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International airport in New York City, United States

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Best podcasts about jfk airport

Latest podcast episodes about jfk airport

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career
RFT 542: Kroger Chief Pilot Brett Minturn

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 33:15


Brett had an early love for aviation, inspired by his uncle, a United Airlines B-747 Captain. He started flying at age 16 and attained all of his certificates while in college. He was anxious to get into professional aviation, and graduated a year early so he could get his start. His first flying job after graduation was in the cold northeast, where the airplane engine had to be artificially warmed for two hours before flight, but the cockpit stayed frigid! He was then hired by Mesa Airlines, based in Orlando, to fly his first jet. He upgraded to Captain at JFK Airport, where he sometimes had to taxi for two hours fo a 30-minute flight.  After about five years and being downgraded, Brett was starting to feel burned out with regional flying. He heard about a corporate flying job and went to a bar to learn more. He wanted to separate himself from the pool of pilot applicants, he had his resume produced on a cake! He didn't get the job, but got on the company's radar, and was ultimately hired. Brett eventually worked his way up to Chief Pilot at Kroger, and is now firmly committed to the company. From NBAA: Since Minturn transitioned from the airlines to business aviation, the NBAA Safety Committee member and chair of the Midwest Safety Roundtable has pursued his passion – aviation safety. He is a staunch advocate for adoption of the Aviation Safety Action Program in Part 91 operations, and last year he worked with the University of Amsterdam to develop aviation safety metrics. Minturn also has helped develop in-house technology solutions for data collection. “What I love about business aviation is I really feel like I'm making the company and the industry better.”

Boomer & Gio
9/9/21 - Boomer & Gio Show - Hour 2 (7am-8am)

Boomer & Gio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 36:56


Former Big League reliever Kyle Farnsworth sent out a tweet regarding players taking days off for 'general soreness' that caught Gio's attention, Adam Gase is coaching high school football, a suggestion how to properly use a PBA cards when you get pulled over, WFAN still has a store at JFK Airport, Jerry then joined the fray to deliver an update, more losing for the baseball locals, Derek Jeter enters the Hall of Fame, prepping for the NFL season, Ed Ogeron prepares to face his son and Anthony doesn't think Gio has what it takes to be a high school football coach.  All that and so much more waits you, so get into it already.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career
RFT 525: Eastern Airlines Flight 401

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 12:25


Flight 401 departed JFK Airport in New York on Friday, December 29, 1972, at 21:20 EST, with 163 passengers and 13 crew members on board. The flight was routine until 23:32, when the plane began its approach into Miami International Airport. After lowering the gear, First Officer Stockstill noticed that the landing gear indicator, a green light identifying that the nose gear is properly locked in the "down" position, had not illuminated. This was later discovered to be due to a burned-out light bulb. The landing gear could have been manually lowered, nonetheless. The pilots cycled the landing gear, but still failed to get the confirmation light. Loft, who was working the radio during this leg of the flight, told the tower that they would discontinue their approach to their airport and requested to enter a holding pattern. The approach controller cleared the flight to climb to 2,000 ft (610 m), and then hold west over the Everglades. The cockpit crew removed the light assembly, and Second Officer Repo was dispatched to the avionics bay beneath the flight deck to confirm via a small porthole if the landing gear was indeed down. Fifty seconds after reaching their assigned altitude, Captain Loft instructed First Officer Stockstill to put the L-1011 on autopilot. For the next 80 seconds, the plane maintained level flight. Then, it dropped 100 ft (30 m), and then again flew level for two more minutes, after which it began a descent so gradual it could not be perceived by the crew. In the next 70 seconds, the plane lost only 250 ft (76 m), but this was enough to trigger the altitude warning C-chord chime located under the engineer's workstation. The engineer (Repo) had gone below, and no indication was heard of the pilots' voices recorded on the CVR that they heard the chime. In another 50 seconds, the plane was at half its assigned altitude. As Stockstill started another turn, onto 180°, he noticed the discrepancy. The following conversation was recovered from the flight voice recorder later:Stockstill: We did something to the altitude.Loft: What?Stockstill: We're still at 2,000 feet, right?Loft: Hey—what's happening here? Less than 10 seconds after this exchange, the jetliner crashed:Cockpit area microphone (CAM): [Sound of click]CAM: [Sound of six beeps similar to radio altimeter increasing in rate]CAM: [Sound of initial impact] The location was west-northwest of Miami, 18.7 mi (30.1 km) from the end of runway 9L. The plane was traveling at 227 miles per hour (197 kn; 365 km/h) when it hit the ground. With the aircraft in mid-turn, the left wingtip hit the surface first, then the left engine and the left landing gear, making three trails through the sawgrass, each 5 ft (1.5 m) wide and over 100 ft (30 m) long. When the main part of the fuselage hit the ground, it continued to move through the grass and water, breaking up as it went. The TriStar's port outer wing structure struck the ground first, followed by the No. 1 engine and the port main undercarriage. The disintegration of the aircraft that followed scattered wreckage over an area 1,600 ft (500 m) long and 330 ft (100 m) wide in a southwesterly direction. Only small fragments of metal marked the wingtip's first contact, followed 49 ft (15 m) further on by three massive 115 ft (35 m) swaths cut through the mud and sawgrass by the aircraft's extended undercarriage before two of the legs were sheared off. Then came scattered parts from the No. 1 (port) engine, and fragments from the port wing itself and the port tailplane. About 490 feet (150 m) from the wingtip's initial contact with the ground, the massive fuselage had begun to break up, scattering components from the underfloor galley, the cargo compartments, and the cabin interior. At 820 ft (250 m) along the wreckage trail, the outer section of the starboard wing tore off, gouging a 59-foot-long (18 m) crater in the soft ground as it did so. From this point on, the breakup of the fuselage became more extensive, scattering metal fragments, cabin fittings, and passenger seats widely. The three major sections of the fuselage—the most intact of which was the tail assembly—lay in the mud towards the end of the wreckage trail. The fact that the tail assembly—rear fuselage, No. 2 tail-mounted engine, and remains of the empennage—finally came to rest substantially further forward than other major sections, was probably the result of the No. 2 engine continuing to deliver thrust during the actual breakup of the aircraft. No complete cross-section of the passenger cabin remained, and both the port wing and tailplane were demolished to fragments. Incongruously, not far from the roofless fuselage center section with the inner portion of the starboard wing still attached, lay a large, undamaged and fully inflated rubber dinghy, one of a number carried on the TriStar in the event of an emergency water landing. The breakup of the fuselage had freed it from its stowage and activated its inflation mechanism. Robert "Bud" Marquis (1929–2008), an airboat pilot, was out frog gigging with Ray Dickinsin (1929–1988) when they witnessed the crash. They rushed to rescue survivors. Marquis received burns to his face, arms, and legs—a result of spilled jet fuel from the crashed TriStar—but continued shuttling people in and out of the crash site that night and the next day. For his efforts, he received the Humanitarian Award from the National Air Disaster Alliance/Foundation and the "Alumitech – Airboat Hero Award", from the American Airboat Search and Rescue Association. In all, 75 survived the crash—67 of the 163 passengers and eight of the 10 flight attendants. Despite their own injuries, the surviving flight attendants were credited with helping other survivors and several quick-thinking actions such as warning survivors of the danger of striking matches due to jet fuel in the swamp water and singing Christmas carols to keep up hope and draw the rescue teams' attention, as flashlights were not part of the standard equipment on commercial airliners at the time. Of the cockpit crew, only flight engineer Repo survived the initial crash, along with technical officer Donadeo, who was down in the nose electronics bay with Repo at the moment of impact. Stockstill was killed on impact, while Captain Loft died in the wreckage of the flight deck before he could be transported to a hospital. Repo was evacuated to a hospital, but later succumbed to his injuries. Donadeo, the lone survivor of the four flight-deck occupants, recovered from his injuries. Frank Borman, a former NASA astronaut and Eastern's senior vice president of operations, was awoken at home by a phone call explaining of a probable crash. He immediately drove to Eastern's Miami offices and decided to charter a helicopter to the crash site as the swampy terrain made rescue difficult and Eastern had not heard any news of progress in rescue efforts. There he was able to land in a swampy patch of grass and coordinate rescue efforts. He accompanied 3 survivors on the helicopter to the hospital including a flight attendant and passenger who lost her baby in the crash. Most of the dead were passengers in the aircraft's midsection. The swamp absorbed much of the energy of the crash, lessening the impact on the aircraft. The mud of the Everglades may have blocked wounds sustained by survivors, preventing them from bleeding to death. However, it also complicated the survivors' recuperation, as organisms in the swamp caused infection, with the potential for gas gangrene. Eight passengers became infected; doctors used hyperbaric chambers to treat the infections. All the survivors were injured; 60 received serious injuries and 17 suffered minor injuries that did not require hospitalization. The most common injuries were fractures of ribs, spines, pelvises, and lower extremities. Fourteen survivors had various degrees of burns. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation discovered that the autopilot had been inadvertently switched from altitude hold to control wheel steering (CWS) mode in pitch. In this mode, once the pilot releases pressure on the yoke (control column or wheel), the autopilot maintains the pitch attitude selected by the pilot until he moves the yoke again. Investigators believe the autopilot switched modes when the captain accidentally leaned against the yoke while turning to speak to the flight engineer, who was sitting behind and to the right of him. The slight forward pressure on the stick would have caused the aircraft to enter a slow descent, maintained by the CWS system. Investigation into the aircraft's autopilot showed that the force required to switch to CWS mode was different between the A and B channels (15 vs. 20 lbf or 6.8 vs. 9.1 kgf, respectively). Thus, the switching to CWS in channel A possibly did not occur in channel B, thus depriving the first officer of any indication the mode had changed (channel A provides the captain's instruments with data, while channel B provides the first officer's). After descending 250 feet (76 m) from the selected altitude of 2,000 feet (610 m), a C-chord sounded from the rear speaker. This altitude alert, designed to warn the pilots of an inadvertent deviation from the selected altitude, went unnoticed by the crew. Investigators believe this was due to the crew being distracted by the nose gear light, and because the flight engineer was not in his seat when it sounded, so would not have been able to hear it. Visually, since it was nighttime and the aircraft was flying over the darkened terrain of the Everglades, no ground lights or other visual signs indicated the TriStar was slowly descending. Captain Loft was found during the autopsy to have an undetected brain tumor, in an area that controls vision. However, the NTSB concluded that the captain's tumor did not contribute to the accident. The final NTSB report cited the cause of the crash as pilot error, specifically: "the failure of the flight crew to monitor the flight instruments during the final four minutes of flight, and to detect an unexpected descent soon enough to prevent impact with the ground. Preoccupation with a malfunction of the nose landing gear position indicating system distracted the crew's attention from the instruments and allowed the descent to go unnoticed." In response to the accident, many airlines started crew resource management training for their pilots. The training is designed to make problem solving in a cockpit much more efficient, thus causing less distraction for the crew. Flashlights are now standard equipment near jumpseats, and all jumpseats are outfitted with shoulder harnesses.

Have You Seen This Man?
S2 | Trailer: Join the Global Manhunt for John Ruffo

Have You Seen This Man?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 2:10


John Ruffo was an unassuming computer salesman from Brooklyn who engineered one of the most outlandish frauds in American history. He received a 17-year sentence for his $350 million swindle -- but his story didn't end there. After he turned in his ankle monitor, Ruffo made a final stop at an ATM, drove to JFK Airport and vanished. The ABC News investigative unit now joins the U.S. Marshals as they span the globe and uncover surprising details about his cloak-and-dagger past.

Infamous America
LUFTHANSA HEIST Ep. 3 | “The Heist”

Infamous America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 27:45


In the early morning hours of December 11, 1978, six masked men carry out a masterful robbery of the High Value Room at the Lufthansa cargo building at JFK Airport. The robbers are from Jimmy Burke's crew, and the heist is even bigger than they expected. They walk out with more than five million dollars in cash and jewels, and earn a place in the record books. Join Black Barrel+ for bingeable seasons with no commercials : blackbarrel.supportingcast.fm/join For more details, please visit www.blackbarrelmedia.com. Our social media pages are: @blackbarrelmedia on Facebook and Instagram, and @bbarrelmedia on Twitter. This show is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please visit AirwaveMedia.com to check out other great podcasts like Ben Franklin's World, Once Upon A Crime, and many more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Vacation Mavens
194 Tamaras Greek Islands Trip

