Epigenetic Medicine and is part of the first cohort of providers to receive the A4M National Peptide Certification.Dr. Elizabeth Yurth is changing the narrative of osteoarthritis and chronic pain in ways most physicians don't even consider.  I am so lucky to know her!!We get into all of it here - inflammation, what might be inflammatory markers, peptides and how they come into play and so much more. If you suffer from arthritis, or want to explore the health options with cellular medicine, this is a must listen.  To get in contact with Dr. Yurth and her team, contact The Boulder Longevity Institute.Mentioned in this episode - my other recording with Dr. Yurth on the differences between general physicians, functional medicine physicians, and cellular medicine physicians - Episode 92.Please subscribe, rate and review my podcast with a few kind words...this totally helps us podcasters to be found in this giant world of podcasting and it really gives back and helps us to secure fabulous guests!  If you use Apple, go into my podcast, scroll down until you see "Write a Review" and proceed.Also - go ahead and follow me on my Instagram and Facebook private group accounts here where you'll get access to even more free content all about health, nutrition, biohacking, balanced living and life over 40!https://www.facebook.com/groups/sandyknutritionpodcast/https://www.instagram.com/sandyknutrition/

Exercício Físico e Ciência
Fisio e Ciência #4 – Ultrassom terapêutico para dor

Exercício Físico e Ciência

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 8:01


Nesse episódio vamos discutir as evidências do uso do ultrassom terapêutico na dor, segue as referências citadas: Ebadi, Safoora, et al. "Therapeutic ultrasound for chronic low back pain." Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 7 (2020). Qing, Wanyi, et al. "Effect of therapeutic ultrasound for neck pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis." Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 102.11 (2021): 2219-2230. Aiyer, Rohit, et al. "Therapeutic ultrasound for chronic pain management in joints: a systematic review." Pain Medicine 21.7 (2020): 1437-1448. Gostou desse episódio? Ficou com alguma dúvida? Quer contribuir com o tema? Me segue e me conta no Instagram @thaissiqueira.fisio --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fabio-dominski/support

Our Lives In Medicine
Dr. Nicolet Finger, DO; Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Resident

Our Lives In Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 55:55


This episode features Dr. Nicolet Finger, DO. Dr. Nicolet Finger is a 3rd year Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R) Resident. This is her second time on the podcast (S2:E17), and on this episode, we discuss the transition from medical student to Intern to Senior Resident. We also discuss the highs and lows of PM&R residency, and how much she and I both have grown and developed since our last episode together. It's a great listen, and I hope you enjoy! . Please share this episode with anyone you think would enjoy, and make sure to like/comment on iTunes or wherever you listen! And please follow on Instagram/TikTok @Ourlivesinmedicine. We appreciate the support so much, and thank you for being part of the family . Intro: “How Rude” by Casey Edwin; IG @caseyedwinmusic, solo.to/caseyedwin. | Outro: “The Sauce” by Bun.E; IG @bun.ehoney, soundcloud.com/bun_e

JAT Podcasts
JAT Chat | Physical Activity and Quality of Life after ACL Reconstruction

JAT Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 21:20


Dr. Shelby Baez interviews Dr. Hope Davis-Wilson about her recent publication titled "Association of Quality of Life With Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction". Article Link: https://bit.ly/3pvobIV Dr. Hope Davis-Wilson is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Colorado. Previously, she completed her Master's in Exercise Physiology and her PhD in Human Movement Science with a specialization in Biomechanics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Davis-Wilson's research is at the intersection of bioengineering and human physiology. She is interested in utilizing wearable sensors to monitor rehabilitation following injury.

The Podcast by KevinMD
Non-judgmental empathy in the exam room

The Podcast by KevinMD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 13:47


"I think we all have an inclination—at least from time to time—to judge others. No matter how experienced, compassionate, and professional we are as physicians, we're still human. I can admit that I have indeed struggled with patients like the 65-year-old morbidly obese male who complains at every visit about how hard it is to control his blood sugar levels with the medications prescribed. I want to convince him so badly about diet and exercise, but I have tried, and often, these patients don't want to hear it. Pharmacological or surgical interventions are the preferred route for many. I know I cannot magically change a patient's attitudes about their health. Nevertheless, I still believe that the best I can do for my patients is to offer them my sincere professional advice without prejudice or discrimination. If my physical presence is intimidating to some, I won't begrudge them for seeking a doctor who makes them feel more comfortable. In the end, I still believe that leading by example is essential for a physician and that I can use my personal experience to inspire positive change. After all, I am here to help." Francisco M. Torres is an interventional physiatrist specializing in diagnosing and treating patients with spine-related pain syndromes. He is certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the American Board of Pain Medicine and can be reached at Florida Spine Institute and Wellness. He shares his story and discusses his KevinMD article, "The importance of non-judgmental empathy." Did you enjoy today's episode? Rate and review the show so more audiences can find The Podcast by KevinMD. Subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out. Click here to earn 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CME for this episode. Also available in Category 1 CME bundles. Powered by CMEfy - a seamless way for busy clinician learners to discover Internet Point-of-Care Learning opportunities that reward AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Learn more at about.cmefy.com/cme-info

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 221: Surgical Interventions for Patients With Cancer

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 43:08


“Our goal in surgical oncology is, of course, to treat the cancer for a cure, but to do it in a safe manner so the patient is able to recover and resume their normal living activities that they had before their surgery,” ONS member Lisa Parks, MS, APRN-CNP, ANP-BC, inpatient nurse practitioner of hepatobiliary surgery at the James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Division of Surgical Oncology, at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, OH, told Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, during a discussion on prehabilitation and preoperative assessments for patients with cancer undergoing surgery, implications of and advancements in cancer surgery, and the interprofessional collaboration that takes place in this scenario. You can earn free NCPD contact hours after listening to this episode by completing the evaluation linked below. Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Earn 0.75 contact hours of nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) by listening to the full recording and completing an evaluation at myoutcomes.ons.org by August 19, 2024. The planners and faculty for this episode have no relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies to disclose. ONS is accredited as a provider of NCPD by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. Episode Notes Complete this evaluation for free NCPD. Oncology Nursing Podcast episodes: Episode 58: The Power of Cancer Rehabilitation Episode 66: Updates in Surgical Oncology—ONS Congress Episode 185: Surgical Oncology: Where We've Come and Where We're Going Episode 212: When Cancer Care Gets Complex: Those Other Oncologic Emergencies ONS Voice article: The Power of Prehabilitation Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing articles: Perioperative Care Implementation: Evidence-Based Practice for Patients With Pancreaticoduodenectomy Using the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Guidelines Use of Robotics in Oncology Surgery Oncology Nursing Forum article: Cancer Prehabilitation Programs and Their Effects on Quality of Life ONS books: Surgical Oncology Nursing Gastrointestinal Cancer Care for Oncology Nurses Cancer Basics (second edition) ONS's Get Up, Get Moving Dana-Farber Cancer Institute article: How ‘Prehabilitation' Can Benefit Cancer Patients American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation article: Cancer Prehabilitation: An Opportunity to Decrease Treatment-Related Morbidity, Increase Cancer Treatment Options, and Improve Physical and Psychological Health Outcomes Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics article: Nutritional Screening in a Cancer Prehabilitation Programme: A Cohort Study National Cancer Institute article: Surgery to Treat Cancer Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Society guidelines To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities. To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org. Highlights From Today's Episode “Prehabilitation for surgery is probably one of the most underutilized areas of the surgical process. The goal of prehabilitation is to initiate coordinated, preoperative, optimized strategies. During the patient's preoperative assessment by the oncology nurse in the clinic, as well as the provider, risk factors are identified that can be addressed for a better surgical outcome.” Timestamp (TS) 02:27 “Any solid tumor patient that is having an oncological surgery can benefit from prehabilitation. It really depends on their overall assessment preoperatively. . . . And certainly, any lengthy surgery that is going to require the patient to be under anesthesia for prolonged time, the patient would benefit from being optimized prior to a surgical procedure.” TS 07:43 “When a patient is initially seen by a surgical oncologist in a pre-op setting, all of these assessments are completed by the oncology nurse, as well as the advanced practice oncology nurse, for the patient. And in order for the patient to go through the surgical process, prehabilitation is started immediately after that initial visit. The patient will be brought back in and reassessed periodically while going through prehabilitation.” TS 09:03 “Our goal in surgical oncology is, of course, to treat the cancer for a cure, but to do it in a safe manner that the patient is able to recover and resume their normal activities that they've been living, that they had before their surgery.” TS 10:51 “I think [one] of the greatest challenges that I hear from nurses are family support. The family needs to understand the whole process of prehabilitation and the fact that the patient is not going to come to harm by waiting a couple weeks to optimize themselves to undergo a major cancer operation, and to make sure that they're providing transportation and assisting their family member if they need to go to outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy, pulmonary rehab, things like that, that the provider may, based on assessment, refer these preoperative candidates for.” TS 12:18 “I think that people always think of surgery as being curative, but a lot of times, some of the procedures that we do are to sustain a quality of life for the patient at the end of their life.” TS 20:41 “Now, what I'm seeing is that the majority of the time, robotic surgery is utilized more often than an open surgery. Of course, any time there is uncontrolled bleeding, any time they're unable to really visualize the surgical field well, they may start out robotically, and then go to an open procedure, but certainly I'm seeing them starting the cases and scheduling them as robotic or robotic-assisted. . . . I just think that robotic-assisted surgery continues to really grow, and I don't think we've reached the full potential of what surgeons can do with the surgeries. There is a great learning curve for these surgical oncologists.” TS 28:10 “Surgical oncology nurses are trained in post-operative care, preoperative care, and for nurses that are in the OR, perioperative nursing, as well as oncology. They have to be competent, not only in surgical care, but in oncology care, too. . . . This specialty is very different than a medical oncology nurse, or a hematology nurse, who is mainly giving chemotherapies, CAR T's, immunotherapies. The surgical oncology nurse needs to understand what chemotherapies, treatments, radiation therapies, anything like that, that has been done with that patient, because that would certainly impact that patient's outcome, but also to understand the whole surgical process.” TS 31:28

Chef AJ LIVE!
FOOD ADDICTION: CONCEPT, CONFLICT AND VITALITY WITH STEPHAN ESSER, M.D.