Vacation Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 68:18


Tamara is just back from a trip to Greece and she tells us all about this dream vacation. Find out what it is like to travel to Greece right now -- plus what to do and where to stay in Santorini and Naxos! ABOUT OUR SPONSOR – ATLAS OCEAN VOYAGES Today's podcast is brought to you by Atlas Ocean Voyages.  If you have ever dreamed of cruising to Greece or Egypt, now is the time to book! Atlas Ocean Voyages just introduced its expedition ship World Navigator. This small ship, luxury vessel is built for adventure in a sustainable, energy-efficient manner.  Perfect for adventurous families or multi-generational groups, its compact size and small guest count of fewer than 200 passengers, means a higher space to guest ratio and more intimacy and personalized service. From August through September 2021, World Navigator will sail 7 separate 12 night itineraries to Greece and Egypt. And its small size and agility means she can dock in smaller ports, avoiding large crowds and getting a more authentic experience. And this summer, arrivals in Greece do not coincide with any other cruise ships in port! Bookings are all inclusive, including both airfare and excursions. The ship's facilities and protocols reflect state of the art public health guidance. With stringent public health protocols followed by staff and crew with pre-boarding and pre-embarkation PCR testing provided for all passengers. Social distancing will be maintained with small group shore excursions. Atlas welcomes travelers to ‘come back to something brand new'      To learn more, please visit www.AtlasOceanVoyages.com and we thank them for their support. 2021 Trip to Greece Tips Greece reopened to USA citizens this springs. Visitors need to either be fully vaccinated (all shots + 14 days) and have a vaccination card OR show a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of boarding the plane. These are reviewed at check in for your flight. Visitors also need to fill out a Passenger Locator Form more than 24 hours before arrival. The Greece government will then send you a QR code after midnight on the day of your arrival that you need to show at Customs on your arrival. You need to show the receipt of submission or QR code when you check in to your flight. Masks are required in airports, planes, trains, ferries, ferry ports, busses, and taxis, as well as indoors. You also need to complete health forms before going on ferries or boats and either be vaccinated or take a test before going on a ferry. Vaccination cards will also be checked when you check into hotels. To return to the USA, you need to take a PCR test within 72 hours of your flight departure. There are public clinics available to get tested but appointments may be required and hours are limited. Tamara's tests on Naxos were 60 euro per person. You can also order Binax Now tests from Abbott Laboratories online. Just make sure they are the ones approved for travel and include online monitoring of the test as that is what is needed for re-entry into the USA. On Santorini, Tamara stayed at the Canaves Oia Epitome, which is a new property from the Canaves brand, and it is a luxury hotel located about 10 minutes walk from Oia and Ammoudi Bay. They booked the honeymoon suite with private plunge pool. Elements Restaurant at the Canaves Oia Epitome offers an amazing Degustation Menu and it was a top dining experience. Santorini is a very popular destination and Oia is the most famous town. When you visit, be sure to go into town early in the morning to avoid crowds. Tamara also had a chef's tasting dinner at Lycabettus in Oia but felt it wasn't worth the price. Santorini Wine Trails does half or full-day wine tours in Santorini. All tours are private right now. Ammoudi Fish Tavern is a fun restaurant right on the water in Ammoudi Bay with great views and fresh fish. Tamara also did a photo shoot with Nikola from Flytographer and got some great photos. Book ferry tickets in advance of your trip Note that you should arrive at the ferry port early to figure out where to queue up. Boarding the ferry can be chaotic so listen closely for when they call your boat and note that the same ferry makes multiple stops at different islands so it isn't like there is a separate boat for each island. It helps to arrange transportation for airport and ferry pick ups so you don't have to wait in a long line when you arrive. We used Welcome Pickups on Santorini and Athens. On Naxos, Tamara stayed at the Virtu Suites boutique hotel on the beach in Agios Prokopios. Naxos is a much more affordable than Santorini -- dinner for two costs only about 40 euro at many local tavernas. Tamara booked a full day private boat tour and snorkeling with Naxos Sailing. They also offer small group trips and have a variety of itineraries. The boat tour stopped in Paros and Tamara took a cab to Naoussa, the main town, which is really beautiful and filled with shops and restaurants. Tamara and Glenn also took a full day wine, cheese and island tour with Eleni from Philema Food Tours. In Naxos Town many people visit Apollo's Temple or the Portara for sunset but you need to get there early to get a prime photo spot. In Athens, Tamara stayed at the Hotel Grand Bretagne, which she was able to book using Marriott points. The rooftop restaurant, where breakfast is also served, has beautiful views of the Acropolis. Full Episode Transcript [00:00:00.060] - Kim Tate Today, we're taking a European journey to the Greek islands.   [00:00:15.900] - Announcer Welcome to Vacation Mavens. A family travel podcast with ideas for your next vacation and tips to get you out the door. Here are your hosts, Kim from Stuffed Suitcase and Tamara from We3Travel.   [00:00:30.870] - Tamara Gruber Today's podcast is brought to you by Atlas Ocean Voyages. If you've ever dreamed of cruising to Greece or Egypt, now is the time to book. Atlas Ocean Voyages just introduced its new expedition ship, The World Navigator. This small ship luxury vessel is built for adventure in a sustainable but energy efficient manner. It's perfect for adventurous families or multigenerational groups. Its compact size and small guest count of fewer than 200 passengers means a higher space to guest ratio and more intimacy and personalized service.   [00:01:00.750] - Tamara Gruber From August through September 2021, World Navigator will sail seven separate 12 night itineraries to Greece and Egypt, and its small size and agility means she can dock in smaller ports, avoiding large crowds and getting a more authentic experience. And this summer, arrivals in Greece do not coincide with any other cruise ships, and port bookings are all inclusive, including both airfare and excursions.   [00:01:22.590] - Tamara Gruber The ship's facilities and protocols reflect state of the art public health guidance, with stringent public health protocols followed by staff and crew. With preboarding and pre embarkation PCR testing provided for all passengers, social distancing will be maintained with small groups shore excursions. Atlas welcomes travelers to come back to something brand new. To learn more, please visit AtlasOceanVoyages.com, and we thank them for their support.   [00:01:48.330] - Tamara Gruber Kim, I have to say after just coming back from Greece, now is such a good time to go that if people could still book a cruise for later this summer or the, you know, the fall, it would really be a great time to go.   [00:02:01.560] - Kim Tate I can see that I was following along on your stories. I think a lot of people are just unsure about all the you know, I guess in some ways you'd say loopholes and things you have to think about when you're traveling. And so it might be the perfect time for summer in Europe.   [00:02:16.230] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it's definitely not as crowded. And people are very eager to welcome you back. And, you know, luckily, especially with Greece, the emphasis that they've put on vaccinating people in hospitality and on the islands and plus the fact that everything is outside it makes you feel so much more comfortable. So definitely a good time to go. But otherwise, if you can't go this year and you've dreamed about a cruise either to Egypt or the Greek islands, then check out Atlas Ocean Voyages for small ship luxury cruising.   [00:02:48.060] - Tamara Gruber Sounds like a great way to go because it includes all your excursions and everything else. At least you know exactly what it's going to cost you.   [00:02:54.660] - Kim Tate Yeah. And as we've already said, the small ships are really the way to get a more intimate experience with the destination. So you're not being dropped off on huge piers.   [00:03:03.390] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, exactly. When we took our ferry back, I saw maybe one or two cruise ships that a couple of the islands that we stopped out on the ferry back to Athens. But those were mostly like small ships as well.   [00:03:14.070] - Tamara Gruber So, yeah, cruising is coming back. We saw on our flight back to JFK, like one whole section in the back seemed to have those little celebrity bags. So it's nice. Yeah, well, that's exciting. And I think it's great if people want to look at kind of that new journey. And like you said, there's still a whole month of August left for the summer. So if you've got some free time to make an impromptu vacation plans, then the Atlas Ocean Voyages might have a good deal for you to jump on.   [00:03:43.800] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, and if you want to explore Greece by land or at least to the islands, then I can give you some tips, because that's what we're going to be talking about this episode.   [00:03:53.460] - Kim Tate I cannot wait to hear about your trip. It seems like you guys really enjoyed your time together. And, you know, for an anniversary trip, it seems like it it just checked all the boxes for you guys. So I'm looking forward to sharing with our listeners everything that you guys did and what you learned. And we should just get right into it.   [00:04:11.580] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, definitely. It was one of those trips where I was prepping myself as we were driving down because we had to drive to New York and we flew from there just so that we could get a direct flight to Athens.   [00:04:23.550] - Tamara Gruber So since our other flight was canceled, we wanted to not have to worry about transiting through another European country and worrying about what their entrance requirements were and such. And so we're driving down and I said to Glennn, like, look like something is going to happen, like not everything is going to go smoothly.   [00:04:41.010] - Tamara Gruber You know, that's always the case, but especially right now, like, we need to prep ourselves like I've had in my mind, like this dream trip for two years now. Right. And that's like dangerous, you know, when you are putting so much like, you know, hope and everything into this trip that you've thought about for so long and especially, you know, as we're used to traveling. But, you know, after two years of not a lot of travel, it's like it gets even more focus, you know, for you.   [00:05:04.510] - Tamara Gruber I'm like, something's going to go wrong. And it just ended up like, you know, OK, there are a couple, like, little bumps, but thankfully, like, nothing huge happened. And it was just it was just so nice. Still be in a different place, you know what I had said, like, I need a change of scenery. If we can't go to Greece, like we're going somewhere that has palm trees or something, like I needed a change of scenery and then it just it was beautiful, but it was everything is outdoors and we just.   [00:05:33.430] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, you had to put on a mask when you were in, like, you know, a cab or something like that. But we just didn't worry.   [00:05:38.770] - Tamara Gruber And it was really amazing.   [00:05:40.450] - Tamara Gruber And I think it was like the combination of those couple of things of like feeling really normal and being in a new place and just having this amazing time.   [00:05:50.260] - Tamara Gruber And and we you know, it was a splurge trip for us. So I booked, you know, some luxury hotels. And just like being that back in that experience. And you think about like what we talked about in our last episode about how like for the services and the hotels and stuff right now, you know, because of staffing, I like to be back in like what felt like a very normal travel experience was it was just amazing. It really is awesome.   [00:06:13.570] - Tamara Gruber It really was so good. And I look yeah, I look at the pictures and I'm like, you can just tell, like, our smiles, like we're just happy.   [00:06:21.670] - Kim Tate Yeah, exactly. That's what I got that sense from. Just everything that I was watching and following and seeing. It was just seemed like you guys had had a really great time. So why don't you start us, you know, for the people who are wondering, why don't you explain what you did before to be able to get to Greece, you know, so they just know what the requirements are maybe. And then walk us through your itinerary if you want or however you want to present it.   [00:06:45.960] - Tamara Gruber Definitely. So, yeah, there's definitely a few things to know about going to Greece right now. I mean, they were one of the first European countries to open up. So what they require is you either need to be vaccinated, fully vaccinated, which includes the two weeks after your second dose or your one dose if your one dose person like I was. And you also need you know, if you don't have that, then you need to show a negative test PCR test within the last 72 hours.   [00:07:14.110] - Tamara Gruber And you show that when you arrive at the airport, when you're checking in in the U.S. and the other thing that you need to do is complete a passenger locator form and you need to do that. You can probably would be emailed it from your airline carrier, but otherwise you can find it on like the Greek website.   [00:07:32.710] - Tamara Gruber You need to fill that out before 24 hours before you leave. So, you know, at least a day before you leave, you fill that out and it has all your information, your passport information, all that kind of stuff. But also look where you're going to be staying.   [00:07:44.950] - Tamara Gruber You know what places you're visiting, all of that. It's an online form. You you submit it and then you get a receipt that it's been submitted and that's what you show when you get to the airport to check in.   [00:07:59.020] - Tamara Gruber Then when you arrive in Greece, it's kind of weird because they email you a QR code, but they only email it to you like after midnight the day of your arrival. So we were doing like an overnight flight. So it's like we couldn't show it at the airport when we arrived because we don't have it yet. But we showed it at the airport I'm sorry, when we arrived in New York. But when we arrived in Athens, luckily they have free Wi-Fi in the airport.   [00:08:23.800] - Tamara Gruber Just connect and then you get the QR code and you show them as you're coming into the customs area for Athens.   [00:08:30.550] - Tamara Gruber So that's really it. It's pretty simple, really. There are some other things to think about just in terms of, you know, traveling right now. Like if you're going on a ferry, you need to show your vaccination card or your test, but you also need to complete like a health form, you know, like one of those like you haven't had these symptoms, you know, that kind of stuff. And they give you a QR code for that.   [00:08:56.200] - Tamara Gruber Of course, I can talk later about like the whole ferry boarding process. And it's such like a madhouse. They don't actually check that.   [00:09:02.110] - Tamara Gruber But, you know, technically, you need to do those kind of things, too. So there are some things.   [00:09:07.900] - Tamara Gruber And when we checked into each of our hotels, they checked our vaccination cards.   [00:09:11.620] - Tamara Gruber So, you know, you keep that information handy. We had to do one for a boat that we went out on for the day. We had to show the vaccination card and fill out a health form for that as well. So I guess either a vaccination card or a negative test. Yeah, but then within three days, does it have to be within three days so we can keep repeatedly testing while you're there if you're not, you know, because we're vaccinated. That's something that you would look into if you have younger children that couldn't be vaccinated or something like that. Yeah. Something to ask. And then, of course, to come back to the US, everyone right now needs to have a negative PCR test.   [00:09:48.940] - Tamara Gruber So when we arrived, I had already figured out what we were going to do to make sure that it was possible. Otherwise I would have bought those Abbot Binax Now test to bring with us.   [00:10:04.990] - Tamara Gruber So they have two different Abbott ones. This is I guess good to know. Like there's one that you can buy just in like a CVS or something. That that does not qualify for overseas travel.   [00:10:15.310] - Tamara Gruber Because it needs to be monitored, but they have another one that you can order online, I think it's one hundred and fifty dollars that includes like multiple tests.   [00:10:24.220] - Tamara Gruber And what you do is you self administer it, but you do it like you get in an appointment with a doctor, like over Zoom. Right. And watch, you know, that you're doing it so that they can verify, you know that to you.   [00:10:36.700] - Tamara Gruber So, yeah, that's a separate one. You have to order online and that's actually an option. But luckily for us, we were able to get to our second island of Naxos. We our hotel helped us arrange an appointment at a clinic there. We just it could take up to 24 hours before we were getting our results. So we did on Friday for a Sunday morning departure. And we had our results by Friday evening. And it cost us only 60 euro per person.   [00:11:03.400] - Tamara Gruber If they came to the hotel and did it for us, it was going to be like a hundred and twenty euro per person. So that's what we did.   [00:11:08.950] - Tamara Gruber But just one thing to note about when you are traveling and you're looking to go to a local clinic for your way back, the hours are very limited. Still, like the one that we went to is closed on Saturdays. So, you know, you needed to plan that into your time window. But then some of them will be open, like for a few hours in the morning or a couple hours in the afternoon. But it's not like all day or, you know, you know, 24 hours.   [00:11:31.600] - Tamara Gruber So you need to definitely plan ahead with that. But overall, like, it was pretty easy. I definitely think the the most challenging part is, you know, just the long flight, you know, frankly, like, I've never had a mask on for 16 hours before. And that is true. You know, that was a really long time because we had to deal with our long flight. You know, you have your time in the airport, the long flight on the way there.   [00:11:54.490] - Tamara Gruber We then had like a three hour layover in the Athens airport and then another flight to Santorini, because our itinerary was to have three nights in Santorini, five nights on Naxos, and then one night in Athens for our return. So when we arrived, we wanted to not have to spend time in Athens, but get right to our destination just because we didn't have we just didn't have a lot of time. If I had two weeks, I would definitely spend more time like in Athens.   [00:12:19.900] - Tamara Gruber So we had that flight, you know, and then the cab ride from the airport to our hotel. So, you know, that's that's a long time, you know, to be in your mask. I definitely switched up my mask like midway. Yeah. About getting this thing kind of stinks after a while, you know. Yeah.   [00:12:36.490] - Kim Tate Are they not doing food either? So do you have to kind of make sure you're packing your own food and then are you able to eat it.   [00:12:41.620] - Tamara Gruber They do do food, yeah.   [00:12:42.770] - Tamara Gruber So we had our flight was Delta from JFK to Athens. We did have a bit of a scare that we weren't going to make our flight because we gave ourselves five hours to get to New York and it should take three hours. But it ended up taking like five and a half. And we parked in like an economy pre booked online. So then we had to take an air train over to the airport. And we were so nervous that, you know, we started off so relaxed, like we have plenty of time. Then we were so nervous that we weren't going to make it, but we got there. It was kind of chaos in the JFK Airport because it's just super busy. And, of course, you know, everyone, not everyone had all the information they were supposed to have right now.   [00:13:25.360] - Tamara Gruber And then that takes a little bit of a longer time. But we got triggered as we were boarding.   [00:13:29.920] - Tamara Gruber We got on luckily, they were serving food because we our plan was to go to a lounge and have a meal and, you know, take some, you know, some time. We didn't have that. So we were getting on to the plane with a bag of chips and some trail mix for like a ten hour flight. So, yeah, luckily they serve food and basically, you know, they make announcements, of course, when you board just the same way they would in the US.   [00:13:53.560] - Tamara Gruber And while you're eating, you can lower your mask. And then it's kind of like after they do their meal service, they're going around being like mask up, like making sure everyone was still lingering, you know, that they're lifting the mask. But I will say, and I've said this before, like with us travel, that if I was not vaccinated, I would not be comfortable going because there are a lot of people that, you know, it's an overnight flight, it's dark.   [00:14:20.080] - Tamara Gruber People are kind of lowering their masks as they're sleeping. And on those kind of overnight flights, the flight attendants aren't up and down the aisles as much checking. So I think, yeah, you definitely see some like if they saw someone, they would say something, but they weren't being super proactive with. Checking often is I say, you know.   [00:14:40.840] - Tamara Gruber But that's not the case in the ferries and in the, you know, Athens airport, it seemed like, you know, much more strict. And on the ferry, someone went around regularly like, you know, talking to people and even having a little confrontations with people. So if that's something that's worried, I know I've gotten a lot of messages. I don't want to linger on this too much because there's a lot of really good stuff to talk about.   [00:15:01.900] - Tamara Gruber But, you know, I've gotten a lot of messages from people, like asking how comfortable I was. And I want to say, like when I was in Greece, I felt extremely comfortable. I really, really did.   [00:15:10.900] - Tamara Gruber You know, we had masks on in the cabs, but everything else. Is really outside, you know, like it's it's amazing how much everything is outside, I came back and I'm like, oh, right, restaurants have indoor dining, but we don't want to do that, you know? So it's it's very comfortable in that way.   [00:15:28.320] - Kim Tate Great. So you made it to Santorini. That was your first stop. So what sort of things did you do there?   [00:15:34.440] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. So in Santorini, Santorini is a very crowded like over tourist island. It's really expensive, but it is very, very beautiful.   [00:15:44.820] - Tamara Gruber And so I knew that we wanted to only spend a few nights there because they didn't have the budget to spend a long time. And I have to say that this year is such a great time to go because it still seemed a little crowded at times and it was picking up like throughout our stay seem to increase. But they were telling me, all the locals are telling me that it was only about 20 percent of the 2019 numbers. So it's definitely like an over tourist destination.   [00:16:12.600] - Tamara Gruber And I had an opportunity to visit when there weren't that many people there, which made it like absolutely amazing.   [00:16:18.460] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, we stayed like one of the main towns is called Oia. And it is it's an essential that everybody sees in the pictures. Exactly.   [00:16:30.130] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Yeah. So I really wanted to stay there again. This was our milestone anniversary, a birthday trip. So it was a splurge, something that we'd saved up for for a while.   [00:16:40.620] - Tamara Gruber So I had booked us three nights at a luxury hotel that called the Canaves Oia Epitome. So this brand, the Canaves, they have, I think three or four properties that are well known, luxury properties, most of them are right in the town. This one is brand new and it is just about a ten minute walk outside of town, kind of like down the hill. But we love the location and I loved the property. It was gorgeous.   [00:17:07.740] - Tamara Gruber I had booked us a honeymoon suite with a plunge pool. So big splurge on the suite. We've never spent this much on a hotel. I will admit, you know, definitely like a huge privilege here.   [00:17:17.580] - Tamara Gruber But we walked in and so it was like you kind of opened this one door. You go up some steps and there's like our patio with our plunge pool to loungers, picnic table, a little bench. And then you go into the room from there.   [00:17:32.340] - Tamara Gruber And we walked in and we were just like, wow, like this. It's just so nice to go back to, like a luxury hotel and have this beautiful place and beautiful, you know, setting. And it was just it was so nice. Like, I'm so glad that we had that splurge. They do have other they have some other spaces for families. And there actually I saw a number of families, both with teens and with like toddlers are smaller, like elementary school age.   [00:18:01.770] - Tamara Gruber So there are other types of rooms, some larger, some smaller. So that was my big splurge. At one point, Glennn was like, how much was this place? And I'm like, I'm not going to tell you. This was one where I was like, I want to book this, you know, and surprise you. And so we we really, really enjoyed that, like, kind of sitting out by the our little plunge pool.   [00:18:22.500] - Tamara Gruber But then they also have, you know, the property has like a really nice infinity pool and it overlooks the water. And you get really beautiful sunset views there, which, you know, in this part of Greece, like some some of the views, some of the places will face a caldera. So you'll get really pretty hues and color, but you don't see the actual sunset. So this is the sunset and it's like ten minute walk up to town or they can shuttle you and like a ten minute walk down to Ammoudi bay, which is where are the sunset catamarans go out.   [00:18:55.620] - Tamara Gruber And it's just like there's a lot of cool fish restaurants. So I thought the location was fabulous.   [00:19:01.110] - Tamara Gruber The service was amazing, the food was great, the breakfast is included. And it's one of those things where you can order as much off the menu as you want. You know, like you order a la carte and then they're like, oh, do you want fruit? Do you want this? Like the one day that I had breakfast, I like pineapple juice. And so on their menu, they had grapefruit and orange juice. And I was like, oh, do you have pineapple juice?   [00:19:22.440] - Tamara Gruber And they're like, we can do that for you. And they came out, they had like blended a fresh pineapple for me.   [00:19:28.770] - Tamara Gruber And the the food was just it was fantastic. Like everything was so good. And our first night there, like we were exhausted.   [00:19:35.280] - Tamara Gruber Right, because we had this five hour drive. Then we had, you know, a ten hour flight, three hour layover, half hour flight, you know, so we got there and I saw those lounge chairs by our plunge pool. And I'm like, I am taking a nap right there. And so we kind of just like napped in the sun for like an hour or two was somehow like it. Just something about the excitement of the first day of your trip where you just like kind of have the adrenaline to keep going, right?   [00:20:01.320] - Tamara Gruber So that little nap was like all I needed. I usually plan for something like this for our first day to just have dinner close to the hotel where we're staying. So I had booked dinner at the hotel. The hotel has two restaurants, one is like fine dining, one is casual. I had booked us at the fine dining restaurant and so we ended up having like a degustation menu, like a chef's tasting menu, seven courses. And so you would think we would be like way to jet lag to like appreciate it.   [00:20:31.580] - Tamara Gruber But I will tell you, this is one of the best dining experiences of our lives. And we still go back and we're like, is it because we were just so happy to be there? Or is it just like that first night? You have nothing to compare it to.   [00:20:44.120] - Tamara Gruber But it was really just wonderful because the service was so it was just so perfect.   [00:20:49.160] - Tamara Gruber It wasn't crowded because it was primarily just people at the hotel. So, you know, we were outside. We are overlooking this beautiful infinity pool and the sunset and, you know, our tables were all spaced and our server was just so sweet. Like every time I was, like, really enjoying a dish. And I would compliment her and compliment the dish. She would get almost like a giggly, you know, like she was so pleased with how much we liked it.   [00:21:17.480] - Tamara Gruber And it just like that shows like how much like it means to them to, like, present and prepare like something that someone's really enjoying, you know, like that kind of hospitality where it's not just like a you know, like a process, like a routine. You know, it was just like a lot of it added a lot of enjoyment. And the the food was just it was fantastic. It was so, so good. So, you know, another huge splurge for us.   [00:21:41.090] - Tamara Gruber But like, if you stay there and I actually had like three people, I think like or more messaged me on Instagram saying that they had either already booked it or they were booking it for the fall, like that particular hotel and asking about the restaurant. So I definitely think it's the it's a luxury hotel. And the price point is just slightly below the places that are in town. So it made it you know, it made it fit with my budget.   [00:22:07.400] - Tamara Gruber You know, it was already a splurge budget, but. Yeah. So anyway, that's what we did the first day. And then the next day, again, I didn't want to like over because I really wanted to make sure that this trip was like some exploration, but a lot of time for like relaxation and doubt and just time to enjoy it and soak it in. You know, I didn't want us to be like, go, go, go.   [00:22:26.300] - Tamara Gruber And we also didn't want to be around a lot of other groups or people. So we did things, you know, like more on our own or privately.   [00:22:33.560] - Tamara Gruber So the next day we decided to walk into town and I thought we're just going to maybe, like, wander around for a little bit. But it was so charming. And so we were just like going down all these side streets and I'm taking like a million pictures and we just loved it.   [00:22:47.810] - Tamara Gruber And it was so quiet at first. Like in the beginning, the streets were like empty when we got there, probably like ten thirty.   [00:22:54.500] - Tamara Gruber And the streets were so empty. And everyone says, like, go super early in the morning, but I'm like my first day. I'm not getting out there like 6:00 a.m. you know, that's not my idea of a vacation. And then it got like a little busier, like closer to noon. But I think if you're going on a regular year, you probably really have to get there early to avoid the crowds. That's why it's kind of nice to stay right in that area, because if you're traveling from another part of the island, of course, you're not going to get there, you know, quite that early.   [00:23:19.820] - Tamara Gruber Right. But it got really hot, definitely. People ask me about the weather, too. It was probably in the high eighties, like maybe low 90s the entire time we were there. I mean, I loved it.   [00:23:30.470] - Tamara Gruber Like it was it was the kind of weather where I could go out every night in a sundress and not have to bring a sweater, you know, just like, wonderful. And it was, you know, the sun was strong.   [00:23:40.940] - Tamara Gruber So you would like a little break from it or take a swim. But it wasn't I didn't find it oppressive. Apparently earlier in that week, there was you kind of what's been typical Europe right now is the end of June, early July for the last few years has had like an extremely high heat wave. So they had temperatures well above one hundred for a few days. But then, like I said, when we were there, it was kind of more normal summer.   [00:24:03.300] - Tamara Gruber But still, we needed a place. We needed a little break. And their lunches are a little bit later. They're still like at one point we stopped and we just Glennn had, I think, like a beer and I had a smoothie and we just sat at a place where we're having this beautiful view. And then we walked around some more and then we had this amazing lunch. I like this salad with grilled shrimp and like, everything was like so wonderful.   [00:24:24.050] - Tamara Gruber And all I could think was like years ago when I was a picky eater, I was like, oh, I could never do I could never go to Greece because I don't like and I like this like at the time I didn't like feta, now I love feta.   [00:24:34.970] - Tamara Gruber I still don't like olives. And I didn't eat as much fish. But it is like the food was amazing. All the food that I had was really, really good and I did not have a problem with that at all because I for a long time ago I was like, I'm gonna have to do it on a cruise so that I like the food, but I've expanded my palate. So we had a wonderful lunch. Like there's just so many places that have beautiful views or cute courtyards.   [00:24:58.520] - Tamara Gruber And it's just we had a lovely time and it reminded me a lot of the Amalfi Coast in Italy and in Capri, except the shops there aren't like the big designer shops. It's more like, you know, there's there's a lot of touristy kind. You know, now knickknacks and T-shirt kind of things, but then there's some more local shops, and so I liked that. You know, sometimes when you go to places and you see all these, like really upscale designer shops and like, well, first of all, I can't afford to shop there wherever I see them.   [00:25:30.650] - Tamara Gruber And like, if you can get that at a city, like, near you, like, why do you need it like on vacation? You know, I'd rather find, like, more of the local kind of authentic things. Like we stopped into a gallery and I totally was ready to buy art until I realized we missed a zero on the on the painting price. But yeah, we just had a really lovely time. We went back and we sat by the pool and then we went back into town that night and we did another tasting menu at this place called Lycabettus, I'm sure mispronouncing it.   [00:25:59.150] - Tamara Gruber But it's named that after a place in Athens that also has a beautiful viewpoint. But it basically is a restaurant like on a cliff side. So you pay more to sit on this like promontory that sticks out into the caldera. And you have this great view. Of course, Glennn was like, so where it is like, am I going to be nervous? And we had to go down all these steps to get to it.   [00:26:24.500] - Tamara Gruber He was like slowly going down the steps and the the hostess kept turning and looking back. And I'm like, we're OK, you know? But I will say, like, that place was crazy expensive, which we knew it was going to be, because it's definitely very like this is one of the most beautiful places to have a meal or whatever. But I didn't think it was worth it. So I wouldn't say to do it like the food was good, but it was much more like it came out very quickly and it was like everybody near us was getting the same thing at the same time.   [00:26:54.950] - Tamara Gruber And it just didn't have that personal feel to it. And for like a gas station menu was a lot of like phone this and, you know, like very I don't know, kind of it was inventive, but it also felt very like it's probably been done a lot, you know. Oh yeah. Yeah, yeah. So I mean, but it was still we had a beautiful view. We wandered around town afterwards and it's just so nice.   [00:27:13.550] - Tamara Gruber We sit as we're sitting there because we probably had like an eight thirty reservation, like, you know, the sunsets. And then so things start to have that beautiful glow and then the lights start to come on. And then by the time you leave, it's like all lit up and it's just, you know, like really, really gorgeous. I really fell in love with, like, that part of Santorini. But, you know, someone asked me, like, how long should you stay in Santorini?   [00:27:35.750] - Tamara Gruber And I said, well, I think at least three nights, you know, maybe two nights if you've already, you know, been in Greece. But really, it depends on your budget. Like, how long can you afford to stay there because the food's expensive, like everything is definitely pricey.   [00:27:49.700] - Tamara Gruber So our last day on Sunday, we ended up we had booked a half day wine tour with Santorini wine trails, and we did that. All the tours that they're doing right now are private. So, you know, we basically visited a vineyard and then Santorini is probably most well known for their wine, their white wine. And so we went to, I think, three wineries and did different tastings and tasting. We had like some local cheese or one thing I totally fell in love with was the tomato paste, because like Santorini is known for tomatoes, too.   [00:28:25.520] - Tamara Gruber And you think about tomato paste like that, you would buy at the store, come to where the little can and you just like your lasagna or something like that. Like this was it was like you just want to spread it on bread. It was amazing. You know, I definitely had a great time on that tour. We learned a lot. You know, it's just the kind of thing that we like to do. Again, this trip was very oriented towards couples, you know, as I apologize, or people like looking for family, you know, kids, things to do because we were very focused on things that we love to do.   [00:28:56.390] - Kim Tate Well, that still sounds awesome. Sounds like a gorgeous splurge. And I'm sure there's plenty of people listening that don't have kids are looking for an anniversary trip or, you know, some kind of luxury luxury time. So I think it's good.   [00:29:08.840] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:29:09.800] - Tamara Gruber And then our last night, we walked down to Ammoudi bay and we watched other sunset catamarans go out and man, those things were packed. Those were crowded.   [00:29:17.900] - Tamara Gruber And then we had dinner down there at a Ammoudi Fish Tavern, which was it was just a great you know, it's very touristy feeling, but it's just it was like such fresh fish. The guy was like, no, no, come over to that, because I was asking, like, what is this type of fish like? And he's like, come look. And I'm like looking at it is not going to help me know how it tastes like, you know, he kept trying to like, you know, like, look at this one and we'll cut it this way.   [00:29:44.810] - Tamara Gruber He'll do this. But, you know, it's very fresh.   [00:29:47.390] - Tamara Gruber So, you know, that was that was a lot of fun. And I didn't mention. But if you follow on Instagram, you've probably seen.   [00:29:52.730] - Tamara Gruber But we did a Flytographer photography shoot that morning before we did the wine tour. So that was a lot of fun to   [00:30:00.770] - Kim Tate those turned out so well. And I'm happy with the dress you chose. It looked perfect.   [00:30:05.240] - Tamara Gruber Thank you. And thank you. Yes. For your advice. I was going back and forth, but I'm like, you know, I just feel comfortable in this one. And I think, like, you know, Glennn is a pink shirt. It'll kind of go together and yeah, we worked with Nikola and he did a fantastic job. And he did so many different, like locations. We're like really fast, which is good because, like, I didn't think about poor Glenn because it was a lot of like edges. Edges.   [00:30:33.540] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, exactly. I did at one point he was just like, I need a break. I, I'm sitting this one out, take some pictures of her on her own. But, you know, we had fun. It was it was really nice. So it's just something that it's just such a good memory. Like I know I will look back at those photos and like always smile, you know, I was they'll bring back such happiness.   [00:30:56.520] - Tamara Gruber It's nice to have photos of the two of us because frankly, I don't know. We have some from our wedding, like, yeah, I have a lot of that.   [00:31:03.210] - Kim Tate So he did a great job also of posing you guys. I mean, they were definitely nice anniversary shots. And I think that was part of it is some of the looks and the poses were great. So it wasn't just being in a beautiful area. I mean, they really were engaging of the two of you and good, good representative representation of your relationship.   [00:31:22.210] - Tamara Gruber So, yeah, no, I agree.   [00:31:23.970] - Tamara Gruber It was it was really it was very nice. And so I'm happy to do that and tip for anyone that wants to do something like that for a future trip. What I do for photographer is every Black Friday they have a sale and I buy a gift certificate like gift card for that sale and then I'll just use it whenever I book for a trip. So little money saving tip there.   [00:31:47.270] - Kim Tate If it's that smart, is it? So it's like a gift card or whatever. And then you can. Yeah.   [00:31:51.840] - Tamara Gruber And then I get a code or whatever you apply.   [00:31:53.670] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Yeah.   [00:31:55.320] - Tamara Gruber So and that one I had a credit from, we had booked for Paris and twenty twenty that we didn't do and so I wanted to use it. I didn't know how long they were going to keep that credit valid and I didn't know when our next family trip would be. So my kids do this so.   [00:32:09.600] - Tamara Gruber Yeah but so that kind of wraps up Santorini. And then the next day we were taking a ferry over to Naxos, which is one of the largest of the Cyclades Islands. And it's you know, but it's quieter and it is a lot less expensive. I know that our friend Eric from Travel Babo has gone there a lot with his family. And, you know, so I decided to do that as our second island.   [00:32:32.860] - Tamara Gruber It would have been nice if we had a little more time to maybe squeeze in one other island. But, you know, that one was good. We did five nights. I think a lot of people will do like Santorini. Well, maybe they'll do Mykonos, but Mykonos is very much like a young party island. I'm like, yeah, I'm too old for that. And it's super expensive. Or they'll do Crete, but Crete is huge. And so you could do like your whole vacation.   [00:32:54.150] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Just on Crete. Yeah. So yeah, this felt like a good mix for us to have like one more of the famous ones and one of the slightly less visited ones. So we took the ferry and I'll just like a few words about taking the ferries in Greece just because it was new to me. And now I know. And if I had known what to expect, I may not have been so stressed out.   [00:33:12.420] - Tamara Gruber But we got to the very port early. But it's just open. There's no like docks that have names of where to go. So we went into like the siege at office, which was the ferry that I had booked.   [00:33:24.000] - Tamara Gruber We had filled out our forms and also done our mobile boarding passes. We had all that like on our phones, but we weren't quite sure where to go when we got there. So I went to the office. They're like, oh, just go to like this building like Terminal four. So, OK, so we go in there and we're sitting there and I hear different people talking around me and they're like, oh, we're going to make a noise, we're going to Athens.   [00:33:43.740] - Tamara Gruber So I'm like, OK, so there's multiple boats. So we have to like, really listen for like when our boat is coming right. And the time is getting closer and closer and closer and the place is really filling up and everyone's talking and it's just like loud and you can't hear a thing. And then I hear some guy like all the way at the end of the hall, like coming in and shouting like anyone going to want, you know, and you're like, what was that?   [00:34:06.870] - Tamara Gruber So there's like nothing on the loudspeaker to like. No. You know, which boat are they announcing? Should I go out? Do I not go out like what's going on? And then finally I hear them say, like Paros and I hear them say things.   [00:34:20.280] - Tamara Gruber And so I'm like, oh, OK, that's not us. That's not us. And then finally, it seems like everyone is just walking and going. So I'm like, we should just go. Like, I was going, yeah. So as we get out there, the boat is coming in and I realize it's a huge boat. This boat is going to all those islands. It's not like there's one boat to meagerness, one boat to Paris, one boat to Athens.   [00:34:43.320] - Tamara Gruber So I'm like, oh, OK, I get it now. But so you're in this giant, like heard and then they are running a few minutes late, which they often are. And so like the boat is not even like docked yet and you know, the gangplank is down, people are ready to walk off and they're like hurting us. They're like, go, go, go, go, go down. You, you know? And I'm like, you know, I have my you know, we have our luggage.   [00:35:07.230] - Tamara Gruber Of course, I have my phone out to show, like the boarding pass. And I think I'm have to show like my health form and my boarding pass and like all this stuff. And the people are streaming off the boat and and, you know, we're like streaming on at the same time and the people are in the back almost with, like, cattle prods, like, go, go, go. And I hear the captain go in like, we got to go.   [00:35:26.710] - Tamara Gruber We got to leave. We got to leave my. Oh, my God. Like, what are they going to do, like leave people, you know, we're barely on the boat. And the thing is coming up and they're pulling away and we're it's just like you're in the hold of the boat with, like, the cars. And there's like these racks where you can put your luggage and some of them are labeled with certain islands. But, you know, people are just throwing their luggage up on racks and like you're running out of space.   [00:35:51.910] - Tamara Gruber So Glenn's like putting it up on the top thing. And then there's this huge, like line to get up the stairs, you know, but it's like very bouncy at this point. So you're, like trying to keep your balance, but there's like a catch point because that's where you then have to show, like, your boarding pass. They never checked the health forms, you know, and then we get up there and then finally they're like, OK, these are your seats.   [00:36:11.650] - Tamara Gruber And we sit down.   [00:36:12.160] - Tamara Gruber We're like, oh, OK.   [00:36:14.200] - Kim Tate Like, that was very stressful. How long ago, right? Was it?   [00:36:17.560] - Tamara Gruber It was. I think I was like about an hour and a half to go from Santorini to Naxos.   [00:36:22.900] - Kim Tate What do they do with the people who don't have their boarding?   [00:36:25.120] - Tamara Gruber I know. Exactly. And they start from like they stopped at another island like Ios, I think first, you know, and so I don't know. I don't know. Do they like I have no idea what you put your kind of don't want to put your bag in first either because like how do you get your bag out then these racks of everybody and throwing their bags on top. And I believe that they wait there for a while. They'll let you get your bag.   [00:36:50.590] - Tamara Gruber so then we're sitting there and you hear and it's, you know, how things are. At least they had a loudspeaker on the on the ferry. And the ferry is very much like, do you actually hear it, though? It's probably like what you're used to with your ferries where, you know, you have assigned seating. It's more like airplane seating, like, you know, like you have seats.   [00:37:07.330] - Kim Tate We don't run out here in Seattle. It's open seating.   [00:37:10.790] - Tamara Gruber So, yeah. So we had assigned seating and I was like, there's a concession bar. So it's more like, you know, it's, it's a big, you know, it's a big boat.   [00:37:17.410] - Tamara Gruber There's multiple tiers.   [00:37:18.790] - Tamara Gruber So there is a loudspeaker, there's like TVs playing but they're in Greek. I don't know what's going on in them. And they're making the announcement first in Greek, but then in English. But I tell them, you you cannot understand it. It's just Charlie Brown. Yeah. And so we're just like, what?   [00:37:33.010] - Tamara Gruber You know, what was that?   [00:37:34.000] - Tamara Gruber What was that? And like, luckily we had seen as the boat was coming in, there was like one of those leg things where it was like Ios, Naxos, Paros, and it gave like the order. It seems like we're going to be the second one. Just remember where the second one, you know, but they're like, oh my, please report to whatever.   [00:37:50.770] - Tamara Gruber So basically, like before you get to your island, they're calling you to go down to the hold and that's where you grab your luggage. Yeah. So then we grab our bag.   [00:37:59.920] - Tamara Gruber But even then, like, it got stuck on, like there was like a net up there and like the wheel was stuck and we're like, oh, I got to get it out, you know. And then we're, you know, standing there and again, like it's like the thing is barely coming down. Stop, drop and roll.   [00:38:12.280] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, like, go, go, go, go.   [00:38:15.040] - Tamara Gruber And then the cars are coming off and they're like, get out of the way. And I'm like, oh my God. Like, what am I supposed to do? This is crazy. But one thing I will say is when you arrive at an island by ferry or by plane, it's really helpful if you have your transportation already arranged because there are not a ton of taxis on these islands. So we saw people like waiting a really long time for a taxi.   [00:38:37.510] - Tamara Gruber So I had used I read about it online somewhere, but it's called Welcome Pickup's. It's like a little bit like an Uber, but you arrange it ahead of time and it worked seamlessly. They weren't on Naxos, but it worked in Athens and it worked in Santorini, you know, where we walked out of the plane in Santorini. And there's a guy holding a sign, you know, Gruber, and we get right in and go. And that's how it was when we arrived in Naxos.   [00:39:00.730] - Tamara Gruber Although I didn't use that service, it was like through the hotel. But it was just so nice to be like, oh, here's a guy. You know, we do that we like just super long line to try to find a taxi. And, you know, so that was really great. I would definitely recommend using the welcome pick ups because the hotel in Santorini was going to arrange something. I think they were going to charge us maybe like seventy five euro.   [00:39:21.580] - Tamara Gruber And then I booked through this and it was like less than 50 euro. So I'm sure it's even cheaper if you got a taxi. Sometimes it's like you're already spending that much money. It's like, do you really need to save twenty five bucks or whatever?   [00:39:38.170] - Tamara Gruber Then that's how a lot of like when we were in Naxos, we the main town is called Naxos Town or Chora, I guess like what I've learned is that on the islands there's one town and all the others are villages, you know, so you have to like get to a certain size. And then all the main town is called like or something like that. And but it's also just called Naxos.   [00:39:56.620] - Tamara Gruber So so we were about fifteen minutes south of there, like on a beach called Agios Prokopios. I always like switch the key in the P and so you could take a bus like back and forth. But we were like, yeah, I'll just take a taxi. But, you know, like, it's it is a little bit more so I can see why people would like to stay in town, but I really loved our location. So we stayed at a place called the Virtu Suites.   [00:40:30.980] - Tamara Gruber Maybe they have a dozen rooms or so. They have different ones. We didn't we didn't go with the top of the line there. I just looked like a Seaview suite. So it was just like basically you walked out of our room and the pool was right there. But I love this hotel again. It was really new. Like they opened, I think late 2019.   [00:40:51.880] - Tamara Gruber So then they were closed most of last year.   [00:40:55.090] - Tamara Gruber And so there, you know, they are back and they were like, please leave us a review. Or if you like, we need, you know, we need to get the word out and like don't you worry. Yeah. I'm going to like let them know. So we, I loved it. Like everything was all these natural materials. It was like rope and wood. And, you know, it's just like a very, very nice style, very comfortable style.   [00:41:16.990] - Tamara Gruber The service was wonderful. It wasn't I don't even know if all the rooms were filled. Definitely not when we got there, because we got there on a Monday, I felt like at first. We might have been like one of the only ones in the place. The room was pretty large, you know, it was just it was just so nice like you.   [00:41:32.230] - Tamara Gruber We walked out of our room, you know, two steps.   [00:41:34.930] - Tamara Gruber There is the pool, you know, ten steps. We're at the restaurant, which is like open area, restaurant, bar facing the street. And then you go across the street and there's the beach and the beach is gorgeous.   [00:41:46.840] - Tamara Gruber And they have you know, they have loungers with umbrellas. And all you have to do is a hotel guest just have them reserve it. They give you a form the night before and the reserve you loungers down in the front. And then if those don't fill up, then like people can come and pay to stay at the other ones, you know, and they can bring you drinks and food and stuff. And so it was the and the beach was beautiful.   [00:42:09.850] - Tamara Gruber The water was like fairly calm, whereas up by town, like there were a lot more waves. It was rougher. Like that's where people like surf and windsurf.   [00:42:17.260] - Tamara Gruber So I thought it was great even for families, you know, like it. And it was it was fun because someone had said like, oh the yeah, the because the beaches in Santorini are like rock.   [00:42:28.990] - Tamara Gruber So they're like, oh no. Naxos has really good beaches there. It's like silk. And I'm like, OK, they haven't seen, you know, some beaches because that was not like Florida. Well, it was it was not rock. It was more like, you know, what I'd have here in the in the Northeast, like, you know, coarse sand and then, you know, maybe some rock, like as you are getting into the water.   [00:42:51.400] - Tamara Gruber And then it kind of drops off fairly quickly. And then it's super, super soft, like there is no seaweed, no shells.   [00:42:57.130] - Tamara Gruber Like it was just really beautiful.   [00:42:59.470] - Tamara Gruber You could go out, you know, and just kind of float or swim. And you had a pretty good current. Glenn tried to swim a little bit and it was it was tough.   [00:43:06.700] - Tamara Gruber But, you know, you can just float and just like, you know, enjoy and relax. And the water was clear and, you know, a couple of fish swimming around. It was just it was really, really beautiful. Like, I was like, why am I in the Caribbean like this water? It was so turquoise. It was really beautiful and quiet. there were families. They would play like beach games and, you know, kids around. But it was it did not feel super crowded at all, like especially if you were out there in the morning. I think I posted some pictures and you can see there was like no one in the water. It was just it was beautiful, really, really beautiful. So I loved where we stayed.   [00:43:40.720] - Tamara Gruber The town right where we were staying was smaller. So it was basically like a couple of beach shops with like beach bags and bathing suits and stuff like that.   [00:43:50.200] - Tamara Gruber Maybe one boutique shop where I actually bought something and a few restaurants, you know, there were there were a few like attached to hotels. There were a few like right on that beachfront road and then a couple of others, but like very, you know, authentic and good food.   [00:44:07.000] - Tamara Gruber You know, like we had our two dinners that we did. There were forty euro total and we had an appetizer to like giant entrees that we couldn't finish, I think. Well, the one place they brought us a free dessert, two drinks, like I was like forty euro versus Santorini. So it was it was really very affordable there. Even the hotel restaurant, which was really good, was not overpriced, you know, for anything. A hotel restaurant is always going to be a bit more.   [00:44:35.380] - Tamara Gruber So we loved it there. I would definitely recommend looking at staying there. Like I said, it was very comfortable, great service.   [00:44:42.520] - Tamara Gruber And, you know, the distance from town was a little bit of a challenge, like we did take a taxi back and forth a few times. But it depends like if you're planning on renting a car or if you're going to, you know, just spend time on the beach, like you don't necessarily need to be going back and forth every day. Yes, I really enjoyed it. And then our first sounds nice.   [00:45:03.010] - Kim Tate You know, first full day there, I had arranged for us to charter a private sailing on a sailboat. It was something that we had done. When we were in Italy one time and it was like one of my best travel days ever, so like, I really want to do this and we just didn't want to do like we wanted. I felt like we're in the islands, like, how do you not get out on the water and see it from the water?   [00:45:25.360] - Kim Tate And like that felt like part of the experience. But I didn't want to do like a big group thing. Like, it just wasn't comfortable with that.   [00:45:31.900] - Tamara Gruber So, yes, I had booked it through Naxos Sailing and the guy, the Captain George was like he was such a character, so funny.   [00:45:40.960] - Tamara Gruber So I don't know, like, sarcastic, like just he was great. But he also like, you know, he really took care of us and he had like another guy that was kind of like apprenticing for him, helping out too. But we went out for the whole day and we went first to it. So basically, like from Naxos, you can see the island of Paros. So we went over to Paros and then there's some small, like a smaller island off of Paros called Antiparos And so there was an area there where we were snorkeling or is like definitely popular. You could see like a number of boats coming out to do snorkeling there. There are a couple like yachts sitting there. It was a little bit rough. It reminded me a little bit of when you and I were in Key Largo and we went, oh, yeah, yeah. So not as seasick, but like, remember when we got in there and we're like, really bobbing around like the water bobbing like this.   [00:46:37.390] Like I went in and I'm going to I'm you know, I'm just not comfortable in the water. It's, I've never like the water, I don't enjoy swimming. I don't like going under the water. Snorkeling is fine because I can stay on top. But then when you're like bobbing around and then like a wave is coming and like water went down my snorkel. So then I'm like coughing and they're like, just blow it out. And I'm like, no, I'm done.   [00:46:55.000] - Tamara Gruber I'm out of here. So, Glenn, you know, he did a little bit more and I just, like, hung out in the boat. But, you know, the water is beautiful, is great.   [00:47:02.680] - Tamara Gruber Then we went over on Paros.   [00:47:04.930] - Tamara Gruber There's like a sea cave that you can snorkel into, but the top of the cave has a big hole in it. So you had, like, the stream of light, like coming into this cave. So it's like a really neat experience. So we pulled up to there. But because it's like a fairly big sailboat, he couldn't get super close.   [00:47:20.200] - Tamara Gruber So you'd have to, like, swim over and he gives you like a noodle and stuff, you know, because, like, I'm not a super strong swimmer, but I, I was like climbing down to get into the water and I just looked at it and I'm like, no, I'm not doing it. I'm sorry. Like, I'm just not I don't because I, I remember when we were in Italy, we I swam through this like grotto and like on the other side I had Hannah and stupidly, we didn't have like life jackets or noodles with us.   [00:47:45.010] - Tamara Gruber And we were both getting tired. And I pulled her up on to some rocks and some guy had to like, help me get her back to the boat. So I'm like, no, I just don't think I can swim that far. Like, I don't think I'm that, you know, I'm comfortable. So Glenn went with, like, the other guy on the boat and I just hung out on the boat and he loved it. He thought it was great, but it just wasn't something like like, again, I'm just not a very good swimmer.   [00:48:06.370] - Tamara Gruber So then from there went to like a small fishing village on Paros and we could stay in, like, hang out and have lunch there and go to a beach there. We're going to be there for like three hours. So it gives you time to like explore Paros. That's the reason I booked this particular tour, because I felt like, oh, this gives us a way to, like, see another island without having to, like, worry about the ferry schedule.   [00:48:29.860] - Tamara Gruber So we decided to go and take a cab to the main town and I always mispronounce this one too. But it's like Naoussa. We had to wait a really long time for a cab. So again, like if we had arranged it ahead of time, it would have worked much better because by the time we finally got there, we only had like a little over an hour and we needed to eat some lunch too.   [00:48:59.380] - Tamara Gruber Like I would have I would have had lunch while I was waiting if I had known it was going to take that long. And they're like, oh, it's going to be ten minutes and it was going to be half an hour. And then suddenly, like an hour later, we're still like waiting for the cab. But that town was gorgeous.   [00:49:12.490] - Tamara Gruber It was so charming. I know again, Eric has posted some pictures from there in the past, but it was I fell in love with that town and I'm like, we have to come back and we have to stay on Pario so that we can explore more of this town.   [00:49:24.430] - Tamara Gruber It just felt like there were just so many shops. There's so many, like in the old town, like so many little alleyways and restaurants and things to explore. Just looks so cute. But we had kind of a quick lunch quick, a little walk through, and then we had to take the cab back.   [00:49:37.990] - Tamara Gruber And then from there we sailed back to Naxos and I just kind of like chilled out. And it was it was a great day.   [00:49:46.420] - Tamara Gruber So, you know, again, a really fun thing to do, whether you do it private or they do, you know, small groups, you know, and he has a bunch of different tours he does on sunset catamarans. So actually, he gives you a DVD with the photos because he has like an underwater camera. So he takes photos all throughout the trip. Then he gives you a DVD.   [00:50:04.990] - Tamara Gruber So the next day when we were in town, we stopped by the boat to get the DVD and he was like, oh, someone like already reached out to me that said that, you know, they heard. About it from you, and they booked a trip with us. I'm like, oh, that's amazing. You know, so because I don't think he I mean, we paid for everything on this trip like nothing was sponsored or comped. So I didn't even always even mention that to people.   [00:50:25.670] - Tamara Gruber So I don't even know if I don't think he's very savvy when it comes to Instagram. I don't think he knew that I tagged, you know.   [00:50:32.000] - Tamara Gruber Oh, yeah. He was probably just like, wow, this is great, you know? Yeah. So that was a great day. I'm sorry. I'm just like going on.   [00:50:41.600]