Chef AJ LIVE!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 68:17


5 DELICIOUS DINNER RECIPES to support your weight loss: https://www.chefaj.com/5-delicious-lo... ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ MY LATEST BESTSELLING BOOK: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1570674086?... -------------------------------------------- Dr Esser is a 4th generation plant based eater! He comes from a line of passionate educators sharing the message of health. He is a Sports and Lifestyle Medicine Physician who completed medical school at the University of South Florida, Residency at Harvard Medical School, Fellowship at Mayo Clinic and is presently a full time clinician in private practice, adjunct faculty for three academic residency programs and the lead team physician for the University of North Florida. Dr. Esser is a lifetime advocate for plant-based nutrition. He completed residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School and a Sports Medicine Fellowship at Mayo Clinic. He is a nationally sought-after speaker and writer on topics related to lifestyle medicine and plant-based nutrition. He runs healthy living seminars and retreats in Jacksonville, Florida. He also provides non-operative sports and spine care to patients in the Jacksonville region at Southeast Orthopedic Specialists. For a telemedicine appointment please visit https://esserhealth.com/ You can follow him on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/esserhealth/ On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EsserHealth Here are the FREE exercise videos he mentioned: https://yalegriffinprc.griffinhealth.... Dr. Esser's 4 week detox:http://esserhealth.com/detox/ To follow Dr. Esser on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/esserhealth/ ----------------------------------------------------------- VIDEO CHAPTERS: 00:00 Guest introduction and food addiction discussion 0:07:33 Slide show presentation - FOOD ADDICTION: CONCEPT, CONFLICT AND VITALITY 0:48:42 Chef AJ and viewer Q & A including details on Dr. Esser's course 1:07:54 Final thoughts and show wrap

Medicine Redefined
68. Asare Christian, MD, MPH: Creating a Holistic Patient Experience to Relieve Pain

Medicine Redefined

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 77:05


Dr. Christian is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation physician (physiatrist). Clinically, Dr. Christian enjoys pain medicine and musculoskeletal medicine. He is the previous outpatient medical director of Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network in Lehigh Valley, PA, and he has an academic appointment with the University of Pennsylvania Department of PM&R. Dr. Christian earned his board certification through the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. He is the owner and medical director of Aether Medicine in the Wayne, Mainline Philadelphia, PA area. Dr. Christian received his medical degree from the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2009, where he was awarded student of the year in PM&R. Dr. Christian earned and completed an internship at Aurora St. Luke's Medical Center in Milwaukee. He received his PM&R training from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2013.  He is a graduate of the Mongan Commonwealth Fund Fellowship at Harvard Medical School. He also obtained a master's degree in public health at the Harvard School of Public Health with a concentration in health policy and management. Dr. Christian's interest in the use of technology to create value for patients led to the recent completion of course work in Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Dr. Christian has obtained advanced training in chronic pain management, spasticity, ultrasound-guided injections, and medical cannabis titration. He's dedicated to learning innovative skills and techniques that bring value to his patient. He's a lifetime learner and enjoys finding new solutions for his patients. In this episode we discuss: - Dr. Christian's approach to educating about pain - Common triggers of pain - How we are transitioning to the "experience revolution" - What "holistic medicine" truly looks like Aether Medicine

U2FP CureCast
A Team Effort (Episode 64)

U2FP CureCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 76:09


Jason and Matthew interview Dr. Camillo Castillo, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Physician at Frazer Rehabilitation Hospital in Louisville KY along with his Clinical SCI Navigation team: Emily Coons, Brendan Doksa and Heather Connor. We are raising a simple question about the introduction of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to the clinic: are we ready to receive it? What will that look like? Who follows the person with the stimulator? Who sets the parameters for stimulation? How is it paid for? And what part of SCI is it intended to treat? Many of us might assume that these questions will work themselves out, but for anyone who has lived through a SCI knows that things don't simply work themselves out. So, what can we as a community do to influence the ways in which innovative and curative treatments, not just SCS, unfold for our community, all of our community? Take a listen and please send us your feedback at curecast@u2fp.org Read Dr. Castillo's Bio on our website: https://u2fp.org/get-educated/curecast/episode-64.html

Female Physician Entrepreneurs Podcast
Practicing On Your Own Terms With a Micropractice Model-Dr Andree LeRoy

Female Physician Entrepreneurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 23:16


https://drleroy.com/ Dr. Andrée LeRoy is both a Harvard-trained medical doctor and a medical intuitive. She is an expert in lifestyle, functional, integrative, and rehabilitation medicine. She comes from a long lineage of western medicine-trained physicians and holistic healers which has shaped her unique and science-based approach to integrative and individualized care. Upon receiving her Bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana in Molecular and Integrative Physiology, she completed her thesis in Medicinal plants and Herbology. She expanded her knowledge of the body systems and mechanics by practicing as a licensed massage therapist before graduating from the University of Illinois at Chicago Medical School in 2006. She then completed her residencies in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts in 2010 and the Durant Fellowship in Global Health and Refugee Medicine from Massachusetts General Hospital in 2011. While working at Massachusetts General Hospital and Spaulding Rehabilitation, Harvard's official teaching hospital for physical medicine and rehabilitation ranked as top 3 rehabilitation hospitals in the United States, she also remained on faculty at Harvard Medical School for 8 years. She completed her Master's degree in Spiritual Psychology with an emphasis in Consciousness, Health & Healing from the University of Santa Monica in 2016. In 2018 she moved to Los Angeles to pursue her dream of creating a patient centered model of healthcare that combines the best art and science to facilitate healing. This model takes a comprehensive mental, spiritual, and physical approach to bring health issues to resolution. She received training in Lifestyle Medicine, Functional Medicine, Reiki, Energy Medicine, and Ayurvedic medicine, making her a catalyst for integrating a holistic approach to her practice. Over the past several years, Dr. LeRoy has worked closely with a high-achieving, heart-centered professionals to take all aspects of their lives to the next level. She has seen how important it is to educate professionals on the importance of creating a healthy work-life balance that results in optimal health, wellness, and vitality. ----------- Sharon T McLaughlin MD FACS is the founder of Mind Lull and Female Physicians Entrepreneurs. Today we speak about being a better speaker. Planning tools for women entrepreneurs who feel stuck so that they can focus and achieve their desired goals. Learn more about Mind Lulls Journals https://mindlull.com Female Physician Entrepreneur Group If you are a women physician, join us at Female Physician Entrepreneurs Group We learn and grow together https://www.facebook.com/groups/FemalePhysicianEntrepreneurs Our website https://FPEStrong.com #physicianentreprener #physiciansidehustle #physiciansidegig #physiciansidegigs #businessgrowth #businessmarketing #offlinebusinessmarketing #womenphysician #womenentreprenuer #physicianspeaker

Your Child's Brain
Long covid in children

Your Child's Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 25:26


On this month's episode of Your Child's Brain, Long covid in children is discussed.  Guests include: Dr. Laura Malone - Physician scientist in the Center for Movement Studies at Kennedy Krieger, Co-director of the Pediatric Post-COVID-19 Rehabilitation Clinic at Kennedy Krieger, Assistant professor of Neurology and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Amanda Morrow - Rehabilitation physician at Kennedy Krieger, Co-director of the Pediatric Post-COVID-19 Rehabilitation Clinic at Kennedy Krieger, Assistant professor of Neurology and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Medicus
Ep92 | MS4 Perspective: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Medicus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 33:34


In this 4th year medical student (MS4) series, we investigate the field of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Our guest, Hye-Jin Yun, shares what led her to pursue this often overlooked specialty and how to make sure you make the most of virtual interviews. Hye-Jin ("HJ") Yun is the former MS4 Class President and recent graduate of Loyola Stritch School of Medicine. She is a preliminary intern at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco and will be training at Stanford University for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R). As a former performer, she holds a certificate in Performing Arts Medicine. Her passion includes utilizing social media to mentor, empower, and provide exposure to the wonderful world of physiatry. You can contact HJ via Instagram @doc.ladywonder or email (doc.ladywonder@gmail.com) Episode produced by: Rasa Valiauga Episode recording date: 5/30/22 www.medicuspodcast.com | medicuspodcast@gmail.com | Donate: http://bit.ly/MedicusDonate --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/medicus/message

Speak Up Talk Radio Network
Dr. D. Terrence Foster Firebird Winner Author Interview

Speak Up Talk Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 26:54


Dr. Foster is Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation as well as Pain Medicine. He is a best-selling multi-award-winning author. He is the author or co-author of several scientific articles. His books include  three best-selling books: The Stress Book: Forty-Plus  Ways to Manage Stress & Enjoy Your Life,  Foster's Opioid Addiction Classification Status Guide,...

PBS NewsHour - Health
How millions of Americans suffering from long COVID can find support

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 7:07


Millions of Americans are suffering from long COVID, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, with symptoms ranging from mild to debilitating. Dr. Monica Verduzco-Gutierrez, chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Texas Health San Antonio, and Karyn Bishof, founder of the COVID-19 Longhauler Advocacy Project, join Geoff Bennett to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How millions of Americans suffering from long COVID can find support

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 7:07


Millions of Americans are suffering from long COVID, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, with symptoms ranging from mild to debilitating. Dr. Monica Verduzco-Gutierrez, chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Texas Health San Antonio, and Karyn Bishof, founder of the COVID-19 Longhauler Advocacy Project, join Geoff Bennett to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine
RMT Podcast #235 – Michael Boninger

McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 11:03


Regenerative Medicine Today welcomes Dr. Michael Boninger.  Dr. Boninger is a Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine. He discusses his research in the development and application of assistive, rehabilitative, and regenerative technologies. For more information about Dr. Boninger, click here. For more [...]

Perry Nickelston: Stop Chasing Pain
SCP Podcast Episode 228: Dr. Allyson Augusta Shrikhande – Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

Perry Nickelston: Stop Chasing Pain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 49:19


In this episode, we chat with Dr. Allyson Augusta Shrikhande.  A board certified Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation specialist, she is the Chief Medical Officer of Pelvic Rehabilitation Medicine. She is also the Chair of the Medical Education Committee for the International

Getting Wise with Dr. Weis
Pediatric Outpatient Therapy: When Kids Need More...

Getting Wise with Dr. Weis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022


In this episode, Dr. Weis speaks with Ryan, Director of Physical Medicine. Ryan oversees the Northwest Children's Hospital Pediatric Therapy Services. The Pediatric Therapy team uses a multidisciplinary, family-centered approach in treating children born prematurely or children with physical, neurologic, or developmental disorders.

Brain & Body Things
Understanding Long COVID with Dr. Janna Friedly.

Brain & Body Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 44:12


Janna Friedly, M.D., is a board certified physiatrist at the Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic at Harborview Medical Center and a Professor at University of Washington School of Medicine. She is the Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Washington. She is also the Editor in chief of the PM&R journal - the official scientific journal of the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.She has spoken extensively on the topic of Post-Acute Sequelae of Sars-COV2 (PASC) or “Long COVID”. She developed a Post Covid rehabilitation clinic at Harborview Medical Center, and has been invited by clinics all over the country to help them develop similar programs.I had the honor of working with Dr. Friedly in her clinic for several months over this last year.  The multidisciplinary, multimodal treatment model spearheaded by her expertise on the topic is extremely successful at helping people with this often debilitating diagnosis. In this episode we discuss:Dr. Friedly's personal experience with COVID and Long-COVID.Common symptoms people continue to experience after COVID.What makes some people more susceptible to Long COVID.Possible mechanisms for ongoing symptoms. The medical work up for Long COVID.Successful treatments for Long COVID.The podcast episodes drop weekly on Monday over the summer. Subscribe to stay up to date, and tune in when you can! Be sure to rate, review, and follow on your favorite podcast app and let me know what other brain & body things you'd like to hear about. For more information about me, check out my website.Follow me on Instagram, Twitter, or Tik Tok @drnatashamehta. Follow Dr. Janna Friedly on Twitter, @JannaFriedlyMD.This episode is not sponsored.