Infamous America
LUFTHANSA HEIST Ep. 1 | “The Robert's Lounge Gang”

Infamous America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 31:19


Henry Hill becomes a New York mob associate at a young age. By the 1960s, he's part of the Robert's Lounge Gang, a crew run by the notorious Jimmy Burke. The five major crime families in New York make money from illegal operations at JFK Airport. In 1967, the Robert's Lounge Gang works with a cargo employee to rob Air France at the airport and it nets a big payday. But the heist pales in comparison to the next one on the horizon... Join Black Barrel+ for early access and bingeable seasons: blackbarrel.supportingcast.fm/join For more details, please visit www.blackbarrelmedia.com. Our social media pages are: @blackbarrelmedia on Facebook and Instagram, and @bbarrelmedia on Twitter. This show is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please visit AirwaveMedia.com to check out other great podcasts like Ben Franklin's World, Once Upon A Crime, and many more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Two Broads From Brooklyn

The broads would like you to know that they are hoes for JFK Airport and Jet Blue. This is not sponsored content it's just a fact. Anna chats about the two most authentic Brooklyn women she's ever seen in a nail salon and how sometimes things happen for us and not to us. Cola circles back to the great debate about New Yorkers being kind but not nice, and we find out a little bit about Chaotic Good and Chaotic Neutrals. 

Raider-Cop Nation
Tony Ducks #223

Raider-Cop Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 50:08


Host: Alpha Mike Intro: Host Alpha Mike welcomes the Nation to episode #223. How to contact us RaiderCop.Com and RaiderCopNation.com. Join us on, our social media accounts, MEWE, Winkin, Clouthub, Gab, Facebook, Instagram, Rumble and Parler. You can find us @RaiderCop @RaiderCopNation or @RaiderCopPodcast.  Also you can hear Raider-Cop  Podcast wherever you get your podcast, just look us up. Alpha reminds the Nation about joining the USCCA, pennies on the dollar when you need it.  You can text, Raider to 87222 to become a member today. Want to upgrade your old gun, well I got the guy for you. Pistol Pete The Gunsmith(8277 NW 64th Street Miami, Florida 33166/ p 786-294-0756), see below for details. Need gun training in th Jersey / Philly area contact Kilo Sierra www.sepulveda.com and you can contact me Alpha Mike (raidercopnation@gmail.com) if you are in Florida for gun training. Alpha on the Living In The Bolshevik States of Woke.. 1. Uncle Joe visits the sight of the Tulsa massacre on the 100th anniversary, never letting a tragedy go to waste. Race hustling 101. 2. Biden taps Harris to lead White House fight on expanding voting rights 3. Pelosi rules out having Biden create Jan 6, commission Joke of the week: 1. How do dog catchers get paid? A. By the pound! 2. Two dog owners are arguing about whose pet is smarter. “My dog is so smart,” says the first owner, “that every morning he goes to the store and buys me a sesame seed bagel with chive cream cheese, stops off at Starbucks and picks me up a mocha latte, and then comes home and turns on ESPN, all before I get out of bed.” “I know,” says the second owner. “How do you know?” the first demands. “My dog told me.”  Word of the week: For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved. John 3:17 Main Topic: Tony Ducks Anthony Corallo, Born NYC Feb 12, 1913 East Harlem in the 1920's Tony Ducks would join the 107th street gang First arrest 1929 grand larceny 1935 Tony Ducks would join the Gagliano Family, after being recruited by Thomas Lucchese Thomas Lucchese would place you Tony Ducks with Capo Johnny Dio to learn the rackets Labor Rackets and Garment District Tony Ducks training ground 1943 at the age of 30 Tony Ducks would become a Capo in the Gagliano Family and move to Queens Tony Ducks would control 5 chapters of teamsters and 1 AFL-CIO chapter 1961 Tony Ducks would be charged with bribing a Judge, he would win his case but lose the bribery case sentence to 3 years Tony Ducks understood power, and created "The Private Sanitation Association" garbage Tony Ducks would control JFK Airport and it's unions Tony Ducks would encourage the expansion of the Lucchese New Jersey branch Up Next: June 6, 2021: The Season Of Opportunity (A-Wall) #224 Instagram @milo_raider_cop  & @raidercoppodcast Co-host of Raider-Cop Tube coming in 2021 Spotify   Stitcher  PodBean Join the Raider-Cop Nation Pistol Pete the Gunsmith                        Kilo Sierra's Firearms Training or Investigation: Sepulveda inc MeWe, WimKin, Rumble.ApplePodcast GooglePodcast Pandora Frank the voice of free speech Parler: @RaiderCop  CloutHub: @RaiderCopWimkin: @Martinino and Raider Cop PodcastMeWe: Raider-Cop Podcast & Alpha MikeGab: @RaiderCopPodcastFacebook @RaiderCopNationGun Owners Of America GOA joinUnited States Concealed Carry Association USCCA JOIN#JailsLASD #CACorrections #MDCR #NYPD #LAPD #LASD #MDPD #MPD #NYSP #NJSP #LVPD #Security #HCSO #PBSO #BSO #OCSO #PCSO #SFPD #DPD #HPD #SAPD #LCSO #FMPD #CCSO #NYC #NYCDOC #NJDOC #PPD #SLPD #CPD #TestEverything @RaiderCopNation #RaiderCopNation #TrainUp #o9TG #WiseGuySeries #TrainUpSeries #RollCallSeries #ThinkOuttaDaBox #SideBarSeries #TheWord #Buccaneer #RaiderCopPodcast #BeLikeJack #Corrections #RaiderCop #EmpanadaLadiesOfGeorgiaYoutube Free Music: Triumph by Yung Logos, Rodeo Show by The Green Orbs, Minor Blues for Booker E's Jammy Jams, Happy Birthday Mambo, by E's Jammy James. The Awakening Patrick jazz Space, The Current Blues, Blue Infusion, Front Porch Blues, Crazy Blues, Midnight Special, Super Blues, Bright Eyed Blues, Bleeker Street Blues, Olde Salooner Blues, Miles Beyond, D.J. Freedem, Causmic, Verified Picasso, Coyote Hearing, Diamond Ortiz, Nico Staf Brooklyn & The Bridge, 2 Hearts Patrick Patikios, A Ghost Town Quinoas Moreira, Tacklebox Blues Mini Vandals. Road Tripzzz of shane 1 & Like That Anno Domini Beats,.PatrikiosMusic: I'm Back by Eye of the beholder.

Hold For Everything
Episode 10: The One Where Ellen is Cancelled

Hold For Everything

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 63:14


On the third Zoom episode in a row, Jake explains to Jess and Eric why friends is a god awful show. The gang recaps on the weeks episode of Mare of Easttown, as well as Ellen leaving Ellen.

Daily News Cast
NEW YORK: Abidemi Rufai, SSA to Ogun State Governor, Arrested For Fraud In The US

Daily News Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 4:48


A Nigerian national, Abidemi Rufai has been caught by the operatives of the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) in New York on the allegations of wire fraud in the United States.According to a report on the US Department of Justice website, Rufai was arrested Friday evening at JFK Airport in New York on a criminal complaint charging him with wire fraud for his scheme to steal over $350,000 in unemployment benefits from the Washington State Employment Security Department.Mr. Rufai is popularly known as Sandy Tang, 42, is a Senior Special Adviser to the Ogun State Governor, Dapo Abiodun, and the reports said that he made his first appearance Saturday, May 15, 2021 in New York. “Since the first fraud reports to our office in April 2020, we have worked diligently with a federal law enforcement team to track down the criminals who stole funds designated for pandemic relief,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Gorman. “This is the first, but will not be the last, significant arrest in our ongoing investigation of ESD fraud.”​The criminal complaint alleges that Rufai used the stolen identities of more than 100 Washington residents to file fraudulent claims with ESD for pandemic-related unemployment benefits. Rufai also filed fraudulent unemployment claims with Hawaii, Wyoming, Massachusetts, Montana, New York, and Pennsylvania. Rufai used variations of a single e-mail address in a manner intended to evade automatic detection by fraud systems. By using this practice, Rufai made it appear that each claim was connected with a different email account.Rufai caused the fraud proceeds to be paid out to online payment accounts such as ‘Green Dot' accounts, or wired to bank accounts controlled by “money mules.” Some of the proceeds were then mailed to the Jamaica, New York address of Rufai's relative. Law enforcement determined more than $288,000 was deposited into an American bank account controlled by Rufai between March and August 2020.“Greed is a powerful motivator. Unfortunately, the greed alleged to this defendant affects all taxpayers,” said Donald Voiret, Special Agent in Charge FBI Seattle. “The FBI and our partners will not stand idly by while individuals attempt to defraud programs meant to assist American workers and families suffering the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic.”Wire fraud is punishable by up to thirty years in prison when it relates to benefits paid in connection with a presidentially-declared disaster or emergency, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.The charges contained in the complaint are only allegations. A person is presumed innocent unless and until he or she is proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.This case was investigated by the FBI, with assistance from the Department of Labor Office of Inspector General (DOL-OIG). The fraud on ESD is being investigated cooperatively by the FBI, DOL-OIG, Social Security Office of Inspector General, U.S. Secret Service, the United States Postal Inspection Service, and the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigations. The Washington Employment Security Department is cooperating in the investigation.The cases are being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Seth Wilkinson, Cindy Chang, and Benjamin Diggs of the Western District of Washington, and Trial Attorney Jane Lee of DOJ's Cyber Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS).”

Two Broke Watch Snobs
Ep. #214: Late To The Party with Henry Margenau

Two Broke Watch Snobs

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 81:01


Henry Margenau TBWS contributor extraordinaire joins Kaz this week to discuss what parts of life (horologically and otherwise) they've just been late to the party on. From being the last person in the watchfam to appreciate G-Shocks to the only person over 15 in the JFK Airport who'd never read The Catcher in the Rye, this week's episode is safe space for anyone else who is late to the party.

Hold For Everything
Episode 9: James Franco Joins the Woody Allen Club

Hold For Everything

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 63:48


Jacob, Jess, and Eric have less problems with doing the podcast over Zoom this time. This episode, the gang talks about life on set, Mare of Easttown, and the potential Black Superman.

The Travelers Blueprint
TTB 136: April Travel Bites

The Travelers Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 23:27


In this episode we discuss some of the recent travel related news we found interesting or relevant over the month of April. We break down our favorite different news articles, including:  https://www.foxnews.com/politics/biden-admin-covid-vaccine-passports-not-required (Biden administration will not require COVID-19 vaccine passports, White House says) https://www.travelandleisure.com/travel-news/covid-vaccine-passport-apps (A Guide to Vaccine Passport Apps for American Travelers) https://thepointsguy.com/news/do-not-travel-advisory/ (Most of the world’s countries added to State Department’s ‘do not travel’ advisor) https://www.cbsnews.com/news/serial-stowaway-marilyn-hartman-arrested-at-chicagos-ohare-international-airport/#app (Serial stowaway Marilyn Hartman arrested yet again, at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport) https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/local-media-release/cbp-discovers-finches-concealed-inside-hair-rollers-guyana-man-s (CBP Discovers Finches concealed inside Hair Rollers in Guyana Man’s Baggage at JFK Airport) https://www.ladbible.com/news/news-man-arrested-in-dubai-after-traces-of-marijuana-found-in-urine-20210410 (Man Faces Three Years In Jail In Dubai For Consuming Marijuana Before Entering The Country) https://www.cbsnews.com/news/mars-perseverance-rover-oxygen-nasa/?ftag=CNM-00-10aac3a (NASA's Perseverance rover just made breathable air on Mars) https://matadornetwork.com/read/cicadas-emerging-scientists-asking-go-cicada-safaris/ (17-year cicadas are emerging, and scientists are asking you to go on cicada safaris) https://www.lonelyplanet.com/articles/us-national-parks-reservations (These US national parks require reservations this summer) https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/airline-news/2021/04/22/covid-travel-summer-vacation-cheap-flights-gone-airline-ticket-prices/7333087002/ (Beware pricey summer flights: Airlines pushing fares higher as travel rebounds) Up This Month:  Mack Woodruff of Disney’s Rouge Trip show on National Geographic Mark of Wolters World Youtube Page  Pete Buthene the star of Whale Wars The Travelers Blueprint is more than just a podcast with consulting services that allow you to Become Your Own Travel Agent! Take a moment to rate us! Screenshot your review, email us the screenshot with your name and address and we will send you a FREE travel sticker! TheTravelersBlueprint@gmail.com FREE Travel Cheat Sheet! Just sign up for all the latest TTB news and guest information at http://www.thetravelersblueprint@gmail.com (www.thetravelersblueprint.com) For Travel Consulting Services w/ Bob: https://thetravelersblueprint.com/travel-consulting (https://thetravelersblueprint.com/travel-consulting) Our Private Community on Facebook is a great way to have your travel questions be heard and speak directly to us. Join here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/260677938112800 (The Travelers Blueprint Community) For less than a cup of coffee you can be a major supporter of our time and efforts in producing this podcast. Please consider becoming a Patron by signing up here: https://www.patreon.com/join/thetravelersblueprint (https://www.patreon.com/join/thetravelersblueprint) Follow Us on Social Media: https://www.instagram.com/the_travelers_blueprint/ (Instagram) - https://www.facebook.com/TheTravelersBlueprint18/ (Facebook) - https://twitter.com/ttblueprint?lang=en (Twitter) - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyB8gPEriEPYP92Q1DHHkbg (YouTube) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

Well... That’s Interesting
In-Betweeni 034: Rhino Poacher Trampled by Elephants + Why 40 Finches Were Smuggled in Hair Rollers

Well... That’s Interesting

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 31:34


From South Africa to JFK Airport, two tales of the illegal animal trade. Thankfully one of them includes a really nice guy named Ray. --- But wait... there's more! IG: @wellthatsinterestingpod Twitter: @wti_pod You're interesting. Email us YOUR facts, stories, experiences... Nothing is too big or too small. We'll read it on the show: wellthatsinterestingpod@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wellthatsinteresting/support

My Minute of News with Jeff Caplan
Bird Smuggling for Singing Competitions

My Minute of News with Jeff Caplan

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 1:52


A bizarre story I saw on KSLNewsradio.com yesterday. A man was arrested by customs at JFK Airport in New York for smuggling.  Tucked inside his jacket… and taped around his legs… not drugs.  No.  Hair curlers.  And inside each curler… was a small bird… stuffed into the roller… with the open ends capped by mesh netting. Why would a guy smuggle 35 little finches into America.  And the answer is… for the singing competitions of course. In New York… this is a man known as the Bird King of Queens.   Ray Harinarain is an immigrant from Guyana in South America…. where bird singing competitions are a form of entertainment.  And he’s brought it here.    Competitors bring their caged birds to a park … for head-to-head sing-offs.   Each cages is placed on a pole… and the rest is like Avian Idol.   Now if you think there’s cruelty involved.  No… no… Owners coddle these birds with protein diets and selective breeding because in a Sunday competition… the bird that makes the most birdcalls in the course of an hour can win  $10,000. No wonder there’s a housefinch smuggling ring.  36 year old Kevin MacKenzie says he was paid $3000 to smuggle the finches into America.   He’s been released by customs  on $25,000 bond.  The smuggler… is now free as a bird.   When Kevin MacKenzie goes to court… he better hope those finches… don’t sing like canaries. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hold For Everything
Episode 7: Off The Rails With Kate Winslet

Hold For Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 59:11


Jess, Eric, and Jake don't manage to make a focused episode. The Dog is upset with us, we're upset with ourselves, Kate Winslet looks different than she did 30 years ago, and Jake bought Eric coffee. Tune in for this week's trainwreck of the Hold For Everything Podcast

Hold For Everything
Episode 6: Alfred Molina Can Get It

Hold For Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 60:40


Eric, Jess, and Jake talk about the excitement surrounding Alfred Molina's return to the Spiderman films and how JFK is across the Bay on this weeks episode. Nothing went wrong, surprisingly enough.

This Date in Weather History
1996: Spring storm dumps snow on US East coast

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2021 2:43


The winter of 1995-1996 in the Northern part of the United State just didn’t seem to want to end. Cold air lingered on well past the start of Spring. April was cold in that region of the country, especially New England and the first half of the month seemed more like winter than Spring. At the start of the second week of April temperatures were below freezing most nights and even during the daytime, readings had a tough time reaching 40. Meanwhile a strong storm was organizing off the coast of South Carolina and started to make its way up the coast, but a bit offshore, but close enough to first push snow only the southern New Jersey coast dumping almost 5” of the white stuff on Atlantic City, an April record. The storm took a turn a bit to the northwest and pushed snow into New York City, JFK Airport had 4” on snow. But the heaviest snowfall was reserved for New England. By the time the snow stopped flying on the evening of April 10, 1996 Boston had 6”, Worcester, Ma 16” and Storrs, Conn 17”. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

No Good Answers
S3 Ep7 - Are martial arts an art?

No Good Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2021 92:00


In this episode, Vincent Tang joins us to give us an insight into the finer points of turning a conscious person unconscious.  Ken starts us off with some microphone jiu-jitsu, Hope tells two tales of getting a ball to the face, Matt waxes poetic on a tennis rally, Gogi updates all the jet-setting hedonists on Nepal's illegal substance policy, I get enthusiastically accosted by a bomb-sniffing dog at JFK Airport.

This Date in Weather History
1966: Christmas Eve coastal storm strikes East coast

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2020 2:37


A coastal storm developed in Gulf States and moved up East Coast on December 24, 1966. A widespread white Christmas resulted for many. Thunder and vivid lightning were reported along with heavy rain and snow from Baltimore north to Rhode Island. JFK Airport closed for 24 hours because of drifting snow. Nantucket Sound saw seas up to 40' - boat trips were cancelled and people were unable to get to Martha’s Vineyard or Nantucket for the Christmas Holiday. Philadelphia had more than a foot of snow. Baltimore more than 8 and Atlantic City more than 6", Washington DC had 6.5" the most ever on Christmas Eve. Highpoint State Park, NYC 19", Central Park, NY 7.1", Pittsfield, MA 17" - all time snow record, 24 hours. In Boston, MA, 67 mph winds blew down Christmas decorations. Storm was of great benefit to holiday skiers; up to 20" of snow in VT and NH mountains. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bowery Boys: New York City History
The Beatles Invade New York!

The Bowery Boys: New York City History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2020 67:30


PODCAST: EPISODE 346 How Beatlemania both energized and paralyzed New York City in the mid 1960s as told by the women who screamed their hearts out and helped build a phenomenon. Before BTS, before One Direction, before the Backstreet Boys and NSYNC, before Menudo and the Jackson 5 -- you had Paul, John, George and Ringo. The Beatles were already an international phenomenon by February 9, 1964. when they first arrived at JFK Airport. During their visits to the city between 1964 and 1966, the Fab Four were seen by thousands of screaming fans and millions of television audiences in some of New York’s greatest landmarks. And each time they came through here, the city — and America itself — was a little bit different.  In this show, we present a little re-introduction to the Beatles and how New York City became a key component in the Beatlemania phenomenon, a part of their mythology — from the classic concert venues (Shea Stadium, Carnegie Hall) to the luxury hotels (The Plaza, The Warwick). We’ll also be focusing on the post-Beatles career of John Lennon who truly fell in love with New York City in the 1970s. And we'll visit that tragic moment in American history which united the world 40 years ago — on December 8, 1980 But we are not telling this story alone. Helping us tell this story are recollections from listeners, the women who were once the young fans of the Beatles here in New York, the women who helped built Beatlemania. boweryboyshistory.com   Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Exclusive interview with the woman pushed onto the train tracks in Union Square yesterday, Mayor de Blasio says he expects NYC to become an "orange zone" by the first week of December, and two people are killed in a shooting near JFK Airport

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2020 7:34


All Local Midday 11/20/2020. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast
APG 447 – Helicopters and Hooters

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2020 181:02


Our crew today: Hosts Dr. Steph, Miami Rick, Captains Nick and Jeff, Producer/Director Liz. Join us for the latest in aviation news, your feedback, and this week's Plane Tale: "Orford Ness." Photo Credit: Nick Anderson [00:06:28] NEWS [00:06:47] Avianca A320-200 Refuses to Land [00:19:24] Too Many Passengers at Front of Plane Caused Take-Off Issue [00:33:18] Air Force Settles $25 Million Lawsuit for F-16 Strafing Run That Killed Contractor [00:36:15] A321 Brushed Past Glider During Descent into Class E Airspace [00:41:31] ‘One In a Million Shot:’ Owl Lands Inside Helicopter Battling Creek Fire [00:44:14] Frog Strike [00:44:57] Hungry 747SP [00:47:26] GETTING TO KNOW US [01:30:50] COFFEE FUND [01:32:44] FEEDBACK [01:33:04] Ivor - Delete as Appropriate [01:35:07] Bruce - "Ask Capt. Jerry" [01:39:42] Dana Training #3 [01:52:21] Kent - LPV Approaches [02:05:52] PLANE TALES - Orford Ness [02:30:03] Larry - Reminder - Sadly for Steph We Probably Missed This! [02:31:06] Erich - Busy Hurricane season October 2020 [02:33:12] George - Critical Engine [02:36:50] Graham Fig - Capt on G4 [02:41:17] Deanna - TWA Hotel at JFK Airport [02:44:23] Nick - A321 Weight and Balance [02:50:18] Larry and Andrew - D. B. Cooper [02:51:31] Sean - POH Doesn't Say You Can't Do This VIDEO Don't see the video? Click this to watch it on YouTube! Looking for the older episodes? You can find them by going here: All APG Episodes Feed ABOUT RADIO ROGER “Radio Roger” Stern has been a TV and Radio reporter since he was a teenager. He’s won an Emmy award for his coverage in the New York City Market. Currently you can hear his reporting in New York on radio station 1010 WINS, the number one all-news station in the nation. Nationally you can hear him anchor newscasts on the Fox News Radio Network and on Fox’s Headlines 24-7 service on Sirius XM Radio. In addition Roger is a proud member of and contributor to the APG community. Audible.com Trial Membership Offer - Get your free audio book today! Give us your review in iTunes! I'm "airlinepilotguy" on Facebook, and "airlinepilotguy" on Twitter. feedback@airlinepilotguy.com airlinepilotguy.com "Appify" the Airline Pilot Guy website (http://airlinepilotguy.com) on your phone or tablet! ATC audio from http://LiveATC.net Intro/outro Music, Coffee Fund theme music by Geoff Smith thegeoffsmith.com Dr. Steph's intro music by Nevil Bounds Capt Nick's intro music by Kevin from Norway (aka Kevski) Doh De Oh by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100255 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Copyright © AirlinePilotGuy 2020, All Rights Reserved Airline Pilot Guy Show by Jeff Nielsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

SHR Soundbites
MCR Development buys StayNTouch

SHR Soundbites

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2020 6:43


MCR Development LLC buys StayNTouch. Jacob Messina, VP of Digital Operations for MCR, joins me from New York City to break it down for us. Key takeaways: -MCR is a hotel management company with 96 hotels across 29 states (U.S.), mostly branded, some independents, including the very cool TWA Hotel (1962 TWA Flight Center at JFK Airport)--a must-see, Google it. - MCR or TWA Hotel rather, started as an impressed customer of the StayNTouch PMS. - Will keep as separate company. - Looking to invest $10MM in first year.