Health Focus
Treatment of knee osteoarthritis

Health Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 3:58


This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Louis Gerena about managing symptoms and treatment for knee osteoarthritis. Dr. Gerena is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine and he's a non-surgical orthopaedic and sport medicine physician at MUSC.

Brain & Body Things
The system is unwell - Dr. Roger Lou on becoming a coach and a teacher.

Brain & Body Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 28:06


Roger Luo, MD is board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R). He specializes in the non-operative management of musculoskeletal and sports injuries affecting the spine, peripheral joints, muscles and tendons.He is an assistant professor of spine and musculoskeletal medicine and serves as the associate residency program director in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. He is active in a number of professional organizations and has presented or published several case studies on orthopedic, musculoskeletal and other injuries.Dr. Luo and I both completed residency in PM&R at Rutgers-New Jersey Medicine School/Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation. Following graduation, he went on to complete a fellowship in Sports and Spine at Hospital for Special Surgery in NYC. Dr. Luo works as a physician and a coach for both his patients and students. He's always finding new ways to motivate people — and that's why I had to interview him for this podcast. Because it's not always easy to be well. In this episode we discuss: What is PM&R or physiatry?How to empower people who have limited resources to exercise.Different ways to combat burnout in healthcare. The podcast episodes drop weekly on Monday over the summer. Subscribe to stay up to date, and tune in when you can! Be sure to rate, review, and follow on your favorite podcast app and let me know what other brain & body things you'd like to hear about. For more information about me, check out my website.Follow me on Instagram, Twitter, or Tik Tok @drnatashamehta. This episode is not sponsored.

The MOVEMENT Movement
Episode 132: Dr. Irene Davis' Change of Heart from Orthotics to Natural Foot Movement

The MOVEMENT Movement

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 66:32


Dr. Irene Davis' Change of Heart from Orthotics to Natural Foot Movement   – The MOVEMENT Movement with Steven Sashen Episode 132 with Irene Davis   Irene Davis is a Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School. She is also the founding Director of the Spaulding National Running Center. Dr. Davis is a Professor Emeritus in Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware where she served on the faculty for over 20 years. Her research is focused on the relationship between lower extremity structure, mechanics, and musculoskeletal injury. She has pioneered the area of retraining faulty gait patterns in both walking and running. She has received funding from the Department of Defense, Army Research Office, and National Institutes of Health to support her research.   Dr. Davis has given over 300 lectures both nationally and internationally and authored over 110 publications. She is a Fellow and Past President of the American Society of Biomechanics. She is also a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and a Catherine Worthingham Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association.   Listen to this episode of The MOVEMENT Movement with Irene Davis about how she changed her mind about orthotics and switched to natural foot movement.   Here are some of the beneficial topics covered on this week's show: - Why actively standing is a good for people to participate in and how to do it. - How prescribing footwear based on someone's foot type doesn't prevent injuries. - Why footwear changes the way runners strike the ground. - How it's important to transition slowly to being barefoot or wearing minimalist shoes. - Why shoe companies started adapting shoes to the wearer, and how that isn't beneficial. Connect with Irene: Guest Contact Info Twitter @IreneSDavis   Connect with Steven: Website xeroshoes.com jointhemovementmovement.com Twitter  @XeroShoes Instagram  @xeroshoes Facebook  facebook.com/xeroshoes

The Back Doctors Podcast with Dr. Michael Johnson
240 Dr. Brian Joves - Spinal Stenosis

The Back Doctors Podcast with Dr. Michael Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 22:07


Interventional physiatrist, Dr. Brain Joves discusses treatment options for spinal stenosis. Dr. Brian Joves is double board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Pain Medicine. He specializes in spine and chronic pain disorders, and is the Chief of Pain Management for Hill Physicians.  Dr. Joves completed his ACGME accredited Fellowship in Pain Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles/ WLA VHA, and his residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of California, Davis. He earned his Medical Degree from Drexel University College of Medicine, his Master's degree in Medical Sciences from Boston University School of Medicine, and his Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Biology from UC Davis.  Dr. Joves believes in a comprehensive approach to pain management: emphasizing education and physical modalities, while utilizing medications, interventions, as well as complementary/alternative medicine approaches to achieve functional restoration and improve his patients' quality of life. His professional interests include neuromodulation including spinal cord stimulation, peripheral nerve stimulation, and dorsal root ganglion stimulation to treat neuropathic pain disorders.  Dr. Joves believes strongly in education. He has helped develop the Spine & Nerve Podcast and YouTube Channel, works with pain medicine fellows across the country as a mentor, and lectures nationally on neuromodulation therapies. Resources: Contact Dr. Joves Spine and Nerve Podcast Spine and Nerve YouTube Episode sponsor: The Cox 8 Table by Haven Medical

Beauty Bytes with Dr. Kay: Secrets of a Plastic Surgeon™
PLATELET-RICH PLASMA POPULARITY IN AESTHETICS WITH DAVID KARLI

Beauty Bytes with Dr. Kay: Secrets of a Plastic Surgeon™

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 34:41


Hi Beauties! On this week's episode of Beauty Bytes with Dr. Kay: Secrets of a Plastic Surgeon, I am excited to introduce Dr. David Karli. He attended medical school at the University of Maryland and completed his residency in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School. Karli has been an Interventional Pain Specialist for just over 22 years with his own practice in Vail, Colorado. Today we are talking all about “Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy” (PRP), the use of a patient's own platelets to accelerate the healing of injuries in the tendons, ligaments, muscles, and joints. We discuss how and why this technique has become so popular within the world of aesthetics! I love informing my Beauty Bytes with information! Have a question or something you'd like covered on the podcast? Send me a DM or email info@beautybydrkay.com! Click HERE to follow me on Instagram Click HERE to purchase KD Skincare Click HERE to listen to more podcasts Click HERE to visit David Karli's website Click HERE to follow David Karli on Instagram