Uncanny Curs
Episode 3: My Brother, My Enemy or How the X-Men Destroyed JFK Airport

Uncanny Curs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2020 119:13


In today's episode, we talk about issue #97. We meet Alex and Lorna again and they are immediately taken over by a mysterious being. Then Xavier goes on vacation and can't be bothered to help his students anymore. Send us an email at uncannycurspodcast@gmail.com. And consider supporting up on Patreon at patreon.com/uncannycurs. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Art Insiders New York Podcast hosted by Anders Holst
TWA FLIGHT CENTER/HOTEL - Interview with Richard Southwick

Art Insiders New York Podcast hosted by Anders Holst

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 49:53


Richard Southwick, Partner at the international architecture firm Beyer Blinder Belle, tells the fascinating story behind the preservation, restoration and reinvention of Eero Saarinen’s architectural masterpiece, the TWA Flight Center at J F Kennedy International Airport, now called the TWA Hotel. Saarinen described the head house form as being like the “Leonardo da Vinci flying machine", according to his associate Kevin Roche.  Hailed as the “Grand Central of the Jet Age,” the TWA Flight Center welcomed hundreds of thousands of travelers to JFK Airport from 1962 through 2001. Since then tens of thousands of people have been touring the building. We talk about the beautiful design of the building, the genius of Eero Saarinen and Richard’s favorite role models as well as his top three projects over his successful career.

CultureNOW | A Celebration of Culture & Community
Restoring Eero Saarinen's Iconic TWA Flight Center | Donald Fram

CultureNOW | A Celebration of Culture & Community

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 3:45


Donald Fram, Chief Architect of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, discusses the historic renovation of Eero Saarinen's TWA Terminal at New York City's JFK Airport.

CultureNOW | A Celebration of Culture & Community

Renowned artist Alice Aycock describes the inspiration for her piece, the Star Sifter, which was commissioned to act as a barrier between JFK Airport security lines and the open atrium above. Airport security had been positioned underneath the atrium, making it possible to for contraband items to be smuggled past security. Star Sifter is conceptualized as a giant net and cone to catch falling items from making their way past security.

This Perfect Day
TWA Flight 800

This Perfect Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2020 44:31


On July 17, 1996, TWA Flight 800, a 747 departing from JFK Airport in New York, bound for Paris, exploded in midair just east of Long Island, killing all 230 passengers and crew on board. Shortly afterwards, witness reports started to emerge about a streak of light, possibly a flare, a firework, or perhaps even a missile, was seen streaking through the sky and impacting the aircraft causing a massive fireball. Was it a terrorist attack? A Navy accident? The NTSB and FBI have said no. But that's definitely not the end of this story. Join Brett and Phil as they discuss much more than just the technical details of the tragedy of TWA Flight 800. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tpdcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tpdcast/support

Protest and Survive
Protest & Survive Season 2 Trailer

Protest and Survive

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 2:00


It’s been over a year and ten episodes of Protest & Survive. In season one, we recounted fighting Proud Boys, learned what it takes to repeal a century-old racist law, saw the response to the Muslim Ban at JFK Airport, heard about the awful people effects of the drug war in the Philippines, reminisced on an Arabic-language punk band’s tour of Southeast Asia, and I got a tattoo. In Season 2, we’re going to keep talking to a lot of dedicated people that you’re probably not going to hear interviewed in too many other places. To all our listeners new and old, thanks for joining us so far, and stay tuned. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/protest-and-survive/support

This Date in Weather History
1996: Spring snowstorm dumps snow along East coast

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2020 2:59


1996: The winter of 1995-1996 in the Northern part of the United State just didn’t seem to want to end. Cold air lingered on well past the start of Spring. April was cold in that region of the country, especially New England and the first half of the month seemed more like winter than Spring. At the start of the second week of April temperatures were below freezing most night and even during the daytime readings had a tough time reaching 40. Meanwhile a strong storm was organizing off the coast of South Carolina and started to make its way off the coast, but close enough to fist push snow only the southern New Jersey coast dumping almost 5” of the white stuff on Atlantic City, an April record. The storm took a turn a bit to the northwest and pushed snow into New York City, JFK Airport had 4” on snow. But the heaviest snowfall was reserved for New England. By the time the snow stopped flying on the evening of April 10, 1996 Boston had 6”, Worcester, Ma 16” and Storrs, Conn 17”.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Generation Slay
Journalist Malick Mercier on The Next Generation of Storytelling and News

Generation Slay

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2020 34:24


Malick Mercier is a student journalist that loves crying, laughing, and chai lattes.  He is sophomore Journalism major at Ithaca College and the host of this news on IGTV where he reports on the passions and pains of Gen Z on they platform we love. Over the summer, Malick was an intern/producer at ABC’s new digital brand, Localish where he shot, edited, produced, and reported a segment on the JFK Airport’s first hotel, the TWA Hotel.  Malick is most known for hosting Instagram’s coverage of the March for Our Lives in Washington, D.C. on the official @Instagram account for 230+ million viewers. Additionally, Malick has worked with Teen Vogue, Seventeen Magazine, Mic.com, DoSomething.org, and JetBlue.You can follow him online @classymalick on Instagram and Twitter.For more Generation Slay, check us out @generationslay on Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook.Follow Emma across the internet! @emmahavi on Instagram and Twitter and on her website, www.emmahavi.comWow, you’re still reading this? Cool, drop a review so more people can hear the pod & we’ll see ya next Friday.

BryghtCast Weekly
BryghtCast Weekly - Episode #5: The Week of January 20th, 2020

BryghtCast Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2020 15:13


  In this week's edition fo the BryghtCast Weekly Podcast, Consultant Bray Wheeler is solo discussing three recent events and their potential impact on private sector organizations. Topics Discussed South China Morning Post:  China coronavirus outbreak could be 10 times worse than SARS, expert says South China Morning Post: Another city joins Wuhan in quarantine lockdown as Beijing tries to contain deadly outbreak BBC:  Davos / World Economic Forum Hub US Department of Homeland Security:  Iran Bulletin US Department of Homeland Security: National Terrorism Advisory System //static.leadpages.net/leadboxes/current/embed.js Episode Transcript Hello. Welcome to this week's episode of BryghtCast Weekly. Today is Tuesday, January 21st, 2020. My name is Bray Wheeler, consultant with Bryghtpath. In this week's episode, we're going to talk about the World Economic Forum, a recent bulletin by the National Terrorism Advisory System, and we're going to begin this week actually talking about the Wuhan coronavirus. So, the United States Centers for Disease Control has announced that the first case of the Wuhan coronavirus has been diagnosed in Washington State, here on Tuesday. The virus appeared last month in the Wuhan province of China and has already made hundreds sick. It's killed about six people already in Asia, according to current counts. The U.S. has become the fourth country outside of China with a confirmed case of the virus. The other countries include Japan, South Korea, and Thailand. While the virus can be spread from person to person, health professionals are indicating that it's not as easily spread, they think, as influenza or measles, for example. But there's not a lot of information kind of about this new virus, in terms of really what makes it tick, where it's kind of... They have a general idea of where it's coming from, but they don't have a lot of the details that they need, in order to effectively kind of combat the virus, as it stands right now. So, the World Health Organization is set to meet tomorrow, to decide whether to declare an international public health emergency. But more than likely, here in the U.S., the CDC has announced that in addition to previously announced passenger screenings... Which they announced on January 17th, I believe, at JFK Airport in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco International Airports... the CDC is also going to start screening passengers flying into Hartsfield Jackson Airport in Atlanta, as well as O'Hare Airport in Chicago. Now, these screenings will only be for passengers that are flying directly or indirectly through Wuhan at the moment. Now certainly, if this kind of virus continues to spread, or things change, it will likely change the way in which they're screening at some of these things, and we could very well see an expansion to different airports. So, what can organizations do right now? Kind of with this new virus, people are already mentioning references to the SARS outbreak, or H1N1, or things like that. But really, kind of for medical facilities especially, a lot of them are beginning to change some of their intakes prompts, to make sure that they're asking anyone with a fever or respiratory symptoms if they've been to or been in contact with anybody who has been in China. We certainly would recommend this to any of our hormonal contraceptive clients or listeners here, to consider implementing those types of steps now. Certainly these facilities and U.S. organizations, as healthcare companies and facilities, definitely are kind of best positioned to respond to some of these and have plans and processes in place around epidemics, or outbreaks of different viruses and things like that. We're certainly in cold and flu season, so a lot of facilities are on alert for those. We've had measles here in the last couple of years, being kind of a real thing, in terms of needing to make sure that those things are contained. So, nothing new, but certainly something that you want to start asking those questions if you're a healthcare, medical company. For other organizations, it's definitely important now to kind of determine your level of travel exposure within Wuhan province in China, as well as other Asian countries, including kind of just China at large. But really, you're going to want to start connecting with your travel agencies or travel security and health vendors, to discuss resources, review processes for offering medical assistance, and just to ensure employees, when they return or if they're currently in or will be going to China or Asia, are aware of the virus, are aware of what medical resources you as an organization have in place for them. Where they should be going, who they should be contacted to make sure they're reporting any concerns about their travel safety or health, or issues that they're having, to your travel safety or security teams, your global operation centers, or just to their managers and leaders. That's kind of the most basic kind of reporting structure. From a broader standpoint, within the organization, it's good... This is kind of a good reminder, at this point, or a good prompt to review your business continuity workforce plans, your pandemic planning. Any related plans or processes, in terms of how you would manage through an incident around an issue like this. It's just a good time to start, kind of... If you haven't dusted them off in a while, it's a good time to dust them off. If you're kind of regularly engaged with them, making sure that you're accounting for any of the new kind of nuances or new information resources that you might be tracking, that are being made available through the CDC or other agencies around this virus. Now, certainly this virus here is... You know. There's not a lot of information there. It's not quite to the level of global concern that SARS is at, but it's definitely getting there. You know, the situation is evolving. It's not yet reached those levels. As I mentioned earlier, the international, or the World Health Organization hasn't issued anything yet. They probably will tomorrow. But it will be important to kind of make sure that you're right-sizing the threat of this for folks, too, because there could be a lot of concern as this thing kind of grows, and more people start talking about it. It's definitely made some headlines here today on Tuesday. But it's important that you as an organization are right-sizing this, in terms of kind of the severity and threat, as well as reviewing and discussing what you would do now, rather than when it's having a tangible impact or a real impact on your workforce, on their families, or on your company operations. Shifting gears a little bit, our next topic is the World Economic Forum is occurring this week in Davos, Switzerland. It's the forum's 50th anniversary, where countries, business leaders, thought leaders, international organizations of all different kinds and advocacy levels convene to discuss global economic issues. It tends to trail into some other topic categories, but the Forum is really about kind of bringing as many folks together, with some intense conversation around some of the major global issues that are going on right now, particularly economic issues. Prominent topics for this year's forum. Kind of the main one that's being talked about is just climate change. Australia's wildfires, rising sea levels, stronger storms, issues in places like Jakarta and California and I mentioned Australia, and others, as well as kind of the sensation that is internationally the Swedish environmental activist, Greta Thunberg, is set to speak. I believe she's speaking actually today, Tuesday, on the issue of climate change. And so, this issue is really looming large over this year's forum, of the announcements. Kind of Black Rocks Movement, and some other organizations and things like that. A lot of those attend these forums. There's a lot more pressure, and a lot of focus on this just as a real issue, because there are some tangible things that organizations and folks are starting to see, even though other organizations have different points of view. Whether or not you believe it's a real thing that's happening or not, we don't tend to get into the politics of it here, but it is the issue that probably will set to kind of take over the primary conversation there. Other topics that are expected to take some sort of center stage, and most likely will: Rising tensions in the Middle East. Certainly, the recent tensions between the U.S. and Iran, as well as some things that are going on in Yemen and Saudi Arabia and others, will likely have folks talking this week. Income inequality. Rising debt. China's rising economic power, kind of compared to Western economic frameworks and setups, is definitely a big issue. Brexit, of course, will likely be an issue, as that is coming down the road here. And then just kind of the forum itself. Its primary ideology is that of globalism, and really taking a focus that the more open borders, the more free trade, the more partnership that's occurring in the world economically, the less likely there will be conflict or broader issues. But there's definitely, folks are seeing kind of that counterpoint that's happening right now to globalism, is that rise of nationalism, authoritarianism, things like that. And so, that's kind of an undercurrent of a conversation that folks are expecting may be a real topic starter throughout the conference here, or the Forum this week. Finally this week, the Department of Homeland Security has, over the weekend, on Saturday, January 18th, released a National Terrorism Advisory System bulletin. It's kind of their lowest level of advisory. But, regarding the potential for Iran-backed terrorism occurring over the next few months. So, there's been kind of... Certainly, the tensions, as the media has indicated, have kind of started to shift down. However, with Iran's admission of its downing of the Ukrainian flight, as well as some other conversation things happening between Trump's administration and Iran in different speeches... You know, those tensions are still very much there, so what DHS has indicated here publicly is that they don't have any information indicating a specific or credible threat to the homeland. However, there is concern about Iran's ability to potentially carry out cyber attacks, as one of kind of the main offshoots here. We heard a lot about that right at the onset of potential responses. Iran ended up responding immediately with those missile strikes off of the U.S. base, which may or may not have injured U.S. military personnel. Initial indications were there were no injuries. There is some indication now that some service members were injured. Regardless of that fact, that was kind of the initial response, but folks kind of expected that there would be some other things that Iran would do in response to this, cyber-attacks being one. So, not really any new information, other than this going in an official bulletin. However, Iran and its partners and proxies, particularly Hezbollah, have demonstrated their abilities to conduct attacks inside and outside of the United States. Iran has a very global reach. I think we've talked about that before. I think Brian's talked about that a little bit in Managing Uncertainty Podcast. But their ability to kind of, for conventional conflict, is not on par with the U.S. or other world powers. However, their ability to fight proxy wars across the globe... Excuse me... is pretty significant. They are pretty well-positioned to do that. And so, there is a real chance that those things could happen inside or outside of the United States, you know, over the next few months. So, this bulletin is set to expire on March 18th, 2020. However, DHS often kind of updates or extends these bulletins as appropriate. They may cancel it earlier. I doubt it. They tend to let them either just expire organically, or oftentimes these are updated. And I expect that this one probably will, as well. But in terms of what organizations can do, the biggest thing for companies and organizations to do right now is to ensure that your cyber and your physical security teams are aware of this potential threat. I'm sure most are. I'm sure most of you get these types of alerts from DHS. But if you don't already, please, please subscribe to these DHS, NTAS alerts. You can find a link to those in our episode notes. It'll actually take you straight to this bulletin, and within the bulletin, there's a link that you can set up to subscribe to these things. But other opportunities exist for your organization. You know, just in terms of the kind of republishing general preparedness, safety, evacuation reminders. You want to be careful in that messaging, though, to avoid any unnecessary alarm or distraction that may be associated with these reminders, especially if you're talking about this threat or other threats that you may encounter. You just want to make sure that you're setting the table appropriately, and that you're not necessarily referencing it to a specific incident or issue. It's really just kind of a great time to issue some of those general responses, so that it's on top of mind for folks, but you're also not overly alarming folks as they go through about their normal business day. So, that will do it for this week's edition of BryghtCast Weekly. You can find links to the topics that we talked about today in the episode notes, as I've mentioned before. Thank you for joining us, and we'll talk to you next week.

Swinging Through The Sixties: The Beatles and Beyond
Episode #21 – ‘When They Was Fab – The Beatles on TV 1962-1966’

Swinging Through The Sixties: The Beatles and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2019


Charming, funny, provocative, hugely talented and already seasoned stage professionals—The Beatles were perfect for television during an era when sales of television sets were skyrocketing. And TV was also the ideal, all-encompassing promotional tool for the Fab Four. So, it was a symbiotic relationship. At first, they were more than happy to not only perform their songs, but also participate in comedy sketches… until they no longer needed to. This show examines the group’s halcyon TV years—and provides viewer sound recordings of several ultra-rare, ‘long lost’ broadcasts. The TV Appearances: (* = unheard since first broadcast) Morecambe and Wise – 2 Dec. 1963 People and Places – 17 Oct. 1962 * People and Places – 2 Nov. 1962 * People and Places – 17 Dec. 1962 * Pops and Lenny – 16 May 1963 * Juke Box Jury – 29 Jun. 1963 The Mersey Sound ¬– 9 Oct. 1963 Ready Steady Go! – 4 Oct. 1963 Val Parnell’s Sunday Night at the London Palladium – 13 Oct. 1963 Drop In – 3 Nov. 1963 The Royal Variety Performance – 6 Jun. 1963 This Week – 7 Nov. 1963 The Huntley-Brinkley Report – 18 Nov. 1963 Late Scene Extra – 27 Nov. 1963 Juke Box Jury – 7 Dec. 1963 It’s The Beatles – 7 Dec. 1963 JFK Airport press conference – 7 Feb. 1964 CBS Evening News – 7 Feb. 1964 The Ed Sullivan Show – 9 Feb. 1964 What’s Happening! The Beatles in the U.S.A. – Feb. 1964 Big Night Out – 23 Feb. 1964 Around The Beatles – 6 May 1964 Beatles in Nederland – 8 Jun. 1964 Not Only… But Also – 20 Nov. 1964 BBC News – 12 Jun. 1965 The Music of Lennon and McCartney – 16 Dec. 1965 Circus Krone-Bau, München – 24 Jun. 1966 Independent Television News – 8 Jul. 1966 Reporting ’66 – 20 Dec. 1966 The Music: This Boy Some Other Guy Love Me Do A Taste of Honey Twist and Shout From Me to You Devil in Disguise I’ll Get You She Loves You I Saw Her Standing There Till There Was You Love Hit Me Money (That’s What I Want) All My Loving You Can’t Do That Nowhere Man Shout

Puro Pourri Podcast
The Puro Pourri Podcast Holiday Special

Puro Pourri Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2019 109:01


In this special bonus episode, George and David discuss last month's respective trips to New York and Tokyo, and recount the many wrestling shows they took in while abroad. Join your guides on an open-top bus tour that takes in Statto's incredibly unwise decision to go from JFK Airport straight to a Smackdown taping, lucha libre at MSG, David's ventures into Dragon Gate, Gatoh Move and a weird indie show whose crowd seemed to be comprised mostly of Shinjuku pimps, also stopping at an experimental jazz club, two baseball stadiums, a hardcore gig in an office building, the Ribera Steakhouse, Toshiaki Kawada's ramen joint and something called the Godzilla Hotel. Roll out your beach towel, rub on some Factor 30 and bury yourself up to your neck in the warm, inviting sand that is the Puro Pourri Podcast.

NDB Media
Terrorism, accident or cover up

NDB Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2019 30:00


Just a hair more than two months after 911, an American Airline Flight 587 plowed through a quiet residential neighborhod near JFK Airport. Is there a government coverup of terrorism? Was it an accident? Are the Saudis invloved? Author Howard Schwach has penned a novel of intrigue and politcal cowardness in his book, American 587 Heavy. Schwach knows his neighborhood and used local landmarks to enhance the story. Schwach was a journalist int he area where the actual flight went down. He is also a Navy veteran who served aboard an aircraft carrier and he uses both backgrounds to enhance an already intriguing story.

Beta Testers
The Strong Silent Type REMAKE

Beta Testers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2019 79:36


SPOILER ALERT! Special guest JFK Airport joins us to talk about, Fire Emblem 3 Houses and Astral Chain silent protagonist, and remake & remastered games.

Warrior Trading | Strategies & Analysis from Successful Traders
Green Day Trading in CA +$3,213! | Ross’ Trade Recap

Warrior Trading | Strategies & Analysis from Successful Traders

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2019 7:52


Hey everyone. All right, so here I am trading on the traveling trading station live in California. A green day, up $3,213 and 41 cents, a little bit more than I made yesterday trading from the Delta Sky Lounge at JFK Airport. What’s interesting is that yesterday I had more lag on the wifi and […] The post Green Day Trading in CA +$3,213! | Ross’ Trade Recap appeared first on Warrior Trading.

Escape Your Limits
Ep.98 - Jay Wright on fitness environments and training for life

Escape Your Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2019 82:55


Jay Wright has built a business based on passion not only for the design of buildings around the globe, but also for the human body. Creating beautiful gyms, high-end luxury condominiums hotels and consulting for developments in many other world-class locations, The Wright Fit elevates experience everywhere it touches for the future of fitness. Creating opportunities to run, jump, lift and carry things, Jay and his team are naturally battling sedentary lifestyle trends with incredible fitness environments and training for life. Watch the full episode on YouTube   Formerly co-owner of the largest private training gym in Manhattan, Jay Wright has designed fitness spaces and wellbeing facilities for some of the most iconic locations in New York City, including 15 Central Park West and JFK Airport. His lifestyle brand continues to educate clients across the country with holistic design, consulting, management and operations expertise in luxury gyms and residential projects. Designs aside, today’s Escape Your Limits episode is a lesson in functional fitness to combat the sedentary evolution of the human race. Meet strength and conditioning specialist, celebrity trainer and gym designer, Jay Wright, CEO of The Wright Fit. As CEO and founder of The Wright Fit, Jay Wright’s role is to create and develop an extraordinary lifestyle brand that elevates the concept, perception and experience of fitness, health and wellness through design, education and service.  The Wright Fit is a premiere lifestyle brand specializing in health and fitness center design, management, operations and providing personal services (including personal training, soft tissue therapy, aquatic lessons, and group fitness). Its purpose is to educate clients and help them achieve their best body and wellbeing; both now and into the long-term. Through a holistic approach, the business’ expertise is unparalleled.   www.thewrightfit.com www.twfperformancelab.com    Episode highlights -   How to pick the most effective location that makes your business work and takes advantage of incredible levels of development across any neighborhood. Why your venture shouldn’t be driven from a business standpoint, but a qualitative perspective for the brand, and how you can achieve this. How to elevate the experience of fitness and wellness from a design perspective, from a service perspective and from a programming perspective combined. Why consulting is impressive but it’s still important to put your money where your mouth is and develop your own spaces with your own resources. How an athletic background and modeling career evolved into bigger passion for fitness and understanding everything to do with personal training, gym design and a world of wellness. How to develop your pursuit of a passion to grow from personal training to gaining operations experience and transitioning to the business side of the industry. Why there’s always opportunity to take advantage of if you’re willing to put the work in and you’re passionate enough to keep pushing for your success. The difference between staying small as a boutique business and growing really big, going along with the ride of development – how this decision offers two very different roads to success. The centrepoint philosophy and how it not only drives people to their goals, but also fills our emotional reservoir that affects what we know we should do and what we feel we should do. The intrinsic link between fitness and real estate, and how strategic partnerships can make or break any location decision or investment.   Join Matthew Januszek in conversation with Jay Wright…

You've Got Hanks
The Terminal (2004) With Charlie Mihelich & Ele Woods

You've Got Hanks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2019 63:53


Be like Viktor Navorski and stick around, because this week, we're talking about The Terminal (2004). I'm joined by comedians Charlie Mihelich (@charlesmihelich) & Ele Woods (@elewoods55) for this very fun chat about Tom Hanks' performance of a man stuck in the International Terminal at JFK Airport. Don't chit and eat to bite this episode, and let me know how much you love that goat @youvegothanks.  — SHOW INFORMATIONInstagram: Instagram Twitter: Twitter Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Subscribe: Spotify

Subway Sagas
TWA Hotel Quest

Subway Sagas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2019 33:09


Sharon and Sean venture out to JFK AIrport...for fun (!!)