Wisdom of the Body
091. Dr. Saloni Sharma on Treating Your Pain

Wisdom of the Body

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 39:01


Listen to Dr. Saloni Sharma, author of The Pain Solution, explain to Heather how to reduce the need for pain medications and how pain, like fertility issues, can disrupt the vision we have for our lives. Learn what you can do before a surgery to reduce pain and opioid use after a surgery, and why alternative treatments for pain are a win over conventional medicine in the long run. Dr. Sharma's advice is useful for anyone experiencing pain or caregiving for a family member in pain.    Heather and Saloni discuss: How to manage pain without opioids Why pain is so difficult to measure and treat How mindfulness exercises, sleep hygiene, and dietary changes can impact your pain levels How complementary medicines treat pain differently than conventional medicine The 5 ways to treat pain in conventional medicine - lifestyle modifications, physical therapy, medications, injections, surgery - and why people don't focus on the less invasive methods enough Why we need to look at the whole person when treating pain How you are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with and what that has to do with your health and resiliency How simple, little tweaks can make a big difference Pain is a signal that something is wrong in your body Why activating the sympathetic nervous system from pain can impact your blood pressure and your whole body 5 steps where you can focus on microboosts to improve your pain: Refuel, Revitalize, Recharge, Refresh and Relate How your relationships can affect pain levels Whether Rumi's words are true, “The cure for pain is in the pain”, and whether pain is a teacher Why pain can be a path to healing How loved ones being in pain impacts friends and family members too Whether using a substance like CBD, cannabis, THC and medical marijuana for pain is a viable option Saloni Sharma, MD, LAc, is double board-certified in pain management and rehabilitation medicine. She is the medical director and founder of the Orthopaedic Integrative Health Center at Rothman Orthopaedics and has treated thousands of patients. She is also cochair of Pain Management and Spine Rehabilitation for the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. A popular speaker at Google and an award-winning clinical assistant professor at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, she lives near Philadelphia. www.salonisharmamd.com Heather Grzych is the author of The Ayurvedic Guide to Fertility and the host of the Wisdom of the Body podcast. A board-certified Ayurvedic practitioner, she teaches the Regenerative Fertility Method to support future generations worldwide. Heather is on the board of directors for the National Ayurvedic Medical Association (NAMA) and has consulted with doctors, governments, and insurance companies. She offers virtual consultations and programs worldwide. www.heathergrzych.com   Connect with Heather: Instagram.com/heathergrzych Facebook.com/grzychheather   Participate in the FREE 3-Day Mind-Body-Spirit Fertility Activation to create the family of your dreams and have the wellness to enjoy it:  https://regenerativefertilitymethod.com/vfaoptin    Join the Wisdom of the Body club on Clubhouse: https://www.joinclubhouse.com/club/wisdom-of-the-body   This podcast is for educational and entertainment purposes only.

Medicus
Ep89 I What It's Like to Be An Intern: Wisdom From the Original Medicus Squad

Medicus

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 31:10


The original creators of the Medicus Podcast are wrapping up their first year of residency and offer their perspectives on being an intern. Alek Druck - Urology, University of South Florida Mara Peterson - Internal Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University Nathan Burstedt - Preliminary Medicine Year, Loyola University Medical Center (going into Internal Medicine at Overland Park Regional Medical Center) Joshua Lewis - Preliminary Medicine Year, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital (going into Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Montefiore Medical Center) Episode produced by: Rasa Valiauga, Katie Mott Episode recording date: January - June, 2022 www.medicuspodcast.com | medicuspodcast@gmail.com | Donate: http://bit.ly/MedicusDonate --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/medicus/message

Brain & Body Things
3. Back pain explained with Dr. Ricky Singh.

Brain & Body Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 37:29


Dr. Jaspal Ricky Singh is Vice Chair & Associate Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College of New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He is a triple-board certified physician specializing in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sports Medicine and Pain Medicine. Dr. Singh specializes in a multidisciplinary approach to treat pain by integrating physical therapy and interventional techniques into his care. Through the use of minimally invasive, fluoroscopic-guided spine procedures, peripheral nerve blocks, electrodiagnostics and musculoskeletal ultrasound, Dr. Singh individualizes his treatment plan with a focus on functional restoration.Dr. Singh has been honored as Super Doctors- New York Rising Star, New York's Top Doctors in Pain Medicine and America's Best Doctor by Castle Connolly.He has a comprehensive website where you can learn more about him at rickysinghmd.com and make sure to tune into his podcast called The Back Story.In this episode we discuss:Causes of low back pain.Treatment options for low back pain.The importance of core strength in preventing and treating back pain.How  to best work your core.Boutique fitness.The importance of recovery.Are there exercises you should never do?Protecting your spine.  Learning what your body needs.The podcast episodes drop weekly on Monday over the summer. Subscribe to stay up to date, and tune in when you can! Be sure to rate, review, and follow on your favorite podcast app and let me know what other brain & body things you'd like to hear about. For more information about me, check out my website.Follow me on Instagram, Twitter, or Tik Tok @drnatashamehta. This episode is not sponsored.