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Deeper Digs in Rock: Can't Give It Away on Seventh Avenue - The Rolling Stones in New York City

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2019 116:27


Start Me Up! The Rock n Roll Archaeologist sits down with author Christopher McKittrick to discuss his new and very timely book, ‘Can’t Give It Away on Seventh Avenue: The Rolling Stones and New York City. When the Rolling Stones first arrived at JFK Airport in June 1964, they hadn’t even had a hit record in America. By the end of the decade, they were mobbed by packed audiences at Madison Square Garden and were the toast of New York City’s media and celebrity scene. More than fifty years later, the history of New York City and the Rolling Stones have entwined and paralleled, with the group playing in nearly all of the Big Apple’s legendary venues. Along the way Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, and the rest of the Stones have left an impact on the culture of the city, from the turbulent “Fun City” of the 1960s and ’70s through the twenty-first century. The evolving career of the Stones has often reflected the cultural changes of the city, as the Stones and their music were the center of social and political controversies during the same era that New York faced similar challenges. Can’t Give It Away on Seventh Avenue: The Rolling Stones and New York City explores the history of the group through the prism of New York. It is a highly detailed document of the dynamic and reciprocal relationship between the world’s most famous band and America’s most famous city as well as an absorbing chronicle of the remarkable impact the city has had on the band’s music and career. Christopher McKittrick is a published author of fiction and non-fiction and a contributor to entertainment websites. Christopher and his work have been quoted in in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Observer, Newsday, USAToday.com, CNBC.com, Time.com, RollingStone.com, and dozens of entertainment and news websites. He has also been interviewed on several radio shows, including WOR Tonight on WOR, The Lisa Show on BYU Radio and Warren in the Morning on WKNY. https://www.amazon.com/Cant-Give-Away-Seventh-Avenue/dp/1642930393/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3O179MXZT305W&keywords=christopher+mckittrick&qid=1566409034&s=gateway&sprefix=christopher+mck%2Caps%2C190&sr=8-1 http://chrismckit.com As live music fanatics like us, the folks atNugs.net are offering our listeners a free 30-day trial. Listen free for 30 days and cancel anytime. Visit nugs.net/deeperdigs to get started!

Deeper Digs in Rock
Can't Give It Away on Seventh Avenue: The Rolling Stones in New York City

Deeper Digs in Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2019 116:27


Start Me Up! The Rock n Roll Archaeologist sits down with author Christopher McKittrick to discuss his new and very timely book, ‘Can’t Give It Away on Seventh Avenue: The Rolling Stones and New York City. When the Rolling Stones first arrived at JFK Airport in June 1964, they hadn’t even had a hit record in America. By the end of the decade, they were mobbed by packed audiences at Madison Square Garden and were the toast of New York City’s media and celebrity scene. More than fifty years later, the history of New York City and the Rolling Stones have entwined and paralleled, with the group playing in nearly all of the Big Apple’s legendary venues. Along the way Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, and the rest of the Stones have left an impact on the culture of the city, from the turbulent “Fun City” of the 1960s and ’70s through the twenty-first century. The evolving career of the Stones has often reflected the cultural changes of the city, as the Stones and their music were the center of social and political controversies during the same era that New York faced similar challenges. Can’t Give It Away on Seventh Avenue: The Rolling Stones and New York City explores the history of the group through the prism of New York. It is a highly detailed document of the dynamic and reciprocal relationship between the world’s most famous band and America’s most famous city as well as an absorbing chronicle of the remarkable impact the city has had on the band’s music and career. Christopher McKittrick is a published author of fiction and non-fiction and a contributor to entertainment websites. Christopher and his work have been quoted in in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Observer, Newsday, USAToday.com, CNBC.com, Time.com, RollingStone.com, and dozens of entertainment and news websites. He has also been interviewed on several radio shows, including WOR Tonight on WOR, The Lisa Show on BYU Radio and Warren in the Morning on WKNY. https://www.amazon.com/Cant-Give-Away-Seventh-Avenue/dp/1642930393/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3O179MXZT305W&keywords=christopher+mckittrick&qid=1566409034&s=gateway&sprefix=christopher+mck%2Caps%2C190&sr=8-1 http://chrismckit.com As live music fanatics like us, the folks atNugs.net are offering our listeners a free 30-day trial. Listen free for 30 days and cancel anytime. Visit nugs.net/deeperdigs to get started!

VinePair Podcast
Chilean Wine Demands Your Attention

VinePair Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2019 31:30


Adam reports in from Santiago, Chile, where he and Zach discuss what's going on in the Chilean wine industry, why Chile might be one of the world's best places to grow grapes, and how producers there are trying to find a way into the American market. Plus, why the revamped TWA Lounge at JFK Airport is a great model for drinking while traveling, and the difference between grafted and own-rooted vines. Please remember to like, subscribe to, rate, and review VinePair on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts, and feel free to send any questions, comments, critiques, or suggestions to podcast@vinepair.com. Thanks so much for listening, and cheers! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

AdriftNYC
Wow, Jamaica Bay! A beautiful marine enviroment in the shadow of JFK airport.

AdriftNYC

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2019 27:46


A heady cocktail of facts and stories fuel Cathy's first-time visit to Jamaica Bay. AdriftNYC explores 30 waterways that touch one or more of the five boroughs of New York City. Each week, you’ll get ideas for a new place to visit, plus learn about the history of the waterway, what’s happening below the surface and how each waterway is inspiring the creation of something amazing, or fun. Share: #AdriftNYC Notes: AdriftNYC.com Instagram: AdriftNYC

Protest and Survive
Rafael Shimunov on Guerilla Art at The Whitney and the JFK Airport Muslim Ban Protests

Protest and Survive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2019 36:19


Rafael Shimunov is "just someone from Queens" who was born in Uzbekistan, and incorporates creative tactics into grassroots campaigns. Rafael is a board member of Jews for Racial & Economic Justice, and formerly with the Working Families Party and the Center for Constitutional Rights. In December 2018, Rafael guerilla-style installed his own painting on a wall in the Whitney Museum of American Art. The piece depicted a family running from teargas that was fired at the U.S./Mexico border. The action was in protest of The Whitney's Board of Trustees Vice Chairman and owner of Safariland, Warren Kanders. Art magazine Hyperalergic reported that canisters of teargas bearing Safariland’s name were found where U.S. Customs and Border Protection had fired teargas at Central American migrants near Tijuana in November 2018. The migrants, who included children, were seeking asylum in the U.S. If you generally pay attention to lefty news, you may already have seen some of Rafael's other work. He livestreamed the JFK Muslim ban protests for the Working Families Party, which received 16 million views on Facebook alone. He also made the video that used a red overlay to compare videos, the original and the doctored Inforwars version that was shared by the White House, of the altercation over a microphone between Jim Acosta and a White House intern when Trump cut off Acosta's question in November 2018. We spoke with Rafael at the Anchor Podcast Lab in Manhattan, about how to and why to sneak a piece of protest art into a museum, the ownership of cultural institutions, cars honking in support of demonstrations, coming to America from Uzbekistan, growing up in an immigrant family in Queens, and how using art in protest taps into different parts of people’s brains. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/protest-and-survive/support

Crime In Music
023 - I'm DMX... FREEZE, I'm NOT a Federal Agent!

Crime In Music

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2019 72:07


  This is our MOST arrested guest of all time! We'll tell you about Earl Simmons, aka DMX. Hear about his time in a Children's Prisons, the importance of Breaking 2: Electric Boog-a-loo, our beatbox skills and how-to do a sweet Vince McMahon impression. Earl continues the trend of musicians escaping jail and raises the bar by impersonating a Federal Agent while trying to commandeer a civilian vehicle outside JFK Airport. Check out our Ditty of DMX! Send Us Some Love: SpeakPipe Voice Msg:www.crimeinmusic.com Tweet Us:www.twitter.com/crimeinmusic Instagram:www.instagram.com/crimeinusic FaceBook:www.facebook.com/crimeinmusic YouTube:www.youtube.com/crimeinmusic

Modhop Podcast
My Helicopter Crashed and Rats are Gross.

Modhop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2019 17:02


We're back (finally) with a bunch of travel related news that happened in the past handful of weeks. United Airlines has a new look, JFK Airport has an awesome looking new hotel and we talk about the worlds best airports for 2019! Plus, rats vs. squirrels. Listen:

This Week in Nope
E77: Nope Live in San Francisco! (feat. Elizabeth Holmes)

This Week in Nope

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2019 53:37


Despite the Uber/Lyft strike and a Louis Vuitton fashion show taking over JFK Airport, we finally made it to San Francisco to perform live at Betabrand’s fabulous Podcast Theatre! It was a week chock full of disgraceful topics to shut down. There was, of course, Donald Trump’s tax returns, a scandal at the Kentucky Derby, involving horses, and at the London Marathon, involving nurses. Also: Sonic the Hedgehog's unrealistic teeth caused a stir on the Internet, Burger King unleashed unhappy meals on an already unhappy public, and a Taiwanese man went to extreme lengths to find a missing AirPod. Finally, Silicon Valley’s finest living Elizabeth Holmes shares #SoManyThoughts with us about the newest royal baby, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor.   HEAR US ON ITUNEShttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/this-week-in-nope/ OVERCAST https://overcast.fm/itunes1312654524/this-week-in-nope SPOTIFY https://open.spotify.com/show/07WFZhd5bgY1l1BspArfRJ STITCHER https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/this-week-in-nope SOUNDCLOUD https://soundcloud.com/user-518735966/tracks POCKET CASTS https://pca.st/SrJY RADIO PUBLIC https://radiopublic.com/this-week-in-nope-GAOx3N   In this week’s episode: If you haven’t read Susanne Craig and Russ Buettner’s expose on Donald Trump’s taxes, check it out immediately. Watch the trailer for Paramount’s forthcoming “Sonic the Hedgehog,” and let us know what you think of the protagonist’s teeth. Click this link if you’d like to see the selfie a guy named Ben Hsu took after he pooped out an AirPod that he had accidentally swallowed while sleeping.   Big #YUPs to… The Met Gala The New York State legislature Ad blocker browser plug-ins

Long Island Explained with Chris Roach and Steve Belanger

Hosts Chris Roach and Steve Belanger chat about John F. Kennedy International Airport. The traffic, the delays, the T.S.A. lines, the AirTrain and so much more. They put the fun back in "Dysfunctional Air Travel".

The Vanished Podcast
Salvador Ramirez Part 2

The Vanished Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2019 36:15


On the afternoon of September 19, 1993, 28 year old Salvador Ramirez, or Sal as was known to loved ones, attended a family gathering at his brothers home in Yonkers, New York after dropping his mother off at JFK Airport. After the gathering, he played some soccer and then left to drive to Elmsford, New York, where he was to collect his two-year-old daughter from his estranged wife's home. A friend saw him driving in that direction but Sal was never seen again. In Part 1, you heard about the disappearance of 28-year-old Sal Ramirez. In Part 2, we are going to take a look at what has happened in the years since his disappearance and where the case stands today.If you have any information regarding Sal’s disappearance, please contact the Yonkers Police Department at 914-377-7731.The episode was co-researched and written by Marissa Jones and Anna Priestland.This episode was sponsored by:Cora - Go to Cora.life/VANISHED to get a one month free trial.Betterhelp - Listeners get 10% off your first month by going to betterhelp.com/VANISHED.You can find episodes of The Vanished, completely ad-free, only on Stitcher Premium. For a free month,go to stitcherpremium.com/wondery and use promo code “WONDERY”.

The Vanished Podcast
Salvador Ramirez Part 1

The Vanished Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2019 39:28


On the afternoon of September 19, 1993, 28 year old Salvador Ramirez, or Sal as was known to loved ones, attended a family gathering at his brothers home in Yonkers, New York after dropping his mother off at JFK Airport. After the gathering, he played some soccer and then left to drive to Elmsford, New York, where he was to collect his two-year-old daughter from his estranged wife's home. A friend saw him driving in that direction but Sal was never seen again. That was over twenty-five years ago. He has long been described as a man who lived for his baby daughter, had no reason to disappear and showed no signs of mental distress.If you have any information regarding Sal’s disappearance, please contact the Yonkers Police Department at 914-377-7731.The episode was co-researched and written by Marissa Jones and Anna Priestland.This episode was sponsored by:Lending Club- Go to LendingClub.com/Vanished to check your rate in minutes and borrow up to $40,000.Ritual- Visit Ritual.com/Vanished to try their Essential for Women vitamins.Sleep Number- You’ll only find Sleep Number at one of their 575 Sleep Number stores nationwide. Visit sleepnumber.com/VANISH find the one nearest you.ThirdLove- Go to ThirdLove.com/Vanished now to find your perfect-fitting bra AND get 15% off your first purchase!You can find episodes of The Vanished, completely ad-free, only on Stitcher Premium. For a free month,go to stitcherpremium.com/wondery and use promo code “WONDERY”.

LongShorts - Banter on All Things Business, Finance, and People

While Sachin Bansal is out shopping, our capabilities are limited to talking. We wonder: * Why IndiGo and India Have Difficulty Hiring Pilots and Air Traffic Control Personnel? * What's the point of Manipal's Redeal, Now for Medanta? * How Govt is Managing its Deficit via Buybacks and Divis from PSUs/Regulators?  _Bonus: Check out this [super interesting ATC recording](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FTw9TQtw38&feature=youtu.be) between Air India 101 and JFK Airport which resulted in a successful landing after the Aircraft faced multiple systems failure.   _

Martini Minute
Martini Minute Script for Feb. 12

Martini Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2019 2:58


Welcome to the Martini Minute, this is what's new in the world of luxury: Qatar Airways will soon have daily flights in and out of LA featuring Qsuite, the airlines’ over-the-top business class that includes a double bed and stowable privacy panels that give passengers a private room. Up to four suites may be joined for friends or families flying together, making way for dinner parties or business meetings. A Qsuite flight from the JFK Airport in New York City to Doha costs around $7,000.

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM169- Entrepreneur Runs an Award Winning Spa in Westchester, NY

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2019 16:56


Oasis Day Spa owner Bruce Schoenberg is living proof that you can make a major career change work successfully. Bruce for over twenty years was involved in the event marketing and trade show industry, producing major events both locally and nationally.  In 1997 seeing the emergence of the wellness and spa industry going mainstream he saw the potential to bring his vision to New York City. After writing several business plans, conducting numerous focus groups and visiting dozens of spas Bruce was convinced the industry was growing and could support another spa in the crowded Manhattan spa business. One of Bruce's golden rules is: “numbers don't lie, only people do”. If you do the math fairly and honestly, you can fairly predict what it will take to create a successful business. Oasis opened its first location in 1998, a seven-room spa in Union Square. Bruce concentrated on the marketing, advertising and business operations end. Knowing his strength lay in marketing, people management and operations, he is most proud of the people he has hired with the expertise in the service end. Bruce also acts as the “Why Guy” regarding any service changes or purchase decisions for professional and retail products. Oasis Day Spa was an overnight success, quickly earning ‘Best of New York' designations from several local and national publications. Oasis second location at One Park Avenue, four times the size of their original spa, opened December 2001, and instantly garnered tremendous reviews and a huge loyal following.  Business partnerships were formed with the Affinia Dumont Hotel where Oasis opened its third location in May 2004. This location also included a fitness center and incorporated more wellness services including Yoga.  Oasis opened their fourth location at the jetBlue Terminal 5 at JFK Airport in December 2004. This partnership with jetBlue Airways culminated after the airline vetted four other spas and selected Oasis. This was Oasis' opportunity to help stressed out travelers find a little peace and wellness during the harried times of traveling. In addition, the jetBlue experience would help Oasis extend their brand recognition. In April 2006 the original Oasis location in Union Square was destroyed by fire, and the landlord opted out of the lease which was way below market value. After careful analysis of the Manhattan real estate market at that time it was decided to just maintain the two current locations.  In the fall of 2007 Oasis opted not to go into the new Terminal 6 at JFK with jetBlue since the terminal location assigned was determined to be incapable of making a profit. In early 2008 Oasis opened their location in Westchester, NY that opened in November 2008. This location is the largest spa in the county and features an outdoor rooftop garden and event space. Oasis Day Spa has been named ‘Best Day Spa of Westchester' by Westchester Magazine for 10 years in a row. Website: https://www.oasisdayspanyc.com/   Facebook: https://web.facebook.com/OasisNY/?_rdc=1&_rdr Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oasisdayspa/  

HPE: High Point Talks
PODCAST: Beatlemania!

HPE: High Point Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2019 67:43


It’s been almost 55 years since The Beatles touched down at JFK Airport in New York City on their first American visit. Join Mark and Joe as they learn some cool facts about that historic day. Test your knowledge of the Fab Four with a quiz at the end of the podcast. Also, the usual … Continue reading "The PoDDCouple: Beatlemania!"

Shades of Gray Podcast
Ep 32 - Ride or Die (feat. Brian)

Shades of Gray Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2018 63:15


Today Brian and Carmen will discuss the differences in being ride or die or if you (women) are there for the ride along. This topic stems from the engagement of Kimbella and Juelz Santana. We also discuss other trash. Southwest has dyslexia, someone is fired and/or dead after $1.3M worth of cocaine is seized at JFK Airport, Tyrese's ex says the living life is an actual factual job and is a proposal with 6 rings #teamtoomuch? Intro: Holding Back the Years by Simply Red Shades of Gray Podcast is also available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play! Subscribe, Rate, Review and Tell a friend! ~Contact Shades of Gray~ www.shadesofgraypod.com FB Group/Page: Shades of Gray Twitter: @shadesofgraypod IG: @shadesofgraypod Email: shadesofgraypod@gmail.com Carmen's IG & Twitter: @cdgray89 Chapter Chat Book Club December Read: Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly https://www.facebook.com/groups/chapterchatbookclub/

Eddie & Rocky on 700WLW
Eddie and Rocky 9/5/18

Eddie & Rocky on 700WLW

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2018 88:47


Channel 9's Tanya O'Rourke touches on the stories of the day; Jay Ratliff tells us what happened at JFK Airport; PG Sittenfeld's thoughts on the Kaepernick situation and Nike boycotts; weird food combos - your calls

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
CT Scanners Find New Use in Airport Security

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2018 2:26


The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), together with American Airlines, has launched new scanners that can better screen luggage. The new scanners use computed tomography (CT), an imaging technology that produces 3D images. With this technology, airport security screeners can see the exact shape and material of items inside a bag. Screeners will even be able to tell overlapping contents apart. The CT scanners also have zoom and rotate functions, making it easy for screeners to maneuver the 3D images of the contents. The machines had already been tested last year, but it was only in July that a CT scanner was installed at the JFK Airport in New York. More scanners will be deployed to US airports by the end of the year. The CT scanners are an upgraded version of the X-ray scanners commonly used in airports. Security X-ray scanners show only the top and side view of a bag, while CT scanners can produce 360-degree images. X-ray scanners also mark anything organic, like food and explosive chemicals, the same way. Because of this, screeners usually request passengers to unpack things like liquids to check for suspicious items. But with CT scanners, passengers may not need to take things out of their luggage at all, resulting in a speedier screening process. CT scanners have been widely used in the medical industry, but they were not popular for airport use due to their size. Apart from their newfound use in airports, CT scanners are also being utilized in the industrial sector. They are being used to scan and assess packaging and to inspect interior machine parts without damaging them.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
611: The Inspirational FinTech Startup Story Behind Arcus

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2018 18:26


Arcus is a fintech startup working to create better financial health for individual people and the financial institutions by using technology to build a more seamless, secure, and enjoyable finance experience. Edrizio De La Cruz is the CEO and Cofounder of Arcus and immigrated from the Caribbean to the South Bronx at age 11, and immediately started working, but quickly became frustrated that he couldn’t help his parents make ends meet and manage their finances. However, being so close to Wall Street fueled him with endless dreams, ambitions and possibilities. After spending time in the US Air Force Reserves, he became an Aircraft Engineer at JFK Airport, but became enamored by the world of finance and technology while attending community college. In spite of not being the ‘traditional fit’, he then kicked off his career as an Investment Banker at J.P. Morgan, and later graduated from The Wharton School. This journey instilled an innate sense of purpose and vision to democratize access to better financial services for everyone. In 2013, this vision sparked the launch of Arcus in Silicon Valley’s Y-Combinator.

Sound Behavior, With Don Crosby
Sometimes you meet the nicest people in airports – Episode 013

Sound Behavior, With Don Crosby

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2018 29:52


A few weeks ago while returning from New York I met the nicest young lady at the JFK Airport. While I was expecting a long two and half hours of waiting, a delightful conversation effortlessly breezed by and stole my expected boredom. If I remember right my contribution was more listening than talking, but I’ve learned the significance of having selective dialog, by allowing someone to express their feelings can be an appreciated experience. She was returning from a romantic rendezvous with someone of whom she thought that just maybe there was a future of long-term potential. By  the painful tone of her voice… I could sense the possible relief that probably her parents were experiencing as they were waiting for her to return home (only speculation), but I often explain to people, that “PUPPY LOVE IS REAL TO THE PUPPY”. Her feelings had been badly bruised; obviously she needed an old fashion banana split and an outstanding comedy to relieve her mind from the sensations of the emotional rollercoaster. As we were departing for our gates I introduced my passion and profession while offering to assist her, she kindly said she would LOVE to… with this episode it is my pleasure to introduce you to Sheridan, of Dallas, Texas.

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast
AvTalk Episode 23: Ground Stop

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2018 32:34


On this episode of AvTalk we recap the meltdown at JFK Airport in New York after a blizzard that forced some flights to wait over 7 hours for a gate. A 737 tries to go swimming in the Black Sea. We review the 2017 Airbus and Boeing delivery numbers. And we remember a few moments … The post AvTalk Episode 23: Ground Stop appeared first on Flightradar24 Blog.