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Monday, June 20, 2022 – The remaining COVID threats

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 55:49


The American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation estimates as many as 25 million Americans are experiencing long COVID. So little is known about the condition that the number could be much higher or significantly lower. But medical experts suggest a large percentage of the population could suffer serious symptoms from the virus for a long time. Those symptoms might be as mild as a loss of smell, or as severe as difficulty breathing. And the significant rate of infections is far from over. Today on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce speaks with Dr. Jill Jim (Navajo), executive director of the Navajo Nation Department of Health; Dr. Anthony Fleg, physician with the University of New Mexico and co-founder of the Native Health Initiative; and Chasity Salvador (Acoma Pueblo), long COVID survivor, community partner with the Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women, poet, community doula, seedkeeper, and farmer.

Association of Academic Physiatrists

This episode is hosted by Dr. Gregory Worsowicz, a Physiatrist and Senior Associate Consultant at Mayo Clinic in Florida. He discusses CMS-13 and advocacy with Dr. John Melvin, a Clinical Professor with the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Thomas Jefferson University.

Back on Track: Overcoming Weight Regain
Episode #48: Empowering Patients with Chronic Conditions Through Education with Dr. Judit Andrea Staneata

Back on Track: Overcoming Weight Regain

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 21:55


As a doctor working with patients with several chronic conditions such as chronic pain or fibromyalgia, I have seen firsthand how it's made exercising difficult for them out of the (understandable) fear that their pain may become worse. But Dr. Judit Andrea Staneata joins me today to discuss that with the proper support and education can we empower patients diagnosed with chronic conditions to become active participants in their recovery and weight loss journey.   Dr. Judit Andrea Staneata is board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, fellowship-trained in interventional spinal procedures and she specializes in the nonsurgical treatment of conditions and injuries of the spine and musculoskeletal medicine. Dr. Staneata co-authored the anthology, “The Warrior Women Project: A Sisterhood of Immigrant Women”, where she talks about her immigration story and her personal life experiences. Dr. Staneata is passionate about empowering women to live their authentic lives despite difficulties and challenges.   Chronic pain is tricky so join Dr. Andrea and me as we dive into the best ways to help our patients be physically active and develop a healthy mindset in a way that best supports them!   Ways to Connect with Dr. Judit Andrea Staneata: Facebook: Judit Andrea Staneata, MD Instagram: @andreastaneata Twitter: @drshellymd LinkedIn: Dr. Andrea Staneata TikTok: @dr.andreastaneata   Resources Mentioned: Purchase “The Warrior Women Project: A Sisterhood of Immigrant Women” by Dr. Judit Andrea Staneata on Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

Dr. Lo Radio Show
Establishing Pediatric Foundations For Health with Dr. Cayley

Dr. Lo Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 44:55


Welcome to another episode of the Dr. Lo Radio Show! I really enjoyed recording this episode, and I think you will enjoy it as well. Today I am chatting with Dr. Cayley Chirumbolo and we are talking all about how to establish pediatric foundations for health. Dr. Cayley Chirumbolo is a Naturopathic Doctor with a special passion for Women's Health and Pediatrics. Dr. Cayley graduated from Bastyr University in San Diego with a Doctorate in Naturopathic Medicine. Dr. Cayley also has a Masters in Public Health from The George Washington University. Prior to her journey of becoming a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Cayley worked as a Personal Trainer with a specialty in Functional Fitness for 12 years. It is her true passion to assist people in unlocking their true health and supporting them on their healing journeys. Dr. Cayley utilizes a Functional and Integrative approach with a focus on exploring the root cause of any disease and dysfunction. With tools like Botanical Medicine, Homeopathy, Physical Medicine, Nutrition, and much more, Dr. Cayley works with her patients to create an individualized health plan that fits their health needs and lifestyle. If you are listening to this episode and you or someone you know is navigating through any of the health issues we discuss, I would be more than happy to support you in the journey! I work with people virtually and in-person in San Diego. Feel free to reach out to me to continue this conversation: @doctor_lo I hope you enjoy and learn something new from this episode! We Discuss:{07:03} Introducing Dr. Cayley {10:57} Dr. Cayley's journey to Pediatrics and Women's Health {11:40} The passion for filling the gap in naturopathic pediatric healthcare {14:42} The deep dive into medical history as compared to just protocols {16:02} Dr. Noel explains that she's a proponent of freedom {17:07} Conventional medicine follows a rigid "flowchart" whereas naturopathic medicine focuses more on individualized treatment {19:42} Antibiotics are not effective against viral infections {22:28} The modalities used in treatment {24:12} Dr. Cayley's favorite essential oils {26:46} The connection with gut disfunction {30:47} The healthy fats in your child's diet {31:54} The sauces for your children's food to "hide" from them what they are actually eating And so much more!  Links Mentioned: Guest on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/c3wellness/ Shine Natural Medicine https://shinenaturalmedicine.com/ Paleovalley https://paleovalley.com/ 15% off with CODE: DRLO

Inner Voice - Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan
E254 - InnerVoice - Dr. Foojan Zeine chats with Dr. Sharma Saloni about The Pain Solution

Inner Voice - Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 43:13


E254 - Inner Voice – a Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan. In this segment, Dr. Foojan chats with Dr. Sharma Saloni, MD. LAC. A double board-certified in pain management and rehabilitation medicine. She is the medical director and founder of the Orthopedic Integrative Health Center at Rothman Orthopedics and has treated thousands of patients. She is also co-chair of Pain Management and Spine Rehabilitation for the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. A popular speaker at Google and an award-winning clinical assistant professor at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, she lives near Philadelphia. More information at www.salonisharmamd.com. We will be talking about her latest book: The Pain Solution – 5 steps to relieve and prevent back pain, muscle pain, and joint pain without medication. We explore all the alternative ways of handling pain, especially the ones with you making great choices every day to create health. Check out my website: www.foojanzeine.com Remember to Subscribe, Listen, Review, Share! Find me on these sites: *iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i...) *Google Play (https://play.google.com/music/m/Inpl5...) *Stitcher (https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=185544...) *YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/DrFoojanZeine ) Platforms to Like and Follow: *Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/DrFoojanZeine/) *Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/Dr.FoojanZe...) *Twitter (https://www.twitter.com/DrZeine/) *LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/DrFoojanZ...)

Brain & Body Things
1. Let movement be thy medicine: Dr. Joel Press on dealing with pain, injury, and the aging musculoskeletal system.

Brain & Body Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 39:08


Dr. Joel Press is the Physiatrist-in-Chief at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City and a Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. He has published extensively, chaired numerous courses, and lectures both nationally and internationally on the rehabilitation of spine and sports-related injuries. He is a Past President of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, North American Spine Society, and the Physiatric Association of Spine, Sports, and Occupational Medicine.In this episode we discuss:- Movement as medicine.- Buzz words like "pain-free" and "anti-aging".- The truth about the natural history of the aging, active body.- Pros and cons of the one size fits all approach to exercise.- Living with chronic pain.- Experiences, challenges, and hope for the future of the treatment of pain.The podcast episodes drop weekly on Monday over the summer. Subscribe to stay up to date, and tune in when you can! Be sure to rate, review, and follow on your favorite podcast app and let me know what other brain & body things you'd like to hear about. For more information about me, check out my website.Follow me on Instagram, Twitter, or Tik Tok @drnatashamehta. This episode is not sponsored.

KoopCast
Performance Testing for Ultrarunners with Dr. Philip Skiba | Koopcast Episode 128

KoopCast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 53:33 Very Popular


Dr. Philip Skiba received his medical degree in June of 2003, and trained in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Georgetown University / National Rehabilitation Hospital, in Washington DC. He then completed residency training in Family Medicine and a fellowship in Sports Medicine. He is board-certified in both Family Medicine and Sports Medicine, and his practice focuses on the non-surgical management of sports injuries, as well as athlete training, health, rehabilitation, and wellness. He completed his Ph.D. (exercise physiology) in the Jones Laboratory at the University of Exeter (UK), where his research studies focused on oxygen kinetics, the determinants of athlete power production, athlete performance, and their relationship to training. Dr. Skiba is the Program Director of sports medicine fellowship at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, in Chicagoland, and is the Regional Director of Sports Medicine for the AdvocateAurora Medical Group, one of the largest in the United States. He is also a team physician for the University of Illinois (Chicago).Dr. Skiba has been working in sports training and performance for more than 2 decades. As a sports physician, he works clinically, on the sidelines, and in the training room with high school, NCAA Division 1, and professional athletes. He has trained a number of Olympian and World Champion endurance athletes and is a regular face in broadcast journalism. Most recently, Dr. Skiba was a consultant on the Nike Breaking 2 project, where he traveled 3 continents training the best marathon runners in the world, appearing in the Cannes Film Festival award-winning documentary Breaking 2.Phil's BookDietary Supplements as Source of Unintentional Doping Buy Koop's new book on Amazon or AudibleInformation on coaching-www.trainright.comKoop's Social MediaTwitter/Instagram- @jasonkoop

The Strength Running Podcast
246. The Big Stress Fracture Episode with Dr. Emily Kraus

The Strength Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 59:32 Very Popular


Stress fractures are an injury feared most by runners. And with good reason - they require extensive time off for healing and recovery.  By understanding common risk factors, you can stay healthy and prevent this distressing diagnosis. Joining us is Dr. Emily Kraus. She is the Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford Children's Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center, specializing in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation sports medicine. She researches bone stress injuries at Stanford's Healthy Runner Project, which is focused on bone stress injury prevention in collegiate distance runners. Emily is an expert on running injuries, stress fractures, and RED-S (Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport). In addition to her research, she performs gait analysis at the Stanford Run Safe Injury Prevention Program and serves as a medical advisor for the Adaptive Sports Injury Prevention Program.  Emily's passion for working with runners stems from her own love of running. She has completed multiple marathons including Boston, as well as a 50km ultramarathon. With a recent marathon PR of 2:50, Emily is both incredibly knowledgeable and fast! During the podcast Emily and I discuss all aspects of stress fractures, including: The difference between stress reactions and stress fractures, and the most effective way to diagnose a bone injury Risk factors for bone injuries, including those that are running-specific and diet-related What is RED-S, who is at risk, and how it relates to stress fractures The treatment and recovery process for bone injuries Prevention strategies to avoid stress fractures This episode is a must for all runners who want to learn more about bone injuries and how to prevent them! Links & Resources from the Show: Follow Emily on Instagram and Twitter Learn more about the Stanford FASTR Program Get stronger to help avoid injury Thank You InsideTracker! This episode is brought to you by InsideTracker, one of the most reputable blood testing companies in the world. They were founded in 2009 by aging, genetics, and biometrics scientists to help you analyze your body's data and get a firm idea of how well you're responding to training. Understanding your body's biomarkers, from stress hormones to testosterone to Vitamin D, can help you figure out if you're over-training, under-training, optimally training, or if you have a health issue that might be affecting your running. But the best part is that they give you personalized optimal ranges for each of these biomarkers and a host of ways to improve these markers through diet, lifestyle, or exercise changes. I've personally gotten three Ultimate tests from them and the process is simple, easy, and very eye-opening if you haven't done a deep dive on your biomarkers yet.  Of all the investments you can make in your running, this one is like getting a detailed checkup or regularly scheduled maintenance for your internal physiology.  If you're ready to t