Caldwell Madison Review
Caldwell Madison Review: Episode 80

Caldwell Madison Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2018 56:00


Topics in this episode include Oprah and Roseanne presidential talk, Ahmadinejad arrested, Iran protests, the upcoming Fake News Awards, Bannon statement on his previous Don Jr. remarks, the JFK Airport mess, Cliven Bundy walking free, Twitter’s shadow banning, Walmart minimum wage increase and store shutdowns, Trump’s talk of internet sales tax and more.   Caldwell Madison Review is a discussion and analysis of news media, politics and current events.   http://www.blogtalkradio.com/caldwellmadison http://www.minds.com/caldwellmadison https://gab.ai/CaldwellMadison https://twitter.com/CaldMad   Also available on iTunes, Player FM and Blubrry   Music Credits: Professor Umlaut by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
327: How Bluetooth & Wi-Fi Technology Is Managing Traffic & Airport Passengers

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2017 17:12


Blip Systems is a sensor-agnostic company, meaning that they use multiple data sources, including WiFi and Bluetooth sensors, 3D cameras, people counters and other third-party data sources, to monitor movement, capacity and wait time. With data, from multiple sources, airports, municipalities and other high-traffic facilities can to quickly and efficiently manage queue and flow, to help reduce overhead, maximise revenue and provide optimum service. The technology is successfully employed in optimization efforts in more than 25 international airports, including Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, JFK Airport in New York, Copenhagen, Oslo, Manchester, Birmingham, Dublin, Brussels, Geneva, San Diego, Keflavik and Edinburgh. “Operationally, the airport uses, among other things, the data to monitor line density in real-time, which allows management to respond promptly…” In recent years, the solution has been rolled out in train stations, ports, ski resorts, amusement parks and at events all over the world. I talk to Christian Bugislaus Carstens, Marketing Manager at BLIP Systems about Bluetooth/WiFi sensors and the difference they are making all over the world.

Feast Yr Ears
Episode 68: Fly-in, Fly-out: A Pilot's Thoughts on Flying and Eating Around the Country and Around the World

Feast Yr Ears

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2017 34:42


Kris Wolmer has been flying commercial planes for 20 years. He's an on-call pilot for JetBlue and flies out of New York. Tune in to hear about his favorite places to eat, what not to order on the plane and how to get into the business if you're so inclined.

POLITICO's Off Message
Hakeem Jeffries: 'Every racist' voted for Trump

POLITICO's Off Message

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2017 36:33


POLITICO's Isaac Dovere sits down with New York Congressman Hakeem Jeffries to discuss his experience with detainees at JFK Airport, the similarities between Donald Trump and Richard Nixon, and how Democrats plan on pushing back against the White House.

(URR NYC) Underground Railroad Radio NYC
Red State Watcher - "Judge Pirro Opening Statement on JFK Airport Protest"

(URR NYC) Underground Railroad Radio NYC

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2017


http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=60155*** http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=60147***

Cooking Issues
Episode 279: Deez Glassy Nuts

Cooking Issues

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2017 54:06


This week on Cooking Issues, bartender Don Lee is sitting in for Nastassia, and he and Dave discuss the squalor of New York airports, the Star Wars prequels, truffles, the ChefSteps recipe for deep-fried glassy nuts, the status of the Spinzall, cocktails, miracle celery dreams, stripping cast iron pans, cool ranch, and more!

Jill Blakeway's Grow Cook Heal
Episode 47 – Change Food Fest 2016, Reversing Bone Loss, and an Asian Spicy Kale Chip Recipe.

Jill Blakeway's Grow Cook Heal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2017 35:45


Did you know that JetBlue has an urban farm at Terminal 5 at JFK Airport in New York? It’s one of the things Jill found out from her first guest on this week’s episode of GCH. Diane Hatz founded a not-for-profit called Change Food to promote sustainable and humane food production. Jill and Diane talk about advances in food technology, the urban gardening movement and how to combat food wastage. All of that and more will be covered at the upcoming Change Food Fest in New York and Diane gives us a preview of the event. Then we join Jill in the kitchen with Marcey Brownstein who is making her version of kale chips, with spicy, Asian flavors. Finally Jill chats with Dr Laura Kelly about her new book on reversing bones loss through diet. Laura first researched osteoporosis to help her own mother and then decided to share her program with the world. Laura explains to Jill why certain countries have lower levels of osteoporosis and the foods we should eat to support our bones.  

Wall & Broadcast
6: The Rebirth of Inmate 92164-054. . . Charlie Shrem (Part 2)

Wall & Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2016 32:11


This is the 2nd part of a two-part episode on Charlie Shrem, America’s first Bitcoin superstar.  When we left Charlie at the end of Episode 1, he was just being confronted by joint FBI, DEA, IRS task force at JFK Airport in New York.  Upon his arrival, he is arrested and detained by the federal authorities.  Tune into the second part of this two-part episode to find out what happened to Charlie. Why was he detained?  On what charges? We follow Charlie through the shock of these events and discover how his experiences changed him and his relationship to the world of Bitcoin and blockchain. We conclude the episode with a conversation with Ned Scott, the Co-founder and CEO of Steemit, an exciting new blockchain project that Charlie is involved in.

Wall & Broadcast
5: The Rise and Fall and Rise Again of Bitcoin Giant, Charlie Shrem

Wall & Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2016 31:21


There was a time; not so long ago, that Bitcoin was just an obscure little diversion for the hardest of the hard-core crypto geeks existing on the fringes of the internet.  Out of those recesses rose a quiet young yeshiva student from Brooklyn who would seize upon a unique opportunity, using his own personal experiences and his love of computers to create one of the first successful retail Bitcoin enterprises.  His name was Charlie Shrem, and by the time he was 21 years old he was a Bitcoin titan.  His startup, BitInstant, allowed ordinary people to easily purchase bitcoins from retailers like 7-11 or Walmart. Within months of starting BitInstant, Charlie was traveling and speaking all over the world about Bitcoin and gaining a reputation as a Bitcoin superstar.  But what goes up can also come down.  Listen to episode 5 of Wall & Broadcast to learn more about how Charlie rose to prominence and ultimately found himself confronted and detained by federal authorities at JFK Airport.       

Congressional Dish
CD132: Airplanes!

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2016 86:48


The Federal Aviation Administration performs the essential work of keeping airplanes from crashing into each other in the sky; in this episode, we take a look at the new law that temporarily funds the FAA and makes some important changes to aviation law. We also travel back in time to the week after 9/11 to examine the origin of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and we examine some ideas that the current leaders of Congress have for the future of air travel in the United States and beyond. Please support Congressional Dish: Click here to contribute with PayPal or Bitcoin; click the PayPal "Make it Monthly" checkbox to create a monthly subscription Click here to support Congressional Dish for each episode via Patreon Mail Contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North #4576 Crestview, FL 32536 Thank you for supporting truly independent media! H.R. 636: FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 Title I: FAA Extension Funding Extends FAA funding through September 30, 2017 Extends fuel and ticket taxes through September 30, 2017 Title II: Aviation Safety Critical Reform Safety Establishes a deadline of April 30, 2017 for the FAA to have a pilots records database online and available for use. Creates a maximum $25,000 fine for pointing a laser pointer at an aircraft or in the path of an aircraft. Prohibits the FAA from hiring newly trained air traffic controllers over the age of 35 The FAA must make sure that each employee of repair stations outside of the United States are given pre-employment background checks Drone Safety Over the next two years, the FAA and industry will have two work together to develop a method of remotely identifying drone operators. Starting in three years, drone manufacturers will have to include safety notices informing customers of drone safety laws and regulations. The FAA will work together with the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture to authorize drone use for firefighting and utility repairs. A person who uses a drone to interfere with firefighting operations, law enforcement, or emergency response can be fined up to $20,000. The FAA will conduct a pilot program testing unmanned aircraft detection systems. In the next year, the FAA and NASA will conduct tests of drones crashing into various sized airplanes and helicopters. Time Sensitive Aviation Reform By July 2017, regulations must be in effect requiring airlines to automatically refund bag fees to anyone whose bags are not delivered within 12 hours after the arrival of a domestic flight or 15 hours after the arrival of an international flight. FAA needs to submit a report, including public comments, about the risks of eliminating contract weather observer service at 57 airports and can not discontinue contract weather observer service before October 1, 2017. FAA must enact regulations requiring pilots of small airplanes to have driver's licenses and pass all medical tests required for a drivers license, completes a medical education course, Airlines will have to let passengers off a plane if it's waiting on the tarmac for 3 hours of a domestic flight or 4 hours for an international flight. Title III: Aviation Security TSA PreCheck Expansion TSA will add "multiple private sector application capabilities" for citizens to use to enroll including online enrollment, kiosks, tablets, or staffed laptop stations. Private sector will collect biometric identification information with "comparable" privacy standards to the standards developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology Private risk assessments will be used instead of fingerprint-based criminal history records checks Private administrators will be allowed to charge fees in excess of the costs of administering the program. Securing Aviation from Foreign Entry Points and Guarding Airports Through Enhanced Security TSA Administrator will be allowed donate security screening equipment to foreign airports with direct flights to the United States TSA must create an international training program to train authorities of foreign governments in air transportation security. Aviation Security Enhancement and Oversight Enacts stricter vetting requirements for people granted access to secure sections of airports Checkpoints of the Future Creates a new pilot program at between 3 and 6 airports that will test new technologies and new baggage and personal screening systems. Services, supplies, equipment, personnel, and facilities can be obtained from the private sector for the pilot programs. Sound Clip Sources: Hearings Hearing: Aviation Security, Joint House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation and Senate Appropriations Committee, September 20, 2001. Witnesses: Gerald Dillingham, Associate Director of the General Accounting Office Jane Garvey, Administration, FAA Kenneth Mead, Inspector General of the Department of Transportation Norman Mineta, Secretary of the Department of Transportation Hank Queen, Vice President of Boeing’s Engineering and Product Integrity division Timestamps and Transcripts {54:15} Kenneth Mead: Given the scope and complexity of the security challenge as we know it now, coupled with the long-standing history of problems with the aviation security program, I think the time’s come to revisit the option of vesting governance of the program and responsibility for the provision of security in one federal organization or not-for-profit federal corporation. This doesn’t mean that everybody has to be a federal employee, but it does mean a much more robust federal presence and control. That entity would have security as its primary and central focus, profession, and mission. Under our current system, we’ve asked FAA to oversee and regulate aviation security, and those charged with providing the security—the airlines and the airports—themselves face other priorities, missions, and indeed, in some cases, competing economic pressures. And I think a centralized, consolidated approach with a security mission would require passenger and baggage screeners to have uniform, more rigorous training, and performance standards applicable nationwide, and I think that would result in more consistent security across this country and have higher quality also. {1:22:46} Harold Rogers: Now, I want to ask you about Dulles. Did you check on the employees of the screening operation at Dulles Airport?Kenneth Mead: Yes. We’re checking on the citizens— Harold Rogers: Tell us the makeup of the staff there, in terms of their citizenship in the U.S., for example. Kenneth Mead: Yes. A substantial percentage of them are not U.S. citizens. Harold Rogers: What percent? Kenneth Mead: I think it’s about 80%. It may be somewhat more. {1:26:40} Harold Rogers: What about the turnover rate, Mr. Dillingham? I’ve been reading the GAO’s report on aviation security, issued June of 2000. I think you’re the principal author, are you not?Gerald Dillingham: Yes, sir. Harold Rogers: Tell us about the type of personnel that’s screening companies you’re hiring around the country at the airports to screen for terrorists. Gerald Dillingham: Let me go back just a little bit to the point you raised before. Screeners don’t have to be U.S. citizens. They can have a resident alien card as well. The other point you raised with regard to Argenbright, I think Argenbright is also a foreign-owned company as well. And with regard to the types of personnel that are being hired, one of the requirements is that you have a high school diploma or a GED. We have not checked the records of individual companies, but in the course of doing our work, we clearly got the idea that this was not a job where you would find the most skilled workers. Harold Rogers: They’re minimum-wage jobs, are they not? Gerald Dillingham: Yes, sir. Harold Rogers: And the turnover rate is exorbitantly high, is it not? Gerald Dillingham: Yes, sir. Harold Rogers: In one airport the turnover rate is 400% a year, correct? Gerald Dillingham: Yes, sir. Harold Rogers: In Atlanta it’s 375% a year. At Baltimore-Washington, 155; Boston Logan, 207; Chicago O’Hare, 200; and Houston, 237% a year; at St. Louis, 416% a year. Is that correct? Gerald Dillingham: Yes, sir. Harold Rogers: So these are untrained, inexperienced, the lowest-paid personnel, many of them certainly noncitizens, and by a company that got the contract by the lowest bid. Gerald Dillingham: Yes, sir. Harold Rogers: Now, what’s wrong with this picture? Gerald Dillingham: I think the picture is clear to everyone. {2:28:58} Carolyn Kilpatrick: This company that’s in 46 airports, that had the low-bid contract, that’s noncitizens, that handles securities, and has criminal convictions, who hired them?Norman Mineta: The airline is the one that contracts with each… Carolyn Kilpatrick: An airline. One airline. So did they all go together and hire them, or each airline hires them on its own? Norman Mineta: The airline hires the company and then the airlines—well, let me have Ken maybe go into that because he’s maybe got the list of airports with the contractors. Kenneth Mead: Yeah. The different airlines can hire the same security company, and that does happen. Carolyn Kilpatrick: Obviously. Low bids, so they’re going for cheapness. Kenneth Mead: Right. And some airports, Dulles, for example, you have the airlines get together there, and they hire one vendor, and in the case of Dulles, it’s Argenbright. In the case of other airports, where you have an airline, say, that has a dedicated concourse, and you have two or three concourses at that airport, you may have, in fact, three different firms providing the security— Carolyn Kilpatrick: Okay, thank you. Kenneth Mead: —each hired by a separate airline. Hearing: Review of ATC Reform Proposals, Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, February 10, 2016. Transcript Witnesses: Mr. Paul Rinaldi, President, National Air Traffic Controllers Association Written Testimony Mr. Nicholas E. Calio, President and Chief Executive Officer, Airlines for America Written Testimony Mr. Ed Bolen, President and CEO, National Business Aviation Association Written Testimony Mr. Robert Poole, Director of Transportation Policy, Reason Foundation Written Testimony Timestamps and Transcripts {13:00} Bill Shuster: A key reform in this bill takes the ATC out of the Federal Government, and establishes a federally chartered, independent, not-for-profit corporation to provide that service. This corporation will be governed by a board representing the system’s users. {17:55} Bill Shuster: But I just want to say that August of this year, Canadians will launch their first satellites into space, and by the end of 2017, they will have over 70 satellites launched. They will have their GPS system up in space. Currently, today, we can only see 30 percent of the airspace on our current technology. When they deploy those 70 or so satellites, they will be able to see 100 percent of the airspace in the globe, the Canadians. I am told there’s already 15 or 16 countries that have signed up for their services. So Canadians, the NAV CAN, and their partners, they’re developing this system. I believe they are going to become the dominant controller of airspace in the world. They’re going to be able to fly planes over the North Atlantic and over the Pacific, straighter lines, closer together, more efficiently; and that’s when we’re going to really see our loss in leadership in the world, when it comes to controlling airspace and being the gold standard. {19:10} Bill Shuster: Again, this corporation we’re setting up is completely independent of the Federal Government. This is not a government corporation, a quasi-governmental entity, or a GSE. It is not that. The Federal Government will not back the obligations, the financial obligations, for this corporation. The corporation will simply provide a service. {27:27} Pete DeFazio: We’re talking about an asset—no one’s valued it—worth between $30 billion and $50 billion that will be given to the private corporation free of charge. That’s unprecedented. There have been two privatizations: one privatization in Canada—they paid $1.4 billion; it was later found that it was undervalued by about $1 billion. I believe in Britain they paid a little over $1 billion for it. We’re going to take a much larger entity, controlling a lot of real estate, some in some very expensive areas like New York City, and we are going to give it to a private corporation, and the day after they establish, they can do with those assets whatever they wish. They can sell them, and we have no say. {30:11} Pete DeFazio: If someone controls the routes, and they control the conditions under which you access those routes, and they control the investment in the system itself, which means maybe we don’t want to invest in things that serve medium and small cities—they aren’t profit centers; why should we be putting investment there—you know, we are keeping control of the airspace? I guess there’s some technical way we’re keeping control of it, but none of that will be subject to any elected representative. {1:00:05} Ed Bolen: Our nation’s air traffic control system is a monopoly, and it will stay a monopoly, going forward. The airlines, for 30 years, have been lobbying Congress so that they can seize control of that natural monopoly and exert their authority over it. We think that is a fatally flawed concept. The public airspace belongs to the public, and it should be run for the public’s benefit. Do we really think that, given control of this monopoly, the airlines would run it for every American’s benefit? Reading the headlines over the past year would suggest that’s probably not the case. ‘‘Airline Consolidation Hits Small Cities the Hardest,’’ wrote the Wall Street Journal; ‘‘Justice Department Investigating Potential Airline Price Collusion,’’ wrote the Washington Post; ‘‘Airline Complaints on the Rise’’ was a headline in the Hill; ‘‘Airlines Reap Record Profits and Passengers Get Peanuts.’’ That appeared in the New York Times this past weekend. {1:02:30} Ed Bolen: We’re talking about giving them unbridled authority to make decisions about access, about rates, charges, about infrastructure. This is a sweeping transfer of authority. {1:31:12} Don Young: Will the gentleman yield? Let’s talk about the board.Bill Shuster: Certainly. Don Young: You got four big airlines board members. Bill Shuster: Right. Don Young: NATCA now is supporting it. And I question that, by the way. I fought for you every inch of the way, and we want to find out what is behind that. General aviation has one. Unknown: Two. Don Young: Two? Unknown: General aviation has two. Don Young: OK, two. Where’s the other one? Bill Shuster: Two to the government. Don Young: Two—and who are they going to be? Do we have any input on that? No. We do not. The president has—— Bill Shuster: The Department of Transportation will have it. Don Young: The president. And we’re the Congress of the United States. I’d feel a lot better if we were to appoint them. Why should we let a president appoint them? This is our job as legislators. If we’re going to change the system, let us change it with us having some control over it, financially. And the board members should be appointed from the Congress. I am not going to give any president any more authority. That is the wrong—we have done this over and over again. We give the president—we might as well have a king. I don’t want a king. Hearing: Airport Security Wait Times, House Homeland Security Committee, May 25, 2016. Witness: Peter Neffenger, Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Timestamps and Transcripts {09:20} Bennie Thompson: In fiscal year 2011, there were approximately 45,000 TSOs screening 642 million passengers. In FY 2016, TSA had 3,000 fewer TSOs screening roughly 740 million anticipated passengers, almost 100 million more passengers and 3,000 fewer screeners. {11:11} Bennie Thompson: TSA should have access to all of the aviation security fees collected by the flying public to bolster security. Yet, the passage of the Budget Act of 2013, TSA is required to divert $13 billion collected in security fees toward the deficit reduction for the next 10 years. This year alone, 1.25 billion has been diverted. {29:40} Michael McCaul: And finally, do you support—well, I can’t say—do you support the concept of expanding TSA’s pre-check program, which, I think, would move a lot of people in the long lines into the pre-check lines, which, I think, would solve many of these problems as well.Pete Neffenger: Absolutely. In fact, that’s one of my fundamental priorities is to dramatically expand the pre-check population and dramatically expand the capability to enroll people in pre-check. {48:30} Pete Neffenger: Right now we do not seem to have trouble meeting our recruiting targets. We have a large pool of people that have been pre-vetted. That’s why we were able to rapidly begin to hire that 768 because we had a large pool of available applicants that had been screened that were looking for work. I still want to work on bringing more of that back in house than is currently done. As you know, we work through a private contractor to do our hiring and recruiting right now. {49:53} Mike Rogers: I plan to introduce legislation to transform TSA from an HR nightmare to a security-focused organization by reforming and greatly expanding the Screening Partnership Program. Having worked on these issues for more than a decade, I’ve seen that TSA can do a mission when it’s given a clear, succinct mission. My bill is going to allow more airports to hire qualified private contractors, capable of managing day-to-day operations, and make TSA the driving force to oversee intelligence-based security strategies. {1:41:30} Buddy Carter: You and I have spoken before about privatization, and as you know, in full disclosure, I’m really big on privatization. Atlanta and the bigger airports are indicating to us, or at least to me, that it’s beyond the scope of a bureaucracy to be able to do this, and I just don’t get a warm and fuzzy feeling that you’re embracing privatization here. Congress passed the Screening Partnership Program. Tell me what you’re doing to implement that? We need to get to a point where you’re on the other side of the table; you’re asking the questions and overseeing this as opposed to being here answering the questions from us.Pete Neffenger: We’ve made a lot of changes to streamline that process. I was concerned that it takes a long time because it has to go out on bid, it has to go out on contract and the like. I have said repeatedly that the law allows for this. I will work with any airport that’s interested. In fact, I have directed airports like Atlanta to go out and talk to San Francisco because that’s the only large category x airport that has a contracted screening force, and we’ll continue to work with them. I think that there are things that we can do. We are somewhat hampered by the way the federal acquisition rules work. Remember, that’s a workforce that’s contracted to the Federal Government, not through the— Buddy Carter: Hold on. I don’t mean to interrupt you, but I want to know. You say you’re hampered. I want to know how I can help you to become unhampered, if that’s a word. Pete Neffenger: Well, as I said, we follow the contracting rules under the Federal Government contracting requirements. It’s a contract to the Federal Government, so I want to make sure that it’s fair and is open competition and you have to give people the opportunity to participate in that. We’ll work with anybody who wants to do that. Buddy Carter: Well, understand that I want to work with you so that we can streamline that process. I still don’t get the feeling that you’re embracing it, and I want to know what you’re doing to encourage it, to the privatization of it. Pete Neffenger: Well, again, it’s up to the airport to determine whether they want to do it. We advertise its availability, we make available information about it. There’s a screening private partnership office that manages that. Additional Sound Clips Video: People Lay on the Floor at JFK Airport as Police Team Search, Daily Mail, August 21, 2016. Video: JFK Airport Shooting Evacuation After Shots Fired JFK Terminal, YouTube, August 15, 2016. Television News Clip: JFK Airport Scare, CBS New York, August 14, 2016. Television News Clip: Nightmarish Lines Continue At Airport Security Checkpoints, CBS Chicago, May 16, 2016. Television News Clip: Passengers Stranded at O'Hare Airport Due to Long TSA Lines By John Garcia and Laura Podesta, ABC News Chicago, May 16, 2016. Television News Clip: Drones Interfere With Wildfire Battle in California, CBS This Morning, July 20, 2015. Television News Clip: American Airlines Passengers Stuck on Tarmac for Several Hours, ABC News, March 2, 2015. Additional Reading Article: Scenes From the Terrifying, Already Forgotten JFK Airport Shooting That Wasn’t By David Wallace-Wells, New York Magazine, August 15, 2016. Article: FAA Reauthorization Protects Weather Observer Program, Spokane International Airport, Aviation Pros, July 14, 2016. Article: Senate Overwhelmingly Passes Bipartisan FAA Bill Without Air-Traffic Control Privatization By Andy Pasztor, The Wall Street Journal, April 19, 2016. Article: FAA Seeks To Cut Airport Weather Observers By Elaine Kauh, AVWeb, February 5, 2016. Article: Republican House Measure Seeks Independent Air-Traffic Control Board By Andy Pasztor, The Wall Street Journal, February 3, 2016. Article When Retirement Becomes a Crisis By Joseph Coughlin and Luke Yoquinto, Slate, February 2, 2016. Article: The Disturbing Truth About How Airplanes Are Maintained Today By James B. Steele, Vanity Fair, December 2015. Article: Union: Chronic Shortage of Air Traffic Controllers a Crisis By Joan Lowy, PBS Newshour, October 14, 2015. Article: TSA Body Scanner Lobbyist Now Overseeing Spending on TSA Security By Lee Fang, The Intercept, May 27, 2015. Press Release: Appropriations Committee Releases Fiscal Year 2015 Homeland Security Bill, The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations, May 27, 2014. Article: ‘Naked Scanner’ Maker OSI Falls After Losing TSA Order By Jeff Plungis. Bloomberg, December 6, 2013. Article: FAA Plan to Terminate Airport Weather Observers Raises Travel Safety Concerns By Jason Samenow, The Washington Post, May 1, 2013. Article: Airlines Reluctant to Pay $6.6B for NextGen Air Transportation System By Jill R. Aitoro, Washington Business Journal, April 9, 2013. Article: Efforts Grow To Convince Airlines Of NextGen Worth By John Croft, Aviation Daily, October 5, 2012. Article: This Week in History: Ronald Reagan Fires 11,345 Air Traffic Controllers By Cody Carlson, Deseret News, August 5, 2012. Article: Obama Signs Bill Ending Partial FAA Shutdown By The CNN Wire Staff, CNN, August 5, 2011. Article: Everything You Need To Know About the FAA Shutdown In One Post By Dylan Matthews, The Washington Post, August 3, 2011. Article Congress Heads Home Without Extending FAA Funding By Ashley Halsey III, The Washington Post, August 2, 2011. Article: Partial FAA Shutdown Cripples Operations for Third Day By Ashley Halsey III, The Washington Post, July 25, 2011. Article: New Air Traffic Control System At Crossroads By Joan Lowy, Yahoo News, July 5, 2011. Article: Fear Pays: Chertoff, Ex-Security Officials Slammed For Cashing In On Government Experience By Marcus Baram, The Huffington Post, November 23, 2010. Article: The Airport Scanner Scam By James Ridgeway, Mother Jones, January 4, 2010. Article: DHS and TSA Have Researched, Developed, and Begun Deploying Passenger Checkpoint Screening Technologies, but Continue to Face Challenges, U.S. Government Accountability Office, October 7, 2009. Additional Information Open Secrets: Representative Bill Shuster Career Profile 9-11 Commission Report, National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, July 22, 2004. Chapter 1: "We Have Some Planes" Reports FAA Continues To Face Challenges in Ensuring Enough Fully Trained Controllers at Critical Facilities, Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, January 11, 2016. Federal Civil Aviation Programs: In Brief By Bart Elias, Congressional Research Service, December 16, 2013. Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio) Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations

Cr3wSh!t Podcast
Ep. 20 "A Fox Ate My Chicken!" [w/ The Whim App]

Cr3wSh!t Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2016 64:59


This week on the podcast we link up with the Darrien and Von from The Whim App...What exactly is The Whim App...How did they come up with the idea...We recap the Cr3w Kikball game we had over the weekend...We discuss buying fake cigarettes in the Bronx...Ryan Lochte getting ran up on in Rio...Jamaicans shutting down JFK Airport after Bolt wins...People eating fake chickens...RIP Dr. Sebi and Ms. Cleo...Give us a listen and PLEASE subscribe, share, rate, and review us on iTunes!!! Interested in joining the Cr3wSh!t Kikball League? RSVP on the link below: https://thecr3wkickball.splashthat.com/ Download the Whim App Here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/whim-black-event-guide-for/id1053832033?mt=8 Follow us on IG: @cr3w.ent @thewhimapp @dre_da_prophet @b.wil___ @iamjoshwells #Cr3wShit #DoSomething #VibeHi #PositiveVibes

(URR NYC) Underground Railroad Radio NYC
#274 - "Tony's White Friend, Won't Sleep With Black Women Heres Why"

(URR NYC) Underground Railroad Radio NYC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2015


I'm driving from JFK Airport back To Soho, Manhattan. I got my two friends (Oshay & Chico) in the backseats when Oshay dropped the BOMB! Had to upload this one, a Moor, a European, a Hindu & Latin brother in the car at the same time. I know you're not going to like it...

The Hangardeck Podcast
Episode #27. The Boeing 747-400 Cargo Aircraft with Pilot Brian Mills.

The Hangardeck Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2015 33:53


In this Episode of the Hangar Deck Podcast, the team discusses our Boeing 747-400 Cargo Aircraft with Pilot Brian Mills.      The Boeing 747-400 is a major development and the best-selling model of the Boeing 747 family of jet airliners. While retaining the four-engine wide-body layout of its predecessors, the 747-400 embodies numerous technological and structural changes to produce a more efficient airframe. Its most distinguishing features versus preceding 747 models are 6-foot (1.8 m) winglets mounted on 6-foot (1.8 m) wing tip extensions, which are found on all 747-400s except for Japanese domestic market versions.   The 747-400 is equipped with a two-crew glass cockpit, which dispenses with the need for a flight engineer, along with more fuel-efficient engines, an optional fuel tank in the horizontal stabilizer, and revised fuselage/wing fairings. The aircraft also features an all-new interior with upgraded in-flight entertainment architecture. As on the 747-300, passenger variants include a stretched upper deck as standard. The model has a maximum capacity of 660 passengers with the 747-400D variant, and can fly non-stop for up to 7,670 nautical miles (14,200 km) with maximum payload, depending on model.   Northwest Airlines first placed the 747-400 in commercial service in February 9, 1989. The 747-400 was produced in passenger (−400), freighter (−400F), combi (−400M), domestic (−400D), extended range passenger (−400ER) and extended range freighter (−400ERF) versions. The 747-400 is the second-most recent version of the Boeing 747 aircraft family, having been superseded by the more economical and advanced Boeing 747-8. The last −400 model was delivered in December 2009.   As many 747-400s are now more than 20 years old, airlines are beginning to replace them. Airlines using the 747-400 have accelerated its retirement (as at 2015) and are replacing the model with more fuel efficient aircraft. The 747-400's leasing, resale and salvage value has dropped steeply because it is relatively expensive to operate. In most cases, it is being replaced with wide-body twin-engine aircraft like B777 or A330. The change in emphasis from hub and spoke operations to point-to-point flights has also reduced the need for jumbo jets. For example, Delta Airlines has reduced the number of flights it operates from the United States to Narita International Airport that are intended to transfer passengers to other destinations in Asia. Instead, Delta will utilize twin-engine widebody aircraft operating from an expanded hub at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Total capacity will be cut, but consequentially load factors will increase. In April 2015, Delta announced it would accelerate the retirement of its 747-400 aircraft and replace them either with Airbus A330 aircraft reassigned from cancelled international runs, or with new Airbus A350 aircraft now on order. That will leave just six 747s flying for the airline in 2015. Delta could not keep the 747s full without deeply discounting ticket prices; the discounts and increased maintenance required of a four-engine aircraft led to a drag on profits. Moreover, economic weakness in air cargo markets has slowed demand for cargo conversions. Since the cost of replacing a 747-400 is high (an airline must purchase or lease another wide-body), some operators choose to fly the 747-400 to the conclusion of its accepted useful life and then scrap it. The current parts resale value for this aircraft has been reduced to its engines. Several airlines have retired their 747-400 from the trans-pacific market. Remaining operators in 2014 include Qantas, British Airways and United. United is retaining its 23 747-400s for now, but the airline's deployment of them also reflects a change in emphasis from Asian hubs to domestic hubs, meaning that it will have more direct flights from the United States to secondary Asian market cities. This may reduce the need for jumbo jets.     747-400     Boeing 747-400 of Singapore Airlines, the type's first international operator   The original variant of the redesigned 747, the 747-400 debuted an increased wingspan, winglets, revised engines, and a glass cockpit which removed the need for a flight engineer. The type also featured the stretched upper deck (SUD) introduced with the 747-300. The passenger model formed the bulk of 747-400s sold, and 442 were built.   In 1989, a Qantas 747-400 flew non-stop from London to Sydney, a distance of 9,720 nmi (11,190 mi, 18,001 km), in 20 hours and 9 minutes to set a commercial aircraft world distance record. As of 2014, this is the fastest heavyweight flight between London and Sydney. This was a delivery flight with no commercial passengers or freight on board. During testing, the first 747-400 built also set a world record for the heaviest airliner takeoff on June 27, 1988, on a flight to simulate heavy-weight stalls. The flight had a takeoff weight of 892,450 pounds (404,810 kg), and in order to satisfy Fédération Aéronautique Internationale regulations, the aircraft climbed to a height of 6,562 feet (2,000 m).   747-400F     Cargolux 747-400F with nose door open.   The 747-400F (Freighter) is an all freight version of the 747-400. While using the updated systems and wing design of the passenger versions, it features the original short upper deck found on the classic 747s in order to save weight. The model's first flight was on May 4, 1993, and it entered service with Cargolux on November 17, 1993. Major customers included Atlas Air, Cargolux, China Airlines, Korean Air, Nippon Cargo Airlines, Polar Air Cargo, and Singapore Airlines. The −400F can be easily distinguished from the passenger −400 by its shorter upper-deck hump and lack of windows along the main deck.   The 747-400F has a main deck nose door and a mechanized cargo handling system. The nose door swings up so that pallets or containers up to 40 ft (12 m) can be loaded straight in on motor-driven rollers. An optional main deck side cargo door (like the 747-400M (Combi)) allows loading of dimensionally taller cargo modules. A lower deck ("belly") side door allows loading of unit load devices (ULD) up to 1,63 m height. Boeing delivered 126 Boeing 747-400F aircraft with no unfilled orders as of November 2009.[2] The last −400F was delivered to Nippon Cargo Airlines on August 2, 2008.   747-400M     A KLM Boeing 747-400 Combi, on short final to JFK Airport in New York City   The 747-400M (a passenger/freight or "Combi" variant) first flew on June 30, 1989 and entered service with KLM on September 12, 1989. Based on the successful Combi versions of the Classic 747s, the −400M has a large cargo door fitted to the rear of the fuselage for freight loading to the aft main deck cargo hold. A locked partition separates the cargo area from the forward passenger cabin, and the −400M also features additional fire protection, a strengthened main deck floor, a roller-conveyor system, and passenger-to-cargo conversion equipment. The last 747-400M was delivered to KLM on April 10, 2002.   747-400D     Japan Airlines Boeing 747-400D at Tokyo International Airport   The 747-400D (Domestic) is a high density seating model developed for short-haul, high-volume domestic Japanese flights. This model is capable of seating a maximum of 568 passengers in a two-class configuration or 660 passengers in a single-class configuration.   The −400D lacks the wingtip extensions and winglets included on other variants. Winglets would provide minimal benefits on short-haul routes, while adding extra weight and cost. The −400D may be converted to the long range version if needed. The 747-400D can be distinguished from the otherwise similar-looking 747-300 by the extra windows on the upper deck. These allow for extra seating at the rear of the upper deck, where a galley would normally be situated on longer flights. In total, 19 of the type were built, with the last example delivered to All Nippon Airways on February 11, 1996. This variant was retired with ANA retiring their last 747 on March 31, 2014.   747-400ER   The 747-400ER (Extended Range) was launched on November 28, 2000 following an order by Qantas for six aircraft. The model was commonly referred to as the '910k' signifying its maximum weight achieved via structural modifications and modified landing gear. This was the only order for the passenger version, chosen by Qantas to allow for full loads between Melbourne and Los Angeles, particularly in the western direction. The −400ER can fly 500 miles (805 km) further, or carry 15,000 lb (6,800 kg) more freight. The first 747-400ER was used as a test flight airplane and painted in Boeing colours, registration N747ER. Qantas received the first delivery of a 747−400ER Registration VH-OEF on October 31, 2002; this was the second airplane built. The flight test airplane was refurbished and delivered in Qantas livery. The 747-400ER included the option of one or two additional 3,240 US gallon body fuel tanks in the forward cargo hold, but no customers ordered the tanks. Manufactured by Marshall Aerospace, these tanks utilized metal to metal honeycomb-bonded technology to achieve a high fuel volume-to-dry weight ratio. The tanks featured a double wall, integrated venting system, and achieve fuel control via a modified Fuel System Management Card (FSMC) which optimizes fuel transfer into the Center Wing Tank (CWT) in flight along with the fuel transfer from the Horizontal Stabiliser Tank (HST). The tank is removable using tooling that interfaces with the cargo loading system. Similar technology has been used by Marshall in the development of body fuel tanks for the Boeing 777-200LR and Boeing P-8A Poseidon. Other changes to the 747-400ER include relocation of oxygen system components and the potable water system tanks and pumps since the body fuel tanks prevent access to the standard locations.   747-400ERF     KLM Boeing 747-400ERF at Schiphol International Airport   The 747-400ERF (747-400ER Freighter) is the freight version of the −400ER, launched on April 30, 2001.[17] The 747-400ERF is similar to the 747-400F, except for increased gross weight capability which allows it to carry more cargo weight. Unlike the 747-400ER, no customers ordered the optional body fuel tanks (cargo compartment fuel tanks). The 747-400ERF has a maximum takeoff weight of 910,000 pounds (412,769 kg) and a maximum payload of 248,600 pounds (112,760 kg). It offers cargo airlines the choice of either adding 22,000 pounds (9,980 kg) more payload than other 747-400 freighter variants, or adding 525 nautical miles (972 km) to the maximum range.   The -400ERF has a range of 5,700 miles (9,200 km) with maximum payload, about 326 miles (525 km) farther than the standard 747-400 freighter, and has a strengthened fuselage, landing gear, and parts of its wing, along with new, larger tires. The first −400ERF was delivered to Air France (via ILFC) on October 17, 2002. Boeing has delivered 40 Boeing 747-400ERFs with no outstanding orders as of 2009. The last 747-400 was a −400ERF delivered on December 22, 2009 to Kalitta Air. The new 747-8 Freighter has more payload capacity, but less range than the 747-400ERF.   747-400 Boeing Converted Freighter   The 747-400BCF (Boeing Converted Freighter), formerly known as the 747-400SF (Special Freighter), is a conversion program for standard passenger 747-400s. The project was launched in 2004 and will be done by approved contractors such as TAECO, KAL Aerospace and SIA Engineering. The first Boeing 747-400BCF was redelivered to Cathay Pacific Cargo and entered service on December 19, 2005. This kind of converting procedure is located at Xiamen Gaoqi International Airport in China.   The 747-400BDSF (Bedek Special Freighter) is another converted version freighter by Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI). The first 747-400BDSF was redelivered to Air China Cargo.[citation needed] EVA Air's several Boeing 747-45EM planes have been converted as BDSF model after retiring from passenger service upon the delivery of Boeing 777-300ER planes. This kind of converting procedure is located at Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv, Israel.   Neither the 747-400BCF nor the 747-400BDSF have a nose cargo door; freight can only be loaded through the side cargo door.   747 Large Cargo Freighter   Main article: Boeing 747 Large Cargo Freighter     Boeing 747 Large Cargo Freighter at Chūbu Centrair International Airport, Japan   Boeing announced in October 2003 that, because of the amount of time involved with marine shipping, air transport would be the primary method of transporting parts for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. Pre-owned passenger 747-400 aircraft have been converted into an outsize, "Large Cargo Freighter" (LCF) configuration to ferry sub-assemblies to Everett, Washington for final assembly. The LCF has a bulging fuselage similar to that of the Aero Spacelines Super Guppy or Airbus Beluga cargo aircraft.   The conversion, designed by Boeing engineers from Puget Sound, Moscow and Canoga Park, Cal., and Gamesa Aeronáutica in Spain, was carried out in Taiwan by a subsidiary of the Evergreen Group. Boeing purchased four second-hand aircraft and had them all converted; the fourth and final LCF took its first flight in January 2010. Delivery times are as low as a day using the 747 LCF, compared to up to 30 days for deliveries by ship. The LCF has the largest cargo hold of any aircraft and can hold three times the volume of a 747-400F freighter. The LCF is not a Boeing production model and has not been offered for sale to any customers. The LCFs are intended for Boeing's exclusive use. In this Episode, Pitchlock Pete's panel of Aviation Contributers included Fast Eddie Raging Rick, and our special Guest Mr. Brian Mills. We would like to thank our listeners for the continued support on our adventure.  The team has reached a milestone of over 7,000 downloads and continue to grow our shows and audience.  If you would like to be a guest on The Hangar Deck Podcast, contact us at Pitchlockpete@thehangardeck.com.  We continue to strive to bring our listeners a great and fun listening experience.    

Vox Tablet
I Was a Teenage Stowaway

Vox Tablet

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2015 22:32


These days it’d be pretty hard to walk without a ticket onto a boarding airplane bound for an international locale. Between the TSA and sniffer dogs, any would-be stowaway would likely see the inside of a jail cell pretty fast. But before September 11, in fact, before 1970, it wasn’t quite as challenging. When Victor Rodack, now a psychiatrist in his 60s, was a young teenager he had but one dream: to get to Israel. He tells Vox Tablet producer Julie Subrin exactly how he made that dream come true. Bonus track: Listen to Victor’s press conference at JFK Airport, just after he landed back in the United States. (Thanks to Victor Rodack and Paul Ruest for making this archival interview... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

MI/ARCH
Cèsar Pelli

MI/ARCH

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2014 37:51


L'incontro fa parte del ciclo MI/ARCH | 8 Lezioni Pubbliche di Architettura Urbana, organizzato in occasione del 150° del Politecnico di Milano. Cèsar Pelli si è laureato in Architettura all'Università di Tucumán in Argentina, ha iniziato la sua carriera nello studio di Eero Saarinen lavorando come Project Designer per numerosi edifici tra cui il TWA Terminal al JFK Airport di New York e i Morse and Stiles Colleges presso laYale University. È stato Director of Design presso DMJM e, più tardi, Partner for Design da Gruen Associates, due studi di Los Angeles. In questi anni ha concepito diversi progetti vincitori di premi, come la San Bernardino City Hall di San Bernardino, il Pacific Design Center di Los Angeles e l'Ambasciata degli Stati Uniti a Tokyo. Nel 1977 è diventato rettore della Yale University School of Architecture (fino al 1984) e ha fondato lo studio Cesar Pelli & Associates, diventato nel 2005 Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. Nella sua lunga carriera ha ricevuto 12 lauree ad honorem e oltre 200, tra premi e riconoscimenti. È membro dell'American Academy of Arts and Letters, della National Academy of Design, dell'International Academy of Architecture e dell'Academie d'Architecture de France. Nel 1995 ha vinto la "Gold Medal" dell'American Institute of Architects awarded e, nel 2004, l'Aga Khan Award for Architecture per il progetto delle Petronas Towers di Kuala Lumpur. A Milano ha progettato i tre edifici della Torre Unicredit, costruzione simbolo del complesso di Porta Nuova Garibaldi realizzato da Hines, di cui lo studio Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects è anche autore del masterplan. Gli edifici dell'area - che ospitano uffici, residenze, alberghi e spazi commerciali -- sono concepiti secondo i più avanzati criteri di risparmio energetico e per valorizzare la dimensione pedonale degli spazi che si sviluppano alla loro base.

Animal Radio®
Animal Radio® Episode 606

Animal Radio®

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2011 110:50


Some Animals Were Harmed What's behind protests against American Humane's "No Animals Were Harmed" trademarked slogan? Some believe that the organization is in bed with Hollywood and that horses have been hurt in the making of some movies. Who's Walking Who? One of the most frustrating behaviors a dog can have is pulling on the leash. Vladae the World Famous Russian Dog Wizard may not make any friends with his blunt and transparent persona - but he sure can stop that pulling on the leash! Hi-Tech Poop Patrol A condo complex in Florida is requiring tenants pay $200 to register their dog's DNA. Dog droppings that are found in the future will then be sent to the lab to identify the owner responsible for not cleaning up after their pet. Turtles Cause Flight Delays Port Authority officials say a runway at JFK Airport was shut down as about 100 Diamondback Terrapins crawled across it. The runway becomes a turtle crossing every year as the animals look for sandy spots to lay their eggs. More this week

The Bowery Boys: New York City History
#124 Idlewild/JFK Airport

The Bowery Boys: New York City History

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2011 49:16


Come fly with us through a history of New York City's largest airport, once known as Idlewild (for a former golf course) and called John F. Kennedy International Airport since 1964. Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia wanted a new and improved facility to relieve the pressure from that other Queens airport (you know, the one with his name on it), but a greater challenge faced developers of the Jamaica Bay project -- the coming of the jet age and the growth of commercial travel. The solution for Idlewild was truly unique -- a series of vastly different and striking-looking terminals assigned to individual airlines. This arrangement certainly had its critics, but it has provided New York with some of the most inventive architecture found within its borders. From stained glass to zodiac sculptures, from the out-of-this-world dramatics of the Pan Am WorldPort to the strangely lifting concrete masterpiece by Eero Saarinen, we take you on a tour of the original '60s terminals and the airport’s peculiar history. With guest appearances by Robert Moses, Martin Scorsese, the Beatles and a pretty awesome dog named Brandy. www.boweryboyspodcast.com Support the show